The Official "I dont have dish or cable" anymore thread - Page 57 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1681 of 1689 Old 07-07-2013, 07:06 PM
AVS Special Member
 
thedeskE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 3,619
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post


"Same list as the last time we went through this?"
"Have a nice day, sir."

Nothing strange here - I get calls, email pitch spams from the same cable provider (internet only) I
subscribe to already. I used to wonder why, but then I consider how big the company is and realize
one arm does not keep up with the other. If you expect both to keep up with little Ol' you, you're
just naive.
thedeskE is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #1682 of 1689 Old 07-08-2013, 02:25 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Jedi Master's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Macon, GA
Posts: 1,627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhufnagel View Post

I've never had a non-native english speaker call me to try to sell me anything. If DirecTV is doing that, then they're the exception to the rule. Now getting a non-native english speaker when you call them, then yes that's common. So tell the truth, did you call them? wink.gif

As far as being greedy, trying to sell you something is being greedy? You have a far different definition of greedy than what Webster's has.

No I didn't call them. When I get bombarded by calls and advertisements from a company that jacks up their price and waters down their product I call that greed.

Broadcast TV - a vital national public resource
Jedi Master is offline  
post #1683 of 1689 Old 07-08-2013, 02:57 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Jedi Master's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Macon, GA
Posts: 1,627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
Quote:
The shorter seasons on cable have been influencing more shows on TV to follow suit.

And why does this matter to you? Because more and more, we’re going to get our favorite TV shows in chunks of 10 to 13 episodes, even on broadcast.

The only thing that won’t get shorter is that waiting time.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/tv-moving-shorter-seasons-article-1.1387581

This is what I'm talking about when I say watering down the product. Pay TV prices continue to climb and the customer keeps getting less. This means there will be more repeats on TV.

Broadcast TV - a vital national public resource
Jedi Master is offline  
post #1684 of 1689 Old 07-08-2013, 08:33 AM
Senior Member
 
borntocoast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi Master View Post

This is what I'm talking about when I say watering down the product. Pay TV prices continue to climb and the customer keeps getting less. This means there will be more repeats on TV.

And this is WHYmore people "Cut the Cord". The whole TV Industry will eventually COLLAPSE! eek.gif A house divided against itself cannot stand. It's only a matter of time.
borntocoast is offline  
post #1685 of 1689 Old 07-08-2013, 11:51 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
NetworkTV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: CT
Posts: 15,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Liked: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

And this is WHYmore people "Cut the Cord". The whole TV Industry will eventually COLLAPSE! eek.gif A house divided against itself cannot stand. It's only a matter of time.
I hope you don't think that cutting the cord will get you longer seasons of TV.

In fact, we'll likely see even shorter ones that will make BBC series look like epic marathons by comparison - and that from a place where you pay for TV just by owning a TV.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
NetworkTV is offline  
post #1686 of 1689 Old 07-08-2013, 11:56 AM
Advanced Member
 
fhall1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Central NY
Posts: 767
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi Master View Post

I found this info on a website. My DVDs in 480p look a whole lot better that SD broadcast channels in 480i. After seeing this info I guess the SD broadcast channels aren't using the full capacity of 480i.


Read about scan lines.....although the "i" and "p" formats have the same number of pixels, the "i" (interlaced) images only contain half the scan lines of a "p" (progressive) image....that's why the "i" looks crappier.
fhall1 is offline  
post #1687 of 1689 Old 07-08-2013, 12:10 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
NetworkTV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: CT
Posts: 15,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Liked: 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by fhall1 View Post

Read about scan lines.....although the "i" and "p" formats have the same number of pixels, the "i" (interlaced) images only contain half the scan lines of a "p" (progressive) image....that's why the "i" looks crappier.
That's not really it.

The interlacing happens so fast, you wouldn't really see the difference. At the same frame rate, the only gain of p over i is the lack of interlacing artifacts when things move fast. Things only look crisper in progressive formats if the frame rate is higher.

The real reasons are these:

1) Cable and satellite whack the heck out of SD video with compression - way more than DVD has. That's why it looks so muddy.

2) Cable and satellite SD isn't actually 480i. It's shaved down to about 350-380i. That's why things look do jagged. You're missing 1/4 the resolution.

So, less resolution + more compression than DVD = worse quality.

I work with archived 480i video in professional TV all the time. It blows away DVD because I'm seeing it before the compression the same video on DVD would have. It definitely looks far better than cable or satellite SD. Likewise, the HD I work with looks amazing compared to what you see at home - even on Blu-ray.

It all comes down to how much messing around has occurred before it gets to the viewer.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
NetworkTV is offline  
post #1688 of 1689 Old 09-17-2013, 05:09 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Aliens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Virginia
Posts: 7,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Liked: 315
More media consumers are cutting the cable cord

Snippet...


Quote:
The vast majority of Americans – 95 percent – still watch television using traditional cable or satellite options, according to Nielsen. But the number of households that choose to opt out of cable or satellite TV is on the rise, from 2 million in 2007 to 5 million in 2013, Nielsen’s data show.

“This scares the bejesus out of the cable and satellite people,” said Jim Barry, a spokesman for the Consumer Electronics Association in Arlington, Va. “I think it’s going to change the business model.”

Catching on to the trend, cable and satellite companies have begun to offer “watch anywhere” services that allow subscribers to get live TV and streaming content on their mobile devices
.
Cord-cutting won’t work for everyone, however. Streaming isn’t ideal if you watch a lot of live television, whether you’re a sports addict or news junkie, or you just can’t wait until tomorrow to catch the latest “Breaking Bad” episode. And premium channels such as HBO or Showtime are available only through cable or satellite.

“At this point, (cord-cutting) is not a realistic option for most households just because the amount of choice that they want is not going to be available online. But it’s only growing, so I think that cable companies are definitely aware of this and reacting to it,” said Jerry Brito, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and the director of its Technology Policy Program.

A main driver behind the high cost of cable and satellite in recent years is the expensive license fees networks pay sports leagues to broadcast their games. The cost gets passed on to consumers to pay for the “bundles” of channels they get with their cable satellite subscriptions, whether they plan to watch sports or not.

The first step, if you’re ready to cut the cord, is to see whether you can get good free over-the-air reception, either with an antenna or online subscription service such as Aereo.

Aereo relies on tiny antennas located in the company’s data centers that pick up local channels’ signals and beam them over the Internet to customers. For a monthly membership of $8 to $12, Aereo customers can watch the channels streaming live online or save them on virtual digital video recorders for later.
Aliens is offline  
post #1689 of 1689 Old 09-18-2013, 02:07 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Jedi Master's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Macon, GA
Posts: 1,627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 22
GfK: Cord-cutting on the rise in US
Quote:
Research from GfK Media & Entertainment shows that the estimated number of Americans now relying exclusively on over-the-air (OTA) television broadcasting increased to 59.7 million, up from 54 million just a year ago. The percentage of TV households currently OTA reliant has now grown from 14 per cent in 2010 to 19.3 per cent in the current survey, a 38 per cent increase in just four years. The survey also found that the demographics of broadcast-only households continue to skew toward younger adults, minorities and lower-income families.

The 2013 Ownership Survey and Trend Report, part of The Home Technology Monitor research series, found that 19.3 per cent of all US households with TVs rely solely on OTA signals to watch TV programming; this compares with 17.8 per cent of homes reported as broadcast-only last year. Overall, GfK estimates that 22.4 million households representing 59.7 million consumers receive television exclusively through broadcast signals and are not subscribing to a pay-TV service (i.e. a traditional pay-TV service such as cable, satellite, Verizon FIOS or AT&T U-Verse).

http://advanced-television.com/2013/06/24/gfk-cord-cutting-on-the-rise-in-us/

Broadcast TV - a vital national public resource
Jedi Master is offline  
Reply HDTV Programming

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off