IBC Show in Amsterdam: Firsts for 3D HD, Super Hi-Vision Broadcasting - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 08-21-2008, 06:46 AM - Thread Starter
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IBC Plans Two HD Firsts

George Winslow -- Multichannel News, 8/19/2008 9:10:00 AM

The IBC show in Amsterdam this September will produce two firsts in the annals of the high-definition signals with the first live transatlantic broadcast of a 3D HD program and the first live broadcast in NHK's new Super Hi-Vision format that offers an image resolution of 7680 pixels on 4320 lines.

Philip White, director of technology and events for IBC noted in an interview that on Sunday, Sept. 14, attendees will be able to watch a live transatlantic 3D HD interview with DreamWorks Animation SKG CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg. Katzenberg will be receiving the IBC International Honor for Excellence award. There will also be a live Q&A session where members of the audience can ask questions.

The interview will be shot by two cameras from 3Ality Digital in Los Angeles and the 3D HD images will be converted using 3Ality's equipment to a regular HD image, said White.

Transmission service provider Arqiva will carry the signals across the Atlantic via satellite to the RAI Auditorium in Amsterdam. A 3Ality decoder will convert the images back to 3D and Christie projectors will project the image onto the auditorium's large screen. The audience will wear 3D glasses from RealD.

Doing the first live transatlantic broadcast posed a number challenges, said 3Ality CEO Steven Schklair.

One problem is that all zoom lenses vary slightly in the way they move in on images, creating a mismatch in the two stereoscopic images by as much as 40 pixels, a problem that can render a 3D broadcast virtually unwatchable.

3D has always required a lot of post production to make it watchable, Schklair said. We know that out future is deeply rooted in live broadcast events. So we've spent years working on technologies so we can originate images that do not need post production to fix.

As a result of that work, 3Ality can now correct images in real time to make certain they match pixel to pixel and at the same time correct for color and other imperfections.

Schklair contends that the demonstration will show that the technological issues with 3D HD have largely been solved and that the issue is now how fast the technology will spread.

Initial uses will probably focus in transmitting live sporting or other events to 3D equipped venues and movie theaters. Some studies indicate that about 1,300 3D equipped theaters in the U.S. today and that the number could grow to 5,000 by the end of 2009, Schklair said.

The next stage of 3D broadcasters to the home will take longer to develop. 3D enabled sets form only a tiny portion of all TVs in the home.

But White said, We know that some broadcasters in Europe that are already doing tests. These are very serious companies -- the BBC, Philips and the like are exploring it. In the past it was kind of gimmicky thing and it is still a few years away but its getting serious.

For the Super Hi-Vision test, images will be sent from London and Torino, Italy, to Amsterdam.

In London, the BBC will work with Siemens and SIS Outside Broadcasts to produce images from a Super Hi-Vision camera over the River Thames. The pictures will be compressed using MPEG-2 to 600 Mbps and then sent by Cable & Wireless over an ultra-broadband fiber to the IBC convention in Amsterdam.

In Torino, Italian pubcaster RAI will operate a Super Hi-Vision server producing content that will be delivered via two satellite transponders by Eutelsat to Amsterdam. The Torino signals will be compressed from Super Hi-Vision's native 24-Gbps transmission rate with MPEG-4/H.264 to a more manageable 140 Mbps.

This is a big deal, White said. It's like the first broadcast of HDTV, its that big of a deal. There will be a little brass plate on the wall saying this is the place for the first ever broadcast of Super Hi-Vision.

http://www.multichannel.com/article/...rce=title&rid=

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post #2 of 17 Old 08-21-2008, 07:20 AM
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I'd love to be there if it weren't for the stinkin' high airfares to Europe.

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post #3 of 17 Old 08-21-2008, 07:22 AM
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Super Hi Def 3D and they waste that on Jeffrey Katzenberg???!!??

3D like this should have premiered with Carmen Electra and Pam Anderson!

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post #4 of 17 Old 08-21-2008, 08:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CycloneGT View Post

Super Hi Def 3D and they waste that on Jeffrey Katzenberg???!!??

3D like this should have premiered with Carmen Electra and Pam Anderson!


Believe the BBC live feed will be a live shot of the London city skyline - should look amazing in Super HiVision. Can't wait to see it!

(Looks like I'll be going to IBC this year - last time I went it was on Brighton seafront in the UK!)
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post #5 of 17 Old 08-21-2008, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post

(Looks like I'll be going to IBC this year - last time I went it was on Brighton seafront in the UK!)

Until the mods and rockers showed up. I've been to Amsterdam and I thought all the TV's there were 3D already?!?! Maybe it was me.

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post #6 of 17 Old 08-22-2008, 03:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus Carr View Post

IBC Plans Two HD Firsts

George Winslow -- Multichannel News, 8/19/2008 9:10:00 AM

The IBC show in Amsterdam this September will produce two firsts in the annals of the high-definition signals with the first live transatlantic broadcast of a 3D HD program and the first live broadcast in NHK’s new Super Hi-Vision format that offers an image resolution of 7680 pixels on 4320 lines....

Nice. But let's see some Super Hi-Vision delivered in 3-D!

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"We believe that Super Hi-Vision is the ultimate 2D broadcasting system. But it is not our final target. What comes next will probably be 3-D TV broadcasting. We want to realize natural, eye-friendly 3D after we realize Super Hi-Vision broadcasting," said Tanioka.

http://www.eetasia.com/ART_880047980...T_4baf2160.HTM
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post #7 of 17 Old 09-17-2008, 11:17 AM - Thread Starter
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Super Hi-Vision to arrive early

Published: 16 September 2008 15:36 Author: Will Strauss
Last Updated: 17 September 2008 08:50

The next generation of high definition television, Super Hi-Vision, will become a consumer service earlier than anticipated, it was revealed at IBC.

The 8k format was initially promised for 2025 but engineers at Japan's NHK, one of the broadcaster's involved in its development, have suggested that a full production system will be possible by 2020 with public attended applications possible even earlier.

NHK's project leader, Dr Keiichi Kubota, said NHK's goal is for Super Hi-Vision to be enjoyed in every home. "It is our responsibility to show broadcasters and network operators that it is not just a dream but a real future television system," he said.

Live Super Hi-Vision was shown at IBC on a 275-inch theatre screen delivered to Amsterdam via fibre and satellite from London and Torino with partners that included outside broadcaster SIS, Cable and Wireless and Siemens.

NHK has developed a special 8k sensor with 33 megapixels for the prototype Super Hi-Vision camera systems and is using prototype projectors.

However, despite optimism and the revelation that the compression technology which will allow the transmission of Super Hi-Vision is improving, domestic displays and television sets are still some way off.

Research and Development support comes from the BBC, RAI and the EBU.

Super Hi-Vision provides 7680 x 4320 pixel (32 million pixels) images with 22.2 channel audio. HDTV offers two million pixels at 1920 x 1080.

Author: Will Strauss.

http://www.broadcastnow.co.uk/news/2...ive_early.html

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post #8 of 17 Old 09-17-2008, 11:31 AM
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I saw the demo at IBC in Amsterdam last Sunday.

They had a large projector screen (with 2xLCoS projectors) running at the 8k x 4k resolution. They were showing a mix of recorded content played locally, a live camera on the Greater London Assembly Building (in association with the GLA, the BBC, SIS (formerly BBC OBs) and Cable and Wireless), shooting the London Skyline and Tower Bridge fed to Amsterdam at 650Mbs using MPEG2 via an IP Fibre circuit, and also pre-recorded content played out from the R&D centre of RAI (the Italian State broadcaster) in Torino via 2x70Mbs satellite transponders (i.e. 140Mbs in total) using H264.

It was quite jaw dropping - particularly the 22.2 surround sound (there are speakers above you, in front of you, and below you to give you height cues as well as positional cues around you.

They also had direct-view 4kx2k LCDs displaying a downconversion - which also looked cracking. They were displaying Dirac (the BBC-developed open-source, free-to-use wavelet-based compression system) compressed content on this.

Amazing to see.

The live camera was probably not being racked amazingly (and hazy early morning sunshine isn't going to deliver eye-poppingly saturated pictures), and the projectors were working in a less than ideal space, but the results were still jaw dropping. (Though they didn't move the live camera very quickly).

The little things stuck out - like in a very wide shot, much wider than a long-shot, you could read the name on the BBC guy's ID badge (which was the same size as the number on a credit card). On a wide shot of the skyline you could read the names of the boats on the river!

For those who are interested - the camera uses 4 CMOS based sensors, with 1 Red, 1 Blue and 2 Green, with the 2 Green spatially off-set to increase the resolution. I believe there are currently only two in existence. The Lens is very tightly engineered (as it would need to be at that resolution) but is a TV-style zoom lens - rather than a film-style model - though it only has a 5x zoom ratio.

The system runs at 7680x4320 at 60 frames progressive. The MPEG2 and H264 encoders, AIUI, are actually 16 ganged 1920x1080/60p models - with some synchronisation employed to ensure that all the frames arrive at the same time, rather than a single 7680x4320 model.

The raw data rate of the camera output is 24Gbs... So compressing this down to 140Mbs is pretty amazing. I think the 140Mbs stuff was a tad softer - but still amazing. (The suggestion is that Dirac may improve over H264 - and degrades more gracefully - softening rather than blocking)

It kind of had the same feeling as IMAX - but the sound really was fantastic.

They had a demo film made by NHK (I think) of images of the earth, kids singing, natural history etc. - and it looked amazing.
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post #9 of 17 Old 09-17-2008, 03:20 PM
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When do we get a 3D HD broadcast of the Cannabis Cup?
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post #10 of 17 Old 09-17-2008, 04:25 PM
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I saw the Super HD demo at NAB. It was only 2D so I assume they have made progress in PQ. While the demo I saw was very impressive, I was surprised to see visible detail enhancement halos on some material. I seem to remember the camera I saw was made by Ikegami.

Well I guess what we have to look forward to is providers getting their hands on it and making Super HD Lite - it only looks as good as uncompressed HD.
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post #11 of 17 Old 09-17-2008, 05:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TVOD View Post

I saw the Super HD demo at NAB. It was only 2D so I assume they have made progress in PQ.

It was 2D in Amsterdam as well.

The other theme at IBC was 3D. Sony, Philips, Quantel etc. all had 3D stuff on show.

The Super HiVision stuff was 2D...

Quote:


While the demo I saw was very impressive, I was surprised to see visible detail enhancement halos on some material.

Yep - the live camera sending pictures from London had VERY harsh detail on the very bright highlights caused by sunny reflections off buildings during a hazy 0830 September morning. Looked almost like they were being triggered by poor infra red filtering?

Quote:


I seem to remember the camera I saw was made by Ikegami.

The only branding on the pictures of the camera I saw were NHK.

Quote:


Well I guess what we have to look forward to is providers getting their hands on it and making Super HD Lite - it only looks as good as uncompressed HD.

Well 140Mbs is quite a way from 14Mbs...
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post #12 of 17 Old 09-18-2008, 07:06 AM
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This is all very interesting; but who has a 3D receiver and when could we buy one?

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post #13 of 17 Old 09-18-2008, 08:29 AM
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What was being used to record and replay this video - is it special equipment to manage those bitrates?
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post #14 of 17 Old 09-18-2008, 09:02 AM
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Hmm this makes me wonder if there is a technology that can deliver a higher throughput than fiber optics.

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post #15 of 17 Old 09-18-2008, 10:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardL View Post

What was being used to record and replay this video - is it special equipment to manage those bitrates?

In the original system, without the live demo compression involved, here's one example:
Quote:


...And uncompressed Ultra HD files are enormous. The video is recorded at 24 gigabits per second, compared to 1.5 for standard HDTV. The hard drives used to store the data weigh 600 pounds, and 18 minutes of video requires 3.5 terabytes of space...

From:http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/fea...yond-hdtv.html
Here's one, not-up-to-date, list of related links .
The fiber optics article sublink in this list outlines how they once used (earlier test) multiple light wavelengths to deliver 24 Gbps signals. Two years ago the bit rate record--in a lab--was 2.56 terabits/sec (tera = 1000 Gbps).
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post #16 of 17 Old 09-18-2008, 01:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clapple View Post

This is all very interesting; but who has a 3D receiver and when could we buy one?

Quite a few people had 3D displays - some requiring glasses (Sony) and some not (Philips?). The ones that don't usually use lenticular lensing to display different images at slightly different angles (so the eye separation means you see two different images)

I saw the Sony demo - which used polarised glasses and a flat panel display that had alternate lines in alternate polarisations. A 1920x1080p display thus delivered two 1920x540p images - one for each eye.

There were a number of Blu-ray replay solutions on display as well.
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post #17 of 17 Old 09-18-2008, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyG View Post

Hmm this makes me wonder if there is a technology that can deliver a higher throughput than fiber optics.

Not needed - fibre can carry far higher data rates than 24Gbs.

Once compressed the signal occupies less bandwith than an uncompressed SD signal, which can be carried relatively long distances over co-ax.
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