Google Fiber Launches in Kansas City - Page 2 - AVS Forum
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post #31 of 54 Old 08-03-2012, 03:47 PM
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I wonder if those 161 channels that they mentioned are in HD or SD?

You can never judge a show by its pilot episode or the half season following it.
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post #32 of 54 Old 08-04-2012, 09:04 AM
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Does this have any "futureproofing" implications if you're building a new home or finishing a room?... such as placing fiber optic cables in walls and/or ceiling.
Not really.

You only need the big pipe coming in and going out. Within the household, standard copper has plenty of bandwidth. Besides, the trend is toward wireless which, unless you employ multiple frequencies, is far slower than anything wired. However, in theory, with frequency sharing, you could easily pull more than enough bandwidth out of wireless tech to have multiple HD streams along side HSI. Remember, TV channels on the consumer end top out at roughly 19Mb/s. Wireless G can more than handle that, even if there's significant signal loss.

In short, any normal gigabit ethernet setup would more than cover you in the home. Fiber would be overkill.

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I wonder if those 161 channels that they mentioned are in HD or SD?
Likely HD. Just all the major sports channels alone are at least 25 of them. add in another dozen news channels, plus the standards like TNNT, TBS, USa, etc and they add up quick.

There aren't many channels left that are only SD anyway. I doubt a new startup would choose to negotiate for the SD version of a channel that is HD. Legacy carriers often have issues with legacy contracts that didn't cover HD, but this is a clean slate.
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post #33 of 54 Old 08-06-2012, 02:36 PM
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Google Fiber coming to northern Johnson County

By SCOTT CANON, The Kansas City Star

Posted on Mon, Aug. 06, 2012 10:46 AM

The Internet speed limit in a small part of northern Johnson County is going up.

Google Inc. has announced tentative agreements to bring its fiberoptic-based Internet service to Westwood, Westwood Hills and Mission Woods.

The cities will still have to wait, however.

[excerpted]

“We’ve been so excited about the number of pre-registrations,” Lo wrote in his post. “Your enthusiasm is contagious—and we’re going to help it spread.”

To reach Scott Canon, call 816-234-4754 or email scanon@kcstar.com.

http://www.kansascity.com/2012/08/06/3745922/google-coming-to-northern-johnson.html
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post #34 of 54 Old 08-16-2012, 11:38 PM
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The pre-registration is the catch. If you don't get enuf in your neighborhood to sign up, Google passes you by. eek.gif

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post #35 of 54 Old 08-17-2012, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by 73shark View Post

The pre-registration is the catch. If you don't get enuf in your neighborhood to sign up, Google passes you by.
That's the idea.  They want interested potential customers to work as an unpaid sales force to get their neighbors to preregister.
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post #36 of 54 Old 08-17-2012, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by dattier View Post

That's the idea.  They want interested potential customers to work as an unpaid sales force to get their neighbors to preregister.
Just as long as they don't use the Amway method:

"Sir, how do you feel about fiber?"

"OK, I guess..."

"Do you feel you get enough? If not, do you feel bad about not having enough fiber available to you? Do you think that having more fiber could make you and those around you happier?"

"Uh, sure, I suppose so..."

"Do you think increasing fiber's availability to everyone is worth a bit of effort and start up cost on your part to make such a thing happen?"

"Hey...wait a second....are you trying to recruit me for Google Fiber?"

"Well, sir, let me just talk to you about opportunity...a chance to get in on the ground floor...."
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post #37 of 54 Old 08-18-2012, 08:57 AM
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It is so tempting to take parts of NetworkTV's post out of context ...
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post #38 of 54 Old 08-18-2012, 02:08 PM
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Hoping this comes to the greater Chicago-land area.
It will good to have another competitor to drive prices into the more affordable range (at least without having to take land-line phones).
For me this could be a good price point for truly high speed service with a modest/useful quantity of programming
(getting a bit tired of these "promotional 3-pack bundles" currently available from Comcast and ATT-UVerse)
if does they better have CSN Chicago HD and CSN Chicago + HD as well all the Big ten HD feeds.
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post #39 of 54 Old 09-07-2012, 07:55 AM - Thread Starter
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Google Fiber to Carry NFL Network/RedZone

Will Offer the Services Starting Sept. 10

John Eggerton -- Multichannel News, 9/6/2012 4:23:04 PM

Google Fiber, the search giant's fiber-delivered broadband service test-bed in Kansas City, has struck a multiyear deal to carry NFL Networks and its RedZone look-in scoring channel (every touchdown from every Sunday afternoon game), the latter as an a la carte offering.

NFL Network pointed out that it marks the second competing provider in a Time Warner Cable market to add the network, after Cincinnati Bell added it to its fiber optic system there Aug. 16.

TWC and Bright House Network, for which the nation's No. 2 cable operator conducts programming negotiations,are the only major distributors that don't carry the network.

How many Google Fiber subs the NFL channels will count is unclear. Registration to Google Fiber ends on Sept. 9, with installation to KC homes presumably kicking off as early Sept. 10, the same day the services will become available on the Google service.

http://www.multichannel.com/article/489188-Google_Fiber_to_Carry_NFL_Network_RedZone.php

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post #40 of 54 Old 09-12-2012, 10:05 AM - Thread Starter
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Google Adds ESPN And Disney Nets To Fiber TV Diet

By: admin
By Todd Spangler

Google reached a deal with Disney/ESPN Media Networks to offer 15 networks -- including ESPN and Disney Channel -- to subscribers of the Internet giant’s soon-to-launch fiber-to-the-home IPTV service in the Kansas City area.

The networks to be available through Google Fiber TV are: ABC Family, ABC News Now, Disney Channel, Disney Junior, Disney XD, ESPN, ESPN Buzzer Beater, ESPN Classic, ESPN Deportes, ESPN Goal Line, ESPN2, ESPNews, ESPNU, the Longhorn Network and SOAPnet.

Google also announced four other channel additions to the lineup: Ovation, TBN, TBN Enlace and Discovery Communications' Velocity.

However, Google’s Fiber TV still lacks several top cable networks -- including HBO, Fox News Channel, TNT, TBS and AMC. The service will offer an optional Hispanic programming package and movie tiers from Showtime Networks and Starz Entertainment.

“Google Fiber TV service already includes almost 200 channels, but we’ll continue to add more over time,” Larry Yang, senior product manager for Google Fiber, wrote in a blog post. “And since our TV service runs on a gigabit network, we can offer access to all our HD channels for no extra charge.”

On Sunday, Google ended the six-week preregistration period for Google Fiber in Kansas City with at least 180 of 202 eligible neighborhoods, or 89%, ready to get connected to the next-generation fiber-to-the-home network. The Internet company said it is still processing some address-verification requests and preregistrations from apartment buildings and condos, and will announce the final list of "fiberhoods" on Thursday, Sept. 13.

The Google Fiber service is $70 per month for broadband only with a one-year contract and $120 per month as part of a broadband/TV bundle with a two-year contract. Customers also can opt for a free -- but significantly slower -- Internet service at 5 Megabits per second if the pay the $300 construction fee.

Google Fiber is challenging incumbent broadband and TV providers in Kansas City, including Time Warner Cable, AT&T, SureWest Communications and, to a limited extent, Comcast.

Google's next-generation IPTV service in Kansas City uses a Nexus 7 tablet as a remote control and a Google-designed DVR, which includes 2 Terabytes of storage (enough for 500 hours of HD programming) and the ability to record up to eight shows at once. The TV service also will provide video on Android and iOS devices and will include a voice-enabled search function.

Google's 1 Gbps Internet service, meanwhile, is more than 100 times faster than the broadband most Americans have today.

http://www.multichannel.com/news-article/google-adds-espn-and-disney-nets-fiber-tv-diet/133470

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post #41 of 54 Old 09-15-2012, 03:40 PM
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Amazing how much Google is charging for this and we have a small city in North Carolina with an all Fiber to the home system with better rates. http://www.fibrant.com/Home.aspx

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post #42 of 54 Old 09-16-2012, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by ybsane View Post

Amazing how much Google is charging for this and we have a small city in North Carolina with an all Fiber to the home system with better rates.
But that's with the internet at 15 mbps, by the time you reach 10% of Google's version you're way passed their prices... wink.gif
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post #43 of 54 Old 09-16-2012, 12:59 PM
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But that's with the internet at 15 mbps, by the time you reach 10% of Google's version you're way passed their prices... wink.gif
But who really needs anything that fast? By the time you go through the myriad of routers and switches that slow things down, you're lucky to get anything close to that visiting most sites. A lot of web servers deliberately limit your connection bandwidth, even if you're the only one connected at the time. Further, even streaming video bit rates are way under that.

About the only connections you really get at maximum speeds are those bandwidth test sites.

For every day use, those higher speeds are fiction.
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post #44 of 54 Old 09-16-2012, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

But who really needs anything that fast? By the time you go through the myriad of routers and switches that slow things down, you're lucky to get anything close to that visiting most sites. A lot of web servers deliberately limit your connection bandwidth, even if you're the only one connected at the time. Further, even streaming video bit rates are way under that.
About the only connections you really get at maximum speeds are those bandwidth test sites.
For every day use, those higher speeds are fiction.

There is no incentive for anyone to create a service that uses really fast connections until there is a large enough installed base for it. It's a chicken and an egg problem. As speeds get faster services will be created that will take advantage of it (4k streaming video from YouTube already exists). There is no reason that internet providers can't continue improving their infrastructure except that they have a monopoly on TV/Internet service and they do not want to allow other TV providers over their monopolized network.

There are a lot of places in the rest of the world (many countries in Europe and Asia) that have had 100+ megabit connections for years for a price that's lower than the average person pays for DSL in the United States. We're quickly falling behind the rest of the world with our communications infrastructure with no real attempt to catch up.
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post #45 of 54 Old 09-16-2012, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

But who really needs anything that fast? By the time you go through the myriad of routers and switches that slow things down, you're lucky to get anything close to that visiting most sites. A lot of web servers deliberately limit your connection bandwidth, even if you're the only one connected at the time. Further, even streaming video bit rates are way under that.
About the only connections you really get at maximum speeds are those bandwidth test sites.
For every day use, those higher speeds are fiction.

I agree..smile.gif a 20x20 Mbps service will handle more than anyone needs, now some buisness customers need more for point to point or for their actual aggregate to the internet where they have 100 user's or more is a little different.

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post #46 of 54 Old 09-16-2012, 08:33 PM
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I agree..smile.gif a 20x20 Mbps service will handle more than anyone needs, now some buisness customers need more for point to point or for their actual aggregate to the internet where they have 100 user's or more is a little different.

Not if your using it for IPTV, which Google is doing with their service. An 8 tuner DVR (which they are offering) * up to about 20Mbps a channel is already 160Mbps.

Also, I could easily see a household needing more than that. One VUDU HDX stream is nearly 10Mbps by itself. Or multiple HD skype video calls, could very easily go over 20Mbps. Or something we haven't thought of yet.

I pay almost $70/month for 12/Mbps/896kbps service. And its the best I can get, and I find it very limiting (the upstream speed more than anything).
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post #47 of 54 Old 09-17-2012, 04:49 AM
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Originally Posted by lobosrul View Post

Not if your using it for IPTV, which Google is doing with their service. An 8 tuner DVR (which they are offering) * up to about 20Mbps a channel is already 160Mbps.
Also, I could easily see a household needing more than that. One VUDU HDX stream is nearly 10Mbps by itself. Or multiple HD skype video calls, could very easily go over 20Mbps. Or something we haven't thought of yet.
I pay almost $70/month for 12/Mbps/896kbps service. And its the best I can get, and I find it very limiting (the upstream speed more than anything).

We are talking about internet speeds not the IPTV pipe for Multi-Casting Video, which is just between the set-top and Head-End/Hub. There is a big difference there, also when you get a chance do a Tracert to one of your favorite sites and see how many hops it takes to get there. There is usally about 3 internally for your Cable/DSL end which goes quick and from there can be anywhere from 6 hop connections to over 18 to get your destination.

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post #48 of 54 Old 09-17-2012, 10:08 AM - Thread Starter
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Google Sets K.C. Fiber Rollout, Inks Deal for Turner Nets

By: Todd Spangler 2012-09-14 19:10:00

Google signed a deal with Turner Broadcasting System to add CNN, TBS, TNT and nine other networks to its fiber-based IPTV service -- but most residents will have to wait at least a year before they can tune in or connect to the promised blistering-fast 1 Gbps broadband service.

The company announced Thursday that it will hook up 180 of the 202 neighborhoods targeted in its initial fiber-to-the-home buildout in Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan.

However, Google won’t begin construction in 53% of those until next fall at the earliest, with another 28% slated for summer 2013.

Google’s staggered schedule reflects the labor-intensive process of building a physical network and connecting residences literally one at a time.

Moreover, the company warned that it may encounter delays. “It’s important to note that our construction schedule isn’t set in stone -- many factors, such as a harsh winter, may affect timing,” Google Access general manager Kevin Lo wrote in a blog post.

The first “fiberhood” to receive Google Fiber will be Hanover Heights in Kansas City, Kan., which preregistered the highest percentage of households on the Kansas side of the line. Google plans to install fiber for its first customer in Hanover Heights “within the next few weeks,” Lo said.

To boost the appeal of Google Fiber, the Internet giant is offering a TV component of the service.

This week, Google announced it will add several major cable networks: It will carry Turner’s Boomerang, Cartoon Network, CNN, CNN en Español, CNN International, HLN, hTV, Infinito, TBS, Turner Classic Movies (TCM), TNT and truTV.

Google also said it will offer MLB Network's Strike Zone as part of an add-on package.

Earlier this week Google announced a pact with Disney/ESPN Media Networks for 15 networks, including ESPN, Disney Channel and ABC Family, as well as Ovation, TBN and Discovery Communications' Velocity.

The Google Fiber project to deliver 1 Gigabit per second broadband without any usage limits is aimed at pushing incumbent cable operators and telcos to crank up their own Internet offerings.

But the heavy lifting and high cost involved have led industry observers to believe Google Fiber is a limited, one-off experiment.

Time Warner Cable, the incumbent MSO in the Kansas City area, has fewer than 100,000 Internet and 100,000 video subscribers that overlap with Google’s footprint, according to chief financial officer Irene Esteves.

"We're talking about less than 1% of our subs [nationwide that are] at risk," she said, speaking at the at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Media, Communications and Entertainment conference on Sept. 12.

Esteves added that she doesn’t expect Google Fiber to expand beyond the initial K.C. market, estimating it would cost upward of $200 billion to deploy fiber-to-the-home nationwide.

Google declined to disclose how many people preregistered for the fiber service. Its franchise agreements in the Kansas City area cover about 1 million people.

The Google Fiber service is $70 per month for broadband only with a one-year contract and $120 per month as part of a broadband/TV bundle with a two-year contract.

http://www.multichannel.com/news-article/google-sets-kc-fiber-rollout-inks-deal-turner-nets/133542

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post #49 of 54 Old 09-17-2012, 10:14 AM
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Interesting that Time Warner offered up their broadcast networks, but no deal for HBO was entailed.

The holes are decreasing with each deal. It's down to the AMC Networks, BBC America, the FOX suite and HBO/Cinemax.

It also doesn't look as if NBA TV is included in this deal, which Turner partly owns.
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post #50 of 54 Old 09-17-2012, 10:19 AM
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We are talking about internet speeds not the IPTV pipe for Multi-Casting Video, which is just between the set-top and Head-End/Hub. There is a big difference there, also when you get a chance do a Tracert to one of your favorite sites and see how many hops it takes to get there. There is usally about 3 internally for your Cable/DSL end which goes quick and from there can be anywhere from 6 hop connections to over 18 to get your destination.

Yes, that part of the pipe would just be from Google's head-end to your set top box(or boxes), but it still uses part of your fiber connection.

I've run tracert many times before, and I realize your connection speed, to any single destination, is at the mercy of what stands between you and it. That doesn't make a high bandwidth connection useless.
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post #51 of 54 Old 09-17-2012, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by lobosrul View Post

Yes, that part of the pipe would just be from Google's head-end to your set top box(or boxes), but it still uses part of your fiber connection.
I've run tracert many times before, and I realize your connection speed, to any single destination, is at the mercy of what stands between you and it. That doesn't make a high bandwidth connection useless.

There is more to that than a fiber connection, WDM gives the ability for a single fiber to have multiple forward and return wavelengths and you are not bandwidth limited at all...smile.gif

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post #52 of 54 Old 09-18-2012, 11:06 AM
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There is no incentive for anyone to create a service that uses really fast connections until there is a large enough installed base for it. It's a chicken and an egg problem. As speeds get faster services will be created that will take advantage of it (4k streaming video from YouTube already exists). There is no reason that internet providers can't continue improving their infrastructure except that they have a monopoly on TV/Internet service and they do not want to allow other TV providers over their monopolized network.
There are a lot of places in the rest of the world (many countries in Europe and Asia) that have had 100+ megabit connections for years for a price that's lower than the average person pays for DSL in the United States. We're quickly falling behind the rest of the world with our communications infrastructure with no real attempt to catch up.
Again, it's not the user and the end destination that are the problem in most cases.

It's all the little stops along the way that cause the bottlenecks. That doesn't even include ad servers, Facebook "thumbs up" buttons and everything else you have to wait to load on the page before you can even start browsing it. Those things used fixed bandwidth and a fast connection will not speed them up. They'll load just as slowly with your 1.5 Mb/s connection as they do at 20Mb/s, since none of those allow connections anywhere near as fast as many broadband connections can reach.

Heck, the path stops at least 2-3 times just at your own ISP gateway alone so they can authorize your account, then scan you and make sure you aren't a terrorist or a pirate.
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Originally Posted by lobosrul View Post

Yes, that part of the pipe would just be from Google's head-end to your set top box(or boxes), but it still uses part of your fiber connection.
I've run tracert many times before, and I realize your connection speed, to any single destination, is at the mercy of what stands between you and it. That doesn't make a high bandwidth connection useless.

No, but in real, day to day use, it hobbles it. It's great for all those VOD and other services you get from your local hub (since those don't really hit the internet in any meaningful way) but for the majority of surfing, those kinds of speeds are nothing but a sales pitch - lots of empty words.
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Again, it's not the user and the end destination that are the problem in most cases.
It's all the little stops along the way that cause the bottlenecks. That doesn't even include ad servers, Facebook "thumbs up" buttons and everything else you have to wait to load on the page before you can even start browsing it. Those things used fixed bandwidth and a fast connection will not speed them up. They'll load just as slowly with your 1.5 Mb/s connection as they do at 20Mb/s, since none of those allow connections anywhere near as fast as many broadband connections can reach.
Heck, the path stops at least 2-3 times just at your own ISP gateway alone so they can authorize your account, then scan you and make sure you aren't a terrorist or a pirate.
No, but in real, day to day use, it hobbles it. It's great for all those VOD and other services you get from your local hub (since those don't really hit the internet in any meaningful way) but for the majority of surfing, those kinds of speeds are nothing but a sales pitch - lots of empty words.

I'm not even sure what were disagreeing about. Of course no one needs a huge "pipe" to post on a web forum or facebook. Avsforum.com typically comes up within a second for me. Never upgrading to FTTH means new services that can utilize such speeds can't exist, which means there's no reason to upgrade to FTTH... its a chicken and egg type problem.

Besides which Googles $120/month TV plus internet deal is FAR less than what I pay combined for both services, and I receive vastly inferior internet service, regardless if I can actually utilize an increase in bandwidth or not.

And I really don't think my ISP "scans me" every time I make a connection somewhere.
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post #54 of 54 Old 09-18-2012, 01:25 PM
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I'm not even sure what were disagreeing about. Of course no one needs a huge "pipe" to post on a web forum or facebook. Avsforum.com typically comes up within a second for me. Never upgrading to FTTH means new services that can utilize such speeds can't exist, which means there's no reason to upgrade to FTTH... its a chicken and egg type problem.
Besides which Googles $120/month TV plus internet deal is FAR less than what I pay combined for both services, and I receive vastly inferior internet service, regardless if I can actually utilize an increase in bandwidth or not.
What I'm saying is, there are few occasions where you'll actually use the bandwidth - even on Youtube, Netflix, Hulu or anywhere else. All those services provide content that fits well within most high speed connections out there (pretty much anything at least 6-8Mb/s). They'll continue to do so since by the time even better quality stuff comes out, more efficient compression will likely keep it within current mid to upper tier connections currently available.

The biggest problem most people encounter is the data caps on most services. Aside from the really slow legacy ones (the 1.5 to 3Mb/s ones), the connections are plenty fast. You just can't use them too much or they'll cut you off or bill you for overages. I'm not sure if Google plans to have caps on their service plans or not.

Having said that, if you're paying more for less service, then you should switch if the opportunity arises. Even if you never use the capacity, why pay more for less?
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And I really don't think my ISP "scans me" every time I make a connection somewhere.
Actually, they scan you even when you aren't going somewhere. They scan your connection to:

1) Determine if you still need your dynamically assigned IP address. If you take your modem offline for an extended period, it's likely it will be reassigned. You'll then get a new one when you reconnect.

2) Determine if you're running a web or some other type of server that might violate your TOS.

3) To determine if you're doing anything else that might violate the TOS,

In the case of Comcast, TWC and some others, they check for signs of torrent activity and other connections that they tend to throttle. They also check to verify whether you are consuming their own content verses someone elses, since some ISPs don't count the cable related content toward your allowance.

Plus, they measure the outside traffic you generate to know if you've used up your monthly transfer allowance.

Finally, ISPs often create localized content on their own sites you might use as your home page or your ISP web mail based on your browsing habits.
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