It's Back: The Broadcast Flag. - Page 4 - AVS Forum

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HDTV Programming

optivity's Avatar optivity
08:17 AM Liked: 12
post #91 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 10,907
Joined: Sep 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVFanAtic
It's not your data. That's where your argument is wrong.

And considering how few people use Bitorrent or know what it is - and how insecure it is as every tracker knows your IP even after you download - one would have to be financially nuts to take the risk in this day and age.

It's much easier to pay your cable company $10 for a DVR instead of the $7 they charge you for a HD STB Box.

For $3, most will go that route - not Bitorrent.
Broadcast protection comes down to one thing: money. Content providers are "paranoid" about HD formats being copied and shared on the Internet. My assumption is the number of people who are capable of doing this or participate in these activities is small compared to the number of legitimate cable/satellite subscribers who just want to watch TV/DVDs in their home. Hollywood's desire to "squeeze" every last nickel they can from their audience is restrictive to the point of being punitive to those buying the service. If they continue to push the limits of these policies eventually the consumer will stop buying the programming and associated A/V equipment they cannot fully use. Rather than punish us for the criminal activities of others, they should prosecute those who violate their copy protection policies.
adb's Avatar adb
08:41 AM Liked: 11
post #92 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 2,640
Joined: Jan 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by donotremove
See, it is MY data if I paid for it. Just because you've been brainwashed into believing so, does not mean that the copyright holders own the physical piece of property that I bought. That's like saying it's not my magazine or it's not my book, since I can't legally republish them. See how silly that sounds?
It is not your data. You paid for the use of it but you didn't buy the data. You own the magazine but you don't own the content. We are constantly reminded by the news media that "any reproduction without their express written consent is prohibited".
Emaych's Avatar Emaych
08:50 AM Liked: 36
post #93 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 3,565
Joined: Aug 2003
optivity:
CAUTION: there you go trying to approach this in some sort reasoned lets-look-at-this-logically kind of way. Discussions involving extreme and ill-designed over-reactions based on false premises should not have to expand to incorporate sanity -- it really is outside the domain covered here, but I'm sure you knew that -- you're just trying to derail this juggernaut, aren't you?
optivity's Avatar optivity
09:07 AM Liked: 12
post #94 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 10,907
Joined: Sep 2004
Sometimes a "voice of reason" must be heard... ;)

not that it matters :rolleyes:
Mntneer's Avatar Mntneer
09:16 AM Liked: 14
post #95 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 2,742
Joined: Mar 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVFanAtic
And all equipment makers are NEVER naive enough to state their equipment will work with standards not in effect at the time the equipment was put to market (In fact many things are brought to market that will not work with specs in already in use in the market).
HP... a proponent of BR... was. Remember their little DVD+RW fiasco?

If I buy an advertised "HDTV Monitor," and then buy an advertised "HD Movie" (via BR or HD-DVD) and don't get "HD", then guess what.... you WILL see lawsuits start to fly.

We are letting Content Producers dictate the development and operation of delivery systems. A FIRST in history that will, IMHO, hamper future technological advancements and backfire in the faces of the Content Producers.
optivity's Avatar optivity
09:24 AM Liked: 12
post #96 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 10,907
Joined: Sep 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mntneer
HP... a proponent of BR... was. Remember their little DVD+RW fiasco?

If I buy an advertised "HDTV Monitor," and then buy an advertised "HD Movie" (via BR or HD-DVD) and don't get "HD", then guess what.... you WILL see lawsuits start to fly.

We are letting Content Producers dictate the development and operation of delivery systems. A FIRST in history that will, IMHO, hamper future technological advancements and backfire in the faces of the Content Producers.
This seems more like “par for the course†to me. The “masses†shall be permitted to enjoy what the politicians and captains of industry allow us to have.
foxeng's Avatar foxeng
11:33 AM Liked: 40
post #97 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 14,032
Joined: May 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by adb
It is not your data. You paid for the use of it but you didn't buy the data. You own the magazine but you don't own the content. We are constantly reminded by the news media that "any reproduction without their express written consent is prohibited".
Same thing when you "buy" a shipping box from the post office. Have you ever read what was on those boxes? They plainly state those boxes remain property of USPS. I am not talking about those bulk mailing boxes, but those little 6 inch by 2 inch by 3 inch boxes you mail small stuff like watches and rings and stuff like that. Check it out. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw it.
paintit77's Avatar paintit77
01:10 PM Liked: 10
post #98 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 1,444
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVFanAtic
And Kei throws out the red herring as well. Pot calling kettle black?

The spectrum the broadcasters are giving back WILL BE AUCTIONED OFF TO REDUCE FEDERAL DEBT. It will not be given to first responders or anything of the like so don't even go there.

The USA could have had HD in the late 80s. HBO had announced a fulltime C Band HDTV to be delivered by the end of 1988. But the digital age came around and instead of making 2 changes as Japan was forced to do, the FCC decided to wait and go with a state of the art digital system from the beginning. If they had not, the spectrum you crave would be even less considering what it takes to broadcast analog HDTV.

In terms of Katrina, considering the Mayors office did not even have an Iridium Sat Phone and had to break into an Office Depot to steal a Cisco Router to get an internet connection - and the fact that I am better prepared every time I travel - shows where the breakdown was in that situation. And lets not forget the Hyatt Hotel they camped out in had at minimum 2 or more routers they could have used.

If it weren't for the National Media coming into Louisiana and Mississippi with their Satphones and the like - and lending them to the public trying to make communication with the outside world, it would have been even more of a mess.

So throw out your Red Herrings, but the truth is all providers will protect their content. I don't like it, but I don't own it either.

And when someone buys a DVI to VGA convertor from you to get rid of their EID information and that device is blacklisted and license revoked, are those people going to sue you for a device that does not work any longer to avoid Copy Protection?
So if I decided to download a movie from the Internet, they have a right to sue me but I don't have the right to sue them when they obsolete my HD equipment? Stealing is wrong no matter who is doing the stealing.
Not one of you statements are plausible. You are wrong. The internet and very smart people are going to correct Hollywood and their stealing from me. When all of their DRM efforts fail, then you and all of their defenders will pay right along with them. The reason, content will cost you more because you decided to defend their actions with your pocket book. All they had to do was give us a full bandwidth over Component Converter Box and quit enacting laws to decide what we do with our airwaves. But they aren't smart enough to do that. They want to steal from us and the CE manufacturers want to keep selling us over and over again. The broadcast flag is a joke with be defeated with a simple software program. I am not concerned. AACS will take some time and HDCP has been cracked. But I would still like to sue Hollywood or at least take ABC, FOX, CBS and the like off of our airwaves to teach them a lesson.

Please continue you weak attempts at defending Hollywood.
kenglish's Avatar kenglish
01:18 PM Liked: 31
post #99 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 5,412
Joined: Jan 2000
"Same thing when you "buy" a shipping box from the post office. Have you ever read what was on those boxes? They plainly state those boxes remain property of USPS. I am not talking about those bulk mailing boxes, but those little 6 inch by 2 inch by 3 inch boxes you mail small stuff like watches and rings and stuff like that. Check it out. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw it."

Shhhhhh!
Where do you think most internet businesses get the boxes they UPS and FedEx their stuff in? ;)
Keenan's Avatar Keenan
03:52 PM Liked: 448
post #100 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 28,506
Joined: Aug 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mntneer
If I buy an advertised "HDTV Monitor," and then buy an advertised "HD Movie" (via BR or HD-DVD) and don't get "HD", then guess what.... you WILL see lawsuits start to fly.
HDTV and HD movies are 2 entirely different things, mixing the 2 together and then adding in a discussion about the broadcast flag just muddies the issue. HiRez DVDs such as BRD or HD-DVD have nothing to do with the broadcast flag.
Keenan's Avatar Keenan
03:59 PM Liked: 448
post #101 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 28,506
Joined: Aug 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by paintit77
So if I decided to download a movie from the Internet, they have a right to sue me but I don't have the right to sue them when they obsolete my HD equipment?
You can sue them all you want, but I doubt seriously if you will get any sort of satisfactory resolution. The argument isn't valid, equipment of all kinds becomes obsolete everyday, are you going to make Ford buy you a new car when your 1980 Mustang doesn't pass new smog regulations?
Jimbo Moran's Avatar Jimbo Moran
04:12 PM Liked: 10
post #102 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 1,451
Joined: Jun 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan
You can sue them all you want, but I doubt seriously if you will get any sort of satisfactory resolution. The argument isn't valid, equipment of all kinds becomes obsolete everyday, are you going to make Ford buy you a new car when your 1980 Mustang doesn't pass new smog regulations?
Keenan,

I see you haven't dealt with Paint much. If you are not with him you are a network shill, I gave up trying to convince him. FWIW I agree with you. :)
Keenan's Avatar Keenan
06:53 PM Liked: 448
post #103 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 28,506
Joined: Aug 2003
:)
optivity's Avatar optivity
08:47 PM Liked: 12
post #104 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 10,907
Joined: Sep 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan
You can sue them all you want, but I doubt seriously if you will get any sort of satisfactory resolution. The argument isn't valid, equipment of all kinds becomes obsolete everyday, are you going to make Ford buy you a new car when your 1980 Mustang doesn't pass new smog regulations?
If you're getting 25 years out of a car... more power to you, but this does not negate the issue that broadcasters can't seem to agree to a standard that TV manufacturers can build on and provide the consumer with the confidence his $5000 TV will last more than a couple of years. I guess the best solution is to quit spending money on fancy A/V equipment and cut our astronomical cable TV bills.
Kei Clark's Avatar Kei Clark
08:58 PM Liked: 15
post #105 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 4,416
Joined: Aug 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by optivity
If you're getting 25 years out of a car... more power to you, but this does not negate the issue that broadcasters can't seem to agree to a standard that TV manufacturers can build on and provide the consumer with the confidence his $5000 TV will last more than a couple of years. I guess the best solution is to quit spending money on fancy A/V equipment and cut our astronomical cable TV bills.
This is the best line of attack when you write your representatives. They fret over a $50 box that they feel the governement may have to provide to the roughly 15% of the country that gets their TV OTA in order for the transition to happen, so let them know how they are going to obsolete several HDTV's on which you invested several thousand of your hard earned dollars. The economic issue is one that the congress people will understand as I'll wager that they have no idea what HDCP does. Heck, throw in the fact that you're already bleeding from high gasoline prices, and can't spare any more to upgrade just to benefit the broadcasters.
Jimbo Moran's Avatar Jimbo Moran
09:36 PM Liked: 10
post #106 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 1,451
Joined: Jun 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kei Clark
Heck, throw in the fact that you're already bleeding from high gasoline prices, and can't spare any more to upgrade just to benefit the broadcasters.
Gas is back under $2 per gallon in OKC today, better leave that portion off your letter. :)
Kei Clark's Avatar Kei Clark
09:41 PM Liked: 15
post #107 of 302
10-10-2005 | Posts: 4,416
Joined: Aug 1999
Quote:
Gas is back under $2 per gallon in OKC today, better leave that portion off your letter.
That's cheap! I haven't seen gas under $2 in I don't know how long...I think it was back at the turn of the century.
HDTVFanAtic's Avatar HDTVFanAtic
12:06 AM Liked: 10
post #108 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 8,143
Joined: Mar 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by donotremove
See, it is MY data if I paid for it. Just because you've been brainwashed into believing so, does not mean that the copyright holders own the physical piece of property that I bought. That's like saying it's not my magazine or it's not my book, since I can't legally republish them. See how silly that sounds?

You're right. You do sound silly.

It's not your data. And you can resell the original book or magazine - but you can't sell copied of them, but that's it.

You were granted no rights when given something over the air for free.

If you don't believe that, find out what happens when you hack a Directv or Dish system - ask OJ.

Nor do you own your copy of Windows (from your arguements you probably never paid for it in the first place). You lease 1 copy. Get over it.
HDTVFanAtic's Avatar HDTVFanAtic
12:16 AM Liked: 10
post #109 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 8,143
Joined: Mar 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kei Clark
This is the best line of attack when you write your representatives. They fret over a $50 box that they feel the governement may have to provide to the roughly 15% of the country that gets their TV OTA in order for the transition to happen, so let them know how they are going to obsolete several HDTV's on which you invested several thousand of your hard earned dollars. The economic issue is one that the congress people will understand as I'll wager that they have no idea what HDCP does. Heck, throw in the fact that you're already bleeding from high gasoline prices, and can't spare any more to upgrade just to benefit the broadcasters.
LOL!!!

You guys have no sense of history.

This is why change in Broadcasting takes forever - backward compatibility.

We had to settle for an inferior color system for backward compatibility to Black and White.

We had to settle for an inferior FM System for compatiability to FM Mono as Stereo isn't really stereo - it's L+R minus L-R to get the two channels - and thats why you get multipath problems.

Compatibility is what slows things to a halt and gives us worse than possible solutions.

Guess what, MPEG2 ATSC is a given OTA. It won't be going MPEG4 just like the satellite systems are doing for your precious compatiability issue - and we will have macroblocking for ages because of it.

At least do some historical searches on compatibility before you try that argument.
HDTVFanAtic's Avatar HDTVFanAtic
12:19 AM Liked: 10
post #110 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 8,143
Joined: Mar 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by paintit77
So if I decided to download a movie from the Internet, they have a right to sue me but I don't have the right to sue them when they obsolete my HD equipment? Stealing is wrong no matter who is doing the stealing.
Not one of you statements are plausible. You are wrong. The internet and very smart people are going to correct Hollywood and their stealing from me. When all of their DRM efforts fail, then you and all of their defenders will pay right along with them. The reason, content will cost you more because you decided to defend their actions with your pocket book. All they had to do was give us a full bandwidth over Component Converter Box and quit enacting laws to decide what we do with our airwaves. But they aren't smart enough to do that. They want to steal from us and the CE manufacturers want to keep selling us over and over again. The broadcast flag is a joke with be defeated with a simple software program. I am not concerned. AACS will take some time and HDCP has been cracked. But I would still like to sue Hollywood or at least take ABC, FOX, CBS and the like off of our airwaves to teach them a lesson.

Please continue you weak attempts at defending Hollywood.

And I suppose your attempts to sue Microsoft for obsoleting your computer equipment have been successful?

Where are the Class Action Lawsuits against them that MUST have happen?

Please.

After seeing these arguments, I understand even more why Hollywood has taken the stance it has because many have no concept of intellectual rights.
Kei Clark's Avatar Kei Clark
01:36 AM Liked: 15
post #111 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 4,416
Joined: Aug 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVFanAtic
LOL!!!

You guys have no sense of history.

This is why change in Broadcasting takes forever - backward compatibility.

We had to settle for an inferior color system for backward compatibility to Black and White.

We had to settle for an inferior FM System for compatiability to FM Mono as Stereo isn't really stereo - it's L+R minus L-R to get the two channels - and thats why you get multipath problems.

Compatibility is what slows things to a halt and gives us worse than possible solutions.

Guess what, MPEG2 ATSC is a given OTA. It won't be going MPEG4 just like the satellite systems are doing for your precious compatiability issue - and we will have macroblocking for ages because of it.

At least do some historical searches on compatibility before you try that argument.
Your point is? I found no relevance in your history lesson.

The history as it is being written now:

The Brodcasters could have lobbied for some type of standard during the development of a national HDTV standard, but they didn't. In fact, many were dragged like petulant kids to where we are today.

What is being proposed is not going the improve the quality of HDTV one iota. The content producers are asking the public to accept restrictions that have never been imposed, copy protection was not allowed by FCC mandate (ahh..the good old days when rules benefit the tax paying public). This proposal will obsolete millions of perfectly good monitors and early adoption TVs and buy no advantage to the viewers that are being forced to pay the tab for the fiasco in the form of license fees costing us millions.

The argument that content would improve is laughable, that would take cutting off the source of real revenue, commercials.

P.S. How ironic is it that HDCP will actually decrease the number of captive eyeballs for OTA broadcasters.
George Thompson's Avatar George Thompson
07:07 AM Liked: 10
post #112 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 1,114
Joined: Oct 2002
Taking a Stand Against Piracy
Digital Media
Source: NBC Universal

by Chris Steib

Before you finish reading this article, your laptop will be outdated and your virus protection program will need to download new definitions. Moments ago, a new digital video camera came off the assembly line that is smaller and has more memory than the one you bought last week – and it is disposable.

In case you were wondering, the cell phone you bought yesterday is no longer the coolest one in the office.

And that’s the good news.

Technology is advancing at an unprecedented rate, providing new ways for companies and consumers to develop, share, and receive information and entertainment. Ten years ago, you would have needed an industrial-sized cart to bring a video camera, still camera, computer, and cellular phone on a business trip. Now they all fit into a single device, all in the palm of your hand.

In fact, there’s a chance you are reading this article on such a gadget right now. The rapid development of personal and business technology is nothing new to the media and entertainment industry – it’s what has allowed our company to evolve and thrive over the years. Today, however, this technology is being exploited to pilfer confidential information and steal copyrighted content such as movies, music, television programming, and books.

By the time you finish reading this article, approximately 600,000 songs will have been transferred illegally over the Internet using peer-to-peer networks (P2Ps) like Grokster and KaZaA. In that same amount of time, approximately 4,200 movies will be stolen – a number that continues to increase rapidly as technology developers build systems with faster transfer rates, more bandwidth, and larger storage capacities.

On the one hand exciting, new technology means new revenue streams, new distribution paths for film and television programming, and a generally broader market for our product. New technology means we can provide our content to our customers when, where, and how they want it. Bigger, faster, better, and more: all the things a growing industry needs. But without appropriate protection for copyrighted material, this new technology becomes the goose that lays the rotten egg.

NBC Universal is no stranger – and certainly no adversary – to new technology. Our company’s history spans nearly 100 years of innovation, starting in 1906 when Universal Pictures founder Carl Laemmle built his first nickelodeon theater in Chicago. Two decades later, NBC established the nation's first permanent radio network and, in 1956, the world’s first compatible color broadcast. Keeping the momentum of a century of groundbreaking new technology, NBC Universal announced in 2004 the launch of the nation’s first all-digital broadcast network, NBC Weather Plus.

Today, as part of General Electric – one of the largest and oldest developers of technology in world, tracing back to Thomas A. Edison – NBCU is making the transition from analog to digital and is at the forefront of the hi-definition revolution. From our Theme Parks division, to Film, to the TV Studios, NBC Universal welcomes and embraces the progress of technology, as long as it is safe, legal, and respects the intellectual property (IP) of individuals and companies.

One of the many myths about IP theft is that it only affects the entertainment industry, as if music and movies are the only content being transferred illegally. True, a significant percentage of stolen material comes from these industries, but consider: 35% of all new software deployed in 2004 was illegally copied and distributed. Additionally, a recent issue of Business Week exposed the global counterfeit industry – which doesn’t just include Louis Vuitton knock-offs, but also unsterilized imitations of the cholesterol-fixer-upper, Lipitor. A test on the phony version of the drug – which was sold widely in the U.S. – revealed similar active ingredients to Pfizer’s copyright-protected product.

Pharmaceuticals is a terrifying addition to the list of patent- and copyright-dependent industries that are being ripped off by IP theft – a list that accounts for more than 20% of the Gross Domestic Product of the United States. When factoring in all these industries, IP theft and counterfeiting left a $250 billion hole in the U.S. economy each year.

As these and other staggering numbers become more widely known, and the overarching effects of IP theft become more apparent, so will the fight against those who violate U.S. copyright laws. Working with media and entertainment companies (including NBCU), the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) has mobilized a PR campaign to discourage digital theft – with a more aggressive operation designed to seek out and punish piracy offenders.

As a result of a series of lawsuits, the MPAA has taken a stand against online trafficking of stolen television shows and movies by completely shutting down such illegal venues as ShunTV and Elite Torrents. The latter of these piracy proliferators – which boasted nearly 8.5 million registered users – was responsible for the illegal distribution of the latest Star Wars film, Revenge of the Sith, even before its theatrical debut.

On Monday, June 27, the content industry had a significant victory in one of the most difficult battles over peer-to-peer theft, when the Supreme Court announced its decision in the MGM vs. Grokster case. The Court ruled that file-sharing services can, in fact, be held responsible if they intend for their customers to use software primarily to swap songs and movies illegally. "We hold that one who distributes a device with the object of promoting its use to infringe copyright...is liable for the resulting acts of infringement by third parties," wrote Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter. Although this is a huge step forward in the fighting digital content theft, it is by no means the conclusion; P2P networks will continue to seek legislative protection in their efforts to legitimize a business model that the Supreme Court has agreed is predicated on theft. Throughout this process, it is critical that lawmakers understand the irreversible impact of IP theft and the potentially devastating effect piracy has on the U.S. economy.

The advancement of technology can neither be halted nor feared, and NBC Universal will continue to embrace it with the same eagerness and pragmatism the company has employed over the last century. But with these industry-shaping innovations comes great responsibility – both on the part of the company and the consumer. In order to foster the progress of technology and ideas, perpetrators and proliferators of digital theft must be punished, and intellectual property – the foundation of all innovation – must be protected.
kenglish's Avatar kenglish
07:45 AM Liked: 31
post #113 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 5,412
Joined: Jan 2000
And, to make matters even worse..........

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=155&sid=117086

The whole world is GTHIAH (Going to ..........Handbasket) :) .
Mntneer's Avatar Mntneer
07:51 AM Liked: 14
post #114 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 2,742
Joined: Mar 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan
HDTV and HD movies are 2 entirely different things, mixing the 2 together and then adding in a discussion about the broadcast flag just muddies the issue. HiRez DVDs such as BRD or HD-DVD have nothing to do with the broadcast flag.
They're not 2 entirely different things. One requires the other. To view a movie in High Definition, you need a High Definition display.

No, BR and HD-DVD have nothing to do with the flag itself, but are apart of the larger DRM discussions.
optivity's Avatar optivity
08:23 AM Liked: 12
post #115 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 10,907
Joined: Sep 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kei Clark
Your point is? I found no relevance in your history lesson.

The history as it is being written now:

The Brodcasters could have lobbied for some type of standard during the development of a national HDTV standard, but they didn't. In fact, many were dragged like petulant kids to where we are today.

What is being proposed is not going the improve the quality of HDTV one iota. The content producers are asking the public to accept restrictions that have never been imposed, copy protection was not allowed by FCC mandate (ahh..the good old days when rules benefit the tax paying public). This proposal will obsolete millions of perfectly good monitors and early adoption TVs and buy no advantage to the viewers that are being forced to pay the tab for the fiasco in the form of license fees costing us millions.

The argument that content would improve is laughable, that would take cutting off the source of real revenue, commercials.

P.S. How ironic is it that HDCP will actually decrease the number of captive eyeballs for OTA broadcasters.
Finding out first hand the "copy restrictions" Time Warner chooses to enforce with their CableCARDs compelled me to cut my cable bill from $158 to $62 per month. Since Time Warner has enjoyed a monopoly in my area for the past 30 years I don't believe they noticed or care. I'm pretty sure none of my local or state representatives care either.
hdtv_moron's Avatar hdtv_moron
08:44 AM Liked: 10
post #116 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 556
Joined: Feb 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by George Thompson
Taking a Stand Against Piracy
Digital Media
Source: NBC Universal

by Chris Steib

Before you finish reading this article, your laptop will be outdated and your virus protection program will need to download new definitions. Moments ago, a new digital video camera came off the assembly line that is smaller and has more memory than the one you bought last week – and it is disposable.
....
Hogwash. Look at the source.

Look everyone that are IP rights proponents on this forum have totally gone off the deep end.

Copyrights (and the closely related patents and trademarks) were invented to encourage the sharing of information in order to promote the overall good of society. This concept is based on the common sense fact that once an idea is public it is ridiculous to claim ownership. Knowlege, once shared (and any form of information media) CANNOT be OWNED. What a ridiculous concept! The size of the police force needed to enforce restrictive copyright laws can't be justified economically. You cannot arrest the majority of the populace for breaking a law the majority don't believe as valid. The framers of copyrights inherently knew this and are obviously much smarter than most copyright proponents here on this forum are. This fact alone is being played out in the cat vs mouse war of **AA vs pirates, p2p sharers, etc.

Note the root benefactor here in the sharing of information is _SOCIETY_ not the rights of indefinite and unlimited profits to the originators of the material. The idea was to allow LIMITED monopolies in exchange for the benefit to SOCIETY. Again the root of the concept was framed with society (people, public, etc. - all used synonymously here). This was a great idea since now under the framework of law the encouragement of an individual or coprporation to "give up their ownership" of information would be protected (as much as the legal system is capable of doing) for a LIMITED TIME. The invention of technology does not change the simple fact that public information cannot be economically protected. P2p piracy alone can be argued as _proof_ of this concept.

The concept of 100 year copyrights, the elimination of fair use, etc. is a political revolution of rich vs poor that smacks of fascism. The cooperation and collusion of the federal government in this process is almost a bulls-eye target in the argument that we are already a fascist state.

But I suppose no one will notice until the jack-booted thugs of a federal police kick down your door for watching a movie you bought and not paying for each play (which _IS_ the whole reason for the DRM movement - THE long term **AA goal) of some movie you were duped into thinking you had the right to watch whenever you wanted (by simply not putting any disclaimer about it in the packaging of the material - something that happens today).

The tragedy is there appeare to be people here in this very forum who thinks that this is totally valid and acceptable.

Amazing.
optivity's Avatar optivity
08:55 AM Liked: 12
post #117 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 10,907
Joined: Sep 2004
Eh, this is nothing more than a guise to make "law-abiding" subscribers pony up some more cash so the Hollywood elites like Tom Cruise and Steven Spielberg can buy another mansion or two or three or ....
donotremove's Avatar donotremove
08:58 AM Liked: 10
post #118 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 213
Joined: Jun 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVFanAtic
You're right. You do sound silly.

It's not your data. And you can resell the original book or magazine - but you can't sell copied of them, but that's it.
You can't republish a magazine and sell it as your own, but you can make personal copies of the individual articles for your own personal use. Or do you think they should outlaw Xerox machines?

Quote:
You were granted no rights when given something over the air for free.

If you don't believe that, find out what happens when you hack a Directv or Dish system - ask OJ.
Huh? Who do you think the airwaves belong to? The broadcasters? You do realize that government is made FOR the people, don't you? They are supposed to act on our behalf, not on the behalf of a few dozen broadcasters making a ridiculous bluff. Your OJ analogy is bunk. DirecTV is not broadcasting over the public airwaves. It's sending encrypted data from a proprietary satellite directly to a proprietary dish.

Quote:
Nor do you own your copy of Windows (from your arguements you probably never paid for it in the first place). You lease 1 copy. Get over it.
I'm glad you are happy that you can't legally sell your used copy of Windows. Next, I think Congress should pass a law disallowing you from selling your old books and magazines, or from reading one you didn't buy without the express written consent of the copyright holders. Those used book store and library pirates have got to be stopped! They are putting the publishing industry out of business!
foxeng's Avatar foxeng
10:42 AM Liked: 40
post #119 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 14,032
Joined: May 2002
When did the American Communist Liberty Union join this thread?
donotremove's Avatar donotremove
10:48 AM Liked: 10
post #120 of 302
10-11-2005 | Posts: 213
Joined: Jun 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng
When did the American Communist Liberty Union join this thread?
About the same time that Americans for Facism did I would presume.

See? It can work both ways. Why not lay off these insipid comments and focus on the issue at hand.

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