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post #3421 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 07:03 AM
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It boggles the mind….

http://en.espnf1.com/f1/motorsport/story/155895.html

Bernie and his accountants make the swindlers on Wall Street look like rank amateurs. Is there any other man on the planet clever enough to get a $100 million per year divorce settlement from his ex-wife? :-)

Bernie Ecclestone avoided a potential £1.2bn tax bill after his ex-wife made a £10m deal with UK tax authorities, according to BBC current affairs programme Panorama.

The programme, set to be aired in the UK on Monday night, claims it "may be the biggest individual tax dodge in British history". Panorama's investigation goes back to the mid-1990s when Ecclestone acquired F1's TV rights and gave them to his then wife, Slavica. She transferred them into a family trust in Liechenstein before they were sold on at a vast profit, which Ecclestone was not liable to pay tax on. Providing Ecclestone did not set up or control the trust the deal is "legally watertight", but Ecclestone has admitted he could have faced a tax bill of £1.2bn if he had.

The Ecclestones' tax affairs were investigated by HMRC for over nine years, with the £10m deal being struck in 2008. The BBC quotes one of the lawyers who helped run the family trust, Frederique Flournoy, as saying: "In summer 2008, the Inland Revenue offered to conclude the matter if we paid £10m. We decided to pay up."

Much of the Panorama investigation appears to be based on transcripts of interviews conducted by a German public prosecutor investigating Ecclestone. According to Flournoy's evidence, the Ecclestone family trusts earn around £10m in interest every six weeks. Flournoy also told the German prosecutor that although Ecclestone does not receive payments from the trusts, he does receive divorce payments of "around $100m a year" from his ex-wife Slavica.

"She is paying me an amount of money she has," Ecclestone told the Guardian. "It is all absolutely legal and straightforward without any ifs or buts. I am divorced from her, not the trust. I have unfortunately nothing to do with the trust."

A lawyer for the family trusts reiterated that Ecclestone has no control over the management of the trusts and also said there were errors in the transcripts from the German prosecutor.

Ecclestone insists he is "proud" to pay British taxes and said he paid more than £50m in tax last year.
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post #3422 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 09:59 AM
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Active Suspension + Sparks + Vapor Trails + Glowing Brakes + 18" Wheels = romantic images of Formula One’s past Stupidity


That's what happens when the marketing department gets to much power. "**** the racing - how can we make more money?"



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post #3423 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 10:03 AM
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+1 Just gimme my noise. :-)
Sad to say, the glorious sounds of the N.A. will not be coming back anytime soon.mad.gif

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It boggles the mind….

http://en.espnf1.com/f1/motorsport/story/155895.html

Bernie and his accountants make the swindlers on Wall Street look like rank amateurs. Is here any other man on the planet clever enough to get a $100 million per year divorce settlement from his ex-wife? :-)
A graduate course in how to take advantage of the tax code.wink.gif

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post #3424 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 10:07 AM
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20th anniversary of Senna death observed

It is a testament to Aryton Senna's lasting impact on Formula One that the 20th anniversary of his death will be observed this week with five days of commemorations at the Imola track where he had his fatal accident.

Current and past F1 drivers, mechanics, racing officials and fans will pay their respects to Senna and Austrian driver Roland Ratzenberger, who also died at the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix.

"When I was a kid I had all the books, all the videos, (Senna) was the driver I looked up to, way before I even started racing," Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton said shortly before winning the Chinese Grand Prix eight days ago. "He kind of inspired me to even be a driver."

Hamilton was nine at the time of Senna's death.

"It was very difficult for several days to really (accept) your hero's gone," the British driver said.

Senna was a hero to many and is often voted as the greatest F1 driver in history.

He won three Formula One titles - in 1988, 1990 and '91 - all with McLaren. He moved to the Williams team for his tragic 1994 season. Despite his career being cut short when he was 34, his 41 wins stand third all-time behind Michael Schumacher's 91 and rival Alain Prost's 51.

Beyond the numbers, Senna attracted legions of followers for his humbleness and strong Catholic faith.

"He was loved to an unbelievable degree," said Mauro Forghieri, a former car designer for Ferrari and other F1 teams, who was called on as an expert witness in the court trial following Senna's death.

Forghieri recounted how when Senna's coffin was transported back to his native Brazil, it wasn't put in the airplane's luggage hold but rather placed over three rows of the first-class cabin.

"Of course the airline and the pilot were Brazilian," Forghieri told The Associated Press in an interview. "He was considered much more important than a president."

The Brazilian government declared three days of national mourning for Senna and an estimated three million people lined the streets as his coffin was driven into his hometown of Sao Paulo.

"It's one of those things, couple of events in your life that happen where you exactly remember where you've been, what you've done," said four-time defending F1 champion Sebastian Vettel, who was 6 when Senna died.

"I remember that I was watching television with my father and obviously as a child you don't really understand what's going on, but just by the reaction of my father, I obviously got to understand that it was very serious and a big loss for Formula One.

"I think only later on and probably the last couple years, I managed to understand how big the loss was for the sport because I got to work with people that used to know him, (and work) with him," Vettel added. "He was the reason why my father decided to follow Formula One."

For anyone watching, the 1994 San Marino GP was truly a disaster.

Senna died after crashing into a concrete wall at about 300 kph (186 mph) in Sunday's race. Another high-speed crash in Saturday's qualifying killed Ratzenberger, a rookie.

On Friday, the car of Rubens Barrichello went airborne, crashed against the barriers and flipped. The young Brazilian sustained a concussion and amnesia and called his survival a miracle.

Senna had been shocked by Ratzenberger's death and refused to complete qualifying on the Saturday.

On Sunday, shortly after the race restarted following five laps at slow speed behind the pace car after another crash that injured four spectators, Senna's Williams Renault car went straight through the Tamburello turn, a spot with a history of bad accidents.

Senna was transported to a hospital in nearby Bologna and was declared dead four hours later.

"For the people who were there and experienced them, they were three days that will never be forgotten," Forghieri said.

The Italian judicial system debated the cause of Senna's death for more than 10 years, with a probe that led to manslaughter charges against the Williams team's technical director, Patrick Head, and former designer Adrian Newey, for a faulty steering column. They were eventually cleared when the statute of limitations had run out.

The attention around Senna's death brought about safety improvements at the Imola track and throughout F1, resulting in shorter straights, more room around dangerous turns and less powerful engines.

After a memorial mass on pit lane at the Imola track on Wednesday, Forghieri and others will discuss the evolution of safety in F1 at a symposium on Thursday - the exact anniversary of Senna's death on May 1, 1994.

There will also be a memorial football match in Imola, a charity dinner, Kart races and other activities.

The San Marino GP was last run in 2006 before F1 expanded into new markets in Asia and the Middle East, but memories of Senna live on an area of Italy that is known as the cradle of auto racing.
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post #3425 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 10:19 AM
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Who is man enough here to do this?


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post #3426 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 10:23 AM
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Ron Dennis on Senna - Part one: the early years

As McLaren team principal, Ron Dennis worked with Ayrton Senna for six of the most fruitful seasons in the Brazilian's illustrious F1 racing career. Under Dennis' watchful eye, Senna won 35 races, claimed 46 pole positions and achieved all three of his world championship crowns.

Twenty years on from Senna's untimely death, Dennis - now the McLaren Group CEO - reveals some of his favourite stories of working with one of Formula One racing's most beloved drivers…

On Senna turning down McLaren's support in 1982
"I can't remember what he was asking for, whether he was asking for an option, or for an F1 test drive, but I said to him if you give me an option, I'll pay for your Formula Three season. But he made it very apparent, although not rudely, that he was not interested.

"He had the ability and he wanted to be independent. I liked that - well, I didn't exactly like it, but I did respect it. When he tested for us in 1983 I thought to myself, ‘I might just give you a bit of a comeuppance, so I won't be too impressed with what you do in the car. Even if I think it, I will not tell you.' Anyway, we didn't actually have a seat available at the time, so playing it down (his test performance) was much better than playing it up.

"When he tested he came across as very arrogant because he was very keen to get an advantage, and he was making quite sure that the car wasn't damaged by the other youngsters, and was he going to have fresh tyres etc. He was clearly impressive, no question, but he was still young."

On Senna instigating joining McLaren…
"All great drivers realise the importance of the team, and don't just wait but facilitate securing the drive. Ayrton put out the feelers: he saw the team was very competitive and made it very clear that he wanted to join. He reached out and said maybe he could convince Honda to come, and of course that opened the door and I engaged with Honda. Niki (Lauda) had pretty much decided to stop, so there was an attraction for the driver and for the engine. That was when I realised Ayrton as an ally was very useful - he was very politically astute."

…and Prost's reaction
"We had to do the announcement in the Phillip Morris facility outside the paddock at Monza, and I had the chance to look at people's faces. It was the first time I could see Alain was pensive about whether it would work. He had achieved ‘number one' status in the team and suddenly had this young guy whom I am sure he had every knowledge of. Alain was fine with the competition, but deeply suspicious too. He said, ‘Let's just wait and see - this is going to be difficult'."

On initial dealings with Senna and Prost
"I knew we would have a handful with these two drivers, and that we needed to be explicit about what we expected of them. I remember thinking, as I started to explain this to them, ‘these guys are not listening'. But on the third time of telling there was absolutely no doubt and they went into shock and went away to talk about it. They came back and ganged up on me and said I had been unfair and aggressive - that this was not the behaviour they expected. And I said, ‘no, you have both communicated your concerns about having such strong team mates, and the only way this will work is if the team comes first. We will give you equality: Alain, I will ensure you get equality from Honda, and Ayrton, you will get equality of the car and everything, but your behaviour is critical."

On a million dollar coin flip
"Ayrton had a pretty healthy appetite for money. We started to butt heads on money, half a million, and couldn't agree, and this got really tense - it was becoming relationship-threatening. Everything had to be black and white for him and the concept of chance didn't enter his psyche, so I said let's flip a coin. He completely lightened up; this was fun. After a bit of a debate about who would do it, I flipped the coin and won the bet. What neither of us had twigged at the time was that it was a three-year contract, so it was a $1.5 million flip. I know it has been seen as a total disrespect for money, but in fact it was a great respect because it was the only way to break our log jam. After that, everything cascaded and off we went."

On Senna's stunning qualifying lap at Monaco in 1988 when he finished 1.4s faster than team mate Prost…
"When Ayrton explained that lap to me, he went into the surreal: he would claim, possibly accurately, that he was almost oblivious to everything, that everything he did was intuitive and unconscious. It was at that point, when he was trying to explain how he did it, that Prost started to infer that he was only achieving these things with great danger, and that he accepted that danger because he felt God was protecting him. But in reality he was just a phenomenal racing driver."

…and on Senna subsequently crashing out of a dominant lead on race day
"It was a lapse in concentration. We were trying to slow him down, and effectively when you back off in a racing car you lose focus. It was just a lapse, nothing else. He was so angry that he did something really uncharacteristic: he didn't come back to the pits, but went to his flat. He just walked through the circuit and went and sat in his flat. He didn't appear again until later that evening. He was so angry with himself."

On Senna and Prost's intra-team battles to have the best engine
"There was a degree of obsession with Ayrton and Alain over engine selection. In the end there were three engines, Honda would recommend two they thought we should race, and then it came down to a coin flip. Two people had to witness it; it was an internal drama, but it was clearly the easiest way to make sure there was no favouritism."

On Senna and Prost's rivalry igniting at Imola in 1989 when the Frenchman claimed the Brazilian broke a pre-race agreement not to overtake at Tosa on the first lap
"They broke each other's confidences: they were both to blame. They made commitments to each other several times - it was just this came into the public domain. There was tremendous tension and anger.

"I'm not proud of this story, but they were testing at Pembery [in the aftermath] and I flew up. I'm no pussycat, and I reduced both of them to tears. Psychology-wise, if I could force them together by making me the bad guy, then they wouldn't be hostile to each other - they would join up and say, ‘isn't Ron being tough?' It is a delicate thing to get right. Of course it was much easier with Alain and Niki, because the deviousness was less with Niki and Alain. These two were perfectly matched in deviousness. They played every game: they played the national press, they would go to Honda, lots of things. It was challenging."

On appealing for Senna, and against Prost, at Suzuka in 1989. After surviving a mid-race tangle with Prost, Senna won the race only to be controversially disqualified for using an escape road to re-join the track
"I was appealing more against (FIA president) Jean-Marie Balestre (than for Senna), because that was just the French hooking up, as simple as that. Ayrton was stationary for so long, and then did a lap with the nose hanging off, that there was no gain on the competition. He was waved through the road by a marshal with a yellow flag - that was one of the things I pointed out. He set lap record after lap record and ended up winning, and all the while Alain is trying to convince Jean-Marie. The rule was you had to enter the circuit at the point you exited it. Consequently that was the debate: there were a few other things but they were thrown by the wayside. I was obviously emotional because it was such a stitch up. We had footage of so many incidents where cars had left the circuit and re-joined successfully."

On Senna wanting to retire at the end of 1989 as a result of his Japanese Grand Prix disqualification
"He retired - he wrote a note that he wasn't going to race next year. He festered away for a month or two after the last race, and phoned me up and said he wasn't going to race anymore; that this motor racing world was unjust, not fair, amoral. I told him to calm down. His sister was always extremely influential in guiding Ayrton. I obviously spoke to her and his father and really the key was in the end I kept saying to him, ‘if you stop, they've won. This is exactly what they want. You are not winning if you stop, you are losing.'"

On Senna's relationship with Prost improving in 1990, after Prost left McLaren for Ferrari
"In many ways when drivers find themselves out of conflict within months they are best friends, because they are not in each other's immediate vicinity or competing in the same team. It makes sense not to be in conflict with drivers when you are going wheel to wheel - it is much better if there is mutual respect when you are racing closely.

"I don't know if people realise that it is only possible for drivers to be close to each other, to be racing aggressively, when there is mutual respect. When you are racing against someone you don't have respect for you give them wide berths because you don't have any trust for their judgement. So there was always respect, but he was more than happy for Alain to leave the team."

On Senna's infamous first-corner crash with title rival Prost at Suzuka in 1990
"I looked at the traces (from Senna's car), the brake and the throttle pedals, and you didn't need to be Einstein to work out what had happened.

"He came back to the pits, and I said, ‘I'm disappointed in you.' He got it. I didn't have to say any more. It was one of his rare moments of weakness. I don't think it was anything that he was particularly proud of, but it was the finishing touch when pole position was on the wrong side of the road.

"He said, ‘there's no way I'm able to get to that first corner first. If I get to that first corner and I'm not able to get through, I won't be exiting it.' It wasn't a great moment, but he had very few lapses in his life and he was an incredibly principled person - a great human being."
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post #3427 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 10:24 AM
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Who is man enough here to do this?
Of course she's good. She's an IndyCar driver.

No, Mr. Bond. I expect you to die!
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post #3428 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 10:25 AM
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Ron Dennis on Senna - Part two: the later years

On Senna finally scoring a home victory in Brazil in 1991…
"As a Brazilian there was a degree of ‘mechanism' about it - he understood that winning in Brazil would be good for him; it would optimise his commercial position and make him an even greater hero. He had a very strong sense of value, but he was passionate as well. Of course, the crowd went berserk and everybody got caught up in it - but to me it was just another race, it just happened to be in Brazil. You know, people very often ask, ‘what's your favourite race?' and I always answer, ‘the last one we won'. So it was very important to him, but it was just another race to me."

…and then struggling physically on the podium
"All racing drivers want to feel part of the car, to such an extent that they don't want to move; they try to lock themselves in. In Brazil (in 1991) Ayrton cut his circulation to his upper body by tightening the seat belts so much, and that is why he subsequently was in a lot of pain on the podium."

On Senna's tolerance for pain
"I remember in Mexico (in 1991), Ayrton made a rare mistake and inverted himself into the gravel trap and the car was upside down and no one really knew how he was. He was taken to the medical centre and I could hear him screaming with pain.

"Sid (Watkins, F1 doctor) came out of the medical centre with a smile on his face. I said, ‘how is he?' and he said, ‘he's fine, he's not hurt. He's just a little shaken up'. I said I had heard him scream, and he said he had a big stone stuffed in his ear, where gravel had gone right up his helmet and into his ear and was giving him a lot of pain.

"His pain tolerance was an interesting part of his make-up. He had a degree of tolerance when he was driving, but less so when he wasn't. He was very conscious of pain outside the car."

On Senna's dedication to physical fitness
"Niki Lauda started realising post-accident how important fitness was, but Ayrton took it to another level. He knew very well that if he was super fit he would be a better racing driver."

On team mate Gerhard Berger's influence on Senna
"Gerhard gave me the perfect weapon to deal with Ayrton because he brought humour into the team. I would say the concept of telling a joke and Ayrton laughing was not even possible before Gerhard arrived, but then that created a massive ice breaker."

On managing Senna as the competitive advantage ebbed away from McLaren and towards Williams at the end of 1991
"If you're experienced and you know your driver, you know what levers to pull, what to say, how to say it, when to say it etc. If you do a lot of winning together you've got to be prepared to do a bit of losing together. Ayrton won 40 percent of all the races he started for McLaren, better than one in three, which is a tremendous statistic. But at the same time he would always wrestle with not being competitive.

"There was a menu of things I would say to him. If I got really frustrated I'd say, ‘If we weren't paying you so much we could spend more money on the car - Frank (Williams) is not paying his drivers a lot of money.' And then he would say, ‘Yeah but you don't have to be paid a lot of money if you've got a competitive car.' Then I'd say, ‘Hold on a second, let's go back to the fact that this is how much I've paid you over the last three years - if I was spending that on the car…' We'd go round and round. There were lots of levers you pulled."

On his fondest memory of Senna
"He gave me an envelope once - his own personal stationary - and I've still got it at home. When he gave it to me it had $10,000 in it for a bet that I couldn't eat a container of chilli in Mexico. Before he could pull the bet back, I wolfed it down. It was the fourth time that he'd lost a bet, and a big one at that. I can remember him giving me the envelope and saying, ‘I'm never going to bet with you ever again. You have got me into betting, and it's not a good thing to do!'

"It's my fondest memory for two reasons: To get a smile across Ayrton's face wasn't easy, but to get him to part with money with a smile on his face was even more difficult! It was great moment - but I paid for it a couple of days afterwards!"

On Senna having second thoughts about moving to Williams in 1994 towards the end of the 1993 season
"He was hovering, he was really hovering. But he said, ‘I've signed a contract.' I said the one thing about (breaking) a contract is you've got to prove loss, and anyway I'll underwrite anything if there's a problem. And he said, ‘Well, I've made a commitment.' But I had him on the hover on the night of the race (Australia 1993, the final round of the season).

"As we approached our last race together I could see Ayrton was wrestling with loyalty because he was leaving the team. And as disastrous as our Peugeot experience was (in 1994), the moment we had factory engines from Peugeot - which was after he left - he phoned up and said, ‘If you'd done that two months earlier, I'd have stayed'. He just could not see a way to win without having a factory engine."

On why Senna is considered by so many to be the greatest F1 driver of all time
"I think it's because he was so good for all of the period he was on the planet. I can see no positives in the fact that he had an accident and lost his life, but what you didn't see is any decline. You remember he was just unbelievably competitive and then, boom, he's not there."

On what he misses most about Senna
"The fun we used to have. Most of the time it was only Gerhard (Berger), Ayrton and myself (involved in practical jokes), but occasionally a trainer would get roped in. Most people would think I'd remember the winning. But no - that was just doing our job. It wasn't the thing it was all about.

"It wasn't just that we were having fun, it was the sophistication of the fun. What do I mean? Well these practical jokes used to get to such fever pitch.

"I remember after dinner (during a Grand Prix weekend), when one of our group got back to his hotel room, there was nothing in it. Literally nothing - no furniture, no clothes. Nothing. These kind of things are the things I remember the most - the laughter and the fun."

On Senna's enduring influence
"I raised my game because I could see the commitment he brought to his driving. Like any team situation, if someone demonstrates that you can try even harder, then you do. He showed what he was prepared to do to achieve his objectives.

"He raised my game because I think that you try to be as good as the person you are with. I liked his principles - they played to my strengths. He changed Formula One because he raised everybody's game."
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This talk of Senna reminds me of Schumacher. When he tied Senna for number of victories they asked him in the post race interview how it felt. He started to cry.

No, Mr. Bond. I expect you to die!
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Who is man enough here to do this?



I'd pay real money to do that. Unfortunately, I'm probably too much "man" to do it. At 6' 2" 230 lb they'd probably point me to the stock car. Or the pits to move the heavy stuff around. mad.gif
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post #3431 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 10:37 AM
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Who is man enough here to do this?


No one here, I would wager, although I would be happy to burn out the clutch trying. :-)

The G-Forces exerted on your body by a modern F1 car are completely incomprehensible. I recall when Richard Hammond drove Fred's Renault F1 (I think that was the car) car a few years ago. He could barely get it out of the pits. I am sure some of his comments were typical British/Top Gear hyperbole, but still, without prior experience with lesser open wheel, winged cars, I doubt most of us could complete a lap.

But again…sign me up. I would happily turn over my man card to Simona for a chance to drive an F1 car. :-)

BGL
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post #3432 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 10:39 AM
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I'd pay real money to do that.
So would I.
And I would be damn sure to immediately go to a massage therapist to fix my stretched neck muscles (ouch! eek.gif).

Quote:
Unfortunately, I'm probably too much "man" to do it. At 6' 2" 230 lb they'd probably point me to the stock car.
I think that would be true for most of us around here.biggrin.gif

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Or the pits to move the heavy stuff around. mad.gif
That might not be a bad thing to see everything close up....
I am reminded of my Brit drinking buddies I met in Austin last year who did just that.

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Here's the most annoying thing about that video; The Sound.

Annoying because F1 cars don't sound like that anymore. :-(
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Here's the problem.......you can't be the "Team Leader" when your team mate beats you every race.


Hamilton: Sebastian needs to show his leadership inside the Red Bull team now

Lewis Hamilton has come out with some advice for Sebastian Vettel, urging the reigning Formula 1 world champion to show true leadership at Red Bull.

The Milton Keynes based team has been pushing to emerge from its pre-season crisis involving troubled engine supplier Renault.

But at the same time, German Vettel – the reigning quadruple-consecutive drivers’ world champion – has been struggling simply to keep up with his fresh-faced new teammate, Daniel Ricciardo, following the sport’s V6 rules switch.

Further up the grid, Hamilton and his Mercedes have been dominating, but in an interview with Bild am Sonntag newspaper, the 2008 world champion commented on Vettel and Red Bull’s plight.

“As a four time world champion, Sebastian needs to show his leadership inside the team now,” Hamilton is quoted as saying.

“When it comes to the crunch, you are able to show that leadership to your team,” he added.

Indeed, Hamilton expects Vettel and Red Bull – formerly a near-unbeatable combination in Formula 1 – to eventually get back to winning.

“Regardless of the power unit, it’s still a strong car,” said the Briton, referring to the Adrian Newey-penned RB10. “So I don’t believe that the current situation will stay the same.”

Hamilton also commented on his ever-intensifying rivalry with Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg, in the wake of their forceful wheel-to-wheel battle in Bahrain.

“We both know what we are doing,” he said, amid reports the Brackley based team is at odds over whether to rein in their battle with some form of ‘team orders’.

“Nico is fair and aggressive, but not wildly aggressive,” Hamilton said. “Just the right amount. The real problem is that he is faster than ever before.”
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post #3435 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 11:02 AM
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In fairness you can be the team leader when your teammate beats you every race if youre a 4 time World Champion. Not forever but certainly when the other guy just arrived.

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In fairness you can be the team leader when your teammate beats you every race if youre a 4 time World Champion. Not forever but certainly when the other guy just arrived.


It's not in Seb's character to be team leader unless he is winning and then it's a forgone conclusion. He falls into that "position" because of circumstance, not because he steps up and leads. Seb is a "one man team". He has never been a team leader. All he cares about is himself. Hence the ignoring team orders twice.
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Here's the problem.......you can't be the "Team Leader" when your team mate beats you every race.
Let's see how the duel progresses thru the season.wink.gif

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Hamilton: Sebastian needs to show his leadership inside the Red Bull team now
Well considered by Hamilton, showing some maturity.

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It's not in Seb's character to be team leader unless he is winning and then it's a forgone conclusion. He falls into that "position" because of circumstance, not because he steps up and leads. Seb is a "one man team". He has never been a team leader. All he cares about is himself. Hence the ignoring team orders twice.
I wont argue that.

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post #3439 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 11:21 AM
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More comments by Lewis:

Lewis Hamilton has urged F1 to find a way for the drivers to put in more laps in all the practice sessions, not just FP1.

Last time out in China, four drivers, including Hamilton and his team-mate Nico Rosberg, did not bother to set a time in Saturday's final practice.

Added to that, only four drivers reached double figures in their lap count.

The lack of running was due not only a limit on the number of tyres the drivers were given for the weekend but also the five engines per season rule.

"I have sympathy for the people watching maybe just one car going round for the first half an hour - I think it can be managed a bit better," Hamilton told Autosport.

"When I used to turn on Formula 1 I wanted to see people driving around.

"Now I'm among the drivers, when you come into the garage and don't go out I can just imagine [what that's like for the fans].

"We can't have too much mileage on the engine so you're limited to almost 15 or 16 laps in the one session.

"We almost need a free engine and we'd be bolting around; we'd get 30 or 40 laps at least in each session.

"I think it would be good fun for the fans to see, and good for development."

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post #3440 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 11:23 AM
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More on Simona:


Formula 1 is still waiting for the first woman F1 driver to break into the ranks on a consistent and competitive basis.

Over the weekend, Simona de Silvestro, Sauber’s development driver, got her chance to do some mileage with 180 laps behind the wheel of a Formula 1 car at a two-day test around Ferrari’s Fiorano circuit in Italy.

Driving the 2012 C31, which is permitted under F1 testing restrictions, the Swiss was limited to one special tyre compound from Pirelli with no lap times being sent out by the team, although the former IndyCar driver was impressed with the machinery beneath her.

The rules say that mileage completed in a non-current F1 car does not count towards earning a super licence, the licence all drivers need in order to compete in F1. This was purely an exercise in getting her used to the feel of an F1 car and to get some mileage. She will have a further opportunity to test in June.

“What impressed me most was the downforce of the car and the braking,” said Silvestro, speaking on Saturday. “When I did my first lap the brakes were cold, but even then the deceleration was beyond what I had experienced before.

“The g-forces are significantly higher compared to what I was used to in IndyCar. Overall, I’m happy with my first day in a Formula 1 car.”



After completing 112 laps on Saturday, the twenty-five year old went on to rack up 180 laps by the close on Sunday and said she felt more confident as the test progressed.

“Everything feels more familiar to me compared to yesterday, when things were new to me,” she added. “We made some changes to the set-up, which gave me the opportunity to get a feeling for those changes and learn how the car reacts to them.

“I can say that I already feel confident in the car, which is very positive.”

De Silvestro’s next test in the Sauber C31 will take place from 25th June to 27th June in Valencia.

The other female driver active in F1 at the moment, Suzie Wolff, does have a licence to take part in official sessions and will get her chance to rack up some more mileage for Williams at two Grands Prix weekends on Friday mornings in Silverstone and Hockenheim.

It can only be positive for the sport to have two women active on the driving front. There have been female drivers in F1 in the past; Maria de Filippis in the 1950s, Lella Lombardi in the 1970s while Giovanna Amati attempted to qualify for some races in the 1990s with Brabham.

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I brought up DeSilvestro over a month ago and said I really like her and would like to see her do well. All I got from you guys then was grief. Thanks. rolleyes.gif

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Al Unser, Jr. won the Toyota GP Pro Celebrity Race. It was great to see him pass Kyle Petty for the win. biggrin.gif

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I brought up DeSilvestro over a month ago and said I really like her and would like to see her do well. All I got from you guys then was grief. Thanks. rolleyes.gif

That's 'cuz we would rather have Danica go to F1. :-)
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post #3444 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 12:33 PM
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That's 'cuz we would rather have Danica go to F1. :-)
lol Only as a grid girl.

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That's 'cuz we would rather have Danica go to F1. :-)
Being as she's doing so well in NASCAR, time to move on to bigger challenges.
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post #3446 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 12:52 PM
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lol Only as a grid girl.

She would need an update to her software to do that.

My moobs are bigger than her boobs. She does have a better butt, though. :-)
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post #3447 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 12:58 PM
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She would need an update to her software to do that.

My moobs are bigger than her boobs. She does have a better butt, though. :-)
I don't know what to say. But somehow I feel like Tack will think of something.

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I brought up DeSilvestro over a month ago and said I really like her and would like to see her do well. All I got from you guys then was grief. Thanks. rolleyes.gif

I felt the same way about Danica Patrick in Indy Car racing. Although she is arguably the best female driver in the history of motor racing, she is far from world class. Ever since Danica burst upon and then mostly faded from the scene, when the name of another young female aspirant comes up, with the suggestion that she has a chance to be the First Great Female Driver, my eyes glaze over. Like you, I would love for DeSilvestro to do well but years of disappointment with Danica have made me wary.
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post #3449 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 01:08 PM
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I don't know what to say. But somehow I feel like Tack will think of something.
I'm sure there will be a picture or pie chart.
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post #3450 of 6626 Old 04-28-2014, 01:10 PM
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I brought up DeSilvestro over a month ago and said I really like her and would like to see her do well. All I got from you guys then was grief. Thanks. rolleyes.gif
If I recall I gave her a thumbs up back then.
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