Top 10 Things You Need to Know About Speaker Configuration and Placement - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 34Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 05:13 AM - Thread Starter
Assoc. Editor @ AVS Forum
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 11,968
Mentioned: 254 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6270 Post(s)
Liked: 10991
Top 10 Things You Need to Know About Speaker Configuration and Placement



Surround sound comes in many flavors, from 5.1 channels up to 32 speakers for immersive 3D audio. The key to great results is placement.

1. Surround-sound speaker systems typically contain five or more speakers and one or more subwoofers. Currently, most movies come with a 5.1 or 7.1 soundtrack; any additional channels are fed with derived signals from the AVR or preamp/processor. (This is not true with immersive soundtracks and speaker systems; all speakers are fed native signals in that case.)

2. The tweeters of the front speakers should be at seated-ear height; use stands with bookshelf-style speakers to place them at the correct height. Make sure you measure carefully when installing in-wall or on-wall speakers.

3. Place standard surround speakers two feet above ear level. For a 5.1 setup, the surrounds should go on the side walls, slightly behind the listening position. In a 7.1 system, the rear surrounds go on the back wall.

4. For flat-panel TVs and acoustically opaque projection screens, place the front left and right speakers within a foot or two of the sides of the screen. The center speaker goes directly above or below the screen—it should go above the screen if you have more than one row of seats.

5. With an acoustically transparent (AT) screen, place the left, center, and right speakers behind the screen, with the left and right as close to the edges of the screen as possible and the center in the middle. If you use a perforated AT screen (as opposed to woven), you also need have enough room to place the speakers about 12 inches behind the screen.

6. Subwoofer placement is tricky. Putting a sub in a corner increases overall levels but may sound boomy. Placing it at the half or quarter point along a wall often results in tighter and more even bass.

7. Using more than one subwoofer can help even out bass response from one seat to the next. This also offers more output compared with using a single sub.

8. Immersive-sound formats such as Dolby Atmos, Auro 3D, and DTS:X create a 3D soundfield using height channels, which requires additional speakers. For example, Trinnov's Altitude32 processor supports 32 speakers, but most current AVRs with immersive capabilities max out at 9 or 11 speakers.

9. DTS:X and Auro 3D recommend placing the height speakers above the main speakers at an elevation of roughly 45° and 30°, respectively. Dolby Atmos suggests placing the height speakers in the ceiling or using special Atmos-enabled speakers.

10. Dolby Atmos-enabled speakers and modules reflect sound from the ceiling to create a sense of height and immersion. However, they require a flat and acoustically reflective ceiling—no higher than 14 feet—for the effect to work well.



Like AVS Forum on Facebook
Follow AVS Forum on Twitter
+1 AVS Forum on Google+

qwho51, doctorno, JSKMDWK and 7 others like this.

Mark Henninger (aka Imagic)
imagic is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 05:49 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
pottscb's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
Liked: 78
Ive seen an article proposing a setup that will enable all immersive formats to function (if one is a little compromised). In order for these these formats make serious market penetration this info will have to be researched, tested and published and referenced in EVERY discussion of speaker setup. Consumers are gun shy of being burned by, yet another, format war. No one cares who wins if the consumer loses...
qwho51, Chuckflhr and Red Devil 24 like this.
pottscb is offline  
post #3 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 06:33 AM
Member
 
agerson's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 75
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Liked: 7
For those of us with acoustically opaque flat screen TVs, is there any solution to the dialogue sounding like its coming so locally from the center channel? I know Yamaha has "dialogue lift", but I have an Marantz AVR. Is there any way to hook up two center channels, both above and bellow your screen, to create a less localized dialogue area? With a non-Yamaha AVR's is there any way to pump some dialogue track to height speakers? As much as my TV speakers don't produce good sound, I do like that sound appears to come from behind the entire TV.

Aperion Verus Grand Bookshelf L/R
Aperion Verus Forte Center Channel
Aperion Verus Forte Satellite
SVS PB-1000
Marantz SR-5009
Samsung UN60F7100 LED TV

Last edited by agerson; 06-05-2015 at 06:38 AM.
agerson is offline  
 
post #4 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 06:53 AM - Thread Starter
Assoc. Editor @ AVS Forum
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 11,968
Mentioned: 254 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6270 Post(s)
Liked: 10991
Quote:
Originally Posted by agerson View Post
For those of us with acoustically opaque flat screen TVs, is there any solution to the dialogue sounding like its coming so locally from the center channel? I know Yamaha has "dialogue lift", but I have an Marantz AVR. Is there any way to hook up two center channels, both above and bellow your screen, to create a less localized dialogue area? With a non-Yamaha AVR's is there any way to pump some dialogue track to height speakers? As much as my TV speakers don't produce good sound, I do like that sound appears to come from behind the entire TV.
In my studio, I've found that Dirac Live running on a DDRC-88A makes center channel speakers disappear into the front soundstage. But that's not a cheap solution. I use center spread, which routes a bit of the center channel signal to the L/R speakers, that also has a positive effect. It's important to tilt the center channel so it's aimed at your head, whether it's above or below the TV.
qwho51 likes this.

Mark Henninger (aka Imagic)
imagic is offline  
post #5 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 07:37 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,190
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 858 Post(s)
Liked: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
4. For flat-panel TVs and acoustically opaque projection screens, place the front left and right speakers within a foot or two of the sides of the screen. The center speaker goes directly above or below the screen—it should go above the screen if you have more than one row of seats.
It seems like the front speakers should be spaced wider. For rooms as narrow ours it's not really an option... but I find myself wishing I had a bigger stereo spread/ the ability to place the speakers 4' away from each side of the screen, but I can't move my walls. The center can handle the space between right?
Aras_Volodka is offline  
post #6 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 07:46 AM
 
RLBURNSIDE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 3,901
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2012 Post(s)
Liked: 1385
I wonder if AVRs are ever going to allow you to pinpoint the exact center position in 3D space of your TV. That way, it can properly render dialogue with the proper height "lift" (or depression).

In the pic at the top, you could pinpoint a sound coming from the middle pretty accurately, given the height channels on the sides, and the L/R which have their tweeters about at the center line of the TV.

Personally I think many concentric drivers (tweeter in the middle of the woofer) placed evenly around the room, would give the most accurate and coherent and clear 3D sound. If you need more SPLs in the front, just add a few more drivers (or bigger ones). But each individual woofer should get their own proper mix according to their positions in 3D. Hard to do that with traditional speakers, especially LCRs which usually have multiple woofers laid out in a straight line. A straight line gives a line-array like dispersion which muddies the response in the axis the drivers are on. So, yeah, concentric drivers = no phasing, 1 mix per 1 driver, crisp, clean.

Someone should write a software program that allows you to add as many Wisa speakers as you want and place them anywhere in the room. If you properly redirect the bass and get some kind of wireless charging going on too, and a decent 3d speaker position calibration (like Yamaha's with the triangular mic thingy, ostensibly made that way to deduce not just the distances from the MLP to each speaker, but their absolute positions in x, y, z coordinates), then you could get the ideal dispersion I think.

Probably over-thinking it, bookshelves are likely going to be the best. I don't think most L/R towers are going to be very good at sound stage localisation in the vertical axis in their "zone". So it would be muddier to have those types of speakers and you're better off with bookshelves for every single channel. Maybe bigger ones for the front since a lot of the sound will be coming from the screen area anyway. But I'd prefer identical drivers all around, with very good dispersion and off-axis response curves in both axes.
RLBURNSIDE is offline  
post #7 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 07:52 AM - Thread Starter
Assoc. Editor @ AVS Forum
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 11,968
Mentioned: 254 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6270 Post(s)
Liked: 10991
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aras_Volodka View Post
It seems like the front speakers should be spaced wider. For rooms as narrow ours it's not really an option... but I find myself wishing I had a bigger stereo spread/ the ability to place the speakers 4' away from each side of the screen, but I can't move my walls. The center can handle the space between right?
It's just loose guideline. But keep in mind that with a TV, in order to maintain an optimal viewing distance you should not be too far away. And if you put speakers two feet from each side of a 65" TV, you wind up with speakers 106" apart (almost nine feet). More with a lrager TV. Unless you have a huge home theater and sit unusually far away from a TV (at which point you should consider front projection) placing speakers farther apart than two feet from screen edges is probably not going to offer much benefit because, as you note, the speakers will wind up too close to the side walls.

But it's just a rule of thumb. It's best to experiment with speaker placement since rooms vary in size and geometry. Plus, you have to consider the dispersion pattern of your speakers. Many high-efficiency designs utilized waveguides that limit dispersion. You don't want to place speakers so far apart that the tweeter can't cover the entire listening area.

Mark Henninger (aka Imagic)
imagic is offline  
post #8 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 07:55 AM - Thread Starter
Assoc. Editor @ AVS Forum
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 11,968
Mentioned: 254 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6270 Post(s)
Liked: 10991
Quote:
Originally Posted by RLBURNSIDE View Post
I wonder if AVRs are ever going to allow you to pinpoint the exact center position in 3D space of your TV. That way, it can properly render dialogue with the proper height "lift" (or depression).

In the pic at the top, you could pinpoint a sound coming from the middle pretty accurately, given the height channels on the sides, and the L/R which have their tweeters about at the center line of the TV.

Personally I think many concentric drivers (tweeter in the middle of the woofer) placed evenly around the room, would give the most accurate and coherent and clear 3D sound. If you need more SPLs in the front, just add a few more drivers (or bigger ones). But each individual woofer should get their own proper mix according to their positions in 3D. Hard to do that with traditional speakers, especially LCRs which usually have multiple woofers laid out in a straight line. A straight line gives a line-array like dispersion which muddies the response in the axis the drivers are on. So, yeah, concentric drivers = no phasing, 1 mix per 1 driver, crisp, clean.

Someone should write a software program that allows you to add as many Wisa speakers as you want and place them anywhere in the room. If you properly redirect the bass and get some kind of wireless charging going on too, and a decent 3d speaker position calibration (like Yamaha's with the triangular mic thingy, ostensibly made that way to deduce not just the distances from the MLP to each speaker, but their absolute positions in x, y, z coordinates), then you could get the ideal dispersion I think.

Probably over-thinking it, bookshelves are likely going to be the best. I don't think most L/R towers are going to be very good at sound stage localisation in the vertical axis in their "zone". So it would be muddier to have those types of speakers and you're better off with bookshelves for every single channel. Maybe bigger ones for the front since a lot of the sound will be coming from the screen area anyway. But I'd prefer identical drivers all around, with very good dispersion and off-axis response curves in both axes.

The Pioneer Elite Atmos-enabled bookshelf speakers (SP-EBS73-LR) offer concentric drivers for the mid/tweeter and I've recently been listening to them as pure 2-channel speakers with a renewed sense of awe and respect. Andrew Jones may be gone from Pioneer, but his final project produced a gem. He told me himself to pay special attention to the bookshelf model, that it was where he achieved something special audio-wise in that line.

Mark Henninger (aka Imagic)
imagic is offline  
post #9 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 07:58 AM
 
witchdoctor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,342
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 754 Post(s)
Liked: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
In my studio, I've found that Dirac Live running on a DDRC-88A makes center channel speakers disappear into the front soundstage. But that's not a cheap solution. I use center spread, which routes a bit of the center channel signal to the L/R speakers, that also has a positive effect. It's important to tilt the center channel so it's aimed at your head, whether it's above or below the TV.
The diagram above has width channels. In my space using width channels make all of the front speakers disappear in the soundstage in multi channel playback.

http://www.audyssey.com/blog/practic...e-audyssey-dsx

Last edited by witchdoctor; 06-05-2015 at 08:07 AM.
witchdoctor is offline  
post #10 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 07:59 AM
 
witchdoctor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,342
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 754 Post(s)
Liked: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aras_Volodka View Post
It seems like the front speakers should be spaced wider. For rooms as narrow ours it's not really an option... but I find myself wishing I had a bigger stereo spread/ the ability to place the speakers 4' away from each side of the screen, but I can't move my walls. The center can handle the space between right?
I don't think you need to change front speaker placement when you are using width channels like in the diagram for multi channel playback. For 2 channel stereo maybe.

http://www.audyssey.com/blog/practic...e-audyssey-dsx

Last edited by witchdoctor; 06-05-2015 at 08:07 AM.
witchdoctor is offline  
post #11 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 08:11 AM
Newbie
 
huhhuh's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Interesting article. Unlike many other speaker placement suggestions, Mark recommends that surround speakers be placed 2 feet above the listener's ear level. Most others recommend surround speakers at ear level. What I've never been able to understand is that in every theater I have ever been to, the surround speakers are place high up on the wall, sometimes 15 to 20 feet. Why isn't the recommendation for home theaters is to have the speakers higher up?
billmich and qwho51 like this.
huhhuh is offline  
post #12 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 08:31 AM - Thread Starter
Assoc. Editor @ AVS Forum
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 11,968
Mentioned: 254 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6270 Post(s)
Liked: 10991
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhhuh View Post
Interesting article. Unlike many other speaker placement suggestions, Mark recommends that surround speakers be placed 2 feet above the listener's ear level. Most others recommend surround speakers at ear level. What I've never been able to understand is that in every theater I have ever been to, the surround speakers are place high up on the wall, sometimes 15 to 20 feet. Why isn't the recommendation for home theaters is to have the speakers higher up?
With Atmos, the recommendation is ear level because there are height channels. However, for 5.1, 7.1, and variants that expand on the theme, there are advantages to having speakers a bit higher. More than anything else, it assures that one audience member's head does not totally block the sound for another audience member. But the elevated positioning also supports the context for most surround effects, which often involve replicating ambiance and fly-over type effects. More often than not, the slight elevation will "ring true."
cdelena and qwho51 like this.

Mark Henninger (aka Imagic)
imagic is offline  
post #13 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 08:43 AM - Thread Starter
Assoc. Editor @ AVS Forum
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 11,968
Mentioned: 254 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6270 Post(s)
Liked: 10991
Quote:
Originally Posted by witchdoctor View Post
The diagram above has width channels. In my space using width channels make all of the front speakers disappear in the soundstage in multi channel playback.

http://www.audyssey.com/blog/practic...e-audyssey-dsx
That diagram is for illustrative purposes only. That particular graphic is for a DTS:Neo X-compatible layout.

Mark Henninger (aka Imagic)
imagic is offline  
post #14 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 08:44 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
xvfx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: UK
Posts: 1,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Liked: 242
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhhuh View Post
Interesting article. Unlike many other speaker placement suggestions, Mark recommends that surround speakers be placed 2 feet above the listener's ear level. Most others recommend surround speakers at ear level. What I've never been able to understand is that in every theater I have ever been to, the surround speakers are place high up on the wall, sometimes 15 to 20 feet. Why isn't the recommendation for home theaters is to have the speakers higher up?
Likely because there will always be some idiots that will hit the speaker or poke the cone. "For a laugh!" While leaving the cinema.
qwho51, imagic and david0406 like this.
xvfx is offline  
post #15 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 08:52 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
tuxedocivic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Ladysmith, BC
Posts: 7,793
Mentioned: 178 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2177 Post(s)
Liked: 2047
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhhuh View Post
Interesting article. Unlike many other speaker placement suggestions, Mark recommends that surround speakers be placed 2 feet above the listener's ear level. Most others recommend surround speakers at ear level. What I've never been able to understand is that in every theater I have ever been to, the surround speakers are place high up on the wall, sometimes 15 to 20 feet. Why isn't the recommendation for home theaters is to have the speakers higher up?
This is to even out sound power acorss a long distance of seats. Nothing more.

If the speaker were at ear height, the guy in the end of the row would get blasted out, the guy at the other end wouldn't hear anything. Then once the effect pans to the other side, the guy who couldn't hear anything will now get blown away and the guy who was just blown away won't hear the effect. Placing the speaker high allows the SPL to be more evenly distributed.

This is common in lots of PA applications, not just theatres. What you see in a theatre should not necessarily be applied to the home setting. Despite this, I think raising the surrounds up can add a spaciousness to the surround effects. Just that what you see in the theatre isn't what justifies the placement at home.

Hope that makes sense.
qwho51 and mhutchins like this.
tuxedocivic is online now  
post #16 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 09:49 AM
 
witchdoctor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,342
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 754 Post(s)
Liked: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
That diagram is for illustrative purposes only. That particular graphic is for a DTS:Neo X-compatible layout.
Have you tried adding width channels yet?
witchdoctor is offline  
post #17 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 10:02 AM - Thread Starter
Assoc. Editor @ AVS Forum
 
imagic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 11,968
Mentioned: 254 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6270 Post(s)
Liked: 10991
Quote:
Originally Posted by witchdoctor View Post
Have you tried adding width channels yet?
I've run width channels in the past. I'm slightly more enamored with Atmos than I am with DTS Neo:X. But if (in the future) I get a chance to add front wides to a system with height channels, I'll do it. I see a DTS:X-compatible AVR or pre/pro in my future.

Mark Henninger (aka Imagic)

Last edited by imagic; 06-05-2015 at 10:30 AM.
imagic is offline  
post #18 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 10:29 AM
Senior Member
 
Pitbull0669's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: upstate New York
Posts: 231
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 74 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by witchdoctor View Post
Have you tried adding width channels yet?


I have them and Love it not to mention DTS-X will make use of them
witchdoctor, qwho51 and imagic like this.
Pitbull0669 is offline  
post #19 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 11:19 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
blastermaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sunny Okanagan
Posts: 1,901
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 498 Post(s)
Liked: 625
As I've been looking at speakers and speaker placement for 3D sound, I've seen pictures of bookshelf style speakers used as ceiling speakers aimed at the MLP. I've also seen (from the Dolby site) diagrams where the ceiling speaker isn't aimed at the MLP, but is just downward firing. I went with the latter in-ceiling speakers and they are spaced pretty much perfectly except they are pretty close to the side walls. Is that going to pose much problem? Damn I can't wait for fall - I can't even test this out until I get a new receiver!
blastermaster is offline  
post #20 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 12:00 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
kharvel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Posts: 1,393
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I am trying to set up a 9.2 system and the surround speaker placement may not be optimal (due to mistakes made in wiring rough-in by supposedly professional audio installers during the new home construction):

From left to right:

(1) Front L, (2) subwoofer, (3) center, (4) subwoofer, (5) Front R.

8 feet away from screen mounted on framing:
(6) Surround L, (7) Surround R

12 feet away from screen:
Theater seating

12 feet away from screen, mounted on the ceiling right above the Theater seating:
(8) Surround L, (9) Surround R

22 feet away from screen, mounted on rear wall:
(10) Surround L, (11) Surround R

So the issue seems to be that there are 2 surrounds on the wall about 5 feet in front of the seating, 2 surrounds on the ceiling right above the seating, and 2 surrounds about 10 feet behind the seating.

Is this speaker placement OK for optimal sound? Or will the placement of surrounds (6) and (7) cause problems?
kharvel is offline  
post #21 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 12:01 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
mtbdudex's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 5,743
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Liked: 771
For non 3D sound formats I share this, it's easy to grasp

mtbdudex is offline  
post #22 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 02:01 PM
Senior Member
 
satfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lewisville, TX
Posts: 215
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Liked: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post
For non 3D sound formats I share this, it's easy to grasp

That's the 11.2 set up I'm using. I had wiring added to a 7.1 system using the Audessey recommended setup. This was quite costly (relatively speaking) which required cutting attic access into the HT ceiling Now, a year later Atmos comes out and I'm wondering if this set up won't sound right with Atmos or DTS-X. I don't have an Atmos enabled AV processor yet but any opinions? Thanks.
mtbdudex likes this.

H/T: Marantz 7702MK II, MM8077, MM7055, Triton 2s, SCXL, SL/SR-S50s, BL/BR-S50s, H/W-4 Sat3s, dual SB16 Ultras, Sony HW50ES, Dalite 110", Tivo PXL, PS-3, Apple TV, GIK Acoustics treatments
Gameroom: Denon AVR-X4300H, NHT S2,SC, 4 NHT ceiling speakers, 2 Velo SPL-1000R, Sony XBR65X850C, PS3, 4, Sony FMP-X10, Samsung K8500
satfam is offline  
post #23 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 02:16 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Kain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Dubai, UAE
Posts: 3,606
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1474 Post(s)
Liked: 420
Is it better to place the center speaker below the screen angled up or above the screen angled down?
Kain is offline  
post #24 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 02:41 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
blazar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 3,511
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 730 Post(s)
Liked: 533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kain View Post
Is it better to place the center speaker below the screen angled up or above the screen angled down?
below angled up. The front soundstage should be setup so all speakers are at the same level ideally. Also people's mouths are at the bottom of their faces which is where much of the dialog in the center channel ought to sound like it is coming from.

Speakers above the screen < speakers below the screen < speakers behind the screen.
mtbdudex likes this.

Blazar!
blazar is offline  
post #25 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 03:19 PM
 
witchdoctor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,342
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 754 Post(s)
Liked: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
I've run width channels in the past. I'm slightly more enamored with Atmos than I am with DTS Neo:X. But if (in the future) I get a chance to add front wides to a system with height channels, I'll do it. I see a DTS:X-compatible AVR or pre/pro in my future.
The Atmos 9.1.2 setup uses width channels

http://www.dolby.com/us/en/guide/dol...-2-setups.html
witchdoctor is offline  
post #26 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 03:25 PM
 
witchdoctor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,342
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 754 Post(s)
Liked: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by satfam View Post
That's the 11.2 set up I'm using. I had wiring added to a 7.1 system using the Audessey recommended setup. This was quite costly (relatively speaking) which required cutting attic access into the HT ceiling Now, a year later Atmos comes out and I'm wondering if this set up won't sound right with Atmos or DTS-X. I don't have an Atmos enabled AV processor yet but any opinions? Thanks.
I think this is pretty much the same as Atmos 9.1.2
http://www.dolby.com/us/en/guide/dol...-2-setups.html
witchdoctor is offline  
post #27 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 07:45 PM
Senior Member
 
myriadcorp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked: 69
If only we all had perfect rooms for idea placement.
Samckaz likes this.

myriadcorp is offline  
post #28 of 70 Old 06-05-2015, 09:05 PM
Member
 
qwho51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: San DIego
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked: 24
Is it better to place the center speaker below the screen angled up or above the screen angled down?
.
IMHO, When placing the center channel its important to keep the tweeters within 18"-24", up or down, of the R/Lmain's tweeters. This helps in keeping the sound fairly even as the sounds pan across the fronts. Angle them accordingly. Don't be afraid to experiment. IMHO,to help in creating a holo-sonic sphere, place the R/L mains and the center in a circle from the MLP, (main listening position). Placed at the proper degree of arc from the MLP you will find the center channel on an axis that lines up the tweeters from the R/L mains and the center in an arc. The center will be further from you than the mains, helping in a time delay effect that will help to create a solid panning effect. Using a string or tape measure, from the MLP to each of the channels, across the front, helps create the arc. Not everyone will agree to this layout, advocating a straight across the front arrangement. Only you will be the final judge on what sounds better.

RustyBones

Last edited by qwho51; 06-05-2015 at 09:07 PM. Reason: editing
qwho51 is offline  
post #29 of 70 Old 06-06-2015, 02:34 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
mtbdudex's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 5,743
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Liked: 771
Quote:
Originally Posted by blazar View Post
below angled up. The front soundstage should be setup so all speakers are at the same level ideally. Also people's mouths are at the bottom of their faces which is where much of the dialog in the center channel ought to sound like it is coming from.

Speakers above the screen < speakers below the screen < speakers behind the screen.
Also, you can employ AT screen material to make a baffle wall for superior acoustics.
Via Nyal Mellor site:
http://www.acousticfrontiers.com/2013322baffle-walls/
Quote:
THX baffle walls – design, build and benefits
March 25, 2013
What is a THX baffle wall and why do I want one in my home theater?! This article explains what a baffle wall is, covers the acoustic and audio benefits and finally provides tips on how to design and build them.
A baffle wall is essentially a false wall into which the screen speakers (i.e. left, center and right) are mounted. It is a core component of a THX certified cinema.
“Unique to every THX Certified Cinema is the THX “baffle wall.” If you were to peel away the screen at any THX Certified Cinema, you will see a massive wall of speakers housed in an acoustic baffle. The baffle wall is approximately the same size as the screen, providing a solid, smooth and uninterrupted surface to distribute sound throughout the auditorium. It produces a large sound image and accurately tracks sound elements with the onscreen action. This makes panning shots and off-screen sounds more believable and natural, helping to pull audiences into the storyline. Without a baffle wall, sound is uncontrolled – producing a weak, uneven image.”

Acoustical and sound quality benefits of baffle walls

Baffle walls have a couple of major acoustical benefits which translate into sound quality benefits:
  • No speaker boundary interference from the front wall behind the speakers, since the speakers are mounted flush with the surface.
  • Increased low frequency output. The baffle wall essentially removes the ‘baffle step‘ which happens when the speaker radiation transitions from half space to full space as the frequencies exceed those which can be controlled by the baffle. If your speakers are designed for flush mounting in a baffle wall, as Procella speakers are, then you gain 6dB of headroom in terms of the ability of the speaker (or sub) to reproduce reference levels.
  • Reduced diffraction. There is little to no diffraction as the front baffle of the speaker is flush with the wall.
From a sound quality perspective these things mean that the sound tracks cleanly from left to right with no jumps, we have more headroom at low frequencies and we have better bass free from boundary interference suckouts.
Note that very few speakers are designed to be baffle wall mounted – most are designed to be used in free space and hence incorporate baffle step compensation circuits or are otherwise designed to counteract baffle step losses. When placed into a baffle wall the frequency at which the baffle step occurs is moved significantly downwards, to 80Hz or lower, which results in a bass boost. It is possible to equalize out this boost using a low shelf filter.
mtbdudex is offline  
post #30 of 70 Old 06-06-2015, 05:09 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Kain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Dubai, UAE
Posts: 3,606
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1474 Post(s)
Liked: 420
Quote:
Originally Posted by blazar View Post
below angled up. The front soundstage should be setup so all speakers are at the same level ideally. Also people's mouths are at the bottom of their faces which is where much of the dialog in the center channel ought to sound like it is coming from.

Speakers above the screen < speakers below the screen < speakers behind the screen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwho51 View Post
Is it better to place the center speaker below the screen angled up or above the screen angled down?
.
IMHO, When placing the center channel its important to keep the tweeters within 18"-24", up or down, of the R/Lmain's tweeters. This helps in keeping the sound fairly even as the sounds pan across the fronts. Angle them accordingly. Don't be afraid to experiment. IMHO,to help in creating a holo-sonic sphere, place the R/L mains and the center in a circle from the MLP, (main listening position). Placed at the proper degree of arc from the MLP you will find the center channel on an axis that lines up the tweeters from the R/L mains and the center in an arc. The center will be further from you than the mains, helping in a time delay effect that will help to create a solid panning effect. Using a string or tape measure, from the MLP to each of the channels, across the front, helps create the arc. Not everyone will agree to this layout, advocating a straight across the front arrangement. Only you will be the final judge on what sounds better.
Thanks.

What if I have a huge TV (70+ inches) that comes with its own floor stand? Wouldn't have to place the center nearly on the floor and angle it upwards? Would this be okay or would it be better to have the center placed above the TV and angle it down?
Kain is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply AVS Forum® Articles

Tags
frontpage , speakers , Surround Sound , surround sound and speaker placement

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off