Sony Blames Blu-ray for "Bag of Hurt" - Page 44 - AVS Forum
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post #1291 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by TinnEars View Post
It's worth it to damage the seller's "current" moniker... though they'll certainly eventually open a new account. I PMed the seller expressing my concerns.
Also file that complaint with Ebay and give them a bad review. Contacting a seller directly who is pumping out bootlegs is just going to be an exercise in frustration. They'll admit nothing, if they ever do get back to you.

Listen up, studios! Just say "NO" to DNR and EE!!
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post #1292 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 12:31 PM
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It's worth it to damage the seller's "current" moniker... though they'll certainly eventually open a new account. I PMed the seller expressing my concerns.
Does the actual disc look legit? Was it new or used?

With the costs of blank Blu-rays what could the margin be for the seller? Just curious. I sell plenty of used BD's on eBay and have bought plenty as well without issue.
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post #1293 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 12:38 PM
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Does the actual disc look legit? Was it new or used?

With the costs of blank Blu-rays what could the margin be for the seller? Just curious. I sell plenty of used BD's on eBay and have bought plenty as well without issue.
It's used but it looks right. The thing is it also came with a DVD which I've already given away. If I want to return this item I'll have to request return of the DVD to make this a complete set. Of course, I'll buy another two-disc set and give them the replacement. Regarding bootleg costs... I can't see how they could have made any money. My guess is the seller unknowingly bought a bootleg copy then passed it along to me. I guess that could happen with all the bootleg copies floating around. Maybe only the BRD was replaced with a bootleg?
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post #1294 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 01:03 PM
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BestBuy was selling the Star Trek Into Darkness BD/DVD/UV title last November for only $8. I would think there are alot of copies out there for that low price. I saw no issues with my copy though. I'm not even sur eif I ever redeemed the UV code. I need to check sometime.

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post #1295 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 01:23 PM
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Honestly, I don't like this movie anyway. I can'r remember which Star Trek movie (original cast) in which Spock dies but many of the scenes in this movie could be swapped... just swap Spock with Kirk. Frankly, I thought it was cheap and cheesy because of this.

Anyway, I've derailed this thread enough.
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post #1296 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 07:14 PM
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I bought a used BRD off eBay... but since it came with the original artwork, paperwork and fitted sleeve I figured it should be fine. Are there bootleg copies with all this included?
I have no idea how common bootleg movies are. I always stick to legitimate retailers. Your description of the quality of the movie just seems a bit "off" for a 2013 movie. (I was still in DVD-land when I watched it, so I can't confirm that the movie isn't pixelated on Blu-ray, though.)

Do you have Amazon Prime? If so, Star Trek Into Darkness is available to watch for free. If the Amazon Prime streaming version looks better than the Blu-ray, then you've got a bootleg.

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post #1297 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 07:20 PM
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Honestly, I don't like this movie anyway. I can'r remember which Star Trek movie (original cast) in which Spock dies but many of the scenes in this movie could be swapped... just swap Spock with Kirk. Frankly, I thought it was cheap and cheesy because of this.
It was The Wrath of Khan, the second (and best) movie. It was then followed by The Search for Spock because Spock had been reincarnated after he died.

I agree regarding the cheesiness.

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post #1298 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 08:11 PM
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I have no idea how common bootleg movies are. I always stick to legitimate retailers. Your description of the quality of the movie just seems a bit "off" for a 2013 movie. (I was still in DVD-land when I watched it, so I can't confirm that the movie isn't pixelated on Blu-ray, though.)

Do you have Amazon Prime? If so, Star Trek Into Darkness is available to watch for free. If the Amazon Prime streaming version looks better than the Blu-ray, then you've got a bootleg.
I don't have Amazon Prime.

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It was The Wrath of Khan, the second (and best) movie. It was then followed by The Search for Spock because Spock had been reincarnated after he died.

I agree regarding the cheesiness.
Yes, that's the one. It was a good movie. "Into Darkness"... not so much.
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post #1299 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 08:36 PM
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Well, for better or worse or no change... Dolby Atmos, in some form or other, will be added to Blu-ray starting this fall to coincide with first gen decoders. No word yet on the ultimate capabilities contained within these consumer object soundtracks compared to the commercial version. No new player will be required.

Hey, TinnEars! Here's your chance to get Into Darkness in Atmos!

Listen up, studios! Just say "NO" to DNR and EE!!
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post #1300 of 1365 Old 06-23-2014, 09:32 PM
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Well, for better or worse or no change... Dolby Atmos, in some form or other, will be added to Blu-ray starting this fall to coincide with first gen decoders. No word yet on the ultimate capabilities contained within these consumer object soundtracks compared to the commercial version. No new player will be required.

Hey, TinnEars! Here's your chance to get Into Darkness in Atmos!
I think I'll look for other releases in Atmos.
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post #1301 of 1365 Old 06-27-2014, 04:07 PM
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Slightly OT but since we've discussed frame rate in this thread -- this is good news: You-Tube is now supportng 48 fps and 60 fps videos!

http://youtubecreator.blogspot.ca/20...#gpluscomments

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post #1302 of 1365 Old 06-28-2014, 06:57 AM
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^ really hoping it isn't trying to use Flash for that.
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post #1303 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 06:16 AM
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I prefer quality over convenience. Physical media has its advantages and disadvantages, and so does virtual media right now. I was reading through the first page of this thread last night, and then decided to read through some of it backwards from the most recent post. Physical media definitly provides the best sound and picture quality. It also provides a way for us to show our libraries to family and friends. However, it can get lost or broken. If a laser or disc mechanism fails, you can't play your collection unless you have another player at your disposal or until your player gets repaired or replaced. Virtual media can be very convenient. It saves physical shelf space. It can't get broken. However, unless or until compression techniques miraculously improve and/or internet speeds miraculously skyrocket, it will never come up to the sound and picture quality of physical media. Another good point that was mentioned is that if for some reason internet service or a particular streaming service goes down, you can't use your paid subscribtion until it's up and running again. While I don't like copy protection and DRM, I have an idea that might cross a fine line and allow us to move forward. What if home video distributors sell their movies as savable downloads, allowing us to choose between a high-quality, time-consuming download, a medium-quality, normal-speed download, and a low-quality, quick-speed download--each version with some kind of copy protection or DRM which would require certain software to play? Each version would include menus, chapter and title searches, different sets of subtitles, different audio tracks, and bonus features. The only ways these downloads could be accessed would be to be logged in to your account, and each download purchased would have its own product key, like the Windows operating system or Microsoft Office. Even the high-quality, time-consuming download version might not come up to Blu-ray quality, but think of it this way. When we went from analog to digital, while we were relieved of VHS's tracking issues, vinyl's crackling, and tape hiss, unless compression either isn't used or compression techniques are good, the audio/video gamut is limited according to binary code. However, most of us have accepted that and have moved on. It'll take years, but through a combination of developing massive data consumption for quality, as well as improving compression techniques, I think we could eventually reach a point where digital(not to be confused with the opposite of physical) editions will be no different from analog studio masters. Think of moving on from physical to virtual as moving on from analog to digital. Through the combination of internet speeds getting faster and compression techniques getting better, we might eventually wind up with virtual media that could tie in quality with physical media. Right now, here are our choices. If you want quality, enjoy physical media. If you want convenience, you'll have to stream (and when possible, download and save).

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post #1304 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 06:49 AM
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This might be a little obsessive, but recently, I bought a Case Logic 320-disc wallet. I divided it into four sections--80 discs per section. I chose discs from my video and audio collection I know I'd never get bored with so I can be happy wherever I am at the time. The first section is dedicated to the "Criminal Minds" TV series on DVD. The second section includes documentaries and shorter series on Blu-ray and DVD. The third section includes movies on Blu-ray and DVD. The fourth section is miscelanious and includes music on CD and SACD, as well as videos on Blu-ray and DVD which are somehow or partially related to music. I have a portable Blu-ray player which can play Blu-rays, DVDs, CDs, and different file types via USB flash (i.e., downloaded audiobooks, which I don't care as much about the quality). It has an internal screan and speakers, headphone jack, composite AV output, and HDMI out, so I could use it in any situation. So as you can see, right now, I choose to go the path of physical media. If my suggestion is taken, I might gradually make the switch.
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post #1305 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 06:52 AM
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While I don't like copy protection and DRM, I have an idea that might cross a fine line and allow us to move forward. What if home video distributors sell their movies as savable downloads, allowing us to choose between a high-quality, time-consuming download, a medium-quality, normal-speed download, and a low-quality, quick-speed download--each version with some kind of copy protection or DRM which would require certain software to play?
That's the direction most things are going. But they want you to use their own box and their own hardware.

Doing so on a PC would make it easy to pirate. Not that using a proprietary system is less easy to pirate anyway, but that's the irrational hope they have.
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post #1306 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 07:23 AM
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That's the direction most things are going. But they want you to use their own box and their own hardware.

Doing so on a PC would make it easy to pirate. Not that using a proprietary system is less easy to pirate anyway, but that's the irrational hope they have.
And what happens with all the unknowns?

What if the software is no longer available, it get's corrupted, the company folds, or the Server provider goes by the wayside. It's the same issue, you may be left with having no access to your purchased downloads and are left holding the bag. You are still at the mercy of all involved and are completely powerless. Physical Media needs to be supported to assure these things do not occur. This streaming/download is being pushed so hard because it's exactly what the Studios want. They want full control again, don't want you owning anything, and charging what they want. Just my take.
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post #1307 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 07:53 AM
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You have a good point about even download services going down. You still wouldn't be able to access the stuff YOU paid for! As far as ownership and being able to use YOUR purchases at YOUR disposal, physical media would be the only way to solve that problem. In fact, you guys just reminded me of a difficult and possibly dangerous experience with a Karaoke subscribtion service which if I had to reinstall my operating system, forget to contact the company, cancel the account, and create a new one so the software would work, the company would take it as a way of me trying to find a way to pay less because every time you cancel an account and create a new one, my credit card wouldn't be charged. Also, due to copyright issues, certain titles weren't available through this service. Where with physical CDs, I don't have to worry about a limited selection, nor policy issues which would prevent me from accessing titles at MY disposal. I am so lucky I stumbled upon this thread and decided to contribute. By doing so, I am reminded of how important it is to be able to use my purchases at my disposal.
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post #1308 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 07:57 AM
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And what happens with all the unknowns?

What if the software is no longer available, it get's corrupted, the company folds, or the Server provider goes by the wayside. It's the same issue, you may be left with having no access to your purchased downloads and are left holding the bag. You are still at the mercy of all involved and are completely powerless. Physical Media needs to be supported to assure these things do not occur. This streaming/download is being pushed so hard because it's exactly what the Studios want. They want full control again, don't want you owning anything, and charging what they want. Just my take.

The world is filled with unknowns. I wanted badly to buy a laserdisk player, I did buy a great HD-DVD (A35) player and still own it, I have two incredible BD players (Oppo 83 and 103D), a record player and would have a great tape player (Nakamichi) if my youngest daughter hadn't stuck branches and leaves in it and would have an excellent S-VHS deck if my oldest daughter hadn't stuck a peanut butter sandwich in it.

Do I feel powerless that HD-DVD no longer has any media? No - I've moved on but still use my existing disks. I am annoyed that those disks are now acquiring the attractively named "disk rot" and am losing some of the disks that I paid for through no fault of my own.

Everything, I figure has a limited life span and rides off into the sunset. There are many movies that are not available on blu that I would love to have and probably will never be. They are available on streaming.

So I can curtail my watching to only what's available on my disks or expand my horizons a bit. I expect that all sorts of options will become available. As in my wait for an Oppo bluray player, I won't dive in until a service that suits me shows up.

I use Netflix, etc. but will keep my disks probably forever (or as long as they also don't rot). If a service that allows fully controllable downloads comes up, then maybe.

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post #1309 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 08:49 AM
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The world is filled with unknowns. I wanted badly to buy a laserdisk player, I did buy a great HD-DVD (A35) player and still own it, I have two incredible BD players (Oppo 83 and 103D), a record player and would have a great tape player (Nakamichi) if my youngest daughter hadn't stuck branches and leaves in it and would have an excellent S-VHS deck if my oldest daughter hadn't stuck a peanut butter sandwich in it.

Do I feel powerless that HD-DVD no longer has any media? No - I've moved on but still use my existing disks. I am annoyed that those disks are now acquiring the attractively named "disk rot" and am losing some of the disks that I paid for through no fault of my own.

Everything, I figure has a limited life span and rides off into the sunset. There are many movies that are not available on blu that I would love to have and probably will never be. They are available on streaming.

So I can curtail my watching to only what's available on my disks or expand my horizons a bit. I expect that all sorts of options will become available. As in my wait for an Oppo bluray player, I won't dive in until a service that suits me shows up.

I use Netflix, etc. but will keep my disks probably forever (or as long as they also don't rot). If a service that allows fully controllable downloads comes up, then maybe.
I'm not talking about the problems in the world, This is just about Physical Media vs Streaming/Download ownership. I defer my response to Big C's take above. This is what I'm talking about.
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post #1310 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 09:04 AM
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I'm not talking about the problems in the world, This is just about Physical Media vs Streaming/Download ownership. I defer my response to Big C's take above. This is what I'm talking about.
I'm also talking about the permanence of physical or any other kind of media. You spoke about the unknowns, so I addressed that.

I understand your concerns, but things change. The quality is not equal among all of the different formats (blu, DVD, streaming... ) and the studios will get their pound of flesh no matter what the delivery method is for their content. Movies get made anyways, so they are not targeted only at bluray, the copying process amortized over many copies can't be onerous, so what is the actual markup of bluray disks?

My point is that while the highest quality is available from bluray, if the majority of consumers move to more convenient formats, then the studios will follow.

If streaming is more popular despite the difference in quality, then that is where they will put their efforts. The artists are the producers, directors, actors, not the studios. The studios just want your money.

And if (as seems to be happening) the quality of streaming begins to approach at least broadcast TV quality, then to most consumers the pertinent question is: why am I going to buy another expensive box and pay for expensive disks when I can get a good presentation (not great, notice I said that) in a convenient, cheaper manner?
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post #1311 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 09:21 AM
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One thing I've noticed is that while streaming seems to be the prefered approach among consumers, the way the physical media industry is being protected is by the studios not allowing streaming services such as Netflix to stream certain titles, but to only mail out the discs. So I guess this helps to balance things if even just a little bit.
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post #1312 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 09:26 AM
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I'm also talking about the permanence of physical or any other kind of media. You spoke about the unknowns, so I addressed that.

I understand your concerns, but things change. The quality is not equal among all of the different formats (blu, DVD, streaming... ) and the studios will get their pound of flesh no matter what the delivery method is for their content. Movies get made anyways, so they are not targeted only at bluray, the copying process amortized over many copies can't be onerous, so what is the actual markup of bluray disks?

My point is that while the highest quality is available from bluray, if the majority of consumers move to more convenient formats, then the studios will follow.

If streaming is more popular despite the difference in quality, then that is where they will put their efforts. The artists are the producers, directors, actors, not the studios. The studios just want your money.

And if (as seems to be happening) the quality of streaming begins to approach at least broadcast TV quality, then to most consumers the pertinent question is: why am I going to buy another expensive box and pay for expensive disks when I can get a good presentation (not great, notice I said that) in a convenient, cheaper manner?
hernnu,

I certainly agree with your explanation and you definitely seem to have a good handle on it all. It's your last paragraph that sums it up.

I'm just thankful that I have my Physical Disc collection and have plenty of movies to tied me over for good regardless as to what comes along later. It's no effort for me to insert a disc in a player and I prefer quality over convenience, plus the fact that I have full control of my collection. Not everything that comes along will be better for all to use.
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post #1313 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 10:43 AM
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My point is that while the highest quality is available from bluray, if the majority of consumers move to more convenient formats, then the studios will follow.

If streaming is more popular despite the difference in quality, then that is where they will put their efforts. The artists are the producers, directors, actors, not the studios. The studios just want your money.
Actually, the studios are leading the push to get more consumers to make the transition from physical media to streaming because it has better profit margin potential. As things stand now, sales of physical media outpaces sales of digitally delivered media at a ratio of about 8 to 1. However, the profits per unit sold are smaller for physical media, because the costs to provide it are higher than that of digitally delivered content and the price you pay is about the same. They would like to see the sales numbers reversed as that would mean more money in their pockets. The fact that some people value the possibility of instant gratification over quality helps their cause.

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And if (as seems to be happening) the quality of streaming begins to approach at least broadcast TV quality, then to most consumers the pertinent question is: why am I going to buy another expensive box and pay for expensive disks when I can get a good presentation (not great, notice I said that) in a convenient, cheaper manner?
Unless you don't know where to look for deals on physical media and ignore the fact that, in many cases, new releases on Blu-Ray/DVD include a redemption code for a digital copy of the content then you can usually save money by purchasing physical media rather than buying the same movie from a streaming/download provider. Sure, you can find some examples where a particular movie might be cheaper to buy from a streaming provider but, more often than not, the reverse is true. The same goes for rentals from Redbox vs. Vudu/iTunes. Digital delivery of content is really only cheaper (per movie) when you go with a subscription service like Netflix. But the tradeoff there is that you have to wait longer for Netflix to get the content (unless is is created by Netflix, e.g. House of Cards) and you don't actually own any of the content you stream from Netflix. Certain titles may be there one day and unavailable the next as they rotate content in and out of their library.

Unless you use your TV's built-in streaming apps, you will need to buy a streaming device or PC to watch your digitally delivered content. Since the built-in apps in smart TV's don't seem to be updated much beyond the time of purchase while better apps and streaming devices are released on a 1-2 year cycle, you are generally better off using a dedicated streaming device or PC rather than the built-in apps once your TV is a year or two old. Fully featured streaming devices (e.g. Roku 3, AppleTV, and Amazon FireTV) cost about $100. So, if a 4K Blu-Ray player costs $200 or even $300 bucks when they are first released we should only be concerned with the $100 to $200 difference if we are comparing the costs of hardware required for streaming vs. physical media. In the short term you may save money on hardware by going the streaming route. But, if a 4K Blu-Ray player lasts for 4-6 years before needing to be replaced/upgraded vs. upgrading your dedicated streaming device every 2 years (or buying 2 or 3 different streaming devices and only upgrading them every 4-6 years) then the hardware costs are the same over time. If you're like me and you use both physical and digitally delivered content then you could even use the 4K Blu-Ray player as your streaming device for a couple years.
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post #1314 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 11:08 AM
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People talk about physical discs not lasting forever, but do you guys really expect to have access to the online content for 20+ years? What happens when the company goes out of business, or stops streaming something (Netflix constantly adds/removes stuff)?

How exactly is physical media less user friendly than streaming? It takes me 10 seconds to open a blu-ray case, and put it in a blu-ray player. I don't have to worry about the internet lagging, or freezing, or stuttering. I can order a blu-ray online and it's delivered right to my door.
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post #1315 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB View Post
Actually, the studios are leading the push to get more consumers to make the transition from physical media to streaming because it has better profit margin potential.
True. Every move they make will be to maximize their earnings and minimize their expenses. It's why they've historically tried to avoid paying their artists.

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As things stand now, sales of physical media outpaces sales of digitally delivered media at a ratio of about 8 to 1.
According to the Wall Street Journal as of January, it's more like 2 to 1. The change in the relationship has been pretty drastic. And that's DVDs + bluray. Streaming income is 3X disk rental income now.

Online subscriptions also grew 32% last year.

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However, the profits per unit sold are smaller for physical media, because the costs to provide it are higher than that of digitally delivered content and the price you pay is about the same. They would like to see the sales numbers reversed as that would mean more money in their pockets. The fact that some people value the possibility of instant gratification over quality helps their cause.
According to the article, price for the streamed copy has been dropping, also helping streaming sales.

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Unless you don't know where to look for deals on physical media and ignore the fact that, in many cases, new releases on Blu-Ray/DVD include a redemption code for a digital copy of the content then you can usually save money by purchasing physical media rather than buying the same movie from a streaming/download provider. Sure, you can find some examples where a particular movie might be cheaper to buy from a streaming provider but, more often than not, the reverse is true. The same goes for rentals from Redbox vs. Vudu/iTunes. Digital delivery of content is really only cheaper (per movie) when you go with a subscription service like Netflix. But the tradeoff there is that you have to wait longer for Netflix to get the content (unless is is created by Netflix, e.g. House of Cards) and you don't actually own any of the content you stream from Netflix. Certain titles may be there one day and unavailable the next as they rotate content in and out of their library.
All of this is true, and valuable to me. If someone has a TV that has an app built in though, it's beside the point. If they are used to and like the convenience of digital delivery, they are going to need an incentive to buy a bluray player over just the TV.

I think you'll also see more original content through streaming.

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Unless you use your TV's built-in streaming apps, you will need to buy a streaming device or PC to watch your digitally delivered content. Since the built-in apps in smart TV's don't seem to be updated much beyond the time of purchase while better apps and streaming devices are released on a 1-2 year cycle, you are generally better off using a dedicated streaming device or PC rather than the built-in apps once your TV is a year or two old.
I agree with you, but again - I think once you're used to a device, you will take its features even if something better is in the environment unless it is obviously better.

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Fully featured streaming devices (e.g. Roku 3, AppleTV, and Amazon FireTV) cost about $100. So, if a 4K Blu-Ray player costs $200 or even $300 bucks when they are first released we should only be concerned with the $100 to $200 difference if we are comparing the costs of hardware required for streaming vs. physical media. In the short term you may save money on hardware by going the streaming route. But, if a 4K Blu-Ray player lasts for 4-6 years before needing to be replaced/upgraded vs. upgrading your dedicated streaming device every 2 years (or buying 2 or 3 different streaming devices and only upgrading them every 4-6 years) then the hardware costs are the same over time. If you're like me and you use both physical and digitally delivered content then you could even use the 4K Blu-Ray player as your streaming device for a couple years.
Believe me, if and when Oppo offers a 4K bluray player, I'll be on it. The problem is that in order to have a 4K bluray player, you'll also need a 4K display. That will most likely have apps able to stream. Then you're back to the same issue with most consumers.

At that point, who knows what the landscape would be... This year "Despicable Me 2" was available to buy online two weeks before the disk release. If more streaming sites provide more original programming, its availability on disk would become later and later.

As an example (and I know it's cable), my girlfriend is FAR behind on watching "Game of Thrones". I am planning on buying the blurays for all four seasons. At about $40 per season, that's $160 and running. I subscribe to HBO, which means that she and I can watch every episode for every season to date on demand. My kids can watch those episodes at their houses on HBOGO they're like a lot of young people now, not only cable cutters, but never got cable.

Everyone asks me (and amazingly, my girlfriend understands my point of view) why on earth I would spend $160 for something I could already watch in many ways for 'free'. For me, it's the quality of sound and video as an essential addition to the story, to them the story is the thing and as long as the sound is good, they don't really care about great.

Last edited by hernanu; 07-02-2014 at 11:42 AM.
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post #1316 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 11:43 AM
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Streaming isn't the same quality of Blu-ray, but the convenience makes up for it for most films. I only buy a Blu-ray anymore if it's a "showcase my theater" quality item. For other films that aren't audio/visual awe-fests, I'm happy to purchase a Digital Copy.
I don't want "convenient" I want high quality, and what now of the Atmos? or the DTS UHD audio?
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post #1317 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 12:40 PM
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People talk about physical discs not lasting forever, but do you guys really expect to have access to the online content for 20+ years? What happens when the company goes out of business, or stops streaming something (Netflix constantly adds/removes stuff)?

How exactly is physical media less user friendly than streaming? It takes me 10 seconds to open a blu-ray case, and put it in a blu-ray player. I don't have to worry about the internet lagging, or freezing, or stuttering. I can order a blu-ray online and it's delivered right to my door.
Couldn't agree more!
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post #1318 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 12:52 PM
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Angry

The one thing that keeps raising it's ugly head for me is this:

Streaming/downloads are less expensive right now for the most part because of the underlining agenda of the Studio's, Content providers, server companies, etc. This is the typical dangling of the carrot to entice everyone to switch and to convince them that this is better.

When everyone in general has been led to believe this is the way to go and they jump on board, Physical Media will mostly be dropped like a hot potato and then they will start the price increasing. It will be nuts, wait and see. This is they're long term agenda, plus full control and no ownership.

I certainly hope it doesn't happen.
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post #1319 of 1365 Old 07-02-2014, 12:56 PM
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You are still at the mercy of all involved and are completely powerless.
Yep. Any system is designed with THEIR interest in mind. Customer's interests are ignored or downright laughed at by forcing intrusive, annoying and retarded DRM measures.

Physical media is annoying as heck too with all the commercials and anti-piracy warnings you cannot skip and the other limitations (talking of movies, not TV shows on DVD), and it is bearable only because it's easy to sidestep (ripping the disk I can easily nuke that nonsense).

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I don't want "convenient" I want high quality, and what now of the Atmos? or the DTS UHD audio?
We are a minority. Most people won't be able to tell the difference between a 720p and a bluray and between stereo and 5.1 (usually because their TV is crap even if technically HD resolution and their sound system is bose or Dr Dre or whatever crap brand).

So yeah, streaming "ultra HD" that is actually more or less 720p will satisfy them more than buying a disk with quality media inside.
Sad fact.
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post #1320 of 1365 Old 07-03-2014, 06:29 AM
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Like it or not, here's what it boils down to. Artists depend on financial support from media distributors. They'll do whatever it takes to get the most from them. Likewise, media distributors depend on financial support from the consumers--us. They'll do whatever it takes to get the most from us. So in the end, all we, the consumers, will be able to do would be to make our best choice according to what's out there at the time we purchase something. Hopefully, we'll still be able to choose between quality, convenience, or both. We'll just have to wait and see.
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