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post #271 of 4224 Old 09-29-2006, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by CHDinCT View Post

You're a shill for the cable companies

Right, get a clue.
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post #272 of 4224 Old 09-29-2006, 04:44 PM
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Now watch the cable companies sue to not pay franchise fees to cities.

Then cities will raise property taxes to make up for lost revenues.

But the prices of cable bills will be no different and cable companies and ATT will still charge taxes.

FiOS is suppose to be in some parts of Southern California. Maybe only data, not FiOS TV. Wonder if they charge taxes.
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post #273 of 4224 Old 09-29-2006, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Samuel_M View Post

FYI...this just in from Governor Schwarzenegger's office.

Gov. Schwarzenegger Signs Groundbreaking Bill to Increase Competition for Cable TV, Ultimately Lower Prices for Consumers

Gov. Schwarzenegger announced the signing of AB 2987 by Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez (D-Los Angeles) that increases the number of competitors in the cable television market and will lead to decreased costs for the people of California.

Increased competition will translate into better service and lower prices for everyone, said Gov. Schwarzenegger. This bill will add another significant player into the cable television marketplace and help speed the spread of new and innovative technologies across the state.

Specifically, the bill allows telecommunications companies to receive a single permit to deliver Internet and television services to homes and businesses instead of having to apply for individual permits with cities and counties.

URL: http://gov.ca.gov/index.php?/press-release/4190/




Now maybe AT&T will have some incentive to actually start laying cable. Of course, the law doesn't go into effect until January 1st.
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post #274 of 4224 Old 09-29-2006, 10:22 PM
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Now maybe AT&T will have some incentive to actually start laying cable. Of course, the law doesn't go into effect until January 1st.

Since the site is trying to reign in my exuberance by not letting me post 12 smiles, I'll add another 3 just to spite them
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post #275 of 4224 Old 10-02-2006, 08:36 AM
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Now watch the cable companies sue to not pay franchise fees to cities.

Then cities will raise property taxes to make up for lost revenues.

But the prices of cable bills will be no different and cable companies and ATT will still charge taxes.

AT&T can legally only charge taxes that it is legally allowed to -- in other words, if a tax is no longer required/collected, they can't keep collecting it from consumers.

Yes, I expect cities to do something to replace lost revenue. So what? Consumers have to pay it one way or another.

Not sure what you mean when you ask whether FIOS will collect taxes.

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post #276 of 4224 Old 10-02-2006, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by wco81 View Post

Now watch the cable companies sue to not pay franchise fees to cities.

Then cities will raise property taxes to make up for lost revenues.

But the prices of cable bills will be no different and cable companies and ATT will still charge taxes.

FiOS is suppose to be in some parts of Southern California. Maybe only data, not FiOS TV. Wonder if they charge taxes.

So did you read the Bill ?? It specifically says that the cities still receive their franchise fees from the State. All the parties agreed with that, Telco's and Cable, to sue to stop payment of franchise fees would require a change to the Bill and would not sit well with the State Legislature that brokered the Bill.
Here's the applicable section of the Bill,

"The bill would provide that cities, counties, cities and counties,
or joint powers authorities would receive state franchise fees in
exchange for the use of public rights-of-way for the delivery of
video services provided within their jurisdictions, based on gross
revenues, pursuant to a specified formula."

Laters,
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post #277 of 4224 Old 10-02-2006, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Samuel_M View Post

FYI...this just in from Governor Schwarzenegger's office.

Gov. Schwarzenegger Signs Groundbreaking Bill to Increase Competition for Cable TV, Ultimately Lower Prices for Consumers

Gov. Schwarzenegger announced the signing of AB 2987 by Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez (D-Los Angeles) that increases the number of competitors in the cable television market and will lead to decreased costs for the people of California.

Increased competition will translate into better service and lower prices for everyone, said Gov. Schwarzenegger. This bill will add another significant player into the cable television marketplace and help speed the spread of new and innovative technologies across the state.

Specifically, the bill allows telecommunications companies to receive a single permit to deliver Internet and television services to homes and businesses instead of having to apply for individual permits with cities and counties.

URL: http://gov.ca.gov/index.php?/press-release/4190/


For those of us who reside in rural areas, I'll believe it when I see it. My local mom & pop cable company will not adjust their prices downward because there is no threat of competition because my local phone carrier (AT&T) will not spend the resources to provide Lightspeed or any other wireless technology here.
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post #278 of 4224 Old 10-02-2006, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by N.B. Forrest View Post

For those of us who reside in rural areas, I'll believe it when I see it. My local mom & pop cable company will not adjust their prices downward because there is no threat of competition because my local phone carrier (AT&T) will not spend the resources to provide Lightspeed or any other wireless technology here.

No, and that's not new, and that's not changing any time soon. Rural areas will never be as well-served as urban ones.

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post #279 of 4224 Old 10-03-2006, 08:06 AM
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No, and that's not new, and that's not changing any time soon. Rural areas will never be as well-served as urban ones.

Never is a long time. I'll give one example of something that could deliver TV programming to rural areas in the near term. I'm not talking about a farm in the middle of Kansas, but a community with a couple thousand people in a close geographic area.

Wi-Max rollout is starting in earnest. Sprint/Nextel has chosen it as the next generation wireless solution, in addition to companies like clearwire that already are deploying Wi-Max hi speed internet solutions. If Wi-Max can indeed deliver anywhere near the 100mbps that it claims, over a distance of several miles, you have the possibility of video distribution. Of course, this all depends on how many individual streams one tower could support, but you get the idea.

The history of telecommunications, especially the recent history, has demonstrated that it's all about sending more data faster over longer distances. There is no reason why this will all of a sudden stop. At some point, I would guess 10 years even in the most remore areas, high speed access including video will be a given. IMHO.
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post #280 of 4224 Old 10-03-2006, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by rnowicki View Post

Never is a long time. I'll give one example of something that could deliver TV programming to rural areas in the near term. I'm not talking about a farm in the middle of Kansas, but a community with a couple thousand people in a close geographic area.

Wi-Max rollout is starting in earnest. Sprint/Nextel has chosen it as the next generation wireless solution, in addition to companies like clearwire that already are deploying Wi-Max hi speed internet solutions. If Wi-Max can indeed deliver anywhere near the 100mbps that it claims, over a distance of several miles, you have the possibility of video distribution. Of course, this all depends on how many individual streams one tower could support, but you get the idea.

The history of telecommunications, especially the recent history, has demonstrated that it's all about sending more data faster over longer distances. There is no reason why this will all of a sudden stop. At some point, I would guess 10 years even in the most remore areas, high speed access including video will be a given. IMHO.

Still, if Wi-max lives up to the hype and is commercialized, it will be deployed to rural areas last. Just plain economics, which no politician can change by fiat.

Chris
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post #281 of 4224 Old 10-03-2006, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by rnowicki View Post

Wi-Max rollout is starting in earnest. Sprint/Nextel has chosen it as the next generation wireless solution, in addition to companies like clearwire that already are deploying Wi-Max hi speed internet solutions.

This is amusing considering Sprint had broadband wireless in Chicago years ago, and it failed miserably. IIRC, they failed to consider signal issues with these things called "trees" near the customer's premise.
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post #282 of 4224 Old 10-04-2006, 07:06 AM
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Never is a long time. I'll give one example of something that could deliver TV programming to rural areas in the near term. I'm not talking about a farm in the middle of Kansas, but a community with a couple thousand people in a close geographic area.

Wi-Max rollout is starting in earnest. Sprint/Nextel has chosen it as the next generation wireless solution, in addition to companies like clearwire that already are deploying Wi-Max hi speed internet solutions. If Wi-Max can indeed deliver anywhere near the 100mbps that it claims, over a distance of several miles, you have the possibility of video distribution. Of course, this all depends on how many individual streams one tower could support, but you get the idea.

The history of telecommunications, especially the recent history, has demonstrated that it's all about sending more data faster over longer distances. There is no reason why this will all of a sudden stop. At some point, I would guess 10 years even in the most remore areas, high speed access including video will be a given. IMHO.

Assuming WiMax isn't a gigantic flop (and I'm not at all convinced it won't be), by the time it's available in rural areas, urban areas will have gigabit speeds and multiple HD streams. Newer technologies will be deployed in urban areas first.

Rural people: get over it. There's a reason your house was $150. You get things last.

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post #283 of 4224 Old 10-04-2006, 08:37 AM
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Assuming WiMax isn't a gigantic flop (and I'm not at all convinced it won't be), by the time it's available in rural areas, urban areas will have gigabit speeds and multiple HD streams. Newer technologies will be deployed in urban areas first.

Rural people: get over it. There's a reason your house was $150. You get things last.

There are lots of benefits to living in a rural setting; less traffic, cleaner environment, more access to nature, less crime, etc., but getting cutting edge technology early is not one of them. That's just life!

Chris
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post #284 of 4224 Old 10-04-2006, 10:33 AM
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There are lots of benefits to living in a rural setting; less traffic, cleaner environment, more access to nature, less crime, etc., but getting cutting edge technology early is not one of them. That's just life!

I do not disagree -- in fact, about once a year (or even more often) I give serious consideration to moving to Missoula, MT...but with the understanding that I won't get HD locals (or much HD at all), multiple broadband providers to choose from, or even a Circuit City.

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post #285 of 4224 Old 10-11-2006, 11:12 PM - Thread Starter
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AT&T's video service gets mixed reviews

Web Posted: 10/10/2006 09:31 PM CDT

Sanford Nowlin, Express-News Business Writer

AT&T Inc. promised a lot when it rolled out U-verse, the high-tech video service it hopes will be a key weapon in its battle with rivals such as Time Warner and Comcast.

Is it delivering?

Some customers in San Antonio the first market in the U-verse rollout say there have been technical flaws with the service but that the phone giant has done a good job of fixing them.

Others, however, say they're fed up with waiting for U-verse to work.

Customer satisfaction with U-verse is key for San Antonio-based AT&T, which is hoping to promote the Internet-based video service largely via personal testimonials and neighborhood promotional events.

"They're trying to grow on word of mouth and use some guerrilla marketing techniques," said Paul Erickson, who is following the rollout for IMS Research in Austin. "If people are experiencing problems or are angry about the kind of service they're getting, that's not the kind of word of mouth you want."

Officials with AT&T, which plans to spend $4 billion on the U-verse rollout, said there have been occasional customer complaints but the overall response to its pay-TV product has been favorable.

One AT&T customer who first complained but is now happy with U-verse is Gina Beadles, who signed up within a couple of weeks of the service becoming available in her Northwest Side neighborhood.

"The first week or two it was a bit frustrating," Beadles said. "We would be watching a movie and it would just stop in the middle it just froze."

But, Beadles said, company technicians worked through the problem. She's now satisfied with the service and impressed with AT&T's responsiveness:

"Time Warner's going to have to jump through a lot of hoops to get us back."

Beadles' son, Michael, is less forgiving about the outages, however. He said he still experiences occasional freezes while watching TV late at night.

"I like it when it's working," he said. "But when it's unreliable, it's just frustrating."

Another subscriber who gave only her first name, Ruth, said she suspended her U-verse before her free three-month trial was up. The service froze several times, she said, and to get it running again after each outage, she had to spend a half-hour on the phone with AT&T's customer service center.

She has since returned to Time Warner cable.

But Michael Grasso, assistant vice president of consumer marketing for the U-verse project, said most customers think AT&T has gotten it right.

"Customers expect more from us because of the quality of phone service they've gotten from us," Grasso said. "If they're getting a little pixelization or freezing, they hold us to a higher standard than they would a cable company."

The company has made the cable-like TV service available to tens of thousands of homes in its home market and held neighborhood parties to drum up interest, and it's sticking by its plans to expand into 15 to 20 more markets by year's end.

The company is spending billions to make U-verse available to 19 million homes by the end of 2008, moving aggressively into the TV business to counter cable rivals such as Time Warner that have made inroads into the phone and high-speed Internet markets.

Because U-verse operates via Internet connections, Grasso said users might need to reboot their set-top boxes about once a month like they do a computer.

The company expects to ship new Motorola set-top boxes during the fourth quarter that should cut down on the number of reboots. The boxes also will enable subscribers to get high-definition channels.

If a customer has a problem, Grasso added, the company's around-the-clock support center will dispatch a repair truck the same day it receives a complaint.

AT&T constantly makes improvements to the service, he said, from finding ways to sharpen the signal on individual channels to installing new Internet routers that make its connections more stable.

"We're definitely getting smarter every day," Grasso said. "We've continued to upgrade software and to improve parts on the network."

Customer Chris Harrison said U-verse works better than his old cable service and he will probably keep subscribing. Even so, he's waiting for the new Motorola boxes to arrive before he makes a final decision.

Many people who sign up at the launch of a new service such as U-verse expect a few technical glitches along the way, Harrison added.

"I think it's almost unavoidable," he said. "It's one thing to make a service like this work in a lab, and it's another to make it work in the real world."

http://www.mysanantonio.com/business...e.2aa25c6.html
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post #286 of 4224 Old 10-17-2006, 01:04 PM - Thread Starter
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AT&T is finally ready to add HD to its much-delayed Project Lightspeed (U-verse) but the project is still dogged by questions and controversy.

http://www.engadgethd.com/2006/10/17...fttn-networks/
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post #287 of 4224 Old 10-18-2006, 08:55 AM - Thread Starter
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AT&T chases tempting idea
Updated 10/18/2006 3:51 AM ET
By Leslie Cauley, USA TODAY
SAN ANTONIO The Andrews household used to spend $80 a month to buy satellite TV services from DirecTV, $40 for cable with Time Warner and $50 for high-speed Internet services with AT&T. The family also invested $300 in a TiVo DVR and program service, using it to record Desperate Housewives,Gilmore Girls and other shows.

Not anymore.

"We're done," says Donna Andrews, a mother of three. Time Warner (TWX) and DirecTV (DTV) are out. Her TiVo (TIVO) sits in a closet.

Their replacement: "U-verse," the new TV service from AT&T (T). Her U-verse receiver has a built-in DVR, and high-speed Internet is part of her package. Monthly cost: $110.

STORY: Bumps show challenges that new system faces

Thanks to the AT&T system's underlying IPTV technology short for Internet Protocol TV Andrews also finds some features, including the DVR, simpler. "It's so much easier than what we had before," says Andrews, whose three-month promotional rate of $15 expires this month.

AT&T is betting billions of dollars that there are millions of other families who will like its TV service as much as Andrews does.

The telecommunications giant is building an advanced broadband network to offer a fat package of phone, wireless, Internet and video services, all under the vaunted AT&T brand name.

Desperation is the driver. Phone company customers are increasingly dumping traditional phone service in favor of VoIP, a cheaper Internet-based phone service now being hawked by cable operators. The number of traditional lines in service dropped by 7% last year, and the losses are escalating. By diving into video, phone companies Verizon also is rolling out video hope to blunt the financial pain.

Consumers stand to benefit from the coming street brawl. When the companies start competing on the full range of services, prices and features should improve substantially, says Adi Kishore, director of Forrester's media and entertainment practice. "This is definitely good for the consumer."

The big question for AT&T, he says, is how fast it can roll out U-verse. Time Warner estimates that U-verse has only about 500 customers. AT&T won't be specific, but claims the figure is "in the thousands," and the company says it still plans to expand the service to 15 to 20 markets by December and to offer it to 19 million households by 2008.

Kishore, for one, is skeptical, noting that AT&T has made several deployment announcements, only to roll them back.

"It's one thing to say you're going to deploy. It's another thing to actually do it," he says.

Jeff Henry, a local marketing manager for Time Warner, agrees. U-verse currently is being sold only in some parts of San Antonio, AT&T's headquarters. To meet the 20-market goal, he says, AT&T would have to start deploying immediately.

It will work but when?

Holding things up, says Rick Thompson, an analyst at Heavy Reading, is the ornery nature of the cutting-edge IPTV technology. He says nobody doubts that AT&T can make IPTV work, but it requires getting a circus of hardware and software all of it brand new to work together seamlessly.

The largest IPTV deployment in the world, he notes, is in Hong Kong, where PCCW, a local broadband carrier, claims 650,000 users about half the population of San Antonio.

Thompson's point: Nobody knows for sure how the technology will hold up under the strain of millions of simultaneous users.

IPTV offers AT&T major cost advantages over other network options because it can deliver video over the existing copper phone lines that run to homes and buildings. AT&T needs only to run upgraded fiber-optic lines to neighborhoods.

Nagging concerns about IPTV figured into Verizon's decision to go the costlier route of replacing all the copper and running high-capacity fiber all the way to the home, Thompson says. That allows Verizon to use a more traditional, more cable-like design to deliver video, making the system relatively easy to manage.

In part because it is using existing technology, Verizon is ahead of AT&T in rolling out its FiOS TV service, which it now offers in parts of 100 markets to about 100,000 homes.

Some of AT&T's vendors "may have underestimated the challenges and complexities" of IPTV, acknowledges Chris Rice, AT&T executive vice president for engineering and network planning, though he won't name names.

For example, AT&T has touted that its system would offer true "whole home" recording and viewing: A customer could record a show on the DVR and watch it on any TV set in the house. Many providers offer some form of multi-room viewing, but this would be more complete.

Microsoft, which is developing the operating system, originally promised it would deliver a whole-home feature in the first phase of U-verse. But sorting out the technical complexities turned out to be a lot harder than anybody expected, Rice says, and the feature now is expected to be added "sometime in 2007."

Racing to hit the rollout

AT&T's biggest focus now is a race to meet the end-of-year deployment schedule. Rice says final lab tests are being conducted seven days a week, 24 hours a day, in some cases.

The industrial-strength testing is necessary, he says, to ensure that IPTV equipment software and hardware meshes perfectly and is bug-free. Otherwise, Rice says, "It's like dominoes. If something doesn't land in exactly the right spot, it doesn't just affect that spot, it affects everything down the stream."

The final hurdle to the rollout, he says, is perfecting the capacity to deliver TV in high definition. Rice says Microsoft is sending AT&T code updates almost daily.

But Microsoft (MSFT) isn't the only bottleneck. Other vendors, working on other aspects of HDTV, also have to deliver, says Christine Heckart, a general manager at Microsoft.

"The whole thing is very chicken-and-eggish," she says. "We are developing 80% of the code, but it doesn't work unless it all works."

Rice says he expects final testing on HDTV by the end of the fourth quarter, allowing AT&T to proceed, as planned, with the national launch. At that point, he says, U-verse will be able to "support millions of customers."

Asked why U-verse took so long to launch almost two years, assuming AT&T meets its latest deployment schedule Rice pushes back. He argues that the development cycle actually has been pretty fast, considering AT&T was working with "brand-new technology to create a brand-new product" from the ground up.

"It's like creating the cable industry, from inception to launch, in 18 months," Rice says. "We hit a few bumps along the way, but overall, we are pretty pleased."

Value is the key feature

None of this means much to Donna Andrews. Like many consumers, she is far more interested in getting the best value for her money.

Compared with the $110 per month she now spends, she used to spend $120 just for cable and satellite TV, plus $50 for AT&T's Internet service. Like many families, the Andrewses got both satellite and cable because they like extra programming options, such as more sports channels.

But money was only one part of the value equation. She also likes all the bells and whistles that are part of U-verse, particularly the video recording feature. It requires just one click of the remote's "Record" button to set up and initiate recording a show, and just one more click to record an entire season of the show.

Another plus, she says, is the "search" function that lets her hunt for a movie or program by simply typing in an actor's name. "I just love that," she says.

She's less wowed by this system's "picture-in-a-picture" feature, which lets customers open a window to see what's playing on other channels without changing the channel they're watching. Microsoft and other vendors spent months developing PIP for U-verse, and they're still tinkering to add audio. "It's OK, I guess," she shrugs.

She also isn't so keen on the set-top box, made by Tatung. Her biggest gripe: the color.

"It's white," she says, wrinkling her nose with palpable disdain. "It's really ugly."

One thing she likes a lot: the iconic AT&T name.

Like many Americans, Andrews grew up with the brand, and she likes what it represents. She says she'd consider buying any product that had AT&T's name attached.

Why? "Because it's AT&T," she says, gently chiding a reporter for even asking. "It's a brand I like, and a name I trust."

But brand loyalty goes only so far. Andrews says she'd reconsider Time Warner "if it would save us a whole bunch of money."

As for her TiVo DVR, she's holding on to that, just in case.

Willing to wait for now

Jerry Talmadge, also of San Antonio, was another U-verse convert.

A medical consultant who works from home, Talmadge says he'd heard about U-verse but didn't pay much attention until an AT&T salesman showed up at his door.

Talmadge says he was impressed by the salesman's manner and product knowledge. "I could sense his integrity," Talmadge says.

He signed up and says it shaved his video and broadband bill by about $24 a month, to $120. For that, he's also getting a fast, reliable Internet connection. Talmadge says his old cable Internet service was starting to slow at "peak" usage hours, and that influenced his move.

When a reporter calls back a few weeks later to see how things are going, there's bad news: An AT&T technician is there trying to fix a TV that keeps overheating. Talmadge says the picture also occasionally "freezes up" for no apparent reason.

He isn't worried. New, slim, silver tuners from Motorola are to be installed by December.

"They told me that right off the bat," he says. Talmadge guesses that will take care of the overheating and the frame-freeze problems.

The good news for AT&T: Thanks to features, price and faith in the brand, he's willing to be patient while the kinks in U-verse are worked out.

Says Talmadge: "I do feel they are going to get this right at some point. And when they do, I think it will be a superior product."

HOW IPTV IS DIFFERENT

Traditional cable TV service

In a typical cable TV system, the subscriber receives all the available channels -- analog and digital -- all the time and uses the TV tuner or cable TV tuner box to select which one to display. The number of channels that can be offered is limited by how many can be stuffed into the cable, or "pipe," into the home. Such a system requires a very large "pipe," generally coaxial or fiber-optic cable.

IPTV

Short for Internet Protocol TV, IPTV is a system that transmits TV content in the form of digital Internet Protocol data packets. It is a "switched" system that delivers just the channels viewers want to watch when they want to watch them. The data traffic to the home is controlled by complex IPTV software. Because it delivers only what is wanted at the time, an IPTV system can offer unlimited choices with no worries about clogging the pipe.

In the case of AT&T's planned system, the efficiencies allow the relatively limited existing copper phone wire into the house to be used to deliver TV.


Find this article at:
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/product...v_x.htm?csp=34
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post #288 of 4224 Old 10-18-2006, 11:37 AM
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But money was only one part of the value equation. She also likes all the bells and whistles that are part of U-verse, particularly the video recording feature. It requires just one click of the remote's "Record" button to set up and initiate recording a show, and just one more click to record an entire season of the show.

So does Tivo.

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Another plus, she says, is the "search" function that lets her hunt for a movie or program by simply typing in an actor's name. "I just love that," she says.

So does Tivo.

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One thing she likes a lot: the iconic AT&T name. Like many Americans, Andrews grew up with the brand, and she likes what it represents. She says she'd consider buying any product that had AT&T's name attached. Why? "Because it's AT&T," she says, gently chiding a reporter for even asking. "It's a brand I like, and a name I trust."

Sounds like the "Because that's the way it's always been done." mentality. Which is probably what AT&T is hoping for.

I'm not knocking a new technology or AT&T, but I want to see real tangible value before it's a consideration.

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post #289 of 4224 Old 10-23-2006, 08:12 PM
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From tvover.net:

AT&T Anticipates U-Verse HDTV Launch
AT&T reported strong third-quarter earnings today driven by revenue gains and margin expansion in wireless, merger-integration progress, and continued solid execution in wireline operations, including improved trends in business services. The results showed an earnings increase of 74 percent to $2.17 billion. Third-quarter consolidated revenues totaled $15.6 billion, up from a pre-merger $10.3 billion in the third quarter of 2005.

In the report, AT&T projects the first launch of HDTV over the IPTV U-Verse service to be in San Antonio in late November. According to AT&T, the initial results from a HDTV trial in Houston have proved to be positive.

AT&T launched its U-Verse service earlier this year in San Antonio. Since then, AT&T is reporting around 3,000 customers, which is a 10 percent penetration rate for the homes with availability.

AT&T plans to launch the U-Verse service in approximately 15 markets across 13-states by the end of 2006. According to AT&T, all markets would include the capability of HDTV service.

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post #290 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 12:38 PM
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HDTV rolled out in San Antonio! channels are:

Channel Network
1004 WOAI HD
1005 KENS HD
1012 KSAT HD
1029 KABB HD
1102 Discovery HD
1103 TNT HD
1104 Universal HD
1105 HDNET
1106 HDMov
1107 HDNETa
1110 Wealth HD
1111 A&E HD
1113 HGTV HD
1114 Food HD
1115 National Geographic HD
1116 MTV HD
1201 ESPN HD
1202 ESPN2 HD
1203 NFL HD
1348 Fox Sports MW HD
1353 Fox Sports SW HD
1400 HBO HD
1401 HBO West HD
1402 Cinemax HD
1403 Cinemax West HD
1404 Showtime HD
1405 Showtime West HD
1406 TMC HD
1408 Starz HD
1409 Starz West HD

http://www.uverseusers.com/article.p...in-san-antonio

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post #291 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 01:38 PM
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Quite a lineup, how's the PQ? AT&T apparently has plans to move into Santa Rosa CA next year, which is good news as Comcast has done nothing in over 3 years and only has 5 locals, ESPN and Discovery, and 3 premiums in HD.
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post #292 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 01:43 PM
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Is it true that only one HD channel is viewable at one time?
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post #293 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by keenan View Post

Quite a lineup, how's the PQ?

On uverseusers.com they posted pictures of someone's TV playing HD content, and I was underwhelmed with the PQ. Time will tell.

When they light up Cleveland, I'll prolly give it a try if I can cancel within the first 3 months and they offer the $15/mo trial deal.
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post #294 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paule123 View Post

On uverseusers.com they posted pictures of someone's TV playing HD content, and I was underwhelmed with the PQ. Time will tell.

When they light up Cleveland, I'll prolly give it a try if I can cancel within the first 3 months and they offer the $15/mo trial deal.

Yes, I saw that, but it looked to be a handheld camera shot so it really can't be used as a way to judge quality.

Frankly, as I understand the AT&T technology, I'm a bit underwhelmed by it but maybe it will be better in the future, the one HD channel only situation would be a non-starter for me. At the very least, if AT&T coming to town prompts Comcast to get off their ass to upgrade our system then I don't care how well the AT&T tech works.
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post #295 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paule123 View Post

On uverseusers.com they posted pictures of someone's TV playing HD content, and I was underwhelmed with the PQ. Time will tell.

When they light up Cleveland, I'll prolly give it a try if I can cancel within the first 3 months and they offer the $15/mo trial deal.

The admin at Uverseusers and users chiming in on the forum compares both TimeWarner cable and Uverse and says the Uverse is at least as good if not better. Its difficult to tell from the pictures.

Drawback is only 1 HD stream at a time currently so you can't watch one HD channel and record another for example.

Still, ESPN2 HD and NFL Network HD with those restrictions is much better than the none at all I get with Time Warner.

I keep hammering the AT&T website checking to see when its available where I'm at in Houston.

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post #296 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paule123 View Post

On uverseusers.com they posted pictures of someone's TV playing HD content, and I was underwhelmed with the PQ. Time will tell.

Tough to tell until someone posts a screen capture rather than a digital picture.
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post #297 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Snickering Hound View Post

Drawback is only 1 HD stream at a time currently so you can't watch one HD channel and record another for example.

With three HD set's and two HD DVR's this is a big show stopper for me wanting to even think about switching from D*.
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post #298 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 08:34 PM
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Same here. I need to be able to record two concurrent HD streams at a MINIMUM. As intriguing as IPTV is to me, I'm not taking a drop in feature/functionality to move.

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post #299 of 4224 Old 11-26-2006, 10:37 PM
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one HD stream at a time = dead on arrival.

I'll stick with Time Warner.
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post #300 of 4224 Old 11-27-2006, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Rakesh.S View Post

one HD stream at a time = dead on arrival.


Agreed. 2 HD DVRs and the ability to record up to 4 HD programs at a time is better than a few extra channels at this point. I'm still hopeful that they'll be able to increase the number of HD streams coming into a house at a time. It might be the only way I'll ever see our local FSN in HD.
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