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post #1 of 35 Old 12-06-2013, 10:25 AM - Thread Starter
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AVS Forum's Top 9 LCD TVs

LCD TVs have taken over the flat-panel market big time. For one thing, they are much brighter than plasmas, which means they catch shoppers' attention much better in the store. They can be made ultra thin with LED illumination, which also offers the added benefit of being much "greener" for the environment than the old fluorescent backlighting. In fact, virtually all LCD TVs these days use LED illumination in one of two configurations—LEDs placed around the edges of the screen (edgelighting) or in an array directly behind the screen (full-array backlighting).

[Jump to the Top 9 LCD TVs]

Let There Be Light

Edgelighting is much more common, because it allows the TV to be extremely thin, which seems to be a big selling point among consumers. It's also less expensive to manufacture. However, it often results in uneven illumination of the image, especially in dark scenes. A few sets offer full-array backlighting, and some such models implement a feature called local dimming, in which the LEDs behind dark portions of the picture are dimmed while the LEDs behind bright portions of the picture are brightened, resulting in greater contrast. Some inexpensive LED-LCD TVs use full-array backlighting without local dimming, but there are fewer LEDs in the array, and these models can't be made quite as thin as edgelit designs. Also, many edgelit sets claim to provide a form of "local dimming" (each manufacturer has its own name for this feature), but I've never seen it work very well.

Problems, Problems

"All LCD TVs suffer from some inherent problems that are addressed in various ways—and that plasmas don't have in the first place."

All LCD TVs suffer from some inherent problems that are addressed in various ways—and that plasmas don't have in the first place. For example, LCDs have a hard time achieving really deep blacks, which can be helped by dynamically dimming the LEDs, either all at once or with local dimming. Also, LCDs exhibit motion blur—objects in motion appear more blurry than they do on plasma. A feature generically called frame interpolation (each manufacturer has its own name for this) sharpens motion blur, but it also introduces an artifact called "the soap-opera effect," because it makes movies look like they were shot on video like a soap opera. In most cases, this feature can be turned off if you really hate the soap-opera effect.

The one problem with LCDs that can't be addressed with a "band-aid" is off-axis performance—as you move away from being centered on the screen, the colors often shift and become desaturated, and the black level appears to rise, leading to a washed-out image. As a result, people sitting to the sides will see a less-than-ideal picture. Of the two basic technologies used to make LCD panels, IPS (in-plane switching) usually provides better off-axis performance in the horizontal direction, while VA (vertical alignment) offers better black levels if you're centered on the screen. Panasonic, LG, and Vizio use IPS panels, while Samsung, Sharp, and Sony use variations of VA.

Active vs. Passive 3D

Most LCD TVs today offer the ability to display 3D content from Blu-rays and broadcast signals. This requires that the images for the left and right eye be isolated from each other, which usually means wearing glasses that let the left image reach the left eye while blocking the right image and vice versa. (Some great work is being done to allow glasses-free 3D, but there are no such sets currently on the market.)

This feature is implemented in one of two ways—with active-shutter glasses or passive-polarized glasses. Active-shutter glasses alternately block the light from the TV to one eye while letting the light reach the other eye, back and forth in rapid succession. The TV displays only the image for the corresponding eye in sync with which lens in the glasses is open. This provides a full-resolution image (1920x1080) for each eye, but the glasses require power (a replaceable or rechargeable battery) for their electronics, making them more expensive and heavier than passive glasses. Also, some people report seeing the image flicker, and a few actually get dizzy or even nauseous when watching 3D with active glasses.

By contrast, passive glasses have no electronics, so they are much less expensive and lighter in weight. In fact, this is the type of 3D glasses used in most commercial cinemas. In this case, the TV screen has an extra layer that polarizes the light from each row of pixels—the odd-numbered rows are polarized in one direction, and the even-numbered rows are polarized in the opposite direction. The left image is displayed in one set of lines, and the right image is displayed in the other set of lines. One lens of the glasses allows only the light from the odd rows to pass, while the other lens allows the light from the even rows to pass.

The only real problem with this approach is that each eye sees only half the vertical resolution available on the TV. That is, each eye sees 1920x540 pixels instead of 1920x1080. Most people report seeing more detail than this would imply, which is often explained as a result of the brain fusing the two images together. However, you can often see very thin black horizontal lines on the screen, especially if you sit close.

UHD or Not UHD?

Several companies have introduced so-called UHD (Ultra High Definition) or "4K" LCD TVs with a pixel resolution of 3840x2160—four times as many pixels as a conventional HDTV. I have decided not to include any of these models in this buying guide, mostly because they will be obsolete in a couple of years as the standards for UHD are finalized. Some of these sets look great displaying regular HD, but there is very little UHD content available, and that content will likely have characteristics the current UHDTVs can't handle in the future. Plus, these sets carry a price premium, though that is diminishing much faster than I would expect with a new technology.

"I have decided not to include any UHD models in this buying guide, mostly

because they will be obsolete in a couple of years as the standards for UHD are finalized."

Actually, there is one reason to get a UHDTV today—at least, a UHDTV that provides 3D with passive glasses. Since the resolution is 3840x2160, each eye sees a vertical resolution of 1080 pixels. Whether or not this is worth the premium price of a UHDTV is up to you. Also, we've learned at in at least one case—the Sony KDL-55X900—the vertical resolution for each eye is only 540 lines, making it no better than conventional LCD TVs in this regard. (We don't know if the 65" version of this TV does the same thing with 3D.)

The LCD TVs in this buying guide were selected as the best 1080p models available in 2013 by consulting various review outlets such as CNET, Consumer Reports, Sound and Vision, and rtings.com as well as AVS reviews and owner threads and a special call out to members for their top picks.

You'll notice an "xx" in the model numbers below; this is a placeholder for the size of the screen. For example, the Vizio E500i has a 50-inch screen, measured diagonally.

Vizio Exx0i

This entry-level line uses full-array backlighting with local dimming—a real surprise for such inexpensive sets. The result is deep blacks, a uniform screen, and great bright-room performance. CNET reports that the local dimming can sometimes obscure shadow detail, and it can be rather obvious in operation during some scenes, but at these prices, that might be easy to overlook. And the use of IPS LCD panels means they look better off-axis than TVs that use VA panels. Also on tap is Internet content from Vizio Internet Apps (VIA), though no 3D.

Scott Says: If saving money is at the top of your list, this line offers a lot for a little.

Vizio Mxx1D

Vizio's M1D line continues the company's tradition of offering exceptional value in its LED-LCD TVs. A favorite of CNET, Consumer Reports, and many AVS members, the M1D uses LED edgelighting and offers passive-glasses 3D and access to Internet content as well as 240 Hz frame interpolation. CNET reports great shadow detail, fairly deep blacks, and excellent processing, though with edgelighting, I'm sure that screen uniformity is not perfect.

Scott Says: A strong contender in the high-value sweepstakes, especially at such large screen sizes.

Sony KDL-xxR550A

This LED-edgelit model represents Sony's midline and probably its greatest value proposition according to CNET, which also reports relatively deep black levels. A matte screen helps combat room reflections, and unlike many Sony TVs, this one provides 3D via passive glasses, which many viewers find more comfortable than active glasses. The colors aren't completely accurate, and the grayscale can't be brought into perfect calibration, but the errors are fairly minor.

The R520A series (60 and 70 inches only) is virtually identical to the R550A except that it has no 3D capabilities for $100 less.

Scott Says: Sony TVs normally command a premium price, but this one is surprisingly affordable, making it a great value.

Samsung UNxxFH6030

The FH6030 continues Samsung's trend to use full-array backlighting in some of its entry-level LED-LCD TVs, though unlike the Vizio Exx0i, this one does not implement local dimming. Still, full-array backlighting does provide much more even illumination across the screen, which is especially important in dark scenes, and the blacks are fairly deep, leading to good contrast. This model also provides 3D with active-shutter glasses and 120 Hz refresh rate with motion interpolation. Other than a narrow viewing angle because of its VA-based LCD panel, the only real downside is a high input lag, which could be a deal-breaker for those wanting to play video games on this TV.

Scott Says: If you want full-resolution 3D and great illumination uniformity without spending a bunch—and you don't plan to play games on it—this is a great choice.

Samsung UNxxF5500

Moving up the Samsung line—which is a bit odd, since that usually means an increasing model number—the F5500 uses full-array backlighting (no local dimming) with active-glasses 3D and a dual-core processor. The refresh rate is 60 Hz, so no frame interpolation, which is no problem if you dislike the soap-opera effect. It does offer smart TV functionality with built-in WiFi, a web browser, and a smartphone control app, and the input lag is about 30% less than the F6030. Like all Samsung models in this buying guide, the picture performance is excellent.

The step-down F5000 is basically the same as the F5500 without smart TV capabilities or built-in WiFi for about $50 less. A CNET top pick.

Scott Says: Recommended by Consumer Reports, rtings.com, and AVS members, this is another fine bargain-priced LED-LCD TV from Samsung.

Sharp LC-xxLE650U

Sharp is best known for making really big LCD TVs, and the mid-level LE650U line is no exception, reaching 80 inches diagonally. CNET says it "boasts better overall picture quality than most competing LCD TVs. Black levels and shadows are dark and detailed, color is accurate, and the image maintains fidelity well in a bright room"—that last one thanks in part to a matte screen. Being edgelit, it does have some minor uniformity issues, and using a variation of VA technology, the off-axis performance suffers in exchange for better blacks when viewed on-axis. Feature-wise, it provides Samsung's stellar smart-TV capabilities with built-in WiFi and 120 Hz frame interpolation, but no 3D.

Scott Says: If you want a relatively affordable big-screen TV, and you don't care about 3D, this is a top contender.

Samsung UNxxF6400

The F6400 uses LED edgelighting with Micro Dimming, which dynamically adjusts the LED brightness to improve contrast and inserts black frames between the video frames to improve contrast and sharpen motion detail without the soap-opera effect. Also available is 120 Hz frame interpolation, and like all Samsung TVs with 3D, this one uses active-shutter glasses. The company's Smart TV feature is among the best in the business, including a web browser and built-in WiFi, and the TV can be controlled with voice interaction through the remote.

The step-down F6300 omits 3D, Micro Dimming, and voice interaction, but it's otherwise very similar for $25 to $600 less, depending on screen size.

Scott Says: This is the least expensive Samsung with 3D, Micro Dimming, Smart TV, and voice interaction, making it a fave among AVS members.

Samsung UNxxF8000

Samsung's flagship 1080p LED-LCD TV, the F8000 uses edgelighting with Micro Dimming Ultimate, a more sophisticated form of black-frame insertion and dynamic LED dimming. It's quad-core processor supports 240 Hz frame interpolation, active-glasses 3D, Smart TV capabilities, and Smart Interaction, which lets you control the TV with voice and hand gestures thanks to the built-in camera. That camera also lets the TV recognize different faces and automatically set the TV to their preferences. Perhaps most importantly, the F8000 provides a feature called Smart Evolution, which lets you upgrade the TV's hardware as new capabilities are developed.

Scott Says: The F8000 is universally hailed as one of the best LED-LCD TVs you can buy today, and it's future-proof with Smart Evolution.

Sony KDL-55W900A

This flagship Sony 1080p set comes in only one screen size and features a new technology—quantum-dot illumination. Dubbed Triluminous by Sony, this technology uses blue LEDs at the edges of the screen that cause microscopic dots of matter in a separate layer to glow green and red, and all three colors combine to form white light as in other LED-illuminated LCD TVs. The W900A offers gorgeous colors, deep blacks, and great shadow detail as well as 3D capabilities with active glasses. And its low input lag makes this set ideal for gaming. The Sony website is selling it for $2000 during the holidays, so now's a great time to get the best.

Scott Says: It's expensive for its size, but this is one of the best LED-LCD TVs on the market today, even more so if you're a gamer.


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post #2 of 35 Old 12-07-2013, 01:13 PM
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No LG lcd-tvs ?
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post #3 of 35 Old 12-07-2013, 02:15 PM
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LG's always have great color reproduction, but always lack contrast.

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post #4 of 35 Old 12-10-2013, 01:33 PM - Thread Starter
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What Heavytoka said. Plus, almost no review outlets include LG LCD TVs in their top picks, except Consumer Reports.<br>

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post #5 of 35 Old 12-11-2013, 03:38 AM
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Next to my Sony I think my LG looks the next best and the passive 3D is better IMO than active.<br><br>"Plus, almost no review outlets include LG LCD TVs in their top picks, except Consumer Reports."<br><br>I hope I read that wrong... LG wasn't included simply because some other sites have chosen not to list them? Intimidation? I know of one TV review site off the top of my head that picked some LG's as Editors Choice. They list Samsung, LG, Sony, and Panasonic as the better TV's.<br><br>Vizio... a friend that sells them claims they have more issues with Vizio than any other brand they sell.<br><br>Take reviews with a grain of salt. Go out and compare for yourself.
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post #6 of 35 Old 12-11-2013, 09:39 AM
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LG's are awesome. If I bought a 3D capable TV today, that is most likely what I would buy. I am still happy with my old Toshiba 720P 50" Plasma. The picture is amazing and until it dies, I have no plans to replace it. I would NOT buy a Vizio. You get what you pay for.
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post #7 of 35 Old 12-11-2013, 02:49 PM - Thread Starter
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BlackHawk1, what site are you thinking of? I should have said, "almost no review sites I checked include LG LCD TVs in their top picks, except Consumer Reports." Plus, few if any AVS members cited LG as their favorite in my call for recommendations.<br>

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post #8 of 35 Old 12-11-2013, 03:32 PM
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Will "soap opera effect" be the #1 catchphrase for neo-Luddites in 2014?

You get what you pay for.  For professional advice, pay the professional rate.
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post #9 of 35 Old 12-11-2013, 05:52 PM
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As I commented on the projector article, I don't understand the rationale for excluding 4K. When a 4K standard is finalized, and new TVs built for that spec hit the market, ALL of today's TVs will be "obsolete." Arguably today's 4K TVs will be LESS obsolete than any of the 1080p TVs on this list.
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This review is totally crap ..... Can't believe this is an expert!
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post #11 of 35 Old 12-13-2013, 07:31 AM
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The biggest shortfall from earlier LCD televisions and briefly mentioned in the introduction, in my opinion, is off axis viewing and light reflection. I have a KDL-52XBR4 that can be viewed a minimum of 30 degrees off axis and its matted screen allows only minimal annoying reflective light from windows or lamps. I shopped for a replacement for this TV earlier in the year that yielded terrible results. Most edge lit LED screens dramatically degrade as little as 15 degrees off axis and all screens have become so reflective, you wonder if you aren't viewing a plasma. What I find annoying is that these facts escape the majority of reviews claiming to be objective. What's satisfactory today would have resulted in a TV being criticized only a matter of a couple years ago. Also, the intro mentioned that LG uses IPS panels and Sony uses VA technology. I'm assuming this is a statement that is restricted to the TVs in this list, since LG makes the panels for the Sony 550A series? Scott, this article seems more of a compilation of previous reviews and not an objective look. Not one of your better efforts.
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post #12 of 35 Old 12-19-2013, 08:41 AM
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I looked around before buying an LG 55LA7400 - and couldn't be happier with the choice. No motion blur (Tru-Motion = Smooth - De-judder = 3, De-Blur = 3), great colors and contrast (100%), and amazing passive 3D. The blacks look black to me (Black Level = Low, Local Dimming = Medium). Visio, Samsung, and Sony models in the same price range didn't compare well at all for picture quality, 3D quality, and motion blur. The only complaint I have with the LG is the lag, making internet useless on it - but I have my PC connected through HDMI and works great.<br><br>It is a bit disappointing that Scott seemed to base his reviews on other's recommendations and other reviews rather than having a look for himself.
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post #13 of 35 Old 12-19-2013, 09:37 AM
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Scott, don't you have the Vizio M and E series TVs reversed? It's the M series that is backlit, is it not? Thanks for the comprehensive review, Rolando
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Nice list Scott, thanks for taking the time to post this.<br>
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Very pure article, more like a tirade how LED / LCD have shortfalls and plasma is good.<br>
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As a TV tech for 45+ years, I'd go with Sony, Samsung, Mits, or even LG as they DO support their sets, and have parts and tech support available.<br>What will you do with a set that has no new parts available for it when it breaks, and it will break?<br>The couple of the parts dist. that sell "Green Parts" are a joke. 75%-85% of the boards that I got from them were defective out of the box.<br><br>Vizio has no appreciable tech support for their sets.<br>They are "throw away" sets.<br>Spend a few bux more, and get one that IS supported by the manufacturer.
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post #17 of 35 Old 12-20-2013, 04:02 AM
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The Vizio E Series is not full array with micro dimming. That is the M series. And even the M series is not a true full array LED.

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post #18 of 35 Old 12-20-2013, 02:45 PM
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Bond 007, could you expand? I was considering The Vizio 70 inch M series.
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post #19 of 35 Old 04-30-2014, 04:53 PM
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Thanks Scott for the list. I looked at several of the TV's on this list. Ultimately I chose the Samsung F8000 in the 65" version. I love it!!<br>

my stuff:

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post #20 of 35 Old 05-07-2014, 11:52 PM
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I've had good luck with Sony,Toshiba ,and Sharp over the last 25 yrs . I currently have a 2013 60" Samsung Plasma , A 2013 40" Sony,LED/LCD a 2012 32" Toshiba CCFL/LCD and a 2013 LG 42" LED/LCD and a 2011 40" Dynex CCFL LCD with a decent Samsung panel.

These are all working well with good pictures with no issues thus far.OFC the Sammie Plasma is the pick of the litter followed by the Sony LED/LCD . The 2 Sony's ,1 Toshiba and 1 sharp I owned in the past were<br>all at least 10 yrs + reliable with no issues 14 yrs for one Sony ,13 for the other one 12 for the Sharp.

I could not find a compelling reason *for me* to buy Visio at this time the pictures on the Visio's I shopped were not bad at all but not any better IMO and not quite as good as the sets I bought IMO ,some were comparable 2014 B series
Visio's

, Ofc a store is not the best viewing situation. The other thing was alleged reliability,warranty and product support issues YMMV . Sony's ,LG's ,Sharps, Samsungs and sometimes Toshiba usually come at a premium price but they have thus far all worked well for me.

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post #21 of 35 Old 06-13-2014, 06:26 AM
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Love the list Scott and I love seeing my W900A rounding out the top 9. I think it should have been rated higher but I am biased lol.
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post #22 of 35 Old 06-13-2014, 08:41 PM
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Looking at buying a TV in the next month or two. Based on what I read, it's not the right time to buy 4K TV yet, but I'm worried that if don't buy a 4K, then my TV I buy will be outdated sooner rather than later.

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post #23 of 35 Old 06-14-2014, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottJ View Post
As I commented on the projector article, I don't understand the rationale for excluding 4K. When a 4K standard is finalized, and new TVs built for that spec hit the market, ALL of today's TVs will be "obsolete." Arguably today's 4K TVs will be LESS obsolete than any of the 1080p TVs on this list.
Exactly why my next TV will be a UHD model.
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post #24 of 35 Old 06-15-2014, 12:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bodean View Post
Looking at buying a TV in the next month or two. Based on what I read, it's not the right time to buy 4K TV yet, but I'm worried that if don't buy a 4K, then my TV I buy will be outdated sooner rather than later.


bodean, every year TV's become outdated. New models are always replaced by the next years model. Unfortunately that's just the way this technology is. It happens with the all mighty 4K sets as well.
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post #25 of 35 Old 06-16-2014, 09:11 AM
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None of the current LCDs surpass the Kuro Elites which weren't perfect. Why buy one? Samsung's best plasma puts all these LCDs in the toilet and is still being produced--so why buy a LCD? Not to mention there are OLEDs that put the 4K LCDs in the toilet. So why buy a LCD?

LCD is permanently forever inferior. Why buy it? Why promote it? Why talk about it? Why care about it?

It is within your power to keep the world from becoming LCD only! You can do that by not buying LCD--not talking about LCD--and by buying and talking about everything that is not LCD. If you don't you'll be stuck with an LCD only world.

Who can take it?!

If you don't believe me then ask yourself this question--if a million faceoffs in a row show LCD still not being superior--would you still buy it because 99% of the TVs offered for sale were LCD? I wouldn't! Would you?
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post #26 of 35 Old 06-16-2014, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Artwood View Post
None of the current LCDs surpass the Kuro Elites which weren't perfect. Why buy one? Samsung's best plasma puts all these LCDs in the toilet and is still being produced--so why buy a LCD? Not to mention there are OLEDs that put the 4K LCDs in the toilet. So why buy a LCD?

LCD is permanently forever inferior. Why buy it? Why promote it? Why talk about it? Why care about it?

It is within your power to keep the world from becoming LCD only! You can do that by not buying LCD--not talking about LCD--and by buying and talking about everything that is not LCD. If you don't you'll be stuck with an LCD only world.

Who can take it?!

If you don't believe me then ask yourself this question--if a million faceoffs in a row show LCD still not being superior--would you still buy it because 99% of the TVs offered for sale were LCD? I wouldn't! Would you?


So why buy an LCD? Because its the persons choice, its their money that's why. This is a LCD topic and not a plasma topic. You Plasma guys have a serious issue, you really do!
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post #27 of 35 Old 06-17-2014, 08:13 AM
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Wanting to not have an LCD only world does not mean one has issues.

Pointing out the inferiority of a technology makes sense at an enthusiast's forum.

LCD is like a 1974 Mustang II--many people bought it--they chose to spend their money that way--that didn't mean that its performance was good.

In 1974 you did have a choice when it came to cars.

The problem with the video display market is it is getting increasingly difficult to buy alternatives to LCD and they may entirely vanish.

If that happens it won't matter even if people choose it. People can choose wrong. Enthusiasts don't base their appreciation of video picture quality by looking at what sells.

I don't have a problem with 90% of the people choosing LCD even though I and many other enthusiasts and professional calibrators know it is an inferior technology. What I have a problem with is an LCD only world orchestrated by video display manufacturing companies who could care less about video picture quality as long as they can make money in an LCD only world.

It is not paranoia to believe that OLED may fail. It is not paranoia to believe that an LCD only world could very well happen. And it is not paranoia at an enthusiast site to warn people of that possibility and to also reiterate opinions as to what the state of the art in video picture quality really is.

One does not have issues when faceoff after faceoff winds up with LCD being inferior. Why would an enthusiast want a world where that inferior technology is the only one available?
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post #28 of 35 Old 06-18-2014, 03:16 PM
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What makes you think all technological advancement will stop with the LCD TV being your only choice forever? That 1974 Mustang may not have be a great car but look at all the choices you have now, relax technology is advancing very quickly now.

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post #29 of 35 Old 06-19-2014, 12:06 PM
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[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artwood View Post
Wanting to not have an LCD only world does not mean one has issues.

Pointing out the inferiority of a technology makes sense at an enthusiast's forum.


One does not have issues when faceoff after faceoff winds up with LCD being inferior. Why would an enthusiast want a world where that inferior technology is the only one available?
Edit :
Edit again: comment removed

I only have one plasma ☺☺☺☺.................... and 4 LCD ☺☺☺

Hires Music formats ..............."Why does it sound like a CD ?" ............. "can we make it louder "?
"The wireless music box has no commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to nobody in particular?"
- David Sarnoff's associates at RCA the 1920's -

Last edited by tubetwister; 06-19-2014 at 06:17 PM.
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post #30 of 35 Old 06-19-2014, 01:25 PM
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Looking at buying a TV in the next month or two. Based on what I read, it's not the right time to buy 4K TV yet, but I'm worried that if don't buy a 4K, then my TV I buy will be outdated sooner rather than later.
This article is dated most of the better 2014 4K (UHD) sets support HDMI 2.0 ( and by implication current 4K (UHD) standards ,60fps and 12 bit color as well although many sets can use 10 bit panels in 12 bit mode and work fine ) and some support HEVC 4K video streaming and playback (do your research and make sure before you buy one though) , and make sure it has the supported features/specs. you will need plenty of info here at AVS.

I don't believe 2K vs 4K is necessarily the issue it was when this article was written and most of the better
LCD sets are or will soon be 4K anyway . Again do your research . Visit the appropriate set owner sub forums here for those you may be looking at
Plasma vs LCD each *can do * something better than the other sometimes again do your research .

Plasma can give you a great picture for the money [/I]in a darkened or decently light controlled room .
I have one precisely because of this it also games well w/ps3 .



LCD are best in bright rooms and daylight ,the better LCD these days are approaching plasma picture quality

I have 1 plasma and 5 LCD TBH in daylight I usually prefer my newest (2013)Sony LED/LCD ( very good picture as LCD goes )

OTOH the Sammie Plasma isn't bad
at all and the picture is excellent in it's light controlled room even with the (non sun facing blinds *slightly open at times
ofc as one would expect it's more excellent in the evening .


If you want bang for the buck you can do very well with a Sammie (Samsung ) Plasma in a light controlled room that's true .

Other than that for LCD I would look at a Sony 6x 8x or 9x .



Sammie f5XXX plasma can put a lot of (most ) LCD to bed ) the f8500 can destroy most LCD or almost anything short of OLED !

Hires Music formats ..............."Why does it sound like a CD ?" ............. "can we make it louder "?
"The wireless music box has no commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to nobody in particular?"
- David Sarnoff's associates at RCA the 1920's -

Last edited by tubetwister; 07-08-2014 at 06:21 AM.
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