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TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 07:11 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsoccer33 View Post

Because a regular person, someone like my mom, doesn't obsess over minutia you think they're delusional?
Whoa now. I didn't say anything about your mother. Geez. Average consumers don't care and probably don't see any dif. Here on AVS, "most" ppl aren't average and put a ton of time and money into their systems.

pittsoccer33's Avatar pittsoccer33 07:23 AM 05-07-2014
Average people will decide the mainstream market. I wasn't trying to feign offense, I'm just saying that there isn't a large scale demand for perfection. Most houses I visit don't even have their televisions set up close to correctly. They'd rather stretch and crop the signal to remove black bars. Someone like that is definitely not going to care about audio resolution or banding.

There is certainly enough spending on a/v to create niche products like the sacd, laserdisc, etc. Something will exist to continue offering extremely high quality media as long as people want it. Even with bluray discs I have to buy many titles online, whereas just a few years ago I could've found them at Best Buy or Media Play.

In all walks of a/v people tend not to choose the highest quality content. If they did no one would buy from iTunes and all houses would use antennas and/or subscribe to satellite programming over cable. Those are trade offs made for various reasons, both cost and simplicity.
TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 07:26 AM 05-07-2014
Imagic... I HAVE compared the video. Yes I have redeemed a few titles on HDX because I had the combo version. Since this discussion actually, I compared Dredd (2D) and The Great Gatsby (2D). I'm sorry but the blu ray was sharper, the overall image was smoother, there was no abundance of color banding on the blus composed to HDX. It was easy to see the difference.. Extremely easy. This was quite obvious on my projector setup but also on my 65" and 55". I've never said I didn't like having the option to stream but the quality difference is no small or slight difference. VUDU is good enough for me for documentary films and for a few titles that are not on blu but there is no comparison, apples to apples, when it comes to blu vs streaming. Like I've said, I welcome the day when it is equal.
imagic's Avatar imagic 07:31 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsoccer33 View Post

Average people will decide the mainstream market.

There is definitely enough spending on a/v to create niche products like the sacd, laserdisc, etc. Something will exist to continue offering extremely high quality media as long as people want it. Even with bluray discs I have to buy many titles online, whereas just a few years ago I could've found them at Best Buy or Media Play.

In all walks of a/v people tend not to choose the highest quality content. If they did no one would buy from iTunes and all houses would use antennas and/or subscribe to satellite programming over cable. Those are trade offs made for various reasons, both cost and simplicity.

 

You know, if you have the money and you are an AV obsessive, you probably have Prima Cinema and a Kaleidescape. In other words, if you can afford it, you're already past handling physical discs. I'd argue that most people trade off Prima Cinema's quality and timely availability because the cost ($500 per viewing, $35,000 player) is prohibitive. But it's also superior to Blu-ray quality and is delivered via the cloud.

 


TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 07:32 AM 05-07-2014
We
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsoccer33 View Post

Average people will decide the mainstream market. I wasn't trying to feign offense, I'm just saying that there isn't a large scale demand for perfection. Most houses I visit don't even have their televisions set up close to correctly. They'd rather stretch and crop the signal to remove black bars. Someone like that is definitely not going to care about audio resolution or banding.

There is certainly enough spending on a/v to create niche products like the sacd, laserdisc, etc. Something will exist to continue offering extremely high quality media as long as people want it. Even with bluray discs I have to buy many titles online, whereas just a few years ago I could've found them at Best Buy or Media Play.

In all walks of a/v people tend not to choose the highest quality content. If they did no one would buy from iTunes and all houses would use antennas and/or subscribe to satellite programming over cable. Those are trade offs made for various reasons, both cost and simplicity.
Well I'm happy to report that I can agree on all points you made. I don't expect most out there to care but I expect most here to care. I have friends and relatives who are happy to watch scope films from their DVD with a player setup for 4:3 output but hooked to a 16:9 flat panel via composite!!! Makes me crazy
TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 07:35 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

You know, if you have the money and you are an AV obsessive, you probably have Prima Cinema and a Kaleidescape. In other words, if you can afford it, you're already past handling physical discs. I'd argue that most people trade off Prima Cinema's quality and timely availability because the cost ($500 per viewing, $35,000 player) is prohibitive. But it's also superior to Blu-ray quality and is delivered via the cloud.


 
I'm not rich. No prima system here but I like the idea. I am av obsessive and like my physical media though. I don't think taste or the ability to discern quality requires a fat bank account.
HockeyoAJB's Avatar HockeyoAJB 07:53 AM 05-07-2014

For the comparisons that you all are doing between blu-ray and Vudu HDX, are you downloading the Vudu HDX title or streaming it?  In the comparisons that Mark (iMagic) has done, the screen shots look close enough that I doubt most people would notice them without doing a side-by-side comparison.  However, those screen shots are clearly with the Vudu HDX version running at its max bit-rate.  I think the biggest concern with streaming video quality isn't the disparity between it and blu-ray when it is at its best, but the pixelation that occurs when your bandwidth drops too low, the periodic stops to buffer, and chance of the app simply locking up or crashing on you, at which point you have to restart it.  Granted, slow internet is the cause of most of these issues but, if that's all you have to work with then it is what it is.  Unfortunately, these problems are a reality for the majority of people.  And that isn't going to change overnight.


imagic's Avatar imagic 08:03 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB View Post
 

For the comparisons that you all are doing between blu-ray and Vudu HDX, are you downloading the Vudu HDX title or streaming it?  In the comparisons that Dave (iMagic) has done, the screen shots look close enough that I doubt most people would notice them without doing a side-by-side comparison.  However, those screen shots are clearly with the Vudu HDX version running at its max bit-rate.  I think the biggest concern with streaming video quality isn't the disparity between it and blu-ray when it is at its best, but the pixelation that occurs when your bandwidth drops too low, the periodic stops to buffer, and chance of the app simply locking up or crashing on you, at which point you have to restart it.  Granted, slow internet is the cause of most of these issues but, if that's all you have to work with then it is what it is.  Unfortunately, these problems are a reality for the majority of people.  And that isn't going to change overnight.

 

Who is Dave, my doppelganger? :D

I stream HDX and I have very fast internet, so it works. It goes without saying that you can't have HDX with slow internet, just like you can't play a Blu-ray on a DVD player.


TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 08:05 AM 05-07-2014
True. And no my comparison is streaming but that's how most would use the service I assume. But there is a noticeable difference. Screenshots also don't tell the whole story like a moving image does. I have super fast internet but even without buffering or start stops, the picture is muddier compared to blu. Blind a/b test me on moving images and I'd pick out streaming every time.
imagic's Avatar imagic 08:09 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSHA222 View Post

True. And no my comparison is streaming but that's how most would use the service I assume. But there is a noticeable difference. Screenshots also don't tell the whole story like a moving image does. I have super fast internet but even without buffering or start stops, the picture is muddier compared to blu. Blind a/b test me on moving images and I'd pick out streaming every time.

 

All right, I admit I've made the exact same claim. And I do believe I can perform the same trick. However, it might take watching a few minutes of footage before I see a "tell." I do agree that there is a distinguishable difference—when scrutinized on decent, properly calibrated gear.


atmusky's Avatar atmusky 08:09 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSHA222 View Post

I'm not rich. No prima system here but I like the idea. I am av obsessive and like my physical media though. I don't think taste or the ability to discern quality requires a fat bank account.
You may not consider yourself rich, but how many people do you think have a projector, 65", & 55" TV? You should certainly be able to see the difference between BRD & HDX on all of those if they are even moderately well calibrated and you are not sitting to far back. But most of the people I know have a 50" or smaller screen that isn't setup correctly, are sitting 10+ feet away and either use the TV for sound or at best have a sound bar. Do you think any of them can tell the difference between HDX & BRD? I have a 6 yr. old 50" plasma with a THX setting along with a good Denon powered surround sound system, but because I end up setting 14 feet away and have issues with speaker placement I can notice very little difference between HDX & BRD. That said I still prefer BRD to HDX, mostly because the only way I can watch in HDX is to down load it so I have to own the movie.
imagic's Avatar imagic 08:10 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by atmusky View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSHA222 View Post

I'm not rich. No prima system here but I like the idea. I am av obsessive and like my physical media though. I don't think taste or the ability to discern quality requires a fat bank account.
You may not consider yourself rich, but how many people do you think have a projector, 65", & 55" TV? You should certainly be able to see the difference between BRD & HDX on all of those if they are even moderately well calibrated and you are not sitting to far back. But most of the people I know have a 50" or smaller screen that isn't setup correctly, are sitting 10+ feet away and either use the TV for sound or at best have a sound bar. Do you think any of them can tell the difference between HDX & BRD? I have a 6 yr. old 50" plasma with a THX setting along with a good Denon powered surround sound system, but because I end up setting 14 feet away and have issues with speaker placement I can notice very little difference between HDX & BRD. That said I still prefer BRD to HDX, mostly because the only way I can watch in HDX is to down load it so I have to own the movie.

 

You can download HDX rentals, not just purchases.


TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 08:11 AM 05-07-2014
There are camps here obviously. The camp that thinks HDX is equal to blu, the camp that thinks, rightly IMO, that blu smokes HDX and the camp that I fall in which takes the second view but adds the qualifier that it will be possible eventually to have steaming equal or best blu. That eventuality is not terribly far off but it's certainly not here today.
TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 08:13 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

All right, I admit I've made the exact same claim. And I do believe I can perform the same trick. However, it might take watching a few minutes of footage before I see a "tell." I do agree that there is a distinguishable difference—when scrutinized on decent, properly calibrated gear.
we agree here
atmusky's Avatar atmusky 08:14 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

You can download HDX rentals, not just purchases.
I have seen others say you can download rentals on a PS3, but I do not have one. When I asked Vudu support if there was away to download rentals they said no (I have a computer attached to my TV) only movies I owned. How to do you download rentals?
TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 08:17 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by atmusky View Post

You may not consider yourself rich, but how many people do you think have a projector, 65", & 55" TV? You should certainly be able to see the difference between BRD & HDX on all of those if they are even moderately well calibrated and you are not sitting to far back. But most of the people I know have a 50" or smaller screen that isn't setup correctly, are sitting 10+ feet away and either use the TV for sound or at best have a sound bar. Do you think any of them can tell the difference between HDX & BRD? I have a 6 yr. old 50" plasma with a THX setting along with a good Denon powered surround sound system, but because I end up setting 14 feet away and have issues with speaker placement I can notice very little difference between HDX & BRD. That said I still prefer BRD to HDX, mostly because the only way I can watch in HDX is to down load it so I have to own the movie.
I'm not rich I promise. I just have no other hobbies so no golf clubs or hunting clubs or fraternal organization dues. And interest free purchasing is a great thing.
OggideM's Avatar OggideM 08:26 AM 05-07-2014
for 90% of content, streaming quality sucks. period- even if your broadband connection supports it.

the fact that joe-six-pack can go to costco or walmart and walk out the door with a 55" and soundbar for $800 , sit 10-12 feet away, and be happy with it means the end
of the market sadly for high quality enthusiasts. welcome to the endgame of bigbox media, retail, and corporatized life in general.
imagic's Avatar imagic 08:33 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by OggideM View Post

for 90% of content, streaming quality sucks. period- even if your broadband connection supports it.

the fact that joe-six-pack can go to costco or walmart and walk out the door with a 55" and soundbar for $800 , sit 10-12 feet away, and be happy with it means the end
of the market sadly for high quality enthusiasts. welcome to the endgame of bigbox media, retail, and corporatized life in general.

 

Blu-ray would certainly not exist without the economy of scale that is the defining characteristic of corporations. Manufacturing and distribution costs made it so. Streaming allows independent video to flourish, just look at YouTube. Streaming is liberating.


TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 08:34 AM 05-07-2014
Let me add... These back and forth discussions are fun and informational but it's really easy to come of sounding like an elitist or a douche. I strive to be neither. You know what everyone says about opinions. I don't mean to talk down to anyone who prefers VUDU for the convenience and high quality compared to other means of viewing content out there. I will vehemently argue that blu-ray has no equal in the streaming market currently. Prima is a different animal of course. Taking the price out of the equation, which is hard when you consider the price, and the service requires a high bandwidth and automatically downloads the films to your server whether you want or not. They only ask you pay the small $500 rental fee to access any given title (that is sarcasm). I would bet dollars to doughnuts that the file size per title is extreme. But I digress. Once the internet infrastructure is vastly improved to the point that service providers aren't putting extremely low caps on the data and once all homes are getting faster than 10-20 mbps download, the studios will move to push everyone to streaming only.
atmusky's Avatar atmusky 08:37 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSHA222 View Post

I'm not rich I promise. I just have no other hobbies so no golf clubs or hunting clubs or fraternal organization dues. And interest free purchasing is a great thing.
I hear yu. I am prepping for retirement and in the same spot, cash only and no hobbies outside of electronics.

I think there are still plenty of people that prefer BRD over digital, just not a majority and maybe not even a very large minority. This thread was talking about why BRD sales aren't as good as one might expect, my take is mostly because you have large groups of people where the benefits of BRDs either don't matter or have been reduced do to other factors. In my Walmart they still have as many DVDs as BRD, the same for my 3 local RedBoxes more titles in DVD than BRD so there is a group of people that don't even care if it is SD or HD. Then you have a very large (in my opinion) number of people that based on their equipment and/or viewing conditions really can not tell much difference between streaming in HD or BRD. Add it all up and BRD don't sell all that well.
imagic's Avatar imagic 08:44 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by atmusky View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

You can download HDX rentals, not just purchases.
I have seen others say you can download rentals on a PS3, but I do not have one. When I asked Vudu support if there was away to download rentals they said no (I have a computer attached to my TV) only movies I owned. How to do you download rentals?

 

You are right. I had never tried downloading a Vudu rental on a PC before, the option does not exist. I just learned something new.


HockeyoAJB's Avatar HockeyoAJB 08:48 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
 

 

Who is Dave, my doppelganger? :D

I stream HDX and I have very fast internet, so it works. It goes without saying that you can't have HDX with slow internet, just like you can't play a Blu-ray on a DVD player.

 

Doh.  Sorry about that, Mark.  Dunno where I got Dave from.

 

The thing is, a blu-ray player is a one time purchase of ~$150 (well, 2 times if you bought one before they came out with 3D capable models and wanted to add that capability).  Where I live, 25MBps internet from Comcast starts at $40 per month for new customers for the first 12 months, at which point it goes up to $55 per month.  That's about double what I pay for Verizon DSL, which is fast enough for anything I do except HD video streaming.  By not switching, I'm saving roughly $25 per month (actually more since I wouldn't be able to triple bundle Comcast internet w/ DirecTV and Verizon land line telephone).  I could buy a new blu-ray player every 6 months for that.  Or, I could just keep the one I already have and save myself over $300 a year.

 

Ideally, I would get rid of the DirecTV service (~$100 a month), upgrade my internet speed to 25MBps, and save ~$75 per month by streaming everything.  But, my wife watches shows that you still can't get from any streaming service and I watch a good deal of sports at home and you have to pay a premium to be able to stream those.  The NFL package alone is something like $350 a year.  Then there's the NHL Center Ice package, MLB, the one for the NBA (though I only really watch NBA playoffs; Go Wizards!), NCAA March Madness (most of which you can probably stream for free without a TV subscription, but not all), UEFA Champion's League, World Cup, Olympics, Formula One, etc.  By the time I have figured out where to get the streams for all of these and paid for those that cannot be gotten for free, I'm probably right back where I started.  Plus, not all of them are on demand, so I would have to set up a PC-based DVR system to allow time shifting and the ability to keep recordings that can be rewatched if desired.

 

Sadly, I think it will be a while before cutting the cord will be an option for me.


UofAZ1's Avatar UofAZ1 08:57 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSHA222 View Post

UofAZ1... Easy there killer. No cheap seats here, I assure you. Enjoy your compromised image quality.

For a title to be bought for 5.00 rather than 28.00 (with tax) I'll suffer the slight picture degradation.. As I mentioned I'm loading up these movies more for my folks and sisters (they couldn't tell the difference between SD and HD if you put them side by side they just care about watching the movie). Now granted there are some Bluray titles I will buy but it has to be an exceptional movie or one (like The Avengers) where I will want the best PQ and Lossless Audio but those movies don't come around that often. Yes I'm aware the PQ is not quite up to Bluray but for what i save in costs on each title it's worth it to me. That and to convert titles that I don't even own and you can't find at best Buy or Wal-Mart it's nice that I can go to my local Public library and convert it for 2.50 (It's cheaper than renting and I and my entire family who live in other cities can enjoy the movies is so worth the couple bucks). I have close to a 1,000 titles on my account and I can't imagine how much I would've spent if i had to buy the actual physical copies for each title (or where to store that many titles). For me Convenience and cost is worth the slight degradation in PQ.
imagic's Avatar imagic 08:59 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
 

 

Who is Dave, my doppelganger? :D

I stream HDX and I have very fast internet, so it works. It goes without saying that you can't have HDX with slow internet, just like you can't play a Blu-ray on a DVD player.

 

Doh.  Sorry about that, Mark.  Dunno where I got Dave from.

 

The thing is, a blu-ray player is a one time purchase of ~$150 (well, 2 times if you bought one before they came out with 3D capable models and wanted to add that capability).  Where I live, 25MBps internet from Comcast starts at $40 per month for new customers for the first 12 months, at which point it goes up to $55 per month.  That's about double what I pay for Verizon DSL, which is fast enough for anything I do except HD video streaming.  By not switching, I'm saving roughly $25 per month (actually more since I wouldn't be able to triple bundle Comcast internet w/ DirecTV and Verizon land line telephone).  I could buy a new blu-ray player every 6 months for that.  Or, I could just keep the one I already have and save myself over $300 a year.

 

Ideally, I would get rid of the DirecTV service (~$100 a month), upgrade my internet speed to 25MBps, and save ~$75 per month by streaming everything.  But, my wife watches shows that you still can't get from any streaming service and I watch a good deal of sports at home and you have to pay a premium to be able to stream those.  The NFL package alone is something like $350 a year.  Then there's the NHL Center Ice package, MLB, the one for the NBA (though I only really watch NBA playoffs; Go Wizards!), NCAA March Madness (most of which you can probably stream for free without a TV subscription, but not all), UEFA Champion's League, World Cup, Olympics, Formula One, etc.  By the time I have figured out where to get the streams for all of these and paid for those that cannot be gotten for free, I'm probably right back where I started.  Plus, not all of them are on demand, so I would have to set up a PC-based DVR system to allow time shifting and the ability to keep recordings that can be rewatched if desired.

 

Sadly, I think it will be a while before cutting the cord will be an option for me.

 

Basically, sports helps keep cable alive, and as long as cable is alive Blu-ray will thrive because people who don't cut the cord also have little incentive to get more broadband than what's needed to browse the web and stream low-resolution video. I can see that dynamic working for at least a few more years, I had not thought of it that way. 

It might be that Europe, which outperforms the US in terms of broadband speeds, is leading the decline in disc-based video media exactly because broadband is (overall) more common and cheaper there.


TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 09:01 AM 05-07-2014
I understand your point of view. My argument has not been that anyone renting or purchasing through VUDU were wrong for being satisfied with the quality just that they were wrong if they felt VUDU was as good as blu ray quality wise.
atmusky's Avatar atmusky 09:24 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by UofAZ1 View Post

For a title to be bought for 5.00 rather than 28.00 (with tax) I'll suffer the slight picture degradation.. As I mentioned I'm loading up these movies more for my folks and sisters (they couldn't tell the difference between SD and HD if you put them side by side they just care about watching the movie). Now granted there are some Bluray titles I will buy but it has to be an exceptional movie or one (like The Avengers) where I will want the best PQ and Lossless Audio but those movies don't come around that often. Yes I'm aware the PQ is not quite up to Bluray but for what i save in costs on each title it's worth it to me. That and to convert titles that I don't even own and you can't find at best Buy or Wal-Mart it's nice that I can go to my local Public library and convert it for 2.50 (It's cheaper than renting and I and my entire family who live in other cities can enjoy the movies is so worth the couple bucks). I have close to a 1,000 titles on my account and I can't imagine how much I would've spent if i had to buy the actual physical copies for each title (or where to store that many titles). For me Convenience and cost is worth the slight degradation in PQ.
I agree with you on the convenience of having a large UV library versus building a large BRD library. I also agree there are significant benefits because UV allows upto 6 members. I share my UV library with my sister and bother. I had purchased some BRD for my 80 year old mother at Christmas this year and saw the UV slips - my brother was also home (he lives 1000 miles away) and asked him if he new anything about them - he didn't but said he had lots of BRDs with the same slips. We both live in Rural areas and at the time both had slower internet access so streaming wasn't a big consideration for either of us. I looked into and got a UV account setup and we all setup Vudu accounts we now have 95 moves and no one has purchased a digital movie yet (added all the UV slips we had, got some free movies for signing up, & converted some BRD & DVD with free Vudu credits). I am guessing that we each have purchased a few more BRD than we might have normally (mostly from the $7.88 BRD bin in walmart tongue.gif) and now that I know you can buy UV codes we likely will buy the codes instead of renting, if more than 1 of us has interest in the movie. By the way thanks for the info on buying UV Codes no idea you could do that.
UofAZ1's Avatar UofAZ1 09:36 AM 05-07-2014
No problem atmusky don't forget your local library. I'm amazed at how many new releases they get in (sadly Vudu sometimes hasn't added a new title to disc to digital...they are normally about 3 months behind). I'd go before the end of June when Vudu disc to digital 50% off ten or more conversions ends (but they may extend that date once again). Use your library for older titles that are hard to find in stores (except MGM dang it they have so many good movies I'd love to add to disc to digital (e.g. James Bonds and Clint Eastwood spaghetti westerns) but can't because they aren't UV compliant.
imagic's Avatar imagic 11:55 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSHA222 View Post

I understand your point of view. My argument has not been that anyone renting or purchasing through VUDU were wrong for being satisfied with the quality just that they were wrong if they felt VUDU was as good as blu ray quality wise.

 

You know, I just installed a bandwidth meter for my future streaming format comparisons and started up an episode of Cosmos in HDX. The bitrate settled down to right around 32 Mbps with peaks at 37 Mbps. It's the only thing using bandwidth, and technically that matches Blu-ray. It looks it, too—the video is super-crisp.

 

For all I know, Vudu HDX is matching Blu-ray quality as we speak with its Cosmos stream. I can't wait until the Blu-ray comes out so I can make that comparison.



 


curlyjive's Avatar curlyjive 12:42 PM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

You know, I just installed a bandwidth meter for my future streaming format comparisons and started up an episode of Cosmos in HDX. The bitrate settled down to right around 32 Mbps with peaks at 37 Mbps. It's the only thing using bandwidth, and technically that matches Blu-ray. It looks it, too—the video is super-crisp.

For all I know, Vudu HDX is matching Blu-ray quality as we speak with its Cosmos stream. I can't wait until the Blu-ray comes out so I can make that comparison.




 

I forget what VUDU HDX has as its minimum requirement....something like 10 Mbps sustained.... but once you get above that, it isn't like your quality is going to improve. Put another way, HDX is not going to scale up to 30Mbps, which would be comparable to blu ray. So there is compression going on above that on the blu ray. As good as it may look, it's not going to be technically as good.
TSHA222's Avatar TSHA222 12:46 PM 05-07-2014
As I type this I know it may expose my ignorance but when you speak about the 32 Mbps bitrate, are you referring to the download speed from your service provider or the bitrate of the source?
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