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oink's Avatar oink 09:59 AM 05-06-2014
Brawn + Ferrari ????


Specialist Ferrari journalist and author Leo Turrini on Tuesday reports that Ross Brawn has this week been at Maranello and Fiorano.

Turrini, who, according to F1 colleague Mathias Brunner, “knows everything when it comes to Ferrari” and recently predicted Stefano Domenicali’s departure, said the recently-retired former Mercedes boss was seen at the fabled Italian team’s headquarters and test circuit.

Brawn, 59, has played down the prospects of a return to formula one, but many insiders believe the F1 paddock has not seen the last of the highly-rated Briton.

As technical director, he was a key player at Ferrari during the highly-successful Michael Schumacher era, spanning multiple years and titles.

Turrini joked on his Quotidiano blog that Brawn may just be in the Italian region to “buy bananas” or “buy a Ferrari,” but there is another obvious hypothesis.

“Marco Mattiacci is a very intelligent person,” he wrote, “and perhaps also very persuasive.”




oink's Avatar oink 10:14 AM 05-06-2014
Cost Reductions?

The way forward suggested by the big teams is by regulation and standardisation of certain parts on the car - a ban on tyre warmers, restriction on creative brake ducts etc. The small teams say that what the big teams have suggested is not enough.

PF1 puts forward five ways that may or not make a major difference to F1 finances...

1. Ban Front and Rear Interconnected Suspensions
F1 has spent an extraordinary amount of money emulating the kind of suspension used successfully by the Williams team in the early 1990s - active suspension. Active suspension constantly adjusts the car to the correct angle (a bit like the fabulous old Citroen hydro-pneumatic suspension) for each corner) to give the perfect ride height.

FRICS, as it is known, does this passively through a great deal of complex and difficult-to-set-up engineering. Mercedes and Lotus were early on the technology but the larger teams are constantly evolving their own solutions. Active suspension would be much cheaper to install and has far greater road-car relevance than the current system

This is a suggestion that has been put forward already and commentators like Martin Brundle have characterised it as a return to "Scalextric" racing. But right now with the removal of downforce cars are going slower round the turns and so this would increase lap times, and help the smaller teams.

2.Limit Aero Changes
The intensely complicated front wings of cars have little or no road car relevance and cost millions to research and develop. Luca Montezemolo is right to rail against this enormous investment in fiddly bits of carbon fibre that in the hands of some drivers don't survive Turn 1 (although now front wings are narrower, the attrition rate is much less).

Limit teams to five changes of the aero package a year. This won't stop creativity, it will just concentrate the teams' ideas. Alternatively, let them change what they like but cut back the wind tunnel and CFD time to a quarter of the current level.

3. It's Simulator OR Testing
The top teams have very sophisticated bespoke simulators that have taken years to assemble and perfect. These have been done in response to the lack of testing.

Give the smaller teams who don't have a simulator eight extra test days. Or let teams decided which they'd sooner have. F1 teams would have to weigh up the balance of advantage. Do they keep their simulator or go for the extra testing?

Alternatively The American sports teams run a successful draft system where the bottom team gets first draft pick of college players, levelling the playing field to a small degree. In F1, the team finishing last in the constructors championship would get the most test days. An alternative for F1 would be for teams to receive a number of core test days - 12 - and then the top team gets no more, second place gets two extra, third gets three extra, fourth four extra, etc.

4. Bernie Pays For New GPs
When the Commercial Rights Holder of F1 suggests a new GP, almost always so they can get a nice fat sanctioning fee, in future they have to pick up the teams' travel and accommodation costs for the first five years. It's all very well suggesting races such as the Azerbaijan Grand Prix but with no history of F1 support the first few years are like the Turkish GP - races in front of empty grandstands.

Most businesses have to invest money before they see a return, yet with new GPs Bernie gets a payback straight away and the host country picks up the enormous cost of building the circuit. Having to pay the teams for the first five years will certainly concentrate the mind about which GP should be added to the calendar.

5. Ban Remote Data Teams
With a limit on the number of personnel at grands prix, the big teams have built up shadow data teams back at the HQ to monitor the telemetry on cars and work out strategy options as the races unfold. At McLaren they have 'Mission Control' which looks like the Houston equivalent with rows of strategists, engineers looking at vehicle dynamics and aerodynamicists.

These could be cut without a significant loss in the spectacle of the race

lobosrul's Avatar lobosrul 10:22 AM 05-06-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

Cost Reductions?

The way forward suggested by the big teams is by regulation and standardisation of certain parts on the car - a ban on tyre warmers, restriction on creative brake ducts etc. The small teams say that what the big teams have suggested is not enough.

PF1 puts forward five ways that may or not make a major difference to F1 finances...

1. Ban Front and Rear Interconnected Suspensions
F1 has spent an extraordinary amount of money emulating the kind of suspension used successfully by the Williams team in the early 1990s - active suspension. Active suspension constantly adjusts the car to the correct angle (a bit like the fabulous old Citroen hydro-pneumatic suspension) for each corner) to give the perfect ride height.

FRICS, as it is known, does this passively through a great deal of complex and difficult-to-set-up engineering. Mercedes and Lotus were early on the technology but the larger teams are constantly evolving their own solutions. Active suspension would be much cheaper to install and has far greater road-car relevance than the current system

This is a suggestion that has been put forward already and commentators like Martin Brundle have characterised it as a return to "Scalextric" racing. But right now with the removal of downforce cars are going slower round the turns and so this would increase lap times, and help the smaller teams.

2.Limit Aero Changes
The intensely complicated front wings of cars have little or no road car relevance and cost millions to research and develop. Luca Montezemolo is right to rail against this enormous investment in fiddly bits of carbon fibre that in the hands of some drivers don't survive Turn 1 (although now front wings are narrower, the attrition rate is much less).

Limit teams to five changes of the aero package a year. This won't stop creativity, it will just concentrate the teams' ideas. Alternatively, let them change what they like but cut back the wind tunnel and CFD time to a quarter of the current level.

3. It's Simulator OR Testing
The top teams have very sophisticated bespoke simulators that have taken years to assemble and perfect. These have been done in response to the lack of testing.

Give the smaller teams who don't have a simulator eight extra test days. Or let teams decided which they'd sooner have. F1 teams would have to weigh up the balance of advantage. Do they keep their simulator or go for the extra testing?

Alternatively The American sports teams run a successful draft system where the bottom team gets first draft pick of college players, levelling the playing field to a small degree. In F1, the team finishing last in the constructors championship would get the most test days. An alternative for F1 would be for teams to receive a number of core test days - 12 - and then the top team gets no more, second place gets two extra, third gets three extra, fourth four extra, etc.

4. Bernie Pays For New GPs
When the Commercial Rights Holder of F1 suggests a new GP, almost always so they can get a nice fat sanctioning fee, in future they have to pick up the teams' travel and accommodation costs for the first five years. It's all very well suggesting races such as the Azerbaijan Grand Prix but with no history of F1 support the first few years are like the Turkish GP - races in front of empty grandstands.

Most businesses have to invest money before they see a return, yet with new GPs Bernie gets a payback straight away and the host country picks up the enormous cost of building the circuit. Having to pay the teams for the first five years will certainly concentrate the mind about which GP should be added to the calendar.

5. Ban Remote Data Teams
With a limit on the number of personnel at grands prix, the big teams have built up shadow data teams back at the HQ to monitor the telemetry on cars and work out strategy options as the races unfold. At McLaren they have 'Mission Control' which looks like the Houston equivalent with rows of strategists, engineers looking at vehicle dynamics and aerodynamicists.

These could be cut without a significant loss in the spectacle of the race

"If you can't afford to be in F1, don't be in F1". I can't remember who said it, but I pretty much agree. However, I do agree with point #1. If teams are getting around the "no active suspension rule" by making their passive systems essentially do the same thing, the rule seems pointless. Don't agree with points 2 or 3 at all. 4, OK I agree with that. Bernie gets rich while everyone else has to wait years for the payout... seems very unfair. 5, I had no idea about that. How much of an advantage is it really though? Its not as if they can adjust the cars aerodynamics during the race.
oink's Avatar oink 10:22 AM 05-06-2014
They don't make 'em like they used to:


“It would be unfair to compare today’s drivers (with Ayrton Senna), as they have a completely different socialization to back then.

“Today they grow up with their IT gadgets so they have never developed that down-to-earth race fanaticism – that fighting for every inch and sacrificing everything for it. It is a different generation.”

This was the quote from Red Bull Racing director Helmut Marko, when asked by Formula 1.com for its Senna tribute section.

It is an interesting concept, an observation from a man in his 60s who has been around racing for many years and who raced himself at a time when drivers were regularly killed. Marko himself lost an eye racing.

Do modern F1 drivers project passion? And as a consequence, does the crowd at the track and the TV audience have less passion to feed off?

As part of the ongoing discussion about F1 and what it stands for, this argument is worth noting, as the drivers are the ultimate showcase for F1, its most popular asset. Marko, who has overseen the progress of almost 100 young drivers through the Red Bull development programme, is suggesting that modern F1 drivers don’t project the passion for the sport that drivers like Senna did 20 years ago, “that down-to-earth race fanaticism – that fighting for every inch and sacrificing everything for it”.

I suspect that drivers like Fernando Alonso would agree with this.

Drivers arrive in F1 now having been on a conveyor belt since karting, funded by wealthy fathers or sponsors and thus highly professionalised from a young age, studying telemetry and data from the earliest days of karting. Are they motorsport fanatics or just drivers on a conveyor belt? That is Marko’s thesis.

Does seeing the world through a series of gadgets create a mood of disengagement in drivers, as many parents worry that it does in their children?

Marko contends that the young drivers of today are reared on Play Station games, iPads and gadgets and as a result they see F1 as a kind of technical exercise. No doubt the fact that the cars are safer -which can only be a good thing – plays a part in their mindset.

The flip side of this, of course, is that social media makes today’s drivers more accessible to the fans than drivers of Senna’s era. They can have a direct connection with the drivers.

And comments on sites like this one, show the level of interest and passion that fans have for their favourite drivers and ones they dislike.

He goes on, “If I were to pick three attributes for Senna it would be speed, charisma and ruthlessness. He was a driver with such a huge level of commitment – in all his races – and somebody who acquired an unbelievable charisma over the years.

“On the driving side you probably would find one or another driver who could match Ayrton, but charisma is something that you either have or you don’t have."

oink's Avatar oink 10:24 AM 05-06-2014
oink's Avatar oink 10:33 AM 05-06-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by lobosrul View Post

"If you can't afford to be in F1, don't be in F1". I can't remember who said it, but I pretty much agree. However, I do agree with point #1. If teams are getting around the "no active suspension rule" by making their passive systems essentially do the same thing, the rule seems pointless.
+1
Since F1 seems to have adopted this "must be roadcar relavent" mentality, it seems like a no-brainer.

Quote:
Don't agree with points 2 or 3 at all. 4, OK I agree with that. Bernie gets rich while everyone else has to wait years for the payout... seems very unfair. 5, I had no idea about that. How much of an advantage is it really though? Its not as if they can adjust the cars aerodynamics during the race.
+2
slowbiscuit 10:52 AM 05-06-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by BGLeduc View Post

Wow…I hd no idea they were doing this two weeks before the 500.

http://www.indianapolismotorspeedway.com/grandprixofindianapolis/eventinfo/52373-Event-Information/

I can't say I follow IndyCar much anymore. They fell off my radar after the IRL/CART split. but this certainly looks interesting.

Yeah I mentioned before that those not watching IndyCar are missing some good racing, they are mostly street and track now not too many ovals left.
Bond 007's Avatar Bond 007 01:00 PM 05-06-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbiscuit View Post

Yeah I mentioned before that those not watching IndyCar are missing some good racing, they are mostly street and track now not too many ovals left.
Totally agree. The racing is very tight. Usually lots of passing. They refuel on pitstops. They are going to standing starts in some of the races now. You never know who's gonna win. The last several years Championships have come down to the last race. And the cars still sound great.
F1 will always be my real passion. And while IndyCar is not as exotic as F1, I hate to say, in many ways the racing is better.
zeus33's Avatar zeus33 01:28 PM 05-06-2014
Renault preparing 'significant' engine upgrade

Renault's customer team's, which include Red Bull, Toro Rosso, Lotus and Caterham, are all set to receive a major performance boost for the Spanish Grand Prix this weekend.

The power unit supplier is preparing a "significant improvement" to its software programme which it believes will deliver enhanced "driveability and overall performance" according to head of trackside operations, Remi Taffin.

"The Spanish Grand Prix will be the second stage of the performance evolutions we kick-started in China," he explained.

"While there are not many visible hardware upgrades, there are significant improvements to the software that should further enhance driveability and therefore overall performance.

"Yet again we have also moved forward in energy management and efficiency so we are hopeful our upward trend will continue in Barcelona," he added.

"We have worked hard on these areas in the past three weeks and we therefore go to Spain more confident of a good performance."

The upgrade could give Red Bull the push it needs to compete on a level-playing field with Mercedes as the Barcelona circuit isn't power dependent, therefore Red Bull's chassis and downforce advantage could be enough to see them challenging for the win.

zeus33's Avatar zeus33 01:33 PM 05-06-2014
McLaren set to try Lotus-style double nose in Spain

McLaren could fit a Lotus-style double-pronged nose concept to their 2014 cars during this weekend’s Spanish Grand Prix.

After a notable dip in form for the Woking based team, AFP news agency reports that bosses Eric Boullier and Jonathan Neale have recently overseen a raft of new signings.

Dan Fallows’ aborted move from world champions Red Bull is now the subject of a legal dispute, but Peter Prodromou is definitely joining in 2015.

And AFP claims that other prominent Formula 1 aerodynamicists – Sauber’s Tony Salter and Lotus’ Guillaume Cattelani – have also been signed by McLaren.

“McLaren is composed of brilliant individuals, they have been winning many races and have been fighting for championships,” said Boullier.

“I think it is just to make sure that the same people are working together in one way with strong leadership, strong guidance and at least it will help them to recover their past success,” he added.

Now, international publications Omnicorse and Speed Week report that McLaren’s 2014 car could be set for a dramatic aerodynamic overhaul this weekend in Barcelona.

Earlier, Williams’ Pat Symonds said he suspected other teams would be looking into designing their own versions of the innovative asymmetrical nose used at the front of the 2014 Lotus.

“Lotus have been haemorrhaging employees from all departments over the last few months, so I think all of the teams had an idea of where they were going,” he said.

Omnicorse claim that the solution has been in the wind tunnel at Woking for some time.

“We have also looked at several interpretations [of the double nose],” admitted Symonds, “but some of them simply did not fit with our car.”

zeus33's Avatar zeus33 01:36 PM 05-06-2014
McLaren passing Mercedes information to Honda?

Toto Wolff suspects McLaren will pass on knowledge about Mercedes' turbo V6 to its 2015 engine supplier Honda.

This year, Mercedes is in the awkward situation of being contractually bound to supply its industry-leading new technology to McLaren, whilst knowing the British team is already setting up its new works relationship with Honda.

When asked by Germany's Auto Motor und Sport how much information about Mercedes has already passed from Woking to Japan, team boss Eric Boullier smiled whilst insisting: "Nothing!"

Indeed, correspondent Tobias Gruner insists Mercedes is "using every means" to prevent Honda from learning from McLaren's final year with Mercedes.

But Wolff admitted: "I am convinced that what McLaren learns is being exchanged with Honda in the context of what is allowed."

He said McLaren's own telemetry will allow Honda engineers to see information about things like torque, power delivery and driveability.

"And also what is needed for cooling, hydraulics, electronics -- all these things are of course passed on," said Wolff.

Wolff said he trusts McLaren - famously fined $100 million by the FIA for the 2007 'spygate' scandal - to stick to what is allowed as it moves from Mercedes to Honda power.

"We have a very clear understanding of what can be disclosed and what cannot, but I am convinced that they acknowledge the partnership and the confidentiality that they enjoy as a client today," he added.

Wolff also acknowledged that even the transfer of some information will not overcome Honda's inherent "disadvantage" of only returning to formula one in 2015.

"Honda has a natural disadvantage," he said, "because they are coming into the sport when everyone else has already been there (in the V6 era) for a year," he said.

At the same time, he also thinks rivals Ferrari and Renault will be closer to Mercedes next year.

"Our concepts are very different," said Wolff, "but the others will certainly catch up a lot, because they have information about how our engine runs when they see it on the track.

"Next year the field will automatically be closer," he added.

Bond 007's Avatar Bond 007 01:53 PM 05-06-2014
McLaren will pass on everything possible to Honda. Just like any other team would. But they better not cross that line. They'll get a royal smackdown this time.
BGLeduc's Avatar BGLeduc 02:16 PM 05-06-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

McLaren will pass on everything possible to Honda. Just like any other team would. But they better not cross that line. They'll get a royal smackdown this time.

Let's flip it around. When a team is buying engines from a supplier, I would expect that there are some engineers that go along with the deal. I recall a lot of Japanese engineers in the McLaren garage when Honda were powering the McLarens. Wouldn't those engineers also be privy to certain aspects of the customer cars that would find there way back to the mother ship, and perhaps get shared with other customer teams?

The difference now of course is the Merc is not just an engine supplier.

It occurred to me that it was perhaps a tactical error on McLaren and Honda's part to announce the deal one year early. Surely Merc does not feel compelled to make sure that McLaren gets all the good stuff when they will soon be powered by an engine supplier that has demonstrated some serious competency in the past.

It will be fun to see how this all plays out.
zeus33's Avatar zeus33 03:00 PM 05-06-2014
Watch Mankind's Pursuit of Speed





Bond 007's Avatar Bond 007 03:20 PM 05-06-2014
Thanks Zeus. DVR is set.
gwsat's Avatar gwsat 04:04 PM 05-06-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Thanks Zeus. DVR is set.

Thanks indeed! Just setup my TiVo to record the show.
zeus33's Avatar zeus33 08:09 PM 05-06-2014
Meet the Rezvani Beast, an American-built road and track attacker










The custom supercar game sports a lot of players and not much success; for every Koenigsegg or Pagani who've managed to build a real business, there's a dozen one-name outfits that show off a design or two then never get off the bench. The latest entry comes from an American designer, who's targeting a more realistic goal rather than reinventing the carbon-fiber wheel.

It's called the Rezvani Beast, designed by California builder Fardees Rezvani. Based on the chassis of the Ariel Atom, the Beast wraps a lightweight and stylish carbon-fiber body around the bare-bones track car, along with an interior that makes the Beast a more comfortable place to spend time on the road. (There's even an optional windshield, something traditional Atom buyers consider a buzzkill.)

"We wanted to get back to the basics," Fardees Rezvani told Yahoo Autos. "We wanted to get back to a raw feel, a car with real tactile feedback, with a lightweight chassis." And while the Atom is popular with people who want a track toy, Rezvani said it held little appeal elsewhere. "The Atom is fast up to 80 mph, but then it would hit a wall because of wind and aerodynamics. We can give this car a world-class design, but keep it ultralight and streamlined — make it appealing to road drivers."

By using carbon fiber for the body, Rezvani says the Beast maintains the Atom's performance with only a 200-lb. penalty for wrapping the frame. In top spec form, the Beast uses an upgraded version of the Atom's four-cylinder engine that's been given both a supercharger and turbocharger for a total of 500 hp, enough grunt to make the sprint to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds. Rezvani will also offer a 315-hp edition, both using the six-speed manual of the Atom.

While many spec supercar builders ask for seven-figure sticker prices, Rezvani says the Beast was designed for a far more affordable price point — $120,000 in base form, a price reachable thanks to 3-D printing and contract assembly in California, with a target of 10 Beasts produced in the first year. "We wanted to keep the costs low," he said. "Our profit margins are small, but our goal was to make it appealing to the average auto enthusiast." In a field of exotic machines and imaginary business plans, the Rezvani Beast stands out for trying to keep it real.

zeus33's Avatar zeus33 08:19 PM 05-06-2014
Entry-Level McLaren P13 Rendered and Looking Handsome

With the introduction of the P1 and 650S, McLaren is continuing to expand its profitable lineup into smaller segments. Its latest and greatest creation will be slot somewhere underneath the current 650S, to compete with cars like the Porsche 911 and Jaguar F-Type. Better known internally as the P13.

All that we’ve heard and seen surrounding the new P13 has been all but a mystery. But thanks to X-Tomi Designs, we’re able to get a better idea of exactly what the new P13 could very well look like. And it looks pretty good.





Like the P1 and 650S, the new McLaren lineup from here on out is expected to carry that curvy new fascia. As seen here on the P13 rendering. Other features include a new set of body lines, a more sloped roof, and a fastback styling reminiscent of the new F-Type Coupe.

The design is pulled together well, and is likely to sport the same twin-turbo V8 found on the 650S when it hits production, albeit with a little less power. Prices should be somewhere close to $195,000, which is expensive, but all just speculation at this point. We’ll just have to wait for the real thing.

zeus33's Avatar zeus33 08:29 PM 05-06-2014
Senna's black and gold special: Flickr photo of the day






It's hard to believe that just last week, on May 1, it had been 20 years since the great Ayrton Senna died in a crash during the Formula One Grand Prix at Imola. As a rookie, the young Brazilian made his mark during a torrential downpour at the Monaco Grand Prix in 1984. Had it not been for politics favoring Frenchman Alain Prost, Senna would have won the race driving for the woeful Toleman team. Still, a second place was far more than the car deserved, and that performance propelled Senna into a competitive Lotus race seat, driving the John Player Special 97T -- a machine that delivered Senna's first win in Portugal (again in the rain) and a further seven pole positions. Today, the car remains almost as iconic as the Brazilian that pedaled it.

Tack's Avatar Tack 08:50 PM 05-06-2014












oink's Avatar oink 12:51 AM 05-07-2014
Looking at these cars remind me just how exposed drivers appear to be.eek.gif

Watched the Hunt vs. Lauda program tonite.
Good stuff...the most entertaining part is the Ferrari and McLaren Team Managers are STILL battling each other after all these years.biggrin.gif
zeus33's Avatar zeus33 09:42 AM 05-07-2014
I know someone posted a pic of this, but here is more info:


An Inside Look at the Insanely Complex Formula 1 Steering Wheel







The modern Formula 1 car is among the most amazing machines ever made. And when you’re going wheel-to-wheel with someone like four-time world champ Sebastian Vettel at 180 mph, you can’t take a hand off the wheel to do, well, anything. Every task a driver might need to do, every bit of information he might need to know, is quite literally at his fingertips.

The modern Formula 1 steering wheel is, therefore, the most amazing ever made. It is, in every way, the nerve center of the car.

That’s because an F1 car has dozens of parameters that can be adjusted on the fly, but only by the driver. Although telemetry provides a nonstop stream of data to engineers on the pitwall and at team HQ, the driver has sole control over things like differential settings, the air-fuel mix, and the torque curve. All of these settings can change several times during a race, or even a lap. Adjustments must be made while keeping both hands on the wheel and both eyes on the track, which is why a modern F1 wheel might have 35 or more knobs, buttons and switches flanking a small LCD screen introduced this season. Drivers also use small paddles behind the wheel to shift up and down as many as 4,000 times in a race, and a third paddle to engage the clutch.

The PCU-8D LCD screen, made by McLaren Electronics, is 4.3 inches wide with a resolution of 480 x 272 pixels. It can display as many as 100 pages of info and the data–everything from engine RPM and oil temperature to current lap speed and how many laps remain–can be configured by the driver or his engineer. This year marks a transition to the new technology, with some teams–including Infiniti Red Bull Racing–sticking with the older, simpler, PCU-6D for one more season.

So What Do All Those Buttons Do, Anyway?

The photo above shows the steering wheel from the Sauber C33, the cars Esteban Gutiérrez and Adrian Sutil are campaigning this season. Teams are notoriously tightlipped about technology, and none of the teams we reached out to had anything at all to say about them, but Sauber has published a diagram explaining everything the wheel does (we’ve mentioned the color of each button to help you find it):

Yellow N button: Selects neutral from 1st or 2nd gear.
BRKBAL (brake balance) rotary switch: Adjusts the front and rear brake balance.
Black Box button: Confirms the driver’s intention to come to the pits.
Blue and orange S1/S2 buttons: These can be programmed for various funcutions.
Entry rotary switch: This allows the driver to make changes to corner entry settings of the differential.
Orange and green BRK-/BRK+ buttons: These change the brake balance between a programmed position and the current BRKBAL rotary position.
IGN (ignition) rotary switch: Controls ignition timing.
White ACK (acknowledge) button: Acknowledges changes in the system.
PREL (preload) rotary switch: Controls the preload differential offset torque.
Red Oil button: Transfers oil from the auxiliary tank to the main tank.
Black BP (bite point) button: Activates the clutch bite point finding procedure.
DRS (drag reduction system) button, upper left edge of the wheel: Activates the rear wing flap in the DRS zone.
Red PL (pit lane) button: Activates the pit lane speed limiter, limiting the car to the designated pit lane speed limit (typically 100 km/hr).
Black R button: Activates the driver radio transmission.
SOC rotary switch: Controls the state of charge of the ERS energy storage system, whether the system is generating or consuming energy.
Pedal rotary switch: Changes the pedal map dictating how the accelerator pedal responds to inputs.
Fuel rotary switch: Controls the rate of fuel consumption.
Black OT button: Activates configurable performance maps to assist the driver in overtaking or defending.
Tire rotary switch: Tells the ECU and other systems what type of tire the car is running on.
BBal-/BBal+ switches: These are used to make fine adjustments to the brake balance offset.
MFRS (multi-function rotary switch): This allows the driver and engineers to control a variety of systems that don’t require a dedicated buttons. They include engine modes (PERF), rev limiter (ENG), air-fuel ratio (MIX), turbo-compressor (TURBO), corner exit differential (VISCO), MGU-K recovery limits (BRK), MGU-K boost limits (BOOST), dashboard options (DASH), cruise control (CC, disabled for qualifying and the race), shift type (SHIFT), and the clutch bite point offset (CLU).
White -10/+1 buttons: These allow quick navigation of maps from the MFRS dial.
That’s a lot to process, and it doesn’t even include the pages of data that can be relayed through the LCD screen. More information isn’t always a good thing, which is why most teams let each driver decide which wheel they prefer– the older style with the simpler display or the new wheel with the LCD. That said, the LCD screens have a distinct advantage, in that the driver knows exactly that’s going on, something that saved Nico Rossberg’s bacon when his car’s telemetry system failed just before the race in China. With no information from the car, engineers had to ask Rossberg for periodic updates on fuel consumption and other information. The Mercedes AMG Petronas driver eventually grew annoyed by the repeated queries and asked his engineers to kindly shut up and let him get on with the business at hand–taking second place behind teammate Lewis Hamilton.

In the video below, Mercedes AMG Petronas drivers Nico Rossberg and Lewis Hamilton explain the steering wheels they used during the 2013 season.


zeus33's Avatar zeus33 09:51 AM 05-07-2014
Ferrari struggling with lack of grip due to design defect in too narrow F14T

Ferrari are enduring yet another below par start to their season, and the popular theory is that the new V6 turbo engine built by the Maranello outfit is down on power and overweight, but it is now emerging that the F14T is also plagued with a major design flaw which is hampering downforce.

Autosprint have clamed that Ferrari’s 2014 challenger “suffers from a congenital defect in the design” which “to put it in a nutshell, is too narrow.”

However there is an additional problem facing Ferrari. Autosprint claim that sources within Maranello have revealed that in the effort to package the F14T as aggressively and effectively as possible, the extreme narrowing of the side-pods has sacrificed downforce.

In other words engineers have failed to optimise the balance between downforce and streamlining the F14T, too much emphasis on the latter being the root of the problem.

The issue is reminiscent to the problems suffered by Sauber last year with their C32, which was tightly packaged, but sacrificed valuable downforce as a result of the narrower sidepods.

This would explain why the F14T is quick to step out of line in medium fast corners, having caught out Fernando Alonso and more often Kimi Raikkonen on a number of occasions this season during race weekends and in testing. It has also proved to be quite a handful in the wet.

The engine issue, where the too small turbo is a problem and has no quick fix as the V6 power unit freeze is now well and truly implemented, with Mercedes clearly enjoying an advantage in this area. Autosprint suggest that Ferrari are expected to test solutions to the problem, with new wider sidepods on the list of items to be tested during free practice for the Spanish Grand Prix this weekend.

oink's Avatar oink 10:01 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeus33 View Post

third paddle to engage the clutch.
This implies a manual transmission.confused.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeus33 View Post

Ferrari struggling with lack of grip due to design defect in too narrow F14T

Ferrari are enduring yet another below par start to their season, and the popular theory is that the new V6 turbo engine built by the Maranello outfit is down on power and overweight, but it is now emerging that the F14T is also plagued with a major design flaw which is hampering downforce.

Autosprint have clamed that Ferrari’s 2014 challenger “suffers from a congenital defect in the design” which “to put it in a nutshell, is too narrow.”

However there is an additional problem facing Ferrari. Autosprint claim that sources within Maranello have revealed that in the effort to package the F14T as aggressively and effectively as possible, the extreme narrowing of the side-pods has sacrificed downforce.

In other words engineers have failed to optimise the balance between downforce and streamlining the F14T, too much emphasis on the latter being the root of the problem.

The issue is reminiscent to the problems suffered by Sauber last year with their C32, which was tightly packaged, but sacrificed valuable downforce as a result of the narrower sidepods.

This would explain why the F14T is quick to step out of line in medium fast corners, having caught out Fernando Alonso and more often Kimi Raikkonen on a number of occasions this season during race weekends and in testing. It has also proved to be quite a handful in the wet.

The engine issue, where the too small turbo is a problem and has no quick fix as the V6 power unit freeze is now well and truly implemented, with Mercedes clearly enjoying an advantage in this area. Autosprint suggest that Ferrari are expected to test solutions to the problem, with new wider sidepods on the list of items to be tested during free practice for the Spanish Grand Prix this weekend.
Ferrari Seems Opportunistic:

Ferrari are confident that Kimi Raikkonen will start delivering results for the Maranello team sooner rather than later, despite the Finn's mediocre start to the year.

Raikkonen has been outpaced by team-mate Fernando Alonso for the majority of the year, with a seventh place in the season-opener in Australia his best result.

After four races, the 2007 Drivers' Championship winner has only 11 points, while Alonso is third overall behind the Mercedes drivers Nico Rosberg and Lewis Hamilton with 41 points.

It has been suggested that Raikkonen perhaps isn't as motivated as he should be and though the Finn quickly quashed those claims, undoubtedly he has been below his best so far this year.

Technical Director James Allison, though, remains confident that he will soon prove his class.

"With Fernando we've seen an extraordinary level of performance [this year], scavenging every possible point at every possible opportunity. Kimi is [also] working extremely well with the team, collaborating with the engineers, helping us to drive this car forwards. He has class written all over him and in a very short space of time, I'm sure we will also see the results of that on the track," Allison confirmed.

"Where did we see the real performance level of the car? Bahrain or China?

"It's a mistake to think in those terms, because it wasn't the same car at the two tracks. Between those two races, we improved the car quite substantially, so not only did the track characteristics change, so did our car," he explained.

"We are learning how to get performance out of this new set of regulations and hopefully to make this car more competitive," he continued. "The key to a successful season is to keep improving your car at every race.

"If we can do that, bringing a meaningful amount of performance to every one of those races, we will keep seeing steps forward. And that will define what is the true F14 T, not just one single race," he concluded on the eve of the start of the European season.

Bond 007's Avatar Bond 007 10:28 AM 05-07-2014
They only use the clutch at the start of the race and when leaving the pits. Assuming they don't stop on track.
Tack's Avatar Tack 10:29 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeus33 View Post

I know someone posted a pic of this, but here is more info:


An Inside Look at the Insanely Complex Formula 1 Steering Wheel




Seems like it would suck some of the fun out of it.
Bond 007's Avatar Bond 007 10:33 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tack View Post

Seems like it would suck some of the fun out of it.
Seems like it would suck a lot of the fun out of it. I don't see how they do it. The controls on the wheel would have to be absolutely commited to memory.
Tack's Avatar Tack 10:34 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

They only use the clutch at the start of the race and when leaving the pits. Assuming they don't stop on track.

Or during a spin. smile.gif

Of course, if you're Senna, you also bang reverse to get out of the way and get going again.



Bond 007's Avatar Bond 007 10:36 AM 05-07-2014
Right. If they dont engage it during a spin the car will die.
Tack's Avatar Tack 10:37 AM 05-07-2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Right. If they dont engage it during a spin the car will die.

And break expensive stuff.
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