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post #721 of 6863 Old 11-23-2007, 02:54 AM
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On a side note, it was smile-inducing to once again see Michael Weitz (a.k.a. wacko Detective Mick Belker from "Hill Street Blues") in front of the camera again for a change, as the note-taking wacko who led Deb/Angel to the information tip about the car and license plate used by the presumed killer of Rodrigo which turned out to be purloined evidence from their unit.

Apologies. Brain/fingers spasm.

For the record, his correct name is BRUCE Weitz, not Michael Weitz. I knew that all along.
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post #722 of 6863 Old 11-23-2007, 06:00 AM
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Here's a Friday NY Times article (from this forum's "HOTP") about "Dexter." I highlighted a paragraph in which I think the Times writer absolutely nails dead-on why we (those of us here and elsewhere 'round the net and the world) love this show to death, no pun intended!

TV Notebook
Sympathy for the Devil:
The Nice-Guy Serial Killer Next Door

By Gina Bellafante, The New York Times - November 23, 2007

During the past two years Showtime has made its mark with series that ostentatiously demand our sympathy for narcissists, wrongdoers, the egregiously misbehaved. At the center of “Californication” is a wounded philanderer. “Brotherhood” delivers a thug with brain trauma. On “Weeds” a widowed mother, her options foreclosed, turns to drug dealing and parental neglect. What does it say that Dexter Morgan, a forensics expert and serial killer, is the most likable character in this assembly?

Two-thirds of the way into its second season “Dexter,” Showtime’s highest-rated series, is better than ever, deriving its suspense from our fear that its hero’s peculiar exercises in paternalism will fall under the harsh judgments of the law.

Killing gives Dexter a rush. But he exercises his criminal impulses according to strict protocol — which he refers to explicitly as “the code” — a method of conduct handed down to him by his foster father, a policeman bent on psychological control whose secrets “Dexter” has been slowly but punctually revealing. The series (shown on Sunday nights) has a great asset in Michael C. Hall, an actor particularly adept at portraying repressives. His Dexter is all taut jaw and rigid gait, as if any expression of agility or appetite would set the universe off kilter.

“Dexter” — which has among its producers John Goldwyn, one of the team behind “I’m Not There,” the new Todd Haynes film about Bob Dylan, and Clyde Phillips, a mystery novelist and comedy writer — remains in some sense a tease, operating under only the pretense of moral ambiguity. (The show is based on “Darkly Dreaming Dexter,” a novel by Jeff Lindsay.) Dexter’s hobby is the ritual chopping up, or even chainsawing, of human flesh, but he banishes from this world only those who have killed, the murderers his employers in Florida law enforcement have failed to contain or sufficiently punish. It is one of the show’s feats that it manages to achieve a complexity and intelligence while immersed in this kind of old-fashioned absolutism.

Because of his inherited code, Dexter doesn’t harm the decent and good. Two weeks ago it seemed as if he might send an innocent man to prison to entrap a colleague intent on fingering Dexter for suspected atrocities. But Dexter’s self-interest never extends beyond what he needs to do to further his civic mission. There are no real collateral victims. The first image we typically get of his chic and tidy apartment are the black and white tiles of his kitchen. Quite literally Dexter doesn’t feed or dwell in shades of gray.

The show relishes these kinds of broad contrasts: the neon and pastels of Miami, the jovial plasticity of Dexter’s comportment, all up against his grim and horrid preoccupations. “Dexter” seems to play up its essential simplicity as it transcends it. What’s currently driving the tension, on the surface at least, is the matter of Dexter’s possible apprehension.

Is he going to be discovered as the Bay Harbor Butcher now that the limbs of so many of the people he has dismembered have turned up on the ocean floor? Though we wonder how Dexter will evade capture, we don’t worry that he will actually get caught. What is at stake is something deeper: the matter of whether his secret, once revealed to his devoted few, will serve to dissolve their affections for him.


“Dexter” finds both its murk and its muscle in explorations of intimacy rather than aberration. Can we be loved once we are really known? Are we to form our closest attachments with those who see and accept the darkest aspects of our nature or the people who prop us up to dull but honorable displays of decency?

“Dexter” is, at heart, a relationship drama, obsessed with the notions of what constitutes family and where our loyalties should ultimately lie. It constantly sets in opposition biological and adoptive connections. Dexter is caregiver not only to his gangly and insecure foster sister Debra (played with an appealing awkwardness by Jennifer Carpenter) but also to the young children of his ex-girlfriend, Rita (Julie Benz), who depend on him for doughnuts and a levity otherwise absent from their lives. Chosen families soften and humanize, and of the rest we ought to be wary.

Dexter’s brother, with whom he witnessed their mother’s murder as a young boy, also turned out to be a serial killer, but without Dexter’s perversely grounding altruism. The father of Rita’s children was an addict and a wife beater; her mother is a battle-ax. That Dexter’s specific assignment within the Miami-Dade police department is to analyze blood patterns serves both as gimmick and poetry, a correlate of his lust for violence and a symbol of the close watch he keeps on his own genealogy.

Perhaps the only thing on “Dexter” scarier than the river of blood that runs through it is the depiction of so much sex resulting in physical and psychic peril. If the series had arrived 10 or 15 years ago, it would likely have been received as a disturbing and possibly even pernicious AIDS allegory. This season has introduced the psychotically unbalanced Lila (Jaime Murray), a young British woman with whom Dexter has been tossing about in dark satin sheets on a bed whose headboard casts shadows of spider webs on his back. With her Dexter has experienced passion for the first time, but there have been no home-baked scones in the morning. The implications have been as gothic as all that imagery implied. In addition to evening walks and baby-doll dresses, Lila, Dexter has learned, also enjoys arson, stalking and beyond-code-orange adventures in emotional terrorism.

The conservative strain of “Dexter” lurks elsewhere as well. Like all vigilante narratives, it is the expression of a certain stylized libertarianism that sees institutional failure wherever it looks. Police departments don’t work on “Dexter”; neither do prisons, psychiatric hospitals, courts, public schools or recovery movements. A few weeks ago viewers were treated to a sidebar lecture on the ways in which an emphasis on mediocrity is ruining modern education. Dexter, we are meant to understand, isn’t half as dangerous as the system that would hack him up. And he is great with kids.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/23/ar...ref=television
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post #723 of 6863 Old 11-23-2007, 11:16 AM
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I think the Lundy character is a strong one - he seems to be a philosophical type - blending music and other types of seemingly unrelated genres to arrive at solutions to problems. He can certainly be the downfall for Dexter. He certainly got Dexter perplexed during the questions asked about the botched bloodwoork.

I wonder if his motives towards Debra are a means to an end with Dexter.
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post #724 of 6863 Old 11-23-2007, 05:09 PM
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I think the Lundy character is a strong one - he seems to be a philosophical type - blending music and other types of seemingly unrelated genres to arrive at solutions to problems. He can certainly be the downfall for Dexter. He certainly got Dexter perplexed during the questions asked about the botched bloodwoork.

I wonder if his motives towards Debra are a means to an end with Dexter.

I think Lundy is a great addition to the show. Keith Carradine is one of my favorites - if you've never seen him as Wild Bill Hickok in season one of Deadwood, you should check him out on DVD. Be forewarned though, his demise comes way too soon!
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post #725 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 10:54 AM
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Here's a Friday NY Times article (from this forum's "HOTP") about "Dexter." I highlighted a paragraph in which I think the Times writer absolutely nails dead-on why we (those of us here and elsewhere 'round the net and the world) love this show to death, no pun intended!

TV Notebook
Sympathy for the Devil:
The Nice-Guy Serial Killer Next Door

By Gina Bellafante, The New York Times - November 23, 2007

During the past two years Showtime has made its mark with series that ostentatiously demand our sympathy for narcissists, wrongdoers, the egregiously misbehaved. At the center of Californication is a wounded philanderer. Brotherhood delivers a thug with brain trauma. On Weeds a widowed mother, her options foreclosed, turns to drug dealing and parental neglect. What does it say that Dexter Morgan, a forensics expert and serial killer, is the most likable character in this assembly?

Two-thirds of the way into its second season Dexter, Showtime's highest-rated series, is better than ever, deriving its suspense from our fear that its hero's peculiar exercises in paternalism will fall under the harsh judgments of the law.

Killing gives Dexter a rush. But he exercises his criminal impulses according to strict protocol which he refers to explicitly as the code a method of conduct handed down to him by his foster father, a policeman bent on psychological control whose secrets Dexter has been slowly but punctually revealing. The series (shown on Sunday nights) has a great asset in Michael C. Hall, an actor particularly adept at portraying repressives. His Dexter is all taut jaw and rigid gait, as if any expression of agility or appetite would set the universe off kilter.

Dexter which has among its producers John Goldwyn, one of the team behind I'm Not There, the new Todd Haynes film about Bob Dylan, and Clyde Phillips, a mystery novelist and comedy writer remains in some sense a tease, operating under only the pretense of moral ambiguity. (The show is based on Darkly Dreaming Dexter, a novel by Jeff Lindsay.) Dexter's hobby is the ritual chopping up, or even chainsawing, of human flesh, but he banishes from this world only those who have killed, the murderers his employers in Florida law enforcement have failed to contain or sufficiently punish. It is one of the show's feats that it manages to achieve a complexity and intelligence while immersed in this kind of old-fashioned absolutism.

Because of his inherited code, Dexter doesn't harm the decent and good. Two weeks ago it seemed as if he might send an innocent man to prison to entrap a colleague intent on fingering Dexter for suspected atrocities. But Dexter's self-interest never extends beyond what he needs to do to further his civic mission. There are no real collateral victims. The first image we typically get of his chic and tidy apartment are the black and white tiles of his kitchen. Quite literally Dexter doesn't feed or dwell in shades of gray.

The show relishes these kinds of broad contrasts: the neon and pastels of Miami, the jovial plasticity of Dexter's comportment, all up against his grim and horrid preoccupations. Dexter seems to play up its essential simplicity as it transcends it. What's currently driving the tension, on the surface at least, is the matter of Dexter's possible apprehension.

Is he going to be discovered as the Bay Harbor Butcher now that the limbs of so many of the people he has dismembered have turned up on the ocean floor? Though we wonder how Dexter will evade capture, we don't worry that he will actually get caught. What is at stake is something deeper: the matter of whether his secret, once revealed to his devoted few, will serve to dissolve their affections for him.


Dexter finds both its murk and its muscle in explorations of intimacy rather than aberration. Can we be loved once we are really known? Are we to form our closest attachments with those who see and accept the darkest aspects of our nature or the people who prop us up to dull but honorable displays of decency?

Dexter is, at heart, a relationship drama, obsessed with the notions of what constitutes family and where our loyalties should ultimately lie. It constantly sets in opposition biological and adoptive connections. Dexter is caregiver not only to his gangly and insecure foster sister Debra (played with an appealing awkwardness by Jennifer Carpenter) but also to the young children of his ex-girlfriend, Rita (Julie Benz), who depend on him for doughnuts and a levity otherwise absent from their lives. Chosen families soften and humanize, and of the rest we ought to be wary.

Dexter's brother, with whom he witnessed their mother's murder as a young boy, also turned out to be a serial killer, but without Dexter's perversely grounding altruism. The father of Rita's children was an addict and a wife beater; her mother is a battle-ax. That Dexter's specific assignment within the Miami-Dade police department is to analyze blood patterns serves both as gimmick and poetry, a correlate of his lust for violence and a symbol of the close watch he keeps on his own genealogy.

Perhaps the only thing on Dexter scarier than the river of blood that runs through it is the depiction of so much sex resulting in physical and psychic peril. If the series had arrived 10 or 15 years ago, it would likely have been received as a disturbing and possibly even pernicious AIDS allegory. This season has introduced the psychotically unbalanced Lila (Jaime Murray), a young British woman with whom Dexter has been tossing about in dark satin sheets on a bed whose headboard casts shadows of spider webs on his back. With her Dexter has experienced passion for the first time, but there have been no home-baked scones in the morning. The implications have been as gothic as all that imagery implied. In addition to evening walks and baby-doll dresses, Lila, Dexter has learned, also enjoys arson, stalking and beyond-code-orange adventures in emotional terrorism.

The conservative strain of Dexter lurks elsewhere as well. Like all vigilante narratives, it is the expression of a certain stylized libertarianism that sees institutional failure wherever it looks. Police departments don't work on Dexter; neither do prisons, psychiatric hospitals, courts, public schools or recovery movements. A few weeks ago viewers were treated to a sidebar lecture on the ways in which an emphasis on mediocrity is ruining modern education. Dexter, we are meant to understand, isn't half as dangerous as the system that would hack him up. And he is great with kids.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/23/ar...ref=television

Good Read - The mediocrity speech has been used before, and I agree with it. Too bad it was used in the context of JoBeth Williams ill-fated role.

Gearing up for tonight!
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post #726 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 12:28 PM
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From Sunday's NY Post (and this forum's "HOTP" thread). Folks, read that last paragraph very carefully for a revelatory clue from M.C. Hall himself about what the season finale of "Dexter" has in store for us. WOW!!!!

TV Notebook
'Killer' Dexter
Michael C. Hall Drama Survives Strike
By Adam Buckman, The New York Post - November 25, 2007

Pity the poor serial killer.

When the bodies pile up, the odds of capture increase proportionately, elevating levels of stress and anxiety, and resulting in acts of carelessness that serve only to make the beleaguered killer's situation more precarious.

Such are the circumstances afflicting Dexter Morgan, title character of Showtime's "Dexter," as the series broadcasts its ninth episode and begins the final third of its 12-episode second season.

It's been an eventful eight episodes so far with the normally asocial Dexter (Michael C. Hall) juggling two love interests - Rita (Julie Benz), the demure mother of two who had been his steady girlfriend, and Lila (Jaime Murray of AMC's "Hu$tle"), the willowy, unstable "sponsor" from Narcotics Anonymous who he met while attending NA meetings under false pretenses.

At the same time, Dexter's also trying to steer clear of suspicion as the FBI and the Miami police (for which he works as a forensics tech) investigate the multiple murders which he himself committed, following the discovery of the spot underwater where he submerged his victims.

It's a far cry from Season One, when all Dexter had to worry about was another serial killer who turned out to be his long lost brother.

"There are so many spinning plates [in Season Two]. There was a sort of streamlined trajectory to the story the first season and the second is just madness. [Dexter is] getting more frantic and haphazard," says the actor who plays the tousle-haired Dexter, Michael C. Hall, who wore his hair much shorter when he played the buttoned-down and uptight David Fisher on "Six Feet Under."

When "Six Feet Under" ran its course in August 2005, "there were certainly things that came my way," said Hall, 36, who grew up around Raleigh, N.C., and later earned a performing arts masters at NYU.

"The last thing I thought I'd do was a TV show because I felt pretty convinced that I was phenomenally spoiled doing 'Six Feet Under' in terms of the character and people I worked with. On all fronts, that show was exceptional."

But when "Dexter" came along, the challenge of playing a secret serial killer who hides in plain sight in the guise of an easygoing single man living in Miami, along with an opportunity for the first time in his career to be the star of a TV show, were too tempting to resist.

"The character was something I couldn't pass up," said Hall in an interview over lunch recently at the Hudson Hotel in midtown. "I think in a lot of ways I felt like I'd spent five seasons on 'Six Feet Under' preparing to be ready for such an opportunity."

The Hollywood writers strike has had no effect on the production of "Dexter" because Season Two - filmed principally at the same facility, Sunset Gower Studios, where "Six Feet Under" was filmed and where "Heroes" currently makes its home - was finished before the strike started. Production on Season Three won't begin until next spring.

Hall, who is currently single following a recent divorce from actress Amy Spanger, said he has no idea where the producers and writers of "Dexter" will take the character next season.

"The second season has a different character than the first and the finale has a different character as well," he said. "But there is a sense of resolution and a sort of stage being set for a new beginning - whatever that might be. I mean, when we finished the first season, I had no idea where things were headed and I'm kind of in the same place about the third, but in a good way."

DEXTER
Sunday, 9 p.m., Showtime


http://www.nypost.com/seven/11252007...388.htm?page=1
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post #727 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Nachosgrande View Post

I wonder if his motives towards Debra are a means to an end with Dexter.

So I take it nobody agrees with this post I posted earlier this week?

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I think it's pretty clear. Lundy is a control freak and wants some young easy to manipulate tail, hence Deb, who is such a pushover it's not even funny.

Deb wants a father figure, because her dad was too fixated with Dexter to be what Deb needed, so she craves what Harry should have been to her, hence her attraction to older distinguished law enforcement.

I don't think it's any more than that.

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post #728 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 03:29 PM
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So I take it nobody agrees with this post I posted earlier this week?

Other than Deb being in the sack with the antagonist (just like last season) I don't see the side angle yet, but we do have 4 epps left. Plenty of time to get it under way
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post #729 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 07:57 PM
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Wow!
Wonderful episode. Cheers.
I originally thought Dexter killed Doaks. The blurting out "sleeping with Lundy" was funny.
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post #730 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 08:21 PM
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What an episode... what a rollercoaster ride (less than 50 minutes yet it felt like half-an-hour or so)... what a f***ed-up (and symbolism-free) opening dream inside Dex's mind (LOL!)... what a show!

So what if last week's preview about Dex being caught and brought to Lundy was a misleading tease? I can't remember a time when watching a TV show has been more tense and biting my nails harder than when 'Resistance is Futile' aired. The only glaring negative I see is that Lundy coming to suspect and be convinced Doakes is the Bay Harbor Butcher is too easy and predictable, rendering his personification of the 'Zen' master throughout the season a little too gullable in this episode. In the previous episode Lundy chews Dex for his screw-up, and the next episode Lundy hands Dex the most important piece of evidence about the biggest serial killer case in Miami history? Too inconsistent and out-of-character for Lundy. Of course this could change if Lundy doesn't really believe Doakes is the BHB and only wants to bring him for questioning because he believes/suspects Dex or someone else (Deborah?) to be the BHB. I'd also like to know how the hell did Doakes get from Haiti all the way back to Florida, planted a tracking device on Dex's boat (maybe he did this before taking off to Haiti) and then got to Dexter just as he was about to dump Jimenez' body. A little too James Bond/impossible-concidence for my blood, but who can complain when it left us with such a crazy-cool set-up for what's to come next week.

I'm glad Batista is going to get a little more face time in the last third of the season (based on this episode and the preview for next week's) since I felt his character was kind-of ignored and neglected through most of this season. Batista's facial expression when looking at Lundy after Deborah blurted out to the office she and Lundy were sleeping together (a look any guy who's been on the dating circle knows perfectly) had me bent over on the couch from laughing so hard. The scenes between Dexter and Rita were moving (I nearly cried when Dex admitted his mistake for sleeping with Lila, then laughed when they reconciled with the G-Men flanking Dex's shoulders), the flashbacks with Harry when he showed young Dex an execution were awesome (neat use of the reflection on the glass to put Dex right in the condemned prisoner's hood) and Lila stepping back into Dexter's life with his colleagues added to an already tense-beyond-belief episode. The Lundy-Deborah romance is shaping up nicely, and for the ladies we got some manly ass nudity to compensate for the ample sight of Ms. 'Pardon My Tits' for the past few weeks (in which M.C. Hall also got to show some beefcake). What can I say about Keith Carradine doing nudity other than the obvious? Baby's got back!

And I got a personal kick when I saw a friend from college appear on this episode. Brian Scolaro, who I went to school with at the State University of New York (SUNY) New Paltz in the mid-90's, played the forensic guy that was giving Dex a hard time with his computer password and then was Dex's bitch when Doakes was named a suspect. So on all accounts a home run out of the park for "Dexter," but again this series is hitting on all cylinders so often it's hard to not keep one's expectations high for the following week. The fact Showtime this week actually plugged next week's "Dexter" at the end instead of "Brotherhood" (and the chat on Sho.com with the actors after the season finale airs), combined with last week's record-setting ratings, shows that even Showtime is aware of how red-hot "Dexter" is. Can't wait for next week!
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post #731 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 08:29 PM
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Wow indeed. Excellent episode. Sets up for a fascinating ending to the season. Just great TV.

The only thing that seemed somewhat odd to me is that Lundy singled out Doakes, and only Doakes, as a suspect (and not Dexter for example), "because he was the lead detective on 4 of them" or something, coupled with his special forces training, and the need to make things personal. That's not to say those things aren't relevant, just that there would seem to be other suspects in-house. For example the point that Dexter was the blood dude on at least 3 of them and his "sloppy" work lead to their release would seem suspicious, since Dexter is so methodical and exact, as Lundy has stated to him on several occassions. I suppose Doakes recent public behavior towards Dexter didn't help. In any case, it is believable still to me, and it was an excellent episode.
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post #732 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 08:33 PM
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An old man walks into a pub in Scottland, his feet shuffling, his back bent. He drags himself onto a stool and orders a beer. Placing the full glass in front of him, the bartender inquires upon his sad face.
The man answers with a smoky and trembling voice and a Scottish accent:
Ah, tell ya man! This pub, this very pub we're just sitting in. I built it, with me own hands! But do they call me the Pubmaker? Naa! See the wall over there, that protects our town? I built it, with me own hands! But do they call me the Wallmaker? And the bridge, you know, that crosses our river, I built it, with me own hands! But do they call me the Bridgemaker?
But I tell ya, man! YOU F*CK ONE GOAT!


classic Lila. This is now my #1 cant miss show on TV. Hell I tivoed the Wildcats game and watched Dexter live.

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post #733 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 08:34 PM
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In the previous episode Lundy chews Dex for his screw-up, and the next episode Lundy hands Dex the most important piece of evidence about the biggest serial killer case in Miami history?

Yeah, that seems odd.
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post #734 of 6863 Old 11-25-2007, 09:51 PM
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Yeah, that seems odd.

My guess is that Lundy already had the box dusted for fingerprints and checked for trace evidence and found Dexter's prints on it. Since Dexter was a possible suspect and because of the presence of trace evidence, Lundy calls in Dexter to test him. When he reports that that no finger prints were found, Lundy will know that he has some involvement (i.e. the prints weren't placed by Doakes).

Maybe I've watched too much Colombo, but it always seems like the more a suspect tries to throw off the clever detective, the more readily they get caught.
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post #735 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 02:26 AM
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And I got a personal kick when I saw a friend from college appear on this episode. Brian Scolaro, who I went to school with at the State University of New York (SUNY) New Paltz in the mid-90's, played the forensic guy that was giving Dex a hard time with his computer password and then was Dex's bitch when Doakes was named a suspect.

Couldn't quite place him but I knew I'd seen him before.

IMDB reveals: he was one of the two Miller brothers who owned the bookstore on Pam Anderson's "Stacked" show on Fox.
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post #736 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 02:30 AM
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My guess is that Lundy already had the box dusted for fingerprints and checked for trace evidence and found Dexter's prints on it.

Doesn't Dexter always have gloves on when he handles the slides and puts the box back in the AC unit? I may be wrong here, but I've never noticed him to slip up on wearing gloves at any opportunity.
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post #737 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 02:33 AM
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Originally Posted by YoungC55 View Post

The blurting out "sleeping with Lundy" was funny.

As was the Captain's line when explaining why the forensics was going to be kept in-house. Let's see if I can get it right... something like "the public's trust in us is about to get one big a** f***ing!"
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post #738 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 02:41 AM
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Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

I'd also like to know how the hell did Doakes get from Haiti all the way back to Florida, planted a tracking device on Dex's boat (maybe he did this before taking off to Haiti) and then got to Dexter just as he was about to dump Jimenez' body. A little too James Bond/impossible-concidence for my blood, but who can complain when it left us with such a crazy-cool set-up for what's to come next week.

And didn't Dex talk about a 20-minute walk to his NEW MARINA? So he'd obviously moved his boat from where they'd put up the surveillance cameras at the old marina.

So how did Doakes know where the boat was now newly kept?

And he gets back from Haiti with exactly plenty of time to do all of this tracking (without being seen, of course, even though Dex is well aware of the Feds tailing him and has also observed Doakes tailing him on numerous occasions) and pop in at just the final moment?

Aw... who cares? THIS STUFF IS GREAT!!! Best show on TV.


Now, how will Dex get back to his apartment, with a bullet wound in his thigh, and not be detected by the security crew who are staked out and apparently did not have the brains to position someone from the group out back of the building, so as to see Dex's escape out the back window! What... six people in suits and dresses all standing in front of the front stairs, the whole night?

That bullet wound is going to be a problem I suspect.
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post #739 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 05:39 AM
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Dex's boat has GPS, he used the GPS on his boat to locate him.

Any GPS device can be used to track the unit.
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post #740 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 06:06 AM
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Best show on TV for sure...

ÂNothing attempted, nothing achievedÂ
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post #741 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by JimmyTango View Post

Dex's boat has GPS, he used the GPS on his boat to locate him.

Any GPS device can be used to track the unit.

I thought a device capable of "being tracked" had to emit a signal capable of being tracked. Portable handheld GPS units receive the signal emitted by GPS satellites. GPS-trackable cellphones emit a signal picked up by the cell towers. But you can't just arbitrarily "track" any other Garmin GPS unit from another Garmin GPS unit, since they're not designed to be "tracked".

Also, I don't think that just because my cell phone has the GPS-emitting feature turned on (so that I can be physically found in case of emergency) that anybody but my cell phone carrier (and their cell towers, and likely the police when they need to tap in) are aware of the probably encrypted signals emitted by my cell phone and can "track" my position. I don't think it's true that "any GPS device can be used to track the unit".

So why would Dex's boat, with engines off and docked, have a GPS device in its navigation gear that is always emitting a signal that would allow it to be tracked? He's not out at sea, where such a safety measure might be appropriate, and he certainly doesn't want to "leave his engine running" at the dock where he's completing his work. Once the engines and power are turned off, I would think the GPS-emitting function (if present) would shut down as well. Doesn't seem like Dex to leave that on, even if he hadn't known Doakes was on his trail, if he'd ever even turned on this feature in the first place. Why would he need to... he's very familiar with the Miami waterways, apparently.

It's one thing to have a GPS navigation device, but it's another to have a GPS trackable/emitting device turned on, and yet a third thing to have an appropriately tuned and decryptable "GPS scanner" to track the GPS-emitting device. So unless Doakes planted a trackable partner device (like Lo-Jacker) on Dex's boat (which brings back my earlier questions on timing, and when/how), I'm not sure how this all falls into place.

I don't want to get too hung up on this detail, but it does appear that the writers are falling into a bit of James Bond "poetic license" of late, for added dramatic effect.
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post #742 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 07:24 AM
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Doakes put the GPS tracking on his boat at some point. It is not clear when. It could have been a month ago back when he was always following him or after the fight in the office. Remember Dex has not been using the boat as much recently. Since the wipe down where he was caught on camera he has stayed away from the boat just moved it to a new marina.


So will he kill Doakes? I'm worried that the finale is going to be a cliffhanger which I do not like one bit since season 1 ended everything nicely and stands by itself. If Season 2 can manage to tie everything up I will be impressed as Weeds and other shows always leave the audience hanging which in my opinion would not do justice to Dexter. I love this show and think it is headed towards being the best show ever produced, however that opinion can be changed on how this season wraps up. Bring on a fresh story for season 3 how about dearly devoted Dexter!

I was lucky in the order, but I've always been lucky when it comes to killin' folk - Unforgiven cannot wait for the hd-dvd of this gem
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post #743 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Ostwald View Post

My guess is that Lundy already had the box dusted for fingerprints and checked for trace evidence and found Dexter's prints on it. Since Dexter was a possible suspect and because of the presence of trace evidence, Lundy calls in Dexter to test him. When he reports that that no finger prints were found, Lundy will know that he has some involvement (i.e. the prints weren't placed by Doakes).

Maybe I've watched too much Colombo, but it always seems like the more a suspect tries to throw off the clever detective, the more readily they get caught.

I think we Dexterphiles have a tendency to over analyze the police/FBI thought process, the conclusions they reach and that PHYSICAL evidence determines everything for them. Lundy is following the PHYSICAL evidence. His profiling merely allowed him to focus on fewer suspects. Doakes easily fits the profile. In addition, Doakes stalked and attacked Dexter. Doakes refused to cooperate with Lundy's investigation and left the country. The slides were found in Doakes car. Lundy has no logical reason to conclude that Dexter could be the BHB because he screwed up the blood work on ONE BHB case. Doakes was the lead detective on FOUR BHB cases. Dexter doesn't fit Lundy's alpha male, angry, vengeful, capable and compulsive vigilante profile. Lundy could have easily concluded that Dexter was intimidated by Doakes if he didn't accept Dexter's overworked and overtired excuse. By the way, Dexter would know if the slides and case had been dusted for fingerprints. And what possible trace evidence could there be that would lead only to Dexter AFTER Doakes had handled it and it had been in Doakes car trunk? Generally speaking, the suspect who looks guilty is guilty when there is PHYSICAL evidence to substantiate it. There is significant circumstantial evidence against Doakes right now and none against Dexter. I think Dexter gave us a hint of things to come in the preview of next week's episode when he made the point that the only person who could save Doakes right now is him....Dexter. Dexter is the controlling lead for the chain of PHYSICAL evidence....the slides. They were in Doakes possession, but what will they reveal? What PHYSICAL evidence could Dexter find that either absolve Doakes or connect them to someone else? Maybe the FBI techs will screw something up. It's fun to try to figure out what might happen, but it's probably not going to be as brilliantly complicated as we Dexterphiles imagine it would be.
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post #744 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 08:03 AM
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The problem is going to be that there's no way Doakes doesn't have an alibi for at least some of those killings that span Dexter's whole life.
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post #745 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank527 View Post

Doakes put the GPS tracking on his boat at some point. It is not clear when. It could have been a month ago back when he was always following him or after the fight in the office. Remember Dex has not been using the boat as much recently. Since the wipe down where he was caught on camera he has stayed away from the boat just moved it to a new marina.

This is exactly what I pulled from the conversation they had as well. Doakes put a GPS tracking device on Dexter's boat, and tracked him.

As far as the slides go Dex HAS touched the slides and the box with his hands and thus the wipe down on the slides AND the box. If they found Dexters prints on any of the evidence you can bet that he wouldnt be doing the lead on it, he would become a suspect.
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post #746 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 08:45 AM
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Spoiler Predictions:

1. Dexter kills Lila.
2. Someone other than Dexter kills Doakes.
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post #747 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 08:46 AM
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There is no way that Dexter can kill Doakes. Doing so would break Harry's rules. As soon as Dexter kills Doakes, he loses all his "morality" and crosses over to being just a killer. Harry's rules are the one thing keeping Dexter somewhat grounded and under control.
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post #748 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by DSperber View Post

I don't want to get too hung up on this detail, but it does appear that the writers are falling into a bit of James Bond "poetic license" of late, for added dramatic effect.

And you know what? This might hurt the replayability of this particular episode and the show a little, but for first-time viewers of "Resistance Is Futile" (either on Showtime airings or DVD) the impact of seeing Doakes pop out of nowhere in the middle of a Florida swamp to confront Dexter is beyond awesome. We've been waiting for 20 episodes for this moment, and for it to come out of left field like that will not be soon forgotten. I was floored!

Now I'm convinced the reason the writer of this episode (Melissa Rosenberg) sent Doakes to Haiti was to fool the audience into thinking Doakes was stuck overseas. It was a deliberate misdirection from the writer so we wouldn't think of Doakes as being anywhere near the vecinity of Dexter. Since our guard was off (mirroring Dex's) the impact of Doakes appearing gun in hand to find Dex 'in fraganti' was the payoff for the early misdirection. And what a payoff it was!
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post #749 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 08:53 AM
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I think you mean "in flagrante delicto".
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post #750 of 6863 Old 11-26-2007, 08:55 AM
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^^^ If you don't get too hung-up on "Dexter's" unrealities then please forgive my screwed-up French.
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