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post #451 of 4109 Old 06-17-2010, 11:25 AM
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That Rubicon special Preview they tacked on appears to be a "Three Days of the Condor" derivative.

Exactly what occured to me as well, with a good deal of A Beautiful Mind too.

This sort of show is only as good as the paranoid delusion they can cook up for it. They could easily keep the show going for a long time with grand promises. I already got suckered into splitting up several years worth of perfectly good Mondays watching Heroes, which also promised a great deal and delivered only a pitiful mess. I'm reticent about trusting Rubicon.

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post #452 of 4109 Old 06-17-2010, 12:14 PM
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Why not start a Rubicon thread and leave this one to BB?
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post #453 of 4109 Old 06-17-2010, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by scowl View Post

I also got the impression that they're going to make the show more action-oriented with lots more drug dealers shooting each other up and fighting over control of the meth trade. Oh well. It should be good for ratings.

This sucks for the few people like me who are still interested in Walt's past because the opening flashback filled in a huge hole in it. My God, less than twenty years ago Walt was still very much like the Walt in college, a totally different man. He was full of optimism and still had (apparently) a good job in his field. He even had smooth confidence and charisma which explains how Skyler fell for him. That means his career and his personality falling to pieces was more recent event than I had thought. Sometime after Walter Jr. was born, he gave up (or was forced out of) his field and ended up a low-paid high school teacher working in a car wash part time.

What happened to Walt during this period is the biggest enigma in the show. He didn't develop this unfocused rage right after the break up of Gray Matter. He still had his life very well together at that point. It all have to have come crashing down in the last ten or fifteen years. That's when his anger over the Gray Matter situation boiled up again which had to have been twenty years in the past.

Not that I count on the show dealing with this. I expect to see many more scenes of Mike the Cleaner blasting away at bad guys to cheesy 70's cop show music (was that supposed to be funny?) and Walt and Jesse blasting other drug dealers to maintain their empire and Gus hiring hit men to blast away at them. I expect Jesse to do stupid things that nearly get him killed, over and over.


Walt's past is an enigma indeed. After watching the first two seasons, in fact right up until this seasons finale, I was convinced that Walter had been a brilliant research scientist and had been working towards something for years with Gretchen and Elliott Schwartz. We know they formed Gray Matter (based on Walter and Elliott's surnames) and it is obvious from flashbacks that Walter and Gretchen once had something along the lines of a romantic relationship. I don't know why, but I always imagined that Walter, Elliott and Gretchen were developing some pharmaceutical breakthrough, a love triangle formed, Walter was the odd person out and he bitterly walked away from Gray Matter just a few weeks or months before the firm made their big breakthrough. Thus Walter felt betrayed on an emotional level because of his lost love and on a professional level based on the fact that Gretchen and Elliott profited from his research. Meanwhile Gretchen and Elliott felt justified in their actions because Walt was the one that walked away.

With the flashback in the season finale my entire thesis blew-up. There is no way that Walt walked away from Gray Matter based on a love triangle because the flashback clearly illustrated that Walt was already married to Skyler before he left Gray Matters. I do look forward to the resolution of this back-story, but I must admit I am a little disappointed that my theory was apparently way off.

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post #454 of 4109 Old 06-17-2010, 02:26 PM
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Walt's past is an enigma indeed.

Cool! Let's compare notes...
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After watching the first two seasons, in fact right up until this seasons finale, I was convinced that Walter had been a brilliant research scientist and had been working towards something for years with Gretchen and Elliott Schwartz. We know they formed Gray Matter (based on Walter and Elliott's surnames) and it is obvious from flashbacks that Walter and Gretchen once had something along the lines of a romantic relationship.

I still believe this and I don't think the opening of the last episode contradicts this.

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I don't know why, but I always imagined that Walter, Elliott and Gretchen were developing some pharmaceutical breakthrough, a love triangle formed, Walter was the odd person out and he bitterly walked away from Gray Matter just a few weeks or months before the firm made their big breakthrough.

I thought (but have no evidence) that Walter and Gretchen were an exclusive couple until he literally abandoned her someplace during a Fourth of July vacation after he got mad at her (did she cheat on him with Elliot?) Naturally she turned to Elliot, however a love triangle also makes sense.

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Thus Walter felt betrayed on an emotional level because of his lost love and on a professional level based on the fact that Gretchen and Elliott profited from his research. Meanwhile Gretchen and Elliott felt justified in their actions because Walt was the one that walked away.

I agree and I still believe this.

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With the flashback in the season finale my entire thesis blew-up. There is no way that Walt walked away from Gray Matter based on a love triangle because the flashback clearly illustrated that Walt was already married to Skyler before he left Gray Matters.

I thought in the flashback Walt had already left Gray Matter far behind and the job he was referring to was with another company. So my timeline is that Walt left Gretchen, walked away from Gray Matter, got a job someplace else, then years later met and married Skyler. At some point after he left Gray Matter the company took off, most likely very shortly afterwards since that would explain his near psychotic rage at Gretchen in the restaurant scene.

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post #455 of 4109 Old 06-17-2010, 03:05 PM
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It seemed at the time I saw their scenes together that something was/had been going on with Walt and Gretchen. Where Skyler was at that point in time was unclear.

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post #456 of 4109 Old 06-17-2010, 03:19 PM
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Cool! Let's compare notes...

Sounds like a plan

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I thought in the flashback Walt had already left Gray Matter far behind and the job he was referring to was with another company. So my timeline is that Walt left Gretchen, walked away from Gray Matter, got a job someplace else, then years later met and married Skyler. At some point after he left Gray Matter the company took off, most likely very shortly afterwards since that would explain his near psychotic rage at Gretchen in the restaurant scene.

Well perhaps I should watch it again. I got the distinct impression that things were humming along at Gray Matters (perhaps close to a breakthrough) and Walt felt it was alright to roll along the house-poor route for a bit because he felt it would be temporary.

He might have also been referring to a different job, but clearly he was not entertaining the possibility of working as a school teacher in that scene.

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post #457 of 4109 Old 06-17-2010, 03:54 PM
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Remember the back-lit, soft-focus scene of a young Walt and Skyler in what really looked to be a (college?) classroom, with Walt talking and clearly entrancing Skyler. I thought I remembered talk somewhere about her being the grad student he swept off her feet.

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post #458 of 4109 Old 06-17-2010, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Shaded Dogfood View Post

Remember the back-lit, soft-focus scene of a young Walt and Skyler in what really looked to be a (college?) classroom, with Walt talking and clearly entrancing Skyler. I thought I remembered talk somewhere about her being the grad student he swept off her feet.

I think you are talking about the flashback in season 1 episode 3 " ...And the Bag's in the River". In that episode we see a flashback of Walt and GRETCHEN discussing the makeup of the human body:

Walt: "I don't knowseems like something's missing."
Gretchen: "What about the soul?"

I pulled the above quote from Gretchen's quotes on the official Breaking Bad site so unless I am way off I think it was Gretchen and Walt that were flirting while discussing the human body.

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post #459 of 4109 Old 06-18-2010, 10:32 AM
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Well perhaps I should watch it again. I got the distinct impression that things were humming along at Gray Matters (perhaps close to a breakthrough) and Walt felt it was alright to roll along the house-poor route for a bit because he felt it would be temporary.

I watched it twice but I still could be wrong. As he vaguely described his job to the real estate agent (note how he was nearly being condescending to the guy) I listened for anything that would tie what he was describing to Gray Matter. If he and Elliot had been partners I think he would have talked about being one of the partners, not just an employee there. It's possible that it hadn't even occurred to Walt to establish a formal partnership with Elliot.

The point of the flashback was to show Walt at the peak of his life. He had a hot young wife, a kid on the way, a good job, and was looking for a nice house. I bet he even had friends. I thought this scene was more interesting than anything else in the episode.

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He might have also been referring to a different job, but clearly he was not entertaining the possibility of working as a school teacher in that scene.

That is absolutely true. I think to understand Walt we have to know how quickly his career fell apart. He was once a research scientist practically bragging about what he was doing to anyone who'd listen. Then sometime later he was a high school teacher and students laughed at him when he worked at the car wash.

Did this happen over fifteen years or five years? Fifteen years could have been a series of life adjustments that Walt could have justified as temporary setbacks. If it happened in say five years before the pilot, in Walt's eyes would have been an epic failure of his life.

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post #460 of 4109 Old 06-18-2010, 08:36 PM
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cliff-hangers are lame, but what can you do.

I don't know. The second Battlestar Galactica wouldn't have been worth watching had it not been for the cliffhangers. I think that's why the show's ending sucked so bad: because all they ever did right was end episodes on a note of suspense. Wrapping the show was just beyond their skill set.

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I for one don't believe Jesse killed the guy, but I hope I'm wrong.

Vince Gilligan speaks as if Pinkman did the deed. And Gilligan strikes me as enough of a TV fan to not pull some lame crap like Pinkman not shooting Gale.

Also, one of the things BB deserves a lot of credit for is going all-in with its characters. A lot of what's happening in the plot now falls under the heading of things that have to happen before the show wraps.

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Gilligan and his writers seem to write the series in a sort of "jazz" fashion

Every TV show is written that way!

What's amazing with BB is that the writers actually are afraid of screwing up continuity and having people do things out of characters.

Go read the BSG thread and the giant freakout that occurred when Ron Moore openly admitted they didn't give a rat's ass about wrapping plotlines when the show ended.

For that matter, rewatch the Lost finale. At the end of the day, that finale sucked for a simple reason: the writers didn't give a **** and the fans did.

Go read some of the stories about the Sopranos writers expressing exasperation that fans still want to know what happened to the damned Russian (about the time I stopped watching, I have to admit).

VG's crew cares that they might fail the viewers. That by itself is a minor miracle.

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Walt's past is an enigma indeed. After watching the first two seasons, in fact right up until this seasons finale, I was convinced that Walter had been a brilliant research scientist and had been working towards something for years with Gretchen and Elliott Schwartz.

Given the show's core theme, about Walt taking (or losing, depending on the story that week) his manhood, the implication I took away from the Grey Matter plotline was that Walt was never man enough to succeed in anything, and just sort of wussed his way out of the company before it hit the big time.
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post #461 of 4109 Old 06-18-2010, 11:06 PM
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He might have also been referring to a different job, but clearly he was not entertaining the possibility of working as a school teacher in that scene.

Walt was working for a company called Sandia Laboratories.

"Giant space lasers? I'll have to bring it up in our next staff meeting."

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post #462 of 4109 Old 06-18-2010, 11:11 PM
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Given the show's core theme, about Walt taking (or losing, depending on the story that week) his manhood, the implication I took away from the Grey Matter plotline was that Walt was never man enough to succeed in anything, and just sort of wussed his way out of the company before it hit the big time.

And Gretchen was "man enough" to take his place showing that "manhood" had nothing to do with it.

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post #463 of 4109 Old 06-19-2010, 07:12 AM
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And Gretchen was "man enough" to take his place showing that "manhood" had nothing to do with it.

Um . . . how does that disprove my theory? Doesn't it make Walt look even less of a man? Ya know, cause a chick could step up.

The entire show is about manhood. Having it, taking it, losing it, fighting for it, committing crimes for it, watching it slip away, etc.

Breaking Bad is a longer, slightly less drugged out version of Fight Club (arguably the only mainstream American postmodern film ever made).
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post #464 of 4109 Old 06-19-2010, 08:29 AM
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Um . . . how does that disprove my theory? Doesn't it make Walt look even less of a man? Ya know, cause a chick could step up.

Walt is a man. He was born one and he looks like one and acts like one.

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The entire show is about manhood. Having it, taking it, losing it, fighting for it, committing crimes for it, watching it slip away, etc.

Manhood is just being an adult male. Walt is an adult male therefore he has achieved manhood.

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Breaking Bad is a longer, slightly less drugged out version of Fight Club (arguably the only mainstream American postmodern film ever made).

Fight Club was about a man who had been suffering from a severe undiagnosed mental disorder for years which was causing him to have vivid hallucinations and resulted in lots of violence.

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post #465 of 4109 Old 06-19-2010, 12:03 PM
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I don't know. The second Battlestar Galactica wouldn't have been worth watching had it not been for the cliffhangers. I think that's why the show's ending sucked so bad: because all they ever did right was end episodes on a note of suspense. Wrapping the show was just beyond their skill set.


Go read the BSG thread and the giant freakout that occurred when Ron Moore openly admitted they didn't give a rat's ass about wrapping plotlines when the show ended.


Given the show's core theme, about Walt taking (or losing, depending on the story that week) his manhood, the implication I took away from the Grey Matter plotline was that Walt was never man enough to succeed in anything, and just sort of wussed his way out of the company before it hit the big time.

As a HUGE Battlestar Galactica fan I believe that the Finale was outstanding, very spiritual and amazing. It is true that Moore admitted that the ending "wrote itself" , but this in my view was for the best. The show's creators ending was well within their "skill set" as it connected to the show's main story arc and principal (metaphysical) themes.

I do agree that Breaking Bad is about the loss of American manhood, its parallel to a western like "The Wild Bunch" or the video game "Red Dead Redemption" its about the end of an era/way-of-life. The setting of Breaking Bad is very symbolic of this and its principal male characters all have been forced to question their definition of post '90s Manhood in the face of loss.
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post #466 of 4109 Old 06-19-2010, 12:11 PM
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Um . . . how does that disprove my theory? Doesn't it make Walt look even less of a man? Ya know, cause a chick could step up.

The entire show is about manhood. Having it, taking it, losing it, fighting for it, committing crimes for it, watching it slip away, etc.

Breaking Bad is a longer, slightly less drugged out version of Fight Club (arguably the only mainstream American postmodern film ever made).

Once again I agree with this comparison. On Breaking Bad, Walt seeks power, control, respect, the ability to provide for his family and wealth; all very American characteristics of "manhood".
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post #467 of 4109 Old 06-19-2010, 02:20 PM
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Walt is a man. He was born one and he looks like one and acts like one.

You are a wall of literalism, sir. Is "scowl" really Sheldon Cooper's handle on here?

Fight Club was about an undiagnosed mental illness? I can't resist: what is your analysis of 12 Monkeys? I need to know whether you're really just this literal, man.

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As a HUGE Battlestar Galactica fan I believe that the Finale was outstanding, very spiritual and amazing. It is true that Moore admitted that the ending "wrote itself" , but this in my view was for the best. The show's creators ending was well within their "skill set" as it connected to the show's main story arc and principal (metaphysical) themes.

I initially liked the ending. On rewatching the series (skipping over huge segments of seasons 2 & 3), the ending is weak. Frankly, I think the price paid in the finale is too low. It's the second time I've made this comparison this week, but . . . it's like an episode of the old GI Joe cartoon (for those who read the other comment, this time I'm serious). If all the good guys survive, who cares?

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I do agree that Breaking Bad is about the loss of American manhood, its parallel to a western like "The Wild Bunch" or the video game "Red Dead Redemption" its about the end of an era/way-of-life. The setting of Breaking Bad is very symbolic of this and its principal male characters all have been forced to question their definition of post '90s Manhood in the face of loss.

I've wanted to throw this one out there for a while: Is Breaking Bad a post-western?

Outlaws and anti-heroes. Since some people consider No Country for Old Men to be a post-western, I think it's OK to consider a more modern story in that category (even though generally the term is used to describe historically-set western films like Unforgiven or shows like Deadwood that far exceed the norms of acceptable behavior in a traditional western).
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post #468 of 4109 Old 06-20-2010, 07:50 AM
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I consider No Country for Old Men to be an incredibly bad movie, and the Coen brothers highly overrated. Fargo excepted.
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post #469 of 4109 Old 06-20-2010, 08:16 AM
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I consider No Country for Old Men to be an incredibly bad movie, and the Coen brothers highly overrated. Fargo excepted.

Although I believe you are in a minority in not liking the Coen brothers' work, you are hardly alone. Their films are certainly not for all tastes and, to say the least, are often almost too subtle for their own good. No Country is difficult. It took three viewings before I finally thought that I really understood it. I thought that both The Big Lebowski and Barton Fink were mediocre when I first saw them but I now believe The Big Lebowski to be a comedy classic. Barton Fink is no The Big Lebowski but it is a terrific movie, nonetheless, in my estimation at least. I think that, along with The Big Lebowski, Fargo and No Country are masterpieces. There is a reason why the Coens have won a bunch of Oscars and been nominated for a bunch more.

CAVEAT: Decide for yourself what my analysis is worth, though, because I am an unabashed Coen brothers fan.

By the way, I have thought that some of the writing in Breaking Bad was right out of the Coens playbook. The dumb but weirdly charming Jesse is a classic example. The meth head couple who Jesse got tied up with in Season 2 also reminded me of the Coens.
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post #470 of 4109 Old 06-20-2010, 08:53 AM
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Although I believe you are in a minority in not liking the Coen brothers' work, you are hardly alone. Their films are certainly not for all tastes and, to say the least, are often almost too subtle for their own good. No Country is difficult. It took three viewings before I finally thought that I really understood it. I thought that both The Big Lebowski and Barton Fink were mediocre when I first saw them but I now believe The Big Lebowski to be a comedy classic. Barton Fink is no The Big Lebowski but it is a terrific movie, nonetheless, in my estimation at least. I think that, along with The Big Lebowski, Fargo and No Country are masterpieces. There is a reason why the Coens have won a bunch of Oscars and been nominated for a bunch more.

CAVEAT: Decide for yourself what my analysis is worth, though, because I am an unabashed Coen brothers fan.

By the way, I have thought that some of the writing in Breaking Bad was right out of the Coens playbook. The dumb but weirdly charming Jesse is a classic example. The meth head couple who Jesse got tied up with in Season 2 also reminded me of the Coens.

Breaking Bad does have some Coen Brothers qualities, and I'm a big fan of "No Country For Old Men" and "The Ladykillers".

"Fargo" had its moments as did "The Big Lebowski".
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post #471 of 4109 Old 06-20-2010, 11:17 AM
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Breaking Bad does have some Coen Brothers qualities, and I'm a big fan of "No Country For Old Men" and "The Ladykillers".

"Fargo" had its moments as did "The Big Lebowski".

Ah, The Ladykillers: "Madam, we must have waffles! We must all have waffles forthwith! We must all think, and we must all have waffles, and think each and every one of us to the very best of his ability..." That scene may have been the hardest I ever laughed. Remakes usually don't work and I guess, in a lot of ways, The Ladykillers remake was no exception. Still, I really enjoyed Tom Hanks as Professor Dorr, with his corn pone accent and stilted syntax.
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post #472 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 03:52 AM
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No Country is difficult. It took three viewings before I finally thought that I really understood it. The Big Lebowski to be a comedy classic. I think that, along with The Big Lebowski, Fargo and No Country are masterpieces. There is a reason why the Coens have won a bunch of Oscars and been nominated for a bunch more.

CAVEAT: Decide for yourself what my analysis is worth, though, because I am an unabashed Coen brothers fan.

Yes No Country for Old Men took me multiple viewings also to understand. The gas station seen was so uncomfortable to watch. The Coen Brothers are the best bar none.

Big Lebowski, Fargo, and No Country for Old Men are three of the greatest movies ever.

Every star in the business wants to do a Coen Brothers movie its the pinnacle of success.

These are just my opinions.
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post #473 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 06:55 AM
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Walt was working for a company called Sandia Laboratories.

That's not a company. Sandia National Laboratories is a Department of Energy facility, principally co-located with Kirtland Air Force Base here in Albuquerque, NM. Walt could have been working at SNL as a government employee, or a support contractor.

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post #474 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by PiratesCove View Post

Once again I agree with this comparison. On Breaking Bad, Walt seeks power, control, respect, the ability to provide for his family and wealth; all very American characteristics of "manhood".

I wasn't aware that no American women do not seek power, control, respect, wealth or to provide for their families. In fact Skyler is doing a great at the "manhood" game at this point in the story. So when women have this, that's a bad thing?

I see Walt seeking one thing more than anything: a friend. That's it. Jesse is his lil' buddy and as we've seen he's more than willing to kill people and put his wealth, family and his only life at risk to keep his drug buddy out of harm's way. How does that fit into the "manhood" theory?

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post #475 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by IAM4UK View Post

That's not a company. Sandia National Laboratories is a Department of Energy facility, principally co-located with Kirtland Air Force Base here in Albuquerque, NM.

Of course I never thought to google it to see if it were real! That explains why the real estate agent joked about him not talking about his work. I wonder if working in the public sector was Walt's first step towards becoming a high school teacher.

My guess is that we'll see he was an enthusiastic teacher when he first started, as if he had finally found his calling. Then as the years go by, he'll enjoy his job less and less, finding himself stuck in education. I saw a lot of teachers go down that route.

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post #476 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 09:45 AM
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You are a wall of literalism, sir.

Yes, I read books too.

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Fight Club was about an undiagnosed mental illness?

Yeah, didn't you see the ending? I hope I didn't spoil it. We discover Tyler is just a manifestation of the unnamed lead character's schizophrenia and self-hatred, causing him to injure himself and provide entertainment to sadistic psychopaths. If his schizophrenia had been diagnosed and treated, it would have been a much shorter movie.

Like Walt, he had no friends.

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I can't resist: what is your analysis of 12 Monkeys? I need to know whether you're really just this literal, man.

It was a clever time-travel plot with lots of fun scenes. No real message in it though. I'm a big fan of "unreliable narrator" movies where the audience can't rely on what we see on the screen as being an objective view of reality.

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post #477 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 10:37 AM
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Yes No Country for Old Men took me multiple viewings also to understand. The gas station seen was so uncomfortable to watch. The Coen Brothers are the best bar none.

Big Lebowski, Fargo, and No Country for Old Men are three of the greatest movies ever.

Every star in the business wants to do a Coen Brothers movie its the pinnacle of success.

Because of our recent discussions here about the Coen Brothers' films I picked up A Serious Man at BB to watch again. I have seen it only once and will be surprised if I don't end up liking it better the second time than I did the first.

I agree that the scene in No Country, in the gas station, between Chigurh and the old gas station owner was difficult. In fact, Chigurh was such a quietly menacing sociopath, all of his confrontation scenes were wearing. I remember particularly his scene with Carson Wells (Woody Harrelson) in Wells' hotel room and, later, with Llewelyn's wife, Carla Jean (Kelly Macdonald), in her house. Brrr!

I thought that some of the scenes in Breaking Bad came close to matching the level of tension that the Coens sometimes provide. Jessie's experience in the meth head couple's house and the little boy shooting one of Jessie's meth vendors on the street and then riding away on his bike were particularly memorable.
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post #478 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Yeah, didn't you see the ending? I hope I didn't spoil it. We discover Tyler is just a manifestation of the unnamed lead character's schizophrenia and self-hatred, causing him to injure himself and provide entertainment to sadistic psychopaths. If his schizophrenia had been diagnosed and treated, it would have been a much shorter movie.

That's what happens. That's not the same thing as what the movie is about.

What you're saying is like watching Band of Brothers and saying the story was about walking and shooting guns and throwing grenades.

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Yes No Country for Old Men took me multiple viewings also to understand. The gas station seen was so uncomfortable to watch. The Coen Brothers are the best bar none.

Big Lebowski, Fargo, and No Country for Old Men are three of the greatest movies ever.

Every star in the business wants to do a Coen Brothers movie its the pinnacle of success.

What I love about the Coen Brothers is that they refuse to be pinned down. They'll gladly follow a movie like No Country for Old Men -- a monstrous film about monstrous people -- with a movie like Burn After Reading -- a film where everyone involved is a self-involved moron. Admittedly, I think Miller's Crossing is about monstrous self-involved morons, but . . . And Raising Arizona is like a Pixar film conceived by Satan . . . But, there's something to be respected about doing movies their way.

It's hard to think the same guys that brought you Javier Bardum's character in No Country also brought you George Clooney's character in O' Brother Where Art Thous?

The Coen Brothers are very take-it-or-leave-it. No question. I certainly don't fault anyone who quickly gets their fill. But, ya gotta respect the balls it takes to make films their way.
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post #479 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by scowl View Post

My guess is that we'll see he was an enthusiastic teacher when he first started, as if he had finally found his calling. Then as the years go by, he'll enjoy his job less and less, finding himself stuck in education. I saw a lot of teachers go down that route.

Maybe like Cray in Treme.

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post #480 of 4109 Old 06-21-2010, 02:37 PM
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Vince G. says in that interview that it was the camera dollying around as Jesse pulls the trigger. But it looked to me like he definitely moved the gun to the right and then shoots. My guess is the ol' dependable TV shoulder shot, not lethal nor even especially debilitating - after all, Jack Bauer can take out a whole army of sinister terrorists after sustaining one.

Jesse shoots Gale in the shoulder, then bundles him out of there - so now the two of them are on the lam and Jesse's got to keep Gale prisoner for awhile (that should be good). Gus's guy shows up at the apartment and sees the blood. No Gale, no kill Walt. Buys them some time. What will be interesting is how Gus and Walt's relationship changes now. I'm guessing no more dinner invitations.
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