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post #31 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by CJPC View Post

The only thing that drives me crazy with the Universal HD presentation- aside from the zooming is that every episode is a few minutes short, at times leaving out relevant plot details.

Blame today's commercial-obsessed society.

In the late 1960's/early 1970's, a full hour-long TV show ran 50-51 minutes, from opening to closing credits. You can see this on episodes of GUNSMOKE or STAR TREK from that era.

TV sitcoms that were 30 minutes long would run about 25 minutes, maybe 25 1/2 tops. Maybe some lasted 24 and change, but they were all about 25 minutes give or take.

Fast-foward.....to the late 1970's/early 1980's.

A prime-time show like DALLAS is now running about 49 minutes during an hour-long show. This is during the ORIGINAL broadcast -- any re-runs during the year might cut it down another 90 seconds or so. STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION comes out in 1987 -- syndicated, an hour-long episode only runs about 46 minutes start-to-end. A few years later, DEEP SPACE 9 and VOYAGER come out -- 44-45 minutes. When the last STAR TREK series ENTERPRISE comes out in 2001, it's down to 42-43 minutes.

The 30-minute sitcoms ? Well, the 25+ minutes out of 30 that we got with ALL IN THE FAMILY and SANFORD AND SON were also proportionately cut. SEINFELD, the quintessential 1990's sitcom, runs about 23 1/2 minutes uncut. But TBS or local reruns will chop that down to about 22 and change. Now you know why TV shows today, esp. the 30-minute sitcoms, have opening and closing credits interposed with the show still continuing (ala SEINFELD).

Net-Net: Hour-long episodes today like "24" have about 5% less time than 20-30 years ago and about 15% less than 40+ years ago. For 30-minute shows, the cut is relatively less: just under 10% compared to 40+ years ago and 5% compared to the 1990's.
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post #32 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 01:10 PM
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I saw Hogan Heroes on that channel,and I don't have a HDTV.However I agree the show looked good.But I did not like the fact that they cropped or cut out quite a bit off the top and bottom of the original version of the show to make it look high definition.I'd rather see it in its orginal format. Many of these older shows were filmed so well they really do not need to be shown in HD.IMO, they look far superior to anything they make nowadays.
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post #33 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 01:46 PM
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PhillipsPhanatic,interesting post.--Hour long Tv shows made during the mid 1960s and before ran 52 and 1/2 minutes with less than 8 minutes of commercials.Half hour shows during that period ran about 27 minutes with 3 minutes of ads.---TV Land just sunk to an all time low.---Their new show Hot In Cleveland(a half hour show) runs 18 minutes with 12 minutes of ads.Plus they compress the ending credits on their own show.Yep these tv stations nowadays just think of more and more ways to show ads---it's pathetic.
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post #34 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by seaxun View Post

Many of these older shows were filmed so well they really do not need to be shown in HD.

Yeah, HD is just a passing fad, no need for it

The fact that 35mm allowed sufficient resolution to be preserved is why they translate well to HD, even with zooming. Using more of the original image would be good if possible (they were filmed with Academy framing), but zooming is a questionable practice. The reason they can look so good now is that modern techniques for color correction, grain reduction and dirt/scratch removal are used. The restoration process can be tedious, but skilled people using modern workflows can produce great results. Star Trek was remastered in it's original 4:3, and some of the less than spectacular effects were tastefully redone.
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post #35 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 02:01 PM
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No,I just meant that alot of the older shows have always looked good.And when they remaster the shows they even look better.I'm not putting down high definition.I'm not into the technical aspects of all this stuff like alot of folks on this forum,but I think the word "zooming" you used accurately describes what I was critical about.Yeah the picture is a little sharper on Hogan Heroes for example, but about 20 percent of the picture is gone too.Shows like Hogan heroes and many other of the classics should be widely shown on tv these days(as they always have been in the past) because they are wonderful tv shows.
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post #36 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 08:10 PM
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Originally Posted by seaxun View Post

PhillipsPhanatic,interesting post.--Hour long Tv shows made during the mid 1960s and before ran 52 and 1/2 minutes with less than 8 minutes of commercials.Half hour shows during that period ran about 27 minutes with 3 minutes of ads.---TV Land just sunk to an all time low.---Their new show Hot In Cleveland(a half hour show) runs 18 minutes with 12 minutes of ads.Plus they compress the ending credits on their own show.Yep these tv stations nowadays just think of more and more ways to show ads---it's pathetic.

Seaxun, I think you slightly overestimate the times for the shows -- don't forget, you also has alot more PSA's running in the 1960's and 1970's, too. 51 minutes is about the longest I've seen from the 1960's/early 1970's; I doubt you'd see a 30-minute TV sitcom hit 26 minutes let alone 27. Figure 25 & change.

Don't forget: the Big 3 networks had 94% of viewers in the 1960's; 92% in the 1970's; 70% in the 1980's; 60% in the 1990's and under 50% today.
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post #37 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by TVOD View Post

The fact that 35mm allowed sufficient resolution to be preserved is why they translate well to HD, even with zooming. Using more of the original image would be good if possible (they were filmed with Academy framing), but zooming is a questionable practice. The reason they can look so good now is that modern techniques for color correction, grain reduction and dirt/scratch removal are used. The restoration process can be tedious, but skilled people using modern workflows can produce great results. Star Trek was remastered in it's original 4:3, and some of the less than spectacular effects were tastefully redone.

I've heard that film (35 MM/70 MM; not sure about 16 MM) has alot of 'data' to make an HD remastering high-quality; why is that ? At first glance, it would appear that a videotape of sitcoms from the 1970's would be better for HD since video always looks 'better' as does live-action (e.g., sporting action). I guess a videotape has less 'data' or 'bits' than a 16/35/70 MM film ??
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post #38 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by PhilipsPhanatic View Post

I've heard that film (35 MM/70 MM; not sure about 16 MM) has alot of 'data' to make an HD remastering high-quality; why is that ? At first glance, it would appear that a videotape of sitcoms from the 1970's would be better for HD since video always looks 'better' as does live-action (e.g., sporting action). I guess a videotape has less 'data' or 'bits' than a 16/35/70 MM film ??

35MM (and even 16MM) film has far greater resolution than SD video, and 35MM has greater resolution than HD video (16MM is slightly less but still can be transferred for high quality HD). The frame rate at 24 or 25fps has less temporal resolution than the 50hz and 60hz based frame rates of video which allows for smoother motion, but the 180 degree shutter angle (another way of saying that the exposure time is half of the frame duration) gives 24 (& 25) frames its distinctive look. Many feel it adds to story telling. Modern electronic cameras typically use these frame rates and shutter angles for episodic and feature production, and the subsequent post production process keeps it in its native frame rate.

Color video up until the late 80s had used composite standards (NTSC & PAL) for production. This compromised the resolution and added chroma artifacts. Later NTSC 3D filters and the BBC's PAL transform decoder allowed improved decoding of composite video, but by then component became commonly used. Early cameras were also a limitation as well as practices such as higher levels of detail enhancement, which unfortunately is still used by some today. Older video can be made to look better than how it looked when it aired originally, but it can not compare to film finished shows.

In the '80s it became popular to shoot on film and finish in video. The masters were 1" C format. These masters did not retain anywhere near the quality of the original film, partly due to the shortcomings of the transfer equipment. Efforts are now being made on some shows to use the original camera negatives and remaster them in HD. Unfortunately the original edit decision lists have been lost on much of this and it's getting down to comparing the images on the original master to the newly transferred material. Older film finished shows, such as Hogan's Heroes, did not have this issue and can be transferred directly from cut negative or IPs (Intermediate Positives).

Even with the advancements in electronic cameras, the potential quality from 35mm film is still higher for resolution and latitude. However they are becoming very popular for episodic TV, especially as it eliminates the processing and transfer/scanning costs of using film.

Color film is not that stable over long periods of time, particularly the cyan (red channel) dye which tends to fade. This is why older film tends to look redish. Electronic restoration has proven to be very effective. Scratches, dirt and processing problems can be eliminated. However, video tape has proven to be more vulnerable to time as the oxide sheds off the backing. The early digital D1 format from the late eighties had tapes deteriorating after less than 10 years.

There is debate whether electronic acquisition is a help or hinder to production. On the one hand it can be a benefit for being sure a scene was captured. Newer workflows allow onsite non-destructive color correction to be added, which can aid with production decisions such as lighting. Conversely it can also slow things down from the added analysis. But it seems electronic is the future , though film is far from dead.
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post #39 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Jedi Master View Post

This is the next DVD set I'm going to buy.

Hogan's Heroes: The Komplete Series, Kommandant's Kollection

http://www.amazon.com/Hogans-Heroes-...=cm_cr_pr_pb_i

I bought this DVD set back in May. Its awesome. It has all six seasons and all 168 episodes in it. The remastering job done with the DVDs is top notch. Its the same DVDs in the seperate box sets but it comes with a new bonus DVD in it. I'm now on season 3. The episodes are 25 minutes long and they are uncut and commercial free with a clean screen. I am enjoying having this set in my DVD library. They don't make good shows like Hogan's Heroes anymore.

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post #40 of 70 Old 07-25-2010, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by seaxun View Post

PhillipsPhanatic,interesting post.--Hour long Tv shows made during the mid 1960s and before ran 52 and 1/2 minutes with less than 8 minutes of commercials.Half hour shows during that period ran about 27 minutes with 3 minutes of ads.---TV Land just sunk to an all time low.---Their new show Hot In Cleveland(a half hour show) runs 18 minutes with 12 minutes of ads.Plus they compress the ending credits on their own show.Yep these tv stations nowadays just think of more and more ways to show ads---it's pathetic.

TV Land is pathetic and they are ate up with corporate greed. Its a shame on how they ruined a good station. They ban posters on their website for talking negative about them. I just got banned from them the other day. But here is a site that welcomes TV Land bashing.

http://tv.groups.yahoo.com/group/TVLANDSUCKS/

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post #41 of 70 Old 07-26-2010, 02:39 AM
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I have 140 hogan's heroes shows in HD when it was on hdnet. there all mpegs files that are on a 500gb drive.
I set my tivoHD to down load them to my computer every time it came on

Better burn them to DVD before that 500gb drive fails or can not be recognized. Just a matter of time.
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post #42 of 70 Old 07-26-2010, 11:04 AM
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I just cannot stand sitcoms with canned laughter. I watched them as a kid but as an adult that prerecorded racket that represents people laughing at something that's supposed to be funny drives me nuts. This falling out of fashion is one of the greatest developments in recent television history.

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post #43 of 70 Old 07-26-2010, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by TVOD View Post

35MM (and even 16MM) film has far greater resolution than SD video, and 35MM has greater resolution than HD video (16MM is slightly less but still can be transferred for high quality HD). The frame rate at 24 or 25fps has less temporal resolution than the 50hz and 60hz based frame rates of video which allows for smoother motion, but the 180 degree shutter angle (another way of saying that the exposure time is half of the frame duration) gives 24 (& 25) frames its distinctive look. Many feel it adds to story telling. Modern electronic cameras typically use these frame rates and shutter angles for episodic and feature production, and the subsequent post production process keeps it in its native frame rate.

Color video up until the late 80s had used composite standards (NTSC & PAL) for production. This compromised the resolution and added chroma artifacts. Later NTSC 3D filters and the BBC's PAL transform decoder allowed improved decoding of composite video, but by then component became commonly used. Early cameras were also a limitation as well as practices such as higher levels of detail enhancement, which unfortunately is still used by some today. Older video can be made to look better than how it looked when it aired originally, but it can not compare to film finished shows.

In the '80s it became popular to shoot on film and finish in video. The masters were 1" C format. These masters did not retain anywhere near the quality of the original film, partly due to the shortcomings of the transfer equipment. Efforts are now being made on some shows to use the original camera negatives and remaster them in HD. Unfortunately the original edit decision lists have been lost on much of this and it's getting down to comparing the images on the original master to the newly transferred material. Older film finished shows, such as Hogan's Heroes, did not have this issue and can be transferred directly from cut negative or IPs (Intermediate Positives).

Even with the advancements in electronic cameras, the potential quality from 35mm film is still higher for resolution and latitude. However they are becoming very popular for episodic TV, especially as it eliminates the processing and transfer/scanning costs of using film.

Color film is not that stable over long periods of time, particularly the cyan (red channel) dye which tends to fade. This is why older film tends to look redish. Electronic restoration has proven to be very effective. Scratches, dirt and processing problems can be eliminated. However, video tape has proven to be more vulnerable to time as the oxide sheds off the backing. The early digital D1 format from the late eighties had tapes deteriorating after less than 10 years.

There is debate whether electronic acquisition is a help or hinder to production. On the one hand it can be a benefit for being sure a scene was captured. Newer workflows allow onsite non-destructive color correction to be added, which can aid with production decisions such as lighting. Conversely it can also slow things down from the added analysis. But it seems electronic is the future , though film is far from dead.

Great post although one thing I don't believe you touched on was Kinescope, or the practice of filming(with film) off a video monitor. Even though this was technically film the quality was severely limited by the cameras and video display.
Prior to '56 videotape was not available so if the program was broadcast live for TV they would have to either have separate cameras(which I'm not sure if this was ever done) or film the image off a live feed CRT. As you can imagine the quality wasn't very good even though it was filmed(most often with 16mm or 35mm stock).

I also don't care for canned laughter but none the less enjoy my HHs DVDs very much.
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post #44 of 70 Old 07-26-2010, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by PhilipsPhanatic View Post

Blame today's commercial-obsessed society.

In the late 1960's/early 1970's, a full hour-long TV show ran 50-51 minutes, from opening to closing credits. You can see this on episodes of GUNSMOKE or STAR TREK from that era.

TV sitcoms that were 30 minutes long would run about 25 minutes, maybe 25 1/2 tops. Maybe some lasted 24 and change, but they were all about 25 minutes give or take.

Fast-foward.....to the late 1970's/early 1980's. :eek.

In fairness, it should be noted that the practice of butchering reruns to insert extra commercials goes way, way back in time.

I never saw "Hogan's Heroes" in first run, but instead first saw it in reruns on KSTW-TV (Tacoma) in the late seventies. With their typical commercial loads, those episodes ran between 22 and 22 1/2 minutes most of the time -- and the edits were just awful. So in that sense, the edits that we're seeing for the syndicated version of "Hogan's Heroes" today aren't all that much different from what happened in many major markets 30 years ago.
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post #45 of 70 Old 07-26-2010, 09:16 PM
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Great post although one thing I don't believe you touched on was Kinescope, or the practice of filming(with film) off a video monitor. Even though this was technically film the quality was severely limited by the cameras and video display.
Prior to '56 videotape was not available so if the program was broadcast live for TV they would have to either have separate cameras(which I'm not sure if this was ever done) or film the image off a live feed CRT. As you can imagine the quality wasn't very good even though it was filmed(most often with 16mm or 35mm stock).

All the kinescopes I've seen were 16mm, and they originated from various networks. The quality improved over time, and later ones used EBR (electron beam recording). Most that I've seen were sharp enough to preserve the scan line structure. This could beat with the scanning structure of the transfer device, especially in 525 SD, and cause moiré. Earlier Cintels made things worse with their gaps between scan lines on the scanning CRT, which one could cheat by mis-adjusting the Y astigmatism. Transfers/ scanning in higher resolutions can result in surprising good quality. Obviously this is still nowhere close to quality captured directly on film.
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post #46 of 70 Old 07-26-2010, 11:57 PM
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Originally Posted by TVOD View Post

35MM (and even 16MM) film has far greater resolution than SD video, and 35MM has greater resolution than HD video (16MM is slightly less but still can be transferred for high quality HD). The frame rate at 24 or 25fps has less temporal resolution than the 50hz and 60hz based frame rates of video which allows for smoother motion, but the 180 degree shutter angle (another way of saying that the exposure time is half of the frame duration) gives 24 (& 25) frames its distinctive look. Many feel it adds to story telling. Modern electronic cameras typically use these frame rates and shutter angles for episodic and feature production, and the subsequent post production process keeps it in its native frame rate.

Color video up until the late 80s had used composite standards (NTSC & PAL) for production. This compromised the resolution and added chroma artifacts. Later NTSC 3D filters and the BBC's PAL transform decoder allowed improved decoding of composite video, but by then component became commonly used. Early cameras were also a limitation as well as practices such as higher levels of detail enhancement, which unfortunately is still used by some today. Older video can be made to look better than how it looked when it aired originally, but it can not compare to film finished shows.

In the '80s it became popular to shoot on film and finish in video. The masters were 1" C format. These masters did not retain anywhere near the quality of the original film, partly due to the shortcomings of the transfer equipment. Efforts are now being made on some shows to use the original camera negatives and remaster them in HD. Unfortunately the original edit decision lists have been lost on much of this and it's getting down to comparing the images on the original master to the newly transferred material. Older film finished shows, such as Hogan's Heroes, did not have this issue and can be transferred directly from cut negative or IPs (Intermediate Positives).

Even with the advancements in electronic cameras, the potential quality from 35mm film is still higher for resolution and latitude. However they are becoming very popular for episodic TV, especially as it eliminates the processing and transfer/scanning costs of using film.

Color film is not that stable over long periods of time, particularly the cyan (red channel) dye which tends to fade. This is why older film tends to look redish. Electronic restoration has proven to be very effective. Scratches, dirt and processing problems can be eliminated. However, video tape has proven to be more vulnerable to time as the oxide sheds off the backing. The early digital D1 format from the late eighties had tapes deteriorating after less than 10 years.

There is debate whether electronic acquisition is a help or hinder to production. On the one hand it can be a benefit for being sure a scene was captured. Newer workflows allow onsite non-destructive color correction to be added, which can aid with production decisions such as lighting. Conversely it can also slow things down from the added analysis. But it seems electronic is the future , though film is far from dead.

So how many of the classic television series (i.e., aforementioned "I Dream of Jeannie) can be converted to HD? And of those, how many could look great in 16:9 or even 14:9? I have seen the Academy show clips of what appears to be "I Love Lucy" in 16:9 HD. Any resources on the net that have a list? Great Info. Thanks!
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post #47 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 02:35 AM
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So how many of the classic television series (i.e., aforementioned "I Dream of Jeannie) can be converted to HD? And of those, how many could look great in 16:9 or even 14:9? I have seen the Academy show clips of what appears to be "I Love Lucy" in 16:9 HD. Any resources on the net that have a list? Great Info. Thanks!

I have the DVDs of I Dream of Jeannie, Hogan's Heroes, and Gilligan's Island and they are remastered in 480p. They look awesome. But they are in 4:3 because that is how they are filmed.

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post #48 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 04:44 AM
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In fairness, it should be noted that the practice of butchering reruns to insert extra commercials goes way, way back in time.

In my own personal recollection, the first time that I remember hearing of syndication taking more commercial time was in the early 70's with the syndie reruns of Star Trek. For the stations to sell more time, the shows, which were sent in on film, were edited down. The resulting left over clips, were then cut up into individual 35mm slides and either sold (not legal, but it happened a lot) or just given away to those who knew to ask and then they would mount them and these slides were sold at the early Star Trek conventions. The only reason this ever came to light was Gene Roddenberry's mail order business, Lincoln Enterprises were selling 35mm slides of Star Trek scenes and had only released the first season worth of slides but were seeing these vendors selling second and third season slides. Lincoln investigated and found the edited clips from the stations were the source of the slides. It was a mild stink with in the world of Trek at the time and now largely forgotten because with the advent of satellite distribution to video tape at the stations in the 80's, the source dried up for the slides, but it shows that adding commercial time is probably as old as syndication itself and the practice was well underway as early as 1970 and probably much, much earlier.

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post #49 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 09:59 AM
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In the 80's one Star Trek syndication deal speed up the shows by 4% which gave 90-120 seconds of extra commercials. If you were blessed (or cursed) with natural pitch, you could tell all the music was a semitone higher.

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post #50 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 10:15 AM
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So they speed up tele shows too.That's terrible.Surely it's got to affect the picture qualilty somewhat also.That's another thing that's not allowed here(UK).
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post #51 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Jedi Master View Post

I have the DVDs of I Dream of Jeannie, Hogan's Heroes, and Gilligan's Island and they are remastered in 480p. They look awesome. But they are in 4:3 because that is how they are filmed.

From the officially released sets (i.e., avaible on Amaznon.com), or are you talking something different? Woud be great to see these shows released on Blu-Ray, in 14:9 or 16:9 if possible ala Seinfeld and Hogan's Heroes. I wonder if they considered releasing Star Trek in 16:9 (or offering it as an option), or if that was not feasable; i.e., if the amount of overscan was not sufficient.
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post #52 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 12:36 PM
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In the 80's one Star Trek syndication deal speed up the shows by 4% which gave 90-120 seconds of extra commercials. If you were blessed (or cursed) with natural pitch, you could tell all the music was a semitone higher.

Good Lord - it was always very obvious that the radio stations have been doing that forever with music, but I never realized or noticed it with any TV shows before. That's really taking it too far, IMO (good thing I at least don't watch any of the syndicated Star Trek shows, anyway).
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post #53 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Rammitinski View Post

Good Lord - it was always very obvious that the radio stations have been doing that forever with music, but I never realized or noticed it with any TV shows before. That's really taking it too far, IMO (good thing I at least don't watch any of the syndicated Star Trek shows, anyway).

Spike was notorious for doing that ages ago (I mean, really, really obvious about it) - seems to have died down quite a bit.

However what was a plus, was when they showed TNG and whatnot "uncut" - a much longer version of the normal broadcast, which usually cut out somewhat "useless" sections, namely glory shots of the ships.

But, getting back to Hogan's Heroes - the DVD's to look great, however I'd love a Blu-Ray release, thought the HDNET presentation was great.

For instance, the Universal HD presentation, if I recall, the episode "The Hostage". They cut out nearly the main plot point in the episode.

Careful - it's a spoiler!

But, Hogan and his men dug a tunnel and planted a bomb underneath the Fuel Depot, and then back-filled it so the bomb could not be removed - from my memory, in the Universal HD presentation, the whole "planting the bomb" part was completely removed!

It should be on again in about 2 weeks to double-check, but they like to remove big chunks of it in exchange for commercials about Stoneware pans that don't stick, or their "undiscovered tv" spots.

Really miss the HDNET presentations~
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post #54 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 03:12 PM
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So how many of the classic television series (i.e., aforementioned "I Dream of Jeannie) can be converted to HD? And of those, how many could look great in 16:9 or even 14:9? I have seen the Academy show clips of what appears to be "I Love Lucy" in 16:9 HD. Any resources on the net that have a list? Great Info. Thanks!

Most television episodics were filmed, although some sitcoms were taped. Variety shows were also taped. Up until the late 80s/early 90s filmed shows were also finished on film including titles. These show should translate well to HD. I Love Lucy was restored in HD, which included fixing the dirt, scratches and other film damage.
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post #55 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 03:40 PM
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So they speed up tele shows too.That's terrible.Surely it's got to affect the picture qualilty somewhat also.That's another thing that's not allowed here(UK).

Do you know this for a fact or is it speculation? Vari-speed on shows is a practice that has been around for decades. Early on there was some problems with vari-speed of composite recordings, such as 1/2 line bobble or switching between full and reduced vertical resolution (earlier Sony machines), but it was largely solved in the 80s beginning with the Ampex Zeus.

Sometimes original showings of episodes were sped up on network airings. This was often done in the transfer process typically using an English made telecine (Rank Cintel). Aside from the destruction of the 2:3 cadence, which didn't affect much since reverse telecine was not available on displays, the effect was unnoticeable unless it was pushed too far. Audio is normally pitch corrected on vari-speed.

To say that vari-speed is not used in the UK is somewhat incorrect. 24fps based material, including features and US shows, have been sped up 4% for showing in 50hz countries at 25fps. I don't know if this is still common practice, but it was for a long time. I think most vari-speed increases for syndication in the US are not as much.

The radio practice of playing music at higher speeds was fairly common in the 60s as airchecks reveal. I don't hear it being used anymore, but there may be some still doing it. Unfortunately processing including high levels of compression is still common and may be worse than ever. Even worse is that modern recording techniques have embraced this practice, and it's affecting the quality of re-released material as well as new. It seems now that if levels are more than a half db below clipping (0db) it's not loud enough. But of course this is OT, so I'll end my rant
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post #56 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 04:10 PM
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So they speed up tele shows too.That's terrible.Surely it's got to affect the picture qualilty somewhat also.That's another thing that's not allowed here(UK).

You may want to check into this further.

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post #57 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 10:36 PM
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The radio practice of playing music at higher speeds was fairly common in the 60s as airchecks reveal.

I'm sure I've heard it since, but I can't remember where offhand.

The worst at that, which some old-timers here might remember, was K-tel records. Then they would fade the songs out thirty seconds to a minute early on top of it. That's how they would cram 25 "hit songs" on an album.
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post #58 of 70 Old 07-27-2010, 11:35 PM
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So they speed up tele shows too.That's terrible.Surely it's got to affect the picture qualilty somewhat also.That's another thing that's not allowed here(UK).

I fell over laughing when you said speed up is not allowed in the UK, considering that due to PAL's 25 fps, practically all filmed material is sped up there! (or was before the High-definition came along)
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post #59 of 70 Old 07-28-2010, 02:53 AM
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From the officially released sets (i.e., avaible on Amazon.com), or are you talking something different? Woud be great to see these shows released on Blu-Ray, in 14:9 or 16:9 if possible ala Seinfeld and Hogan's Heroes. I wonder if they considered releasing Star Trek in 16:9 (or offering it as an option), or if that was not feasable; i.e., if the amount of overscan was not sufficient.

They are the officially released DVD sets. All my DVDs in my library are the official DVDs. I don't buy copies or bootlegs.

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post #60 of 70 Old 07-28-2010, 02:59 AM
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Originally Posted by CJPC View Post

But, getting back to Hogan's Heroes - the DVD's to look great, however I'd love a Blu-Ray release, thought the HDNET presentation was great.

For instance, the Universal HD presentation, if I recall, the episode "The Hostage". They cut out nearly the main plot point in the episode.

Careful - it's a spoiler!

But, Hogan and his men dug a tunnel and planted a bomb underneath the Fuel Depot, and then back-filled it so the bomb could not be removed - from my memory, in the Universal HD presentation, the whole "planting the bomb" part was completely removed!

I just watched this episode on DVD the other day. Its terrible that this part would get cut out. It makes me glad I have the DVDs.

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