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post #181 of 4220 Old 06-03-2006, 10:28 AM - Thread Starter
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Whitacre Sees No Video Price War

By John Eggerton -- Broadcasting & Cable, 6/2/2006 2:58:00 PM

AT&T Chairman Edward Whitacre tried to assure Wall Street types at a Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. media conference in New York this week that the entry of telcos into the video space would not lead to price cuts in video service.

When asked whether a price war between telco video, like AT&T's Lightspeed service, and cable wasn't inevitable, Whitacre said: "If I were the cable companies I guess I wouldn't be offering discounts."

He pointed to AT&T's plan to bundle broadband, voice, long distance, wireless, and video (a quintuple play) and said that would give the company flexibility in pricing.

I don't think there's going to be a price war. I think it's going to be a war of value and of services," he said. "I think we will be very well positioned."

Most legislators have pointed to price and service competition as driving forces behind revamping telecom legislation to make it easier to launch video service in competition to cable.

Wall Street is concerned that a price war would affect the long-term health of Lightspeed.

On the issue of 'net neutrality, Whitacre said that he would continue to try to educate Congress that company is "not going to do anything to affect the Internet. Zero."

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/art...=Breaking+News
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post #182 of 4220 Old 06-08-2006, 06:42 AM
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AT&T Video Via Phone Approved by DPUC

By STEPHEN SINGER
AP Business Writer

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) _ In a blow to cable TV in Connecticut, state regulators on Wednesday approved a plan by AT&T to offer video over phone lines without requiring it to seek a cable franchise.

In a 3-2 vote, commissioners of the Department of Public Utility

Control said AT&T demonstrated that its video product is a packet of data streamed over a network that is ``fundamentally different'' from cable TV. DPUC Chairman Donald Downes said the agency's decision also met the intent of the state to foster competition, a DPUC spokeswoman said.

How consumers would benefit is up for debate. AT&T said the decision spurs competition, giving consumers more choice.

A representative of the cable TV industry denounced the decision as a boon to AT&T, which is now free of regulations intended to protect consumers. An industry group plans to appeal the ruling. The regulatory battle reflects rapid changes in an industry that is increasingly being blurred by technology and its ability to deliver images, data and telecommunications.

AT&T, once known for its telephone service, is now applying broadband technology to deliver Internet service, video and other products that challenge other businesses and state rule-making.

Following the DPUC decision, AT&T said it will now begin to deploy its Connecticut portion of a fiber optic and broadband network in its 13-state territory. The $4.6 billion system will eventually reach about 19 million households in Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas and Wisconsin. ``Connecticut consumers enjoyed a significant victory today,'' Michele Macauda, president and chief executive of AT&T Connecticut, said in a statement. ``Most importantly, Connecticut consumers will gain a much-needed alternative to their cable company.''

Cablevision Systems Corp., based in Bethpage, N.Y., criticized the decision as a ``special deal for a $100 billion phone company that creates an uneven playing field for competitors.'' Paul Cianelli, president of the New England Cable & Telecommunications Association, faulted the state agency. ``Thanks to the DPUC's decision, Connecticut now has the dubious distinction of exempting telecommunications giant AT&T from cable television regulations designed to protect the public,'' he said.

``Throughout the rest of the country, regulators have protected taxpayers and consumers by forcing the former telephone monopolist to play by the same rules as other cable television providers.'' Cianelli said the cable TV trade group will appeal the DPUC decision in state or federal court.

Cianelli and consumer advocates say the decision will allow AT&T to serve wealthy communities while ignoring others. John Emra, a spokesman for AT&T, said cable TV will now face competition.

``Satellite TV in Connecticut is not really providing competition,'' he said. ``Cable has a real stranglehold in Connecticut.''

http://www.wtic.com/pages/44026.php?
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post #183 of 4220 Old 06-10-2006, 06:16 AM - Thread Starter
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As It Starts TV Service, AT&T Hopes Its Pipes Are Fast Enough
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...ack=crosspromo
From the Los Angeles Times
The phone giant, using Net technology, aims to amaze. But its network isn't the speediest.
By James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer

June 10, 2006

As phone and cable companies race to be the be-all and end-all connection to the home, AT&T Inc. is betting that its new broadband network will be fast enough to win over customers.

The nation's largest phone company said it would begin "changing the way people watch TV" this month by starting to pump programs over the network, which combines fiber optic cable with existing copper lines.

The move by AT&T comes as it is trying to thwart the advances of cable companies, which are aggressively trying to steal away phone customers.

The public rollout of the network and of AT&T's new pay-television service is scheduled to start within weeks in the company's hometown of San Antonio. Executives say they will add 20 more markets, including Anaheim, by the end of the year.

AT&T and its main partner, Microsoft Corp., have been keeping mum on most details about the service, including its plans for California beyond Anaheim. Nevertheless, industry experts are questioning whether the offering is enough to woo customers away from cable.

"A lot of eyes around the world are on AT&T because this launch is on a very large scale," said analyst Teresa Mastrangelo of Broadband Trends Research in Roanoke, Va. "Will it work? Will service meet expectations? Is there going to be enough bandwidth to do what they want?"

Microsoft also has a lot riding on the project. The Redmond, Wash.-based company wrote the software that will power the video system, which relies on Internet technology. Microsoft also has picked up contracts to provide the software to 14 other companies worldwide, including Deutsche Telekom in Germany, BT in the United Kingdom and T-Online Hungary.

Verizon Communications Inc., the second-largest U.S. phone company, has started adding some of the features of Microsoft's technology to its existing cable-like, pay-TV package, and BellSouth Corp., the next-largest phone company, has committed to using the technology.

"It's TV at the core, but a new type of TV," said Ed Graczyk, Microsoft TV marketing director.

A TV system using Internet technology TV doesn't broadcast all signals at once, as cable or over-the-air networks do. That would require more data than AT&T's copper lines could handle. Instead, the technology delivers only the channel the viewer wants. The software also predicts which channel a viewer is likely to visit next and buffers that data to give what AT&T promotes as instant channel changes.

"Boom, you're there," said Alan Weinkrantz, a technology industry public relations consultant and San Antonio resident who joined the U-verse test group in mid-May and posted his impressions on his daily blog.

Microsoft and AT&T say transmitting video using Internet technology offers richer colors than cable and makes it easier to order video on demand and to watch several picture-in-picture views.

"The user interface is so cool because it's a software metaphor with pull-down menus," said Weinkrantz, who gave up the high-definition TV service he had and liked with Time Warner Cable to join the test. "It's faster and more intuitive."

In his blog and an interview, Weinkrantz gave high marks for ease of use and picture quality, though he noticed a "couple of flickers" on the screen during an episode of "The Sopranos."

He knew he would be giving up high-definition television on two of his three sets, including a 56-inch model. He said he would wait for AT&T to introduce a set-top box in October that can handle high-definition and record one channel while he watches another.

"I did it because I really wanted to see what this was all about," Weinkrantz said. "I thought it would be fun to be a tester, and I was curious to see Microsoft's hand in it."

Searching for videos on demand is quick, but it takes 13 seconds to get a movie, he said. And a program guide not only lists what's on but also shows it in a box as he scrolls through the listings of 200-plus channels.

"Today, everything is fine. I'm just a consumer staying at home on the couch, saying, 'Oh, I like this,' and 'Wow, look at that,' " he said.

With TV running over a pipeline along with voice and other data, the company can integrate services, said Chris Rice, an AT&T executive vice president. Television programs, for instance, could be sent to a big-screen TV, computer, laptop or cellphone.

But industry analysts are skeptical about the network, dubbed Project LightSpeed, and the TV service, called U-verse.

"This is a complicated product launch on a scale that is pretty much unprecedented," said analyst Adi Kishore of the Yankee Group research firm in Boston. "They're going to have problems, especially given the relatively tight time frame to get things done."

Experts question the wisdom of creating a network that's likely to be technologically out of date by the time it's complete. LightSpeed is designed to send data at an average of 25 megabits per second by extending high-capacity fiber optic lines to within 3,000 feet of homes. To cover the remaining distance, AT&T plans to rely on new DSL gear to send data humming over existing copper lines.

That's sufficient for standard television, one high-definition feed and a 6-megabit-per-second Internet connection. But cable companies say they have the technology to better that. And Verizon offers as much as 30 megabits per second for Internet use on a fiber optic network that extends all the way to homes. It offers video on a separate fiber optic strand.

"This is a huge debate in the industry," said Maribel Lopez, lead telecom analyst for Forrester Research in Boston. "If you look at the technology three to five years out, this is not enough. But if you look at what most consumers use today, it is."

Unlike Verizon's separate strands for Internet and cable-like video, AT&T must send everything over a combined pipeline, so it's critical for LightSpeed to create an unhindered lane to the home, said analyst Matt Davis of International Data Corp. research firm.

LightSpeed customers would get as much as 6 megabits per second for their Internet connection; the rest would be devoted to the U-verse TV service, said Lea Ann Champion, AT&T's senior executive vice president in charge of the project. "We are seasoned players," she said. "We know how to deliver broadband. We know how to scale, and we build the systems that are necessary to support growth."

She says the company has a number of options to increase bandwidth as consumers' needs grow. For example, it could extend the fiber optic lines closer to homes. The shorter the run on copper, the faster the speeds.

In newly built neighborhoods the company is taking fiber optic lines directly to the homes for the ultimate bandwidth.

Lopez said AT&T also was looking at technology that would compress high-definition TV signals enough to allow two simultaneous streams.

Champion wouldn't comment on the compression technologies the company is using.

The U-verse TV service will be rolled out gradually in each new market, she said, and upgrades will be added along the way.

AT&T's strategy is to bring LightSpeed to 19 million homes in 41 of its markets by the end of 2008 a little more than half the homes in its 13-state territory, including California. The rollout is expected to cost $4.6 billion. Other customers can get Homezone, a combination of satellite TV and high-speed Internet access, which will be available in the next few months.

Verizon says it will have fiber optic service available to 15 million to 20 million homes in 2008 or 2009. Fiber optic networks for 6 million homes, about 20% of Verizon's territory, will be ready by the end of this year, the company said. The build-out is expected to cost $6 billion by then.

"AT&T is saying, 'This is a good enough network and we'll try to make more interesting TV,' " Lopez said. "Verizon is making a big gamble on a solid infrastructure and will gradually add in more interesting TV."

Edward E. Whitacre Jr., AT&T's chairman, has led lobbying efforts to ease local cable franchising rules for new pay-TV providers. He has touted the need for competition to, among other things, lower prices. But he recently told analysts that he didn't envision a price war.

"I think it's going to be a war of value and of services," he said. With the ability to bundle landline and wireless phone service, video and high-speed Internet "all together, that gives us a lot of flexibility on pricing."

AT&T won't reveal its TV package prices yet. But Internet information company Broadband Reports said users of its online forums learned that the basic bundle of 170-channel TV service plus 1.5-megabit-per-second Internet access would cost $85 a month. The top tier of more than 200 channels with 6-megabit-per-second access would cost $114 a month.

AT&T is smart to look for ways to improve television viewing and make it different from cable TV service, said Kathie Hackler, an analyst at Gartner Inc. research firm. "To come in with a 'me too' offer would be a huge mistake," Hackler said.

As the first company out the door with Microsoft's TV technology, she said, AT&T should take the time it needs to make sure the product works flawlessly because viewers will notice.

Because the Internet technology being used by AT&T breaks signals into packets for delivery and reassembles them at the other end, a few lost packets could mean missing the winning field goal in the Super Bowl or a key scene in "Desperate Housewives."

"There's a big difference when you're trying to go into a market that has been working well," Davis of International Data Corp. said. "You can't have any hiccups."
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post #184 of 4220 Old 06-21-2006, 06:57 AM - Thread Starter
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AT&T rewrites rules: Your data isn't yours
- David Lazarus
Wednesday, June 21, 2006

AT&T has issued an updated privacy policy that takes effect Friday. The changes are significant because they appear to give the telecom giant more latitude when it comes to sharing customers' personal data with government officials.

The new policy says that AT&T -- not customers -- owns customers' confidential info and can use it "to protect its legitimate business interests, safeguard others, or respond to legal process."

The policy also indicates that AT&T will track the viewing habits of customers of its new video service -- something that cable and satellite providers are prohibited from doing.

Moreover, AT&T (formerly known as SBC) is requiring customers to agree to its updated privacy policy as a condition for service -- a new move that legal experts say will reduce customers' recourse for any future data sharing with government authorities or others.

The company's policy overhaul follows recent reports that AT&T was one of several leading telecom providers that allowed the National Security Agency warrantless access to its voice and data networks as part of the Bush administration's war on terror.

"They're obviously trying to avoid a hornet's nest of consumer-protection lawsuits," said Chris Hoofnagle, a San Francisco privacy consultant and former senior counsel at the Electronic Privacy Information Center.

"They've written this new policy so broadly that they've given themselves maximum flexibility when it comes to disclosing customers' records," he said.

AT&T is being sued by San Francisco's Electronic Frontier Foundation for allegedly allowing the NSA to tap into the company's data network, providing warrantless access to customers' e-mails and Web browsing.

AT&T is also believed to have participated in President Bush's acknowledged domestic spying program, in which the NSA was given warrantless access to U.S. citizens' phone calls.

AT&T said in a statement last month that it "has a long history of vigorously protecting customer privacy" and that "our customers expect, deserve and receive nothing less than our fullest commitment to their privacy."

But the company also asserted that it has "an obligation to assist law enforcement and other government agencies responsible for protecting the public welfare, whether it be an individual or the security interests of the entire nation."

Under its former privacy policy, introduced in September 2004, AT&T said it might use customer's data "to respond to subpoenas, court orders or other legal process, to the extent required and/or permitted by law."

The new version, which is specifically for Internet and video customers, is much more explicit about the company's right to cooperate with government agencies in any security-related matters -- and AT&T's belief that customers' data belongs to the company, not customers.

"While your account information may be personal to you, these records constitute business records that are owned by AT&T," the new policy declares. "As such, AT&T may disclose such records to protect its legitimate business interests, safeguard others, or respond to legal process."

It says the company "may disclose your information in response to subpoenas, court orders, or other legal process," omitting the earlier language about such processes being "required and/or permitted by law."

The new policy states that AT&T "may also use your information in order to investigate, prevent or take action regarding illegal activities, suspected fraud (or) situations involving potential threats to the physical safety of any person" -- conditions that would appear to embrace any terror-related circumstance.

Ray Everett-Church, a Silicon Valley privacy consultant, said it seems clear that AT&T has substantially modified its privacy policy in light of revelations about the government's domestic spying program.

"It's obvious that they are trying to stretch their blanket pretty tightly to cover as many exposed bits as possible," he said.

Gail Hillebrand, a staff attorney at Consumers Union in San Francisco, said the declaration that AT&T owns customers' data represents the most significant departure from the company's previous policy.

"It creates the impression that they can do whatever they want," she said. "This is the real heart of AT&T's new policy and is a pretty fundamental difference from how most customers probably see things."

John Britton, an AT&T spokesman, denied that the updated privacy policy marks a shift in the company's approach to customers' info.

"We don't see this as anything new," he said. "Our goal was to make the policy easier to read and easier for customers to understand."

He acknowledged that there was no explicit requirement in the past that customers accept the privacy policy as a condition for service. And he acknowledged that the 2004 policy said nothing about customers' data being owned by AT&T.

But Britton insisted that these elements essentially could be found between the lines of the former policy.

"There were many things that were implied in the last policy." He said. "We're just clarifying the last policy."

AT&T's new privacy policy is the first to include the company's video service. AT&T says it's spending $4.6 billion to roll out TV programming to 19 million homes nationwide.

The policy refers to two AT&T video services -- Homezone and U-verse. Homezone is AT&T's satellite TV service, offered in conjunction with Dish Network, and U-verse is the new cablelike video service delivered over phone lines.

In a section on "usage information," the privacy policy says AT&T will collect "information about viewing, game, recording and other navigation choices that you and those in your household make when using Homezone or AT&T U-verse TV Services."

The Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984 stipulates that cable and satellite companies can't collect or disclose information about customers' viewing habits.

The law is silent on video services offered by phone companies via the Internet, basically because legislators never anticipated such technology would be available.

AT&T's Britton said the 1984 law doesn't apply to his company's video service because AT&T isn't a cable provider. "We are not building a cable TV network," he said. "We're building an Internet protocol television network."

But Andrew Johnson, a spokesman for cable heavyweight Comcast, disputed this perspective.

"Video is video is video," he said. "If you're delivering programming over a telecommunications network to a TV set, all rules need to be the same."

AT&T's new and former privacy policies both state that "conducting business ethically and ensuring privacy is critical to maintaining the public's trust and achieving success in a dynamic and competitive business climate."

Both also state that "privacy responsibility" extends "to the privacy of conversations and to the flow of information in data form." As such, both say that "the trust of our customers necessitates vigilant, responsible privacy protections."

The 2004 policy, though, went one step further. It said AT&T realizes "that privacy is an important issue for our customers and members."

The new policy makes no such acknowledgment.

David Lazarus' column appears Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. Send tips or feedback to dlazarus@sfchronicle.com.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cg...UG9VJHB9C1.DTL
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post #185 of 4220 Old 06-21-2006, 07:29 AM
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Scary stuff. As excited as I've been about U-Verse, I don't much care for the erosion of civil liberties we've had lately, and AT&T agreeing to offer up information without the compulsion of a warrant bothers me significantly.

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post #186 of 4220 Old 06-21-2006, 11:51 AM
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I'll have to email Mr. Lazarus & thank him for the info.

If the representations alleged to have been made by AT&T are true, then I won't be considering switching to Lightspeed if it ever becomes available in my area.
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post #187 of 4220 Old 06-21-2006, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.B. Forrest View Post

I'll have to email Mr. Lazarus & thank him for the info.

If the representations alleged to have been made by AT&T are true, then I won't be considering switching to Lightspeed if it ever becomes available in my area.

Same here, and in fact, I may switch to Comcast internet service. It looks like this covers regular DSL service as well.
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post #188 of 4220 Old 06-21-2006, 04:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Jun. 21, 2006

ST. LOUIS - State regulators in Missouri have demanded to know whether AT&T violated consumer privacy laws by giving the federal government customer phone and Internet records.

The subpoenas served Monday require AT&T to respond by July 12 with records and testimony by company officials under oath, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Wednesday.

They were filed after AT&T announced last week that it cannot and will not answer any questions. The company has said national security laws preclude it from revealing what it might have done.

New Jersey's state attorney general issued similar subpoenas last week. The Justice Department is seeking to block them.

Missouri's, New Jersey's and other legal challenges set the stage for fights between the state and federal government over competing interests - civil liberties vs. national security.

The challenges accuse the government of abusing anti-terrorism laws, and AT&T of allowing government agencies to monitor millions of phone calls and e-mails without legal authority.

The government maintains that confirming or denying sensitive information would put the phone company in a position to cause "exceptionally grave harm to the national security."

The Missouri and New Jersey subpoenas ask whether the phone company is releasing information to the government without any court order or search warrant.

In Missouri, Public Service Commissioners Steve Gaw and Robert Clayton have made numerous written requests with AT&T and its affiliates, for the company's legal authority to provide customer calling information to the government.

AT&T official Alfred Richter Jr. responded to Missouri last week, saying the company could be found in violation of federal law by stating whether it has provided information to the National Security Agency.

USA Today and The New York Times have reported that AT&T secretly gave the government records revealing who millions of customers have talked to.

Missouri regulators said they issued 12 subpoenas, one each for documents and testimony, because AT&T operates under at least six names in Missouri.

Gaw and Clayton said they have legal and moral obligations to enforce state consumer-privacy laws. They said they want to know if AT&T is releasing the private information of Missouri citizens illegally.

Meanwhile, a federal court in St. Louis is weighing a customer's civil lawsuit that seeks damages from AT&T over the issue.
Information from: St. Louis Post-Dispatch, http://www.stltoday.com
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post #189 of 4220 Old 07-05-2006, 01:01 AM - Thread Starter
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AT&T plan would cost city
Giant utility wants to install high-speed system that would mean less revenue for cities.
By Chris Wiebe
(Published: July 4, 2006)

BURBANK -- City officials are negotiating with representatives from telecommunications giant AT&T to accelerate a process to bring cable television services to Burbank residents over the Internet.

The proposed plan, dubbed Project Lightspeed, calls for installing broadband cables within 3,000 feet of homes in Burbank to facilitate quicker Internet speed and to enable AT&T to provide both cable television and telephone service online, Assistant City Manager Mike Flad said.

But with transmission lines for television and telephone signals moving from above-ground and underground cables to fiber optic networks under the plan, the city would lose its ability to impose traditional telecommunication taxes, Flad said. The city would also lose the ability to regulate the placement of the infrastructure required to provide a service, Flad said.

"If our wired telephone went over the Internet, we could lose $3.5 million per year in recurring money," he said. "For us, this infrastructure, while on its face is a great thing and gets customers and our citizens the fastest and highest and best technology available, what it could cause is a fiscal crisis for us in the short term. It's just a matter of figuring out how to make cities' revenue streams work."

A bill pending in the state Legislature would shift fees municipalities receive from companies that utilize city infrastructure to a statewide model, meaning a more uniform standard for telecom providers, but less revenue for cities, Flad said.

Through negotiations with AT&T, officials hope to forge an agreement that could put the city in a better financial position once the legislation is passed, Flad said.

The city, for instance, wants to recoup costs from AT&T that the city will likely incur to process the numerous permits required to supply power to AT&T's forming network.

Granting the city such amenities would allow AT&T to begin constructing its network, rather than waiting until the legislation progresses through the Legislature and is signed by the governor.

AT&T is negotiating with municipalities in order to expand consumer choice in the cable television market, AT&T spokesman Gordon Diamond said.

"There's certainly something going on at the state level but we still have been in discussion with cities, including the city of Burbank, and really what it means is to be able to provide this new technology, to provide consumers with a choice for video services," Diamond said.

But City Councilman David Gordon voiced concerns over the details of negotiations, which have not been made available for public input, adding that increased competition does not necessarily mean a better result for the consumer.

"I think providing better and alternative cable services is great," he said.

"I think people have been asking for that for a long time. But the problem is you don't want to sell your soul to the devil in order to get competition .... Just because there's more competition doesn't mean there's going to be better service or less cost."

QUESTION

What do you think about a plan to wire Burbank with cable television over the Internet? E-mail your responses to burbankleader @latimes.com; mail them to the Burbank Leader, 111 W. Wilson Ave., Glendale, CA, 91203. Please spell your name and include your address and phone number for verification purposes only.

* CHRIS WIEBE covers City Hall and the courts. He may be reached at (818) 637-3242 or by e-mail at chris.wiebelatimes.com.

http://www.burbankleader.com/front/v...0p-76172c.html
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post #190 of 4220 Old 07-09-2006, 08:07 AM
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Check out www.uverseusers.com Looks to be a promising forum for getting *real* details from actual users and ATT techs. They also have a photo of the "top secret" channel lineup card.

Here's an interesting post:

Quote:


U-Verse will use the Motorola VIP 1200 and VIP 1216 STB's, which support both SD and HD video. The current STB from Tatung supports only SD video. The 1200 is diskless, and the 1216 comes with a 160Gb HDD. Combined, this will allow for whole home DVR, with diskless STB's in the bedrooms, den, etc. accessing the HDD in the living room/home theater. As one writer noted, there are no tuners in the box, therefore no limit to the number of video channels and DVR sessions from a hardware perspective. The only limit is bandwidth into the home, with U-Verse supporting four simultaneous streams initially, meaning that there could be a combination of up to four Live TV, VOD or DVR streams into the household at any one time. As AT&T increases network bandwidth over time, the number of simultaneous streams supported will also increase, with no need to replace the STB's. DVR can be recorded in the background while another video activity (Live TV, VOD) is taking place, so long as the four stream threshhold into the household is not exceeded. If users on other TV's are watching currently recorded programs, then this has no impact on streams into the house, i.e. they can be watching/recording up to four additional streams whle watching DVR. The reason for limited info on this STB is because the product is in final stages of test and integration, before it is launched commercially, which is planned for later this year - it is very close to being ready. There is a brief description at:

http://broadband.motorola.com/catalo...?ProductID=454

While it says Eurpoean version, this is the same platform for NA. Understand that Deutsche Telecom and other European operators are also launching IPTV.

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post #191 of 4220 Old 07-13-2006, 12:40 PM
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http://www.mediaweek.com/mw/news/net..._id=1002838929


AT&T U-Verse TV to Offer NFL Net

John Consoli

JULY 13, 2006 -

AT&T U-Verse TV will begin offering the NFL Network, including its Thursday-Saturday National Football League regular season package, under a deal announced today.

The distribution agreement will include both standard definition and high definition feeds of the network, as well as video-on-demand programming.

AT&T U-Verse is television delivered by fiber-optics technology. AT&T expects to reach nearly 19 million households by the end of 2008.

"We are eager to be part of the AT&T U-Verse experience and to further diversify our customer footprint by delivering NFL Network to U-verse subscribers," said Brian Decker, NFL Network vp of national accounts.

.

There he goes again... Good Ol' R. Reagan's favorite Troll line !
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post #192 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 06:00 AM
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Just had AT&T U-Verse (IPTV) installed on Friday. Up to 30MBPS IP into the house. 6 MBPS dedicated to Internet and the rest to the IPTV.Some intial glitches, but as of now everything operating great. Lots of on-demand programming. HD Programming will not be available till later this year, but it should be well worth the wait. Still have my Dish HDTV programming till AT&T releases HD.

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post #193 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 06:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeTimeF View Post

Just had AT&T U-Verse (IPTV) installed on Friday. Up to 30MBPS IP into the house. 6 MBPS dedicated to Internet and the rest to the IPTV.Some intial glitches, but as of now everything operating great. Lots of on-demand programming. HD Programming will not be available till later this year, but it should be well worth the wait. Still have my Dish HDTV programming till AT&T releases HD.

Where are you located?
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post #194 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 06:11 AM
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San Antonio, TX. I believe that this is the first Test Market for AT&T.

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post #195 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 06:13 AM
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Just had AT&T U-Verse (IPTV) installed on Friday. Up to 30MBPS IP into the house. 6 MBPS dedicated to Internet and the rest to the IPTV.Some intial glitches, but as of now everything operating great. Lots of on-demand programming. HD Programming will not be available till later this year, but it should be well worth the wait. Still have my Dish HDTV programming till AT&T releases HD.

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post #196 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 06:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeTimeF View Post

Just had AT&T U-Verse (IPTV) installed on Friday. Up to 30MBPS IP into the house. 6 MBPS dedicated to Internet and the rest to the IPTV.Some intial glitches, but as of now everything operating great. Lots of on-demand programming. HD Programming will not be available till later this year, but it should be well worth the wait. Still have my Dish HDTV programming till AT&T releases HD.

TTF, thanks for the info. I think you may be the first U-Verse user to post on AVS!

Where are you located? San Antonio?

How many STB's do you have installed?

If you don't mind, what's the package you ordered and the price?

Do you have to be an AT&T landline phone customer to get U-Verse?
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post #197 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 06:48 AM
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Where are you located? San Antonio? - Yes

How many STB's do you have installed? - 2. One is the main STB w/ DVR for my Living Room. Bedroom STB can use this DVR as well. Was surpised by the manufacturers choice - TATUNG. Had never heard of them before.

If you don't mind, what's the package you ordered and the price? I ordered the Top Tier Package U400 (all movie channels) and Elite DSL (up to 6 mbps). Price is only $25 a month for the 1st 3 months. After that it will boost to $126/m. Have not seen what increase there will be once they offer HD programming.

Do you have to be an AT&T landline phone customer to get U-Verse? I believe so.

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post #198 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 06:56 AM
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Here is a link to there website

Uverse.att.co_m

Can check availabilty, pricing, and packages

-TTF

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post #199 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 06:57 AM
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Sorry
.com

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post #200 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 10:19 AM
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Do you have a DVR? If so, how is it? Is 6mb the max for internet connection, or can you purchase a higher plan?

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post #201 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 10:44 AM
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Are they running fiber to your home or still copper to get those speeds?

I'd heard that unless AT&T went to fiber, they were going to be stuck between 20-25 Mbps total bandwidth so 30 Mbps is somewhat surprising.

Tatung used to make cheap PCs. Probably some Taiwanese manufacturer.

How is the channel switching? Two channels simultaneously? Are the STPs connecting to the phone jacks which were already in your home or did they put in new copper inside the home?
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post #202 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 11:37 AM
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Are they running fiber to your home or still copper to get those speeds?Fiber to what they call the "Node" and copper to the home.

How is the channel switching? Instantly in a pip.

[/IMG]Two channels simultaneously? Yes

Are the STPs connecting to the phone jacks which were already in your home or did they put in new copper inside the home? They actually use COAX to an apapter that converts to CAT5.

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post #203 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 11:41 AM
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There is a DVR, but it does not seem as advanced as Dish Network's.

6 mb is the highest you can get right now, but have heard that w/ the HD rollout there will a faster package you can purchase as well.

-TTF

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post #204 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 12:35 PM
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U-Verse is supposed to get Discovery HD and NFL Network HD. Those are the only HD channels I've seen anything about so far.

YOU ARE READING AVS FORUM

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post #205 of 4220 Old 07-17-2006, 12:39 PM
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For more info, check out the ever expanding AT&T Lightspeed thread that's been around since the beginning of the year:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=638947

.

There he goes again... Good Ol' R. Reagan's favorite Troll line !
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post #206 of 4220 Old 07-19-2006, 06:38 AM
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AT&T U-Verse adds "TV One":

http://www.multichannel.com/article/...=Breaking+News

.

There he goes again... Good Ol' R. Reagan's favorite Troll line !
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post #207 of 4220 Old 07-19-2006, 08:33 AM
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Quote:
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I'd heard that unless AT&T went to fiber, they were going to be stuck between 20-25 Mbps total bandwidth so 30 Mbps is somewhat surprising.

Most of the folks over at uverseusers.com have mentioned getting 30mbps+. And in theory they could do pair bonding at some point to double that.

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post #208 of 4220 Old 07-19-2006, 08:28 PM
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At the farthest reachs of VDSL you should be able to get 20M.

Pair bonding is a definate possibility in the future.

Just like DSL, closer to the DSLAM the better, should get upwards of 40M+ at some of the closer points.

VDSL2 will only enhance this...

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post #209 of 4220 Old 07-20-2006, 10:35 AM
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AT&T U-verse TV to Include Content From MTV Networks and BET Networks Program Services

SAN ANTONIO, July 20 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T), MTV
Networks and BET Networks, divisions of Viacom (NYSE: VIA and VIA:B), today
announced a distribution agreement to deliver MTVN and BET linear, high-
definition, on-demand and digital music programming as part of the AT&T U-
verse TV(SM) channel lineup.

Under the agreement, AT&T will provide its U-verse TV customers with
the following network entertainment brands: BET, BET J, BET Gospel, CMT,
CMT Pure Country, Comedy Central, LOGO, MTV, MTV2, MTV Hits, MTV Jams, MTV
Espanol (soon to become MTV Tr3s), Nickelodeon, Nick2, Nicktoons, Nick GAS,
Noggin, The N, Spike TV, TV Land, VH1, VH1 Classic, VH1 Soul and VH Uno.
Additionally, AT&T will deliver MTV Networks' and BET Networks'
video-on-demand content as part of the U-verse "Free On Demand" platform
and will also carry MTVN's recently-launched high-definition channel, MHD;
MTV's channels specifically designed to serve ethnic populations in the
United States, including MTV Chi, MTV Desi and MTV K; as well as digital
audio radio programming from URGE, MTV Networks' new digital music service.
"The MTV Networks and BET Networks brands are among the strongest in
television," said Dan York, head of programming, AT&T Operations, Inc. "We
are very happy to be offering the wide array of MTV Networks and BET
Networks program services to AT&T U-verse customers."

"MTV Networks and BET Networks are dedicated to bringing our audiences
the content they are passionate about," said Nicole Browning, president,
affiliate sales and marketing, MTV Networks. "As AT&T U-verse TV develops
new platforms to provide an advanced and personalized entertainment
experience for consumers, we are delighted to partner with them to deliver
our strong brands and services and further diversify our customer
footprint."

AT&T U-verse TV is delivered by Project Lightspeed, the company's
initiative to expand the fiber-optics network deeper into neighborhoods to
deliver U-verse TV, AT&T Yahoo!(R) High Speed Internet U-verse Enabled and,
in the future, Voice over IP services. Through its subsidiaries, AT&T
expects to reach nearly 19 million households by the end of 2008 as part of
its initial deployment, using fiber-to-the-node (FTTN) and
fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) technologies.
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post #210 of 4220 Old 07-28-2006, 10:33 AM - Thread Starter
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AT&T going 40G
AT&T plans to begin upgrading its global MPLS backbone to 40Gbps OC-768 speeds this summer.
[AT&T going 40G]

The upgrade is part of AT&T's network expansion plan announced in February. That plan is funded by a 2006 capital expenditure budget of US$8 billion to $8.5 billion.

AT&T Senior Vice President and CTO John Stankey announced the 40Gbps upgrade, which will quadruple the backbone's current bandwidth, during a keynote address at this week's Globalcomm 2006 conference in Chicago. Stankey said initial deployments of OC-768 will be in 31 U.S. cities by the first quarter of 2007.

Global Crossing this week also disclosed it has begun upgrading its MPLS backbone (http://www.networkworld.com/news/200...rades.html?brl) to OC-768.

Stankey also said AT&T is on target to roll out IPTV in 15 to 20 markets by the end of this year. He said AT&T has been able to achieve 20Mbps to 25Mbps over 4,000 feet, and even more in shorter distances.

IPTV is one application of AT&T's $6 billion Project Lightspeed fiber and DSL deployment.

http://www.pcwelt.de/news/englishnew...ication/41529/
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