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post #72451 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

I would bet much of that was from people like me who DVRed the show, only to have it cut off right at the beginning of the retrospective segment due to the game running over.

Dont we all know that especially when its a CBS doubleheader weekend (even singleheader it can happen too) all CBS shows that night should be timepadded.

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post #72452 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Let's see:

- Pretty much out of a job due to series cancellation.
- Injured on the job of shooting scenes from cancelled series that no one may ever see.
- House gets crashed into by a drunk driver.

Add to that the last series he was on (Chase) failed, I think he should consider hiding out in a bunker for a while. His luck seems to have taken a turn for the worse.

Or, as Ed Cibrian's ex Brandi Glanville would call it, karma.

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Originally Posted by dcbowboy7 View Post

Dont we all know that especially when its a CBS doubleheader weekend (even singleheader it can happen too) all CBS shows that night should be timepadded.

But only 40% of Americans (at most) have access to DVR's. The rest have to tune in and see their shows real-time, which means a lot of them either tune out or sit around waiting for their show/segment to come around. Sucks, but viewers of CBS shows on Sundays are used to this by now.


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post #72453 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Sucks, but viewers of CBS shows on Sundays are used to this by now.

Thankfully, after decades of indifference, CBS has finally started running "**** will start at hh:mm pm" banners at the top of the hour, no more guessing from the 60 minutes stopwatch.
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post #72454 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 09:05 AM
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Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Fox wins third straight Tuesday night
Averages a 3.6 adults 18-49 rating to No. 2 CBS's 3.3
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - October 5th, 2011

Three weeks into the new season, Fox is officially the network to beat on Tuesdays.

The network won its third straight Tuesday last night, with new comedy "New Girl" once again finishing as the night's top program.

"Girl" averaged a 4.3 adults 18-49 rating at 9 p.m., according to Nielsen, down just a tick from last week's 4.4.

"Girl" has fallen only 10 percent since its surprisingly strong 4.8 debut two weeks ago, a good sign for any new show.

It also continued to grow out of lead-in "Glee," which averaged a 3.5 in the 8 p.m. timeslot.

Most shows on broadcast saw week-to-week declines last night, with ABC's "Body of Proof" the exception. It was up 11 percent from last week's 1.9 to a 2.1 last night.

New CBS drama "Unforgettable" began to stabilize, seeing a smaller week-to-week decline. It averaged a 2.4, winning the 10 p.m. timeslot and off only 4 percent from the previous week.

NBC's "The Biggest Loser" continues to struggle from 8 to 10 p.m. The aging reality show slid 13 percent from last week, to a 2.0.

Meanwhile, Fox finished first for the night among 18-49s with a 3.6 average overnight rating and a 9 share. CBS was second at 3.3/9, ABC third at 2.2/6, NBC fourth at 2.0/5, Univision fifth at 1.5/4, CW sixth at 0.6/2 and Telemundo seventh at 0.5/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-two percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. CBS began the night in the lead with a 4.1 for "NCIS," followed by Fox with a 3.5 for "Glee." NBC was third with a 1.9 for "Loser," ABC fourth with a 1.7 for "Dancing with the Stars: The Encore Performance," Univision fifth with a 1.6 for the premiere of "Una Familia con Suerte," CW sixth with a 0.6 for "90210" and Telemundo seventh with a 0.4 for "Mi Corazon Insiste."

Fox took the lead at 9 p.m. with a 3.6 for "Girl" (4.3) and "Raising Hope" (2.9), while CBS slipped to second with a 3.4 for "NCIS: Los Angeles." ABC was third with a 2.8 for "Dancing with the Stars Results," NBC fourth with a 2.1 for more "Loser," Univision fifth with a 1.5 for "La Fuerza del Destino," CW sixth with a 0.6 for "Ringer" and Telemundo seventh with a 0.5 for "Flor Salvaje."

CBS moved back to first at 10 p.m. with a 2.4 for "Unforgettable," with ABC second with a 2.1 for "Proof." NBC was third with a 2.0 for "Parenthood," Univision fourth with a 1.2 for "Aqui y Ahora" and Telemundo fifth with a 0.6 for "La Casa de al Lado."

CBS led the night among households with a 9.4 average overnight rating and a 15 share. ABC was second at 7.6/12, Fox third at 4.6/7, NBC fourth at 3.5/5, Univision fifth at 1.9/3, CW sixth at 1.0/1 and Telemundo seventh at 0.7/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art...sday-night.asp


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post #72455 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 09:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Let's see:

- Pretty much out of a job due to series cancellation.
- Injured on the job of shooting scenes from cancelled series that no one may ever see.
- House gets crashed into by a drunk driver.

Add to that the last series he was on (Chase) failed, I think he should consider hiding out in a bunker for a while. His luck seems to have taken a turn for the worse.

Well let's see cheat on your wife with Leanne Rimes who was cheating on her husband. I call it karma.
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post #72456 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by HDTVChallenged View Post

Thankfully, after decades of indifference, CBS has finally started running "**** will start at hh:mm pm" banners at the top of the hour, no more guessing from the 60 minutes stopwatch.

I've been signed up for email notification from CBS for a couple of years. Check out http://www.cbs.com/eye-lerts/
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post #72457 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 09:19 AM
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TUESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media INsight's Blog.


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post #72458 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by BCF68 View Post

Well let's see cheat on your wife with Leanne Rimes who was cheating on her husband. I call it karma.

Next thing you know Cibrian will have a dark cloud raining over his head inside his hospital room that's constantly throwing lightning bolts at him... guy just can't catch a break!


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post #72459 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 09:30 AM
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TV Notes
'Hey Dude' returns to TeenNick, '90s block moves to primetime
By Lynette Rice, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - October 5th, 2011

TeenNick’s ’90s block is just too crazy popular to air at midnight, so the cable net has decided to move it where even more 20-something can appreciate a good rerun when they see one. Beginning this Friday, The ’90s Are All That will move up two hours to 10 p.m., where the rotating block of beloved Nick shows will now air seven days a week.

That’s not all: Hey Dude will now have a much-coveted spot in the lineup, alongside All That, Kenan & Kel and Doug. And Stick Stickly – aka the famous popsicle stick from the ’90s — who make a triumphant return to host a new interactive segment called “UPick with Stick.” Every Friday night, Stick (voiced by Paul Christie, who first originated the role for Nick) will highlight ’90s Nickelodeon episodes chosen by viewers via Facebook and www.90sAreAllThat.com.

Still like the idea of watching Kenan and Co. at midnight? Have no fear: TeenNick still plans to replay the block from 12 to 2 a.m. (At 10, the block will replace back-to-back repeats of Malcolm in the Middle and What I Like About You).

For those who forgot about the goofy conceit behind Hey Dude, here’s a quick reminder: The live-action series was one of Nickelodeon’s first that aired from 1989 to 1991. Shot on location in Tucson, Ariz., the laugher centered on a wacky group of teenagers working at the Bar None western dude ranch and starred David Brisbin (Mr. Ernst), David Lascher (Ted), Christine Taylor (Melody), Kelly Brown (Brad), and Joe Torres (Danny).

TeenNick says The ‘90s Are All That has scored huge gains for the net, posting double-digit increases over last year (50%) among adults 18-34 in the time period. The reruns are a throw back to Nick’s roots in 1991, when it first expanded into original programming with Ren & Stimpy, Doug and Rugrats.

http://insidetv.ew.com/2011/10/05/he...ick-90s-block/


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post #72460 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 09:34 AM
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TV/Business Notes
Univision to distribute its top programs online through Hulu
By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - October 5th, 2011

For the first time, Univision will make its popular Spanish-language novelas, variety shows and reality series available online, through Internet television provider Hulu.

The deal represents a milestone for Univision, the fifth-largest television network in the U.S., whose popular programming dominates the Spanish-language market.

Starting later this year, Univision said, it will make some of its prime-time shows available on the free, ad-supported Hulu.com site a day after an episode's initial airing. A more extensive collection of the current season's shows and past series can be found on Hulu Plus, the subscription service that charges $7.99 a month.

"The deal is significant, not just for Univision and Hulu, but for individual [viewers] as well," said Tonia O'Connor, Univision Communications' president of distribution and sales. "This is the first time we are making this content available online."

Univision did not identify which of its shows it planned to offer for free online viewing, and which would require a paid subscription. Its partership with Mexico City-based television giant Grupo Televisa enables Univision to draw from a trove of low-cost Televisa-produced telenovelas, which fuel its prime-time ratings.

Last week, Univision accounted for the top 10 programs among Latino viewers, according to Nielsen ratings.

Andy Forssell, Hulu's senior vice president of content acquisition, said the partnership with Univision would enable the online video service to reach a population of 50 million Latino people in the United States -- a group advertisers are eager to reach.

"It's young, it's active, it's upwardly mobile and it's hard to get to," Forssell said. "It's exactly the audience you'd expect to be online in force, but they haven't been. There has not been any significant amount of long-form Spanish-language content online."

Forssell said the Univision deal will break down the barriers to online viewing of these shows.

Univision tapped into demand for online Spanish-language content when it streamed World Cup soccer matches in June 2010. When it allowed viewers to watch full episodes of one of its novelas, "Eva Luna," the network discovered the online offering fueled television viewing. The show's finale in April drew 9.5 million viewers, making it the highest-rated domestically produced novela in history.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/ente...ms-online.html


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post #72461 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

She came in 3rd in the news demo, 4th overall:

P2+ (000s)--25-54 (000s)--35-64 (000s)

FNC The Fox Report W/S.SMITH
1,868--409--816
CNN ERIN BURNETT OUTFRONT
535--215--279
MSNBC Hardball WITH C. MATTHEWS
796--188--408
CNBC Kudlow Report
204--51--87
HLN ISSUES
714--236--394

per tvbythenumbers

Just as I suspected. Thanks.

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post #72462 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by HDTVChallenged View Post

Thankfully, after decades of indifference, CBS has finally started running "**** will start at hh:mm pm" banners at the top of the hour, no more guessing from the 60 minutes stopwatch.

I record the 8 and 9 PM Central CBS shows and have solved the game length problem by simply extending the 9 PM recording by an hour. So far this has been enough padding.

When news breaks...we fix it.
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post #72463 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Or, as Ed Cibrian's ex Brandi Glanville would call it, karma.


But only 40% of Americans (at most) have access to DVR's. The rest have to tune in and see their shows real-time, which means a lot of them either tune out or sit around waiting for their show/segment to come around. Sucks, but viewers of CBS shows on Sundays are used to this by now.

Much less of a problem when you consider only Central/Eastern viewers are affected by NFL overrun. Last Sunday's CBS lineup started at regular times for Western/Mountain viewers.
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post #72464 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Dont we all know that especially when its a CBS doubleheader weekend (even singleheader it can happen too) all CBS shows that night should be timepadded.

Since it's been years since the last time I watched anything on CBS Sundays, no I didn't think about it. I recorded it just to see what they did with his last regular segment, since I used to watch the show years ago.

I wasn't alone since some the comments on the CBS site mentioned other people had the same issue. A lot of people who aren't regular viewers, but were curious about it, recorded it to watch later.

Not all of us watch football or give a damn about it to remember it can't actually end on time. Some of us wonder what the point of having a clock at all is if they keep stopping it. We're also the ones who would love to see every bit of sports go to a paid tier so it doesn't mess with regularly scheduled shows.


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post #72465 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

...Not all of us watch football or give a damn about it to remember it can't actually end on time. Some of us wonder what the point of having a clock at all is if they keep stopping it. We're also the ones who would love to see every bit of sports go to a paid tier so it doesn't mess with regularly scheduled shows...

"Tis, Tis, and Tis."
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post #72466 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 02:06 PM
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Tech/TV Notes
Microsoft adding new television content to Xbox game console
By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - October 5th, 2011

Microsoft Corp. is adding significantly more video content to its Xbox 360 game console, though it's not yet ready to replace the cable box.

The technology giant has reached deals with nearly 40 television distributors and content providers that will offer more TV shows via the Xbox Live online service by this holiday season.

However, with only certain channels and programs available, the agreements fall short of aspirations Microsoft discussed at the E3 industry conference in June of making its console an all-in-one entertainment device that could replace traditional set-top boxes from cable and satellite television services.

Moreover, users will still have to subscribe to traditional cable services in order to access much of their content on the Xbox.

The nation's largest cable TV distributor, Comcast Corp., said it would put its Xfinity service on the game console, allowing its subscribers to watch a wide variety of TV shows on demand. Telecommunications giant Verizon also will offer some live channels from its FiOS TV service.

And, premium cable channels HBO and Epix will allow subscribers to watch their movies and original programs on demand through the Xbox, as will NBC Universal-owned networks Bravo and Syfy. Internationally, the BBC will be available in the U.K.

Marc Whitten, vice president of the Xbox Live service, said the agreements expand the console's entertainment offerings. Some 35 million people use the Xbox Live service, which extends the gaming experience online and provides access to movies, TV shows and music.

Over the last few years Microsoft has made a wide variety of TV shows available to watch or rent and also added popular on-demand offerings from Netflix and ESPN.

Roughly 40% of the time people spend on Xbox Live is devoted to activities other than gaming, with video consumption up 300% from a year ago, said Whitten.

A new version of Xbox Live will be released in time for the holidays to allow people to use voice and gestures (instead of remote controls) to search for movies and TV shows with Microsoft's Kinect controller.

"What we're trying to do is change the way the content is experienced in the living room," Whitten said.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/ente...-hbo-epix.html


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post #72467 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

But only 40% of Americans (at most) have access to DVR's. The rest have to tune in and see their shows real-time, which means a lot of them either tune out or sit around waiting for their show/segment to come around. Sucks, but viewers of CBS shows on Sundays are used to this by now.

Yea but i was just replying to the post about missing the end of the show.

Like you said someone without a dvr wouldve still seen it if they stuck around to watch & if they didnt care enough to stick around then they really werent that interested i guess.

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post #72468 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 02:19 PM
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Notice the new debut schedule for "Rules of Engagement" in the last paragraph; sounds like CBS is having second thoughts about letting this utility player go to waste on Saturday nights.

TV Notes
CBS orders full season of '2 Broke Girls'
By Jon Weisman, Variety - October 5th, 2011

For the second straight season, CBS has successfully launched a new Monday sitcom, picking up "2 Broke Girls" for a full season.

Starring Kat Dennings and Beth Behrs, "Girls" has averaged a 4.6 rating among viewers 18-49 and more than 11 million viewers overall over the past two weeks, sandwiched between the Eye's "How I Met Your Mother" and "Two and a Half Men."

Michael Patrick King exec produces "Girls," the highest-rated new show of the fall season, thanks in part to the huge sampling it received (19.4 million viewers) for its debut, airing immediately after the season premiere of "Men" with Charlie Sheen replacement Ashton Kutcher.

Whitney Cummings, who co-wrote the pilot for "Girls" and serves as an exec consultant for the Warner Bros. TV series, has now had both of her shows picked up for a full season -- her NBC sitcom "Whitney" received the greenlight Tuesday.

Matthew Moy, Jonathan Kite and Garrett Morris co-star in "Girls."

The pickup cements CBS' Monday night lineup, which wraps with "Mike & Molly" at 9:30 p.m. and "Hawaii Five-0" at 10. CBS' other new comedy for the fall, Thursday's "How To Be a Gentleman," is less secure after dropping roughly 40% of the audience from its "The Big Bang Theory" lead-in when it premiered Sept. 29.

CBS has pushed back the start date of veteran "Rules of Engagement," which has been slated for Saturdays, to Oct. 15. The comedy is a potential replacement for "Gentleman" on Thursdays if the latter continues to shed viewers.

http://www.variety.com/article/VR111...CNews%7CTVNews


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post #72469 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Since it's been years since the last time I watched anything on CBS Sundays, no I didn't think about it. I recorded it just to see what they did with his last regular segment, since I used to watch the show years ago.

I wasn't alone since some the comments on the CBS site mentioned other people had the same issue. A lot of people who aren't regular viewers, but were curious about it, recorded it to watch later.

Not all of us watch football or give a damn about it to remember it can't actually end on time. Some of us wonder what the point of having a clock at all is if they keep stopping it. We're also the ones who would love to see every bit of sports go to a paid tier so it doesn't mess with regularly scheduled shows.

Hardly the NFL's fault. Fox doesn't have this problem. CBS just refuses to pad the schedule.


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post #72470 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

I record the 8 and 9 PM Central CBS shows and have solved the game length problem by simply extending the 9 PM recording by an hour. So far this has been enough padding.

In a world where the majority of DVRs never have enough drive space or tuners, extending a one hour show by at least another hour is a poor solution.

As I mentioned in the Good Wife thread, this problem could be solved if broadcasters and providers started to implement an equivalent to Accurate Recording or PDC. Europe has had this in place for almost twenty years now and it worked with VCRs. It's a simple system that involves a device waiting for a signal transmitted with the broadcast to indicate the show is starting. That way a recording never starts too late or finishes too early.


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post #72471 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 04:21 PM
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Tech/TV Notes
'Tower Heist' to hit video-on-demand three weeks after theatrical debut
By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - October 5th, 2011

In an audacious move that could shake up the way Hollywood has done business for decades, Universal Pictures plans to make its upcoming Eddie Murphy action comedy film "Tower Heist" available through video-on-demand just three weeks after it debuts in theaters Nov. 4.

But that convenience will come with a hefty asking price -- $59.99 -- that many cash-strapped consumers will balk at in the current economic slump.

The proposed test, which will be offered in Atlanta and Portland, Ore., to approximately 500,000 digital cable subscribers of Universal’s corporate parent, Comcast Corp., marks the first time a major studio movie will be available to watch in-home while still playing in thousands of theaters.

A person with knowledge of the "Tower Heist" release strategy who was not authorized to discuss it publicly confirmed the details for The Times. Spokeswomen for Universal and Comcast declined to comment.

If enough people take advantage of Universal's offer without a significant drop in box-office receipts, other studios could adopt similar strategies in the future. Such a development would end the industry's long tradition of imposing a delay of several months between when a movie is shown in theaters and when it is accessible on television screens.

Studios are looking to such experiments as a way to shift their age-old business models and generate additional revenue that can help compensate for plunging DVD sales that have been undermining movie economics over the last several years.

Universal's move is likely to infuriate theater owners, some of whom were informed of the plan this week after more than a year of discussions on the topic. The cinema industry has reacted angrily to any attempt by studios to shrink the traditional "window" of 90 days between the time a movie debuts in theaters and when it's available for home view.

Executives at the nation’s three largest theater chains -- AMC Entertainment, Regal Entertainment and Cinemark -- were outraged in the spring when four studios including Universal worked with satellite television distributor DirecTV on a test that made certain movies available for video-on-demand 60 days after they premiered in theaters for $29.99.

Spokespeople for the three companies did not return calls or declined to comment.

Many studio executives considered that test a bust because minimal promotion and relatively unpopular films such as "Sucker Punch" and "Paul" created a tepid consumer response and little data to evaluate.

That probably won't be the case with "Tower Heist," which also stars Ben Stiller and Matthew Broderick and is one of the highest profile releases of the fall. With the picture still in theaters it will benefit from word-of-mouth if it's a hit, along with a theatrical marketing campaign still fresh in the public's mind that will be supplemented with advertising in the test cities to promote the VOD test.

While the test probably won't be broadly popular, Universal is betting it will appeal to certain families and groups of friends who are eager to see "Tower Heist" but don't want to drive to a theater and pay for multiple tickets along with popcorn and drinks.

That's precisely what theater operators fear, at a time when attendance is already down. They have argued that so-called "premium video-on-demand" will shift consumer behavior, encouraging people to wait to watch a movie at home rather than seeing it in theaters a few weeks earlier.

Universal is assuring exhibitors that they will be compensated if "Tower Heist" ticket sales are lower than expected during the premium VOD test. Whether studio and exhibition executives can agree on what box office grosses would have been, however, remains to be seen.

If cinema owners are angry enough about the strategy they could threaten to not play "Tower Heist" in the two test markets when they debut on VOD or, potentially, at all. Such a response, if shared by most exhibitors, could even force Universal to alter or cancel its plan.

The studios seem committed to establishing a premium VOD business, however, and will probably launch similar offerings down the line with or without theaters' cooperation.

Universal and Comcast selected Atlanta and Portland for the test because they were seeking midsize markets that have a certain number of digital cable subscribers and moviegoing patterns similar to other cities where premium VOD won't be available. The companies believe that will make it easier to compare the results.

The "Tower Heist" plan would mark the most significant collaboration to date between Universal and its corporate parent since Comcast acquired media conglomerate NBCUniversal early this year. It represents a bold but risky step by Universal Pictures Chairman Adam Fogelson, NBCUniversal Chief Executive Steve Burke and Comcast Chief Executive Brian Roberts as they position their company on the leading edge of one of the most controversial issues in the entertainment business.

To fend off potential complaints that it is favoring its owner, Universal will offer other cable and Internet companies the chance to release "Tower Heist" via video-on-demand at the same time and on the same terms as Comcast.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/ente...cal-debut.html


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Tech/TV Notes
'Tower Heist' to hit video-on-demand three weeks after theatrical debut
By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - October 5th, 2011

In an audacious move that could shake up the way Hollywood has done business for decades, Universal Pictures plans to make its upcoming Eddie Murphy action comedy film "Tower Heist" available through video-on-demand just three weeks after it debuts in theaters Nov. 4.

But that convenience will come with a hefty asking price -- $59.99 -- that many cash-strapped consumers will balk at in the current economic slump.

So not only is it $60, but it's also three weeks after release and more importantly "Tower Heist."

If this was a major summer blockbuster with massive hype then that would be something that might justify the insanity of paying that much money to begin with.

If theaters think this is worth protesting then they are completely out of touch with reality. The person willing to spend $60 is never going to go to the theater anyway.


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post #72473 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 04:49 PM
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Steve Jobs just died?

Cancer sucks. :thumbdown:
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Steve Jobs just died?

Cancer sucks. :thumbdown:

http://www.apple.com/stevejobs/

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...210811910.html
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post #72475 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 05:01 PM
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http://www.apple.com/stevejobs/

Very cool page. Simple and neat.

Thank you for the posting.
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post #72476 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 05:05 PM
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Here's another.

http://www.apple.com/
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post #72477 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 06:03 PM
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Obituary
Steve Jobs, Apple's Visionary, Dies at 56
By John Markoff, The New York Times - October 6th, 2011

Steven P. Jobs, the visionary co-founder of Apple who helped usher in the era of personal computers and then led a cultural transformation in the way music, movies and mobile communications were experienced in the digital age, died Wednesday. He was 56.

The death was announced by Apple, the company Mr. Jobs and his high school friend Stephen Wozniak started in 1976 in a suburban California garage.

Mr. Jobs had waged a long and public struggle with cancer, remaining the face of the company even as he underwent treatment. He continued to introduce new products for a global market in his trademark blue jeans even as he grew gaunt and frail.

He underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer in 2004, received a liver transplant in 2009 and took three medical leaves of absence as Apple’s chief executive before stepping down in August and turning over the helm to Timothy D. Cook, the chief operating officer. When he left, he was still engaged in the company’s affairs, negotiating with another Silicon Valley executive only weeks earlier.

“I have always said that if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s C.E.O., I would be the first to let you know,” Mr. Jobs said in a letter released by the company. “Unfortunately, that day has come.”

By then, having mastered digital technology and capitalized on his intuitive marketing sense, Mr. Jobs had largely come to define the personal computer industry and an array of digital consumer and entertainment businesses centered on the Internet. He had also become a very rich man, worth an estimated $8.3 billion.

Eight years after founding Apple, Mr. Jobs led the team that designed the Macintosh computer, a breakthrough in making personal computers easier to use. After a 12-year separation from the company, prompted by a bitter falling-out with his chief executive, John Sculley, he returned in 1997 to oversee the creation of one innovative digital device after another — the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad. These transformed not only product categories like music players and cellphones but also entire industries, like music and mobile communications.

During his years outside Apple, he bought a tiny computer graphics spinoff from the director George Lucas and built a team of computer scientists, artists and animators that became Pixar Animation Studios.

Starting with “Toy Story” in 1995, Pixar produced a string of hit movies, won several Academy Awards for artistic and technological excellence, and made the full-length computer-animated film a mainstream art form enjoyed by children and adults worldwide.

Mr. Jobs was neither a hardware engineer nor a software programmer, nor did he think of himself as a manager. He considered himself a technology leader, choosing the best people possible, encouraging and prodding them, and making the final call on product design.

It was an executive style that had evolved. In his early years at Apple, his meddling in tiny details maddened colleagues, and his criticism could be caustic and even humiliating. But he grew to elicit extraordinary loyalty.

“He was the most passionate leader one could hope for, a motivating force without parallel,” wrote Steven Levy, author of the 1994 book “Insanely Great,” which chronicles the creation of the Mac. “Tom Sawyer could have picked up tricks from Steve Jobs.”

“Toy Story,” for example, took four years to make while Pixar struggled, yet Mr. Jobs never let up on his colleagues. “‘You need a lot more than vision — you need a stubbornness, tenacity, belief and patience to stay the course,” said Edwin Catmull, a computer scientist and a co-founder of Pixar. “In Steve’s case, he pushes right to the edge, to try to make the next big step forward.”

Mr. Jobs was the ultimate arbiter of Apple products, and his standards were exacting. Over the course of a year he tossed out two iPhone prototypes, for example, before approving the third, and began shipping it in June 2007.

To his understanding of technology he brought an immersion in popular culture. In his 20s, he dated Joan Baez; Ella Fitzgerald sang at his 30th birthday party. His worldview was shaped by the ’60s counterculture in the San Francisco Bay Area, where he had grown up, the adopted son of a Silicon Valley machinist. When he graduated from high school in Los Altos in 1972, he said, ”the very strong scent of the 1960s was still there.”

After dropping out of Reed College, a stronghold of liberal thought in Portland, Ore., in 1972, Mr. Jobs led a countercultural lifestyle himself. He told a reporter that taking LSD was one of the two or three most important things he had done in his life. He said there were things about him that people who had not tried psychedelics — even people who knew him well, including his wife — could never understand.

Decades later he flew around the world in his own corporate jet, but he maintained emotional ties to the period in which he grew up. He often felt like an outsider in the corporate world, he said. When discussing the Silicon Valley’s lasting contributions to humanity, he mentioned in the same breath the invention of the microchip and “The Whole Earth Catalog,” a 1960s counterculture publication.

Apple’s very name reflected his unconventionality. In an era when engineers and hobbyists tended to describe their machines with model numbers, he chose the name of a fruit, supposedly because of his dietary habits at the time.

Coming on the scene just as computing began to move beyond the walls of research laboratories and corporations in the 1970s, Mr. Jobs saw that computing was becoming personal — that it could do more than crunch numbers and solve scientific and business problems — and that it could even be a force for social and economic change. And at a time when hobbyist computers were boxy wooden affairs with metal chassis, he designed the Apple II as a sleek, low-slung plastic package intended for the den or the kitchen. He was offering not just products but a digital lifestyle.

He put much stock in the notion of “taste,” a word he used frequently. It was a sensibility that shone in products that looked like works of art and delighted users. Great products, he said, were a triumph of taste, of “trying to expose yourself to the best things humans have done and then trying to bring those things into what you are doing.”

Regis McKenna, a longtime Silicon Valley marketing executive to whom Mr. Jobs turned in the late 1970s to help shape the Apple brand, said Mr. Jobs’s genius lay in his ability to simplify complex, highly engineered products, “to strip away the excess layers of business, design and innovation until only the simple, elegant reality remained.”

Mr. Jobs’s own research and intuition, not focus groups, were his guide. When asked what market research went into the iPad, Mr. Jobs replied: “None. It’s not the consumers’ job to know what they want.”

Early Interests

Steven Paul Jobs was born in San Francisco on Feb. 24, 1955, and put up for adoption by his biological parents, Joanne Carole Schieble and Abdulfattah Jandali, a graduate student from Syria who became a political science professor. He was adopted by Paul and Clara Jobs.

The elder Mr. Jobs, who worked in finance and real estate before returning to his original trade as a machinist, moved his family down the San Francisco Peninsula to Mountain View and then to Los Altos in the 1960s.

Mr. Jobs developed an early interest in electronics. He was mentored by a neighbor, an electronics hobbyist, who built Heathkit do-it-yourself electronics projects. He was brash from an early age. As an eighth grader, after discovering that a crucial part was missing from a frequency counter he was assembling, he telephoned William Hewlett, the co-founder of Hewlett-Packard. Mr. Hewlett spoke with the boy for 20 minutes, prepared a bag of parts for him to pick up and offered him a job as a summer intern.

Mr. Jobs met Mr. Wozniak while attending Homestead High School in neighboring Cupertino. The two took an introductory electronics class there.

The spark that ignited their partnership was provided by Mr. Wozniak’s mother. Mr. Wozniak had graduated from high school and enrolled at the University of California, Berkeley, when she sent him an article from the October 1971 issue of Esquire magazine. The article, “Secrets of the Little Blue Box,” by Ron Rosenbaum, detailed an underground hobbyist culture of young men known as phone phreaks who were illicitly exploring the nation’s phone system.

Mr. Wozniak shared the article with Mr. Jobs, and the two set out to track down an elusive figure identified in the article as Captain Crunch. The man had taken the name from his discovery that a whistle that came in boxes of Cap’n Crunch cereal was tuned to a frequency that made it possible to make free long-distance calls simply by blowing the whistle next to a phone handset.

Captain Crunch was John Draper, a former Air Force electronic technician, and finding him took several weeks. Learning that the two young hobbyists were searching for him, Mr. Draper appeared one day in Mr. Wozniak’s Berkeley dormitory room. Mr. Jobs, who was still in high school, had traveled to Berkeley for the meeting. When Mr. Draper arrived, he entered the room saying simply, “It is I!”

Based on information they gleaned from Mr. Draper, Mr. Wozniak and Mr. Jobs later collaborated on building and selling blue boxes, devices that were widely used for making free — and illegal — phone calls. They raised a total of $6,000 from the effort.

After enrolling at Reed College in 1972, Mr. Jobs left after one semester, but remained in Portland for another 18 months auditing classes. In a commencement address given at Stanford in 2005, he said he had decided to leave college because it was consuming all of his parents’ savings.

Leaving school, however, also freed his curiosity to follow his interests. “I didn’t have a dorm room,” he said in his Stanford speech, “so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned Coke bottles for the 5-cent deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the seven miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on.”

He returned to Silicon Valley in 1974 and took a job there as a technician at Atari, the video game manufacturer. Still searching for his calling, he left after several months and traveled to India with a college friend, Daniel Kottke, who would later become an early Apple employee. Mr. Jobs returned to Atari that fall. In 1975, he and Mr. Wozniak, then working as an engineer at H.P., began attending meetings of the Homebrew Computer Club, a hobbyist group that met at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in Menlo Park, Calif. Personal computing had been pioneered at research laboratories adjacent to Stanford, and it was spreading to the outside world.

“What I remember is how intense he looked,” said Lee Felsenstein, a computer designer who was a Homebrew member. “He was everywhere, and he seemed to be trying to hear everything people had to say.”

Mr. Wozniak designed the original Apple I computer simply to show it off to his friends at the Homebrew. It was Mr. Jobs who had the inspiration that it could be a commercial product.

In early 1976, he and Mr. Wozniak, using their own money, began Apple with an initial investment of $1,300; they later gained the backing of a former Intel executive, A. C. Markkula, who lent them $250,000. Mr. Wozniak would be the technical half and Mr. Jobs the marketing half of the original Apple I Computer. Starting out in the Jobs family garage in Los Altos, they moved the company to a small office in Cupertino shortly thereafter.

In April 1977, Mr. Jobs and Mr. Wozniak introduced Apple II at the West Coast Computer Faire in San Francisco. It created a sensation. Faced with a gaggle of small and large competitors in the emerging computer market, Apple, with its Apple II, had figured out a way to straddle the business and consumer markets by building a computer that could be customized for specific applications.

Sales skyrocketed, from $2 million in 1977 to $600 million in 1981, the year the company went public. By 1983 Apple was in the Fortune 500. No company had ever joined the list so quickly.

The Apple III, introduced in May 1980, was intended to dominate the desktop computer market. I.B.M. would not introduce its original personal computer until 1981. But the Apple III had a host of technical problems, and Mr. Jobs shifted his focus to a new and ultimately short-lived project, an office workstation computer code-named Lisa.

An Apocalyptic Moment

By then Mr. Jobs had made his much-chronicled 1979 visit to Xerox’s research center in Palo Alto, where he saw the Alto, an experimental personal computer system that foreshadowed modern desktop computing. The Alto, controlled by a mouse pointing device, was one of the first computers to employ a graphical video display, which presented the user with a view of documents and programs, adopting the metaphor of an office desktop.

“It was one of those sort of apocalyptic moments,” Mr. Jobs said of his visit in a 1995 oral history interview for the Smithsonian Institution. “I remember within 10 minutes of seeing the graphical user interface stuff, just knowing that every computer would work this way someday. It was so obvious once you saw it. It didn’t require tremendous intellect. It was so clear.”

In 1981 he joined a small group of Apple engineers pursuing a separate project, a lower-cost system code-named Macintosh. The machine was introduced in January 1984 and trumpeted during the Super Bowl telecast by a 60-second commercial, directed by Ridley Scott, that linked I.B.M., by then the dominant PC maker, with Orwell’s Big Brother.

A year earlier Mr. Jobs had lured Mr. Sculley to Apple to be its chief executive. A former Pepsi-Cola chief executive, Mr. Sculley was impressed by Mr. Jobs’s pitch: “Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?”

He went on to help Mr. Jobs introduce a number of new computer models, including an advanced version of the Apple II and later the Lisa and Macintosh desktop computers. Through them Mr. Jobs popularized the graphical user interface, which, based on a mouse pointing device, would become the standard way to control computers.

But when the Lisa failed commercially and early Macintosh sales proved disappointing, the two men became estranged and a power struggle ensued, and Mr. Jobs lost control of the Lisa project. The board ultimately stripped him of his operational role, taking control of the Lisa project away from, and 1,200 Apple employees were laid off. He left Apple in 1985.

“I don’t wear the right kind of pants to run this company,” he told a small gathering of Apple employees before he left, according to a member of the original Macintosh development team. He was barefoot as he spoke, and wearing blue jeans.

That September he announced a new venture, NeXT Inc. The aim was to build a workstation computer for the higher-education market. The next year, the Texas industrialist H. Ross Perot invested $20 million in the effort. But it did not achieve Mr. Jobs’s goals.

Mr. Jobs also established a personal philanthropic foundation after leaving Apple but soon had a change of heart, deciding instead to spend much of his fortune — $10 million — on acquiring Pixar, a struggling graphics supercomputing company owned by the filmmaker George Lucas.

The purchase was a significant gamble; there was little market at the time for computer-animated movies. But that changed in 1995, when the company, with Walt Disney Pictures, released “Toy Story.” That film’s box-office receipts ultimately reached $362 million, and when Pixar went public in a record-breaking offering, Mr. Jobs emerged a billionaire. In 2006, the Walt Disney Company agreed to purchase Pixar for $7.4 billion. The sale made Mr. Jobs Disney’s largest single shareholder, with about 7 percent of the company’s stock.

His personal life also became more public. He had a number of well-publicized romantic relationships, including one with the folk singer Joan Baez, before marrying Laurene Powell. In 1996, a sister, the novelist Mona Simpson, threw a spotlight on her relationship with Mr. Jobs in the novel “A Regular Guy.” The two did not meet until they were adults. The novel centered on a Silicon Valley entrepreneur who bore a close resemblance to Mr. Jobs. It was not an entirely flattering portrait. Mr. Jobs said about a quarter of it was accurate.

“We’re family,” he said of Ms. Simpson in an interview with The New York Times Magazine. “She’s one of my best friends in the world. I call her and talk to her every couple of days.”

His wife and Ms. Simpson survive him, as do his three children with Ms. Powell, his daughters Eve Jobs and Erin Sienna Jobs and a son, Reed; another daughter, Lisa Brennan-Jobs, from a relationship with Chrisann Brennan; and another sister, Patti Jobs.

Return to Apple

Beginning in 1986, Mr. Jobs refocused NeXT from the education to the business market and dropped the hardware part of the company, deciding to sell just an operating system. Although NeXT never became a significant computer industry player, it had a huge impact: a young programmer, Tim Berners-Lee, used a NeXT machine to develop the first version of the World Wide Web at the Swiss physics research center CERN in 1990.

In 1996, after unsuccessful efforts to develop next-generation operating systems, Apple, with Gilbert Amelio now in command, acquired NeXT for $430 million. The next year, Mr. Jobs returned to Apple as an adviser. He became chief executive again in 2000.

Shortly after returning, Mr. Jobs publicly ended Apple’s long feud with its archival Microsoft, which agreed to continue developing its Office software for the Macintosh and invested $150 million in Apple.

Once in control of Apple again, Mr. Jobs set out to reshape the consumer electronics industry. He pushed the company into the digital music business, introducing first iTunes and then the iPod MP3 player. The music arm grew rapidly, reaching almost 50 percent of the company’s revenue by June 2008.

In 2005, Mr. Jobs announced that he would end Apple’s business relationship with I.B.M. and Motorola and build Macintosh computers based on Intel microprocessors.

By then his fight with cancer was publicly known. Apple had announced in 2004 that Mr. Jobs had a rare but curable form of pancreatic cancer and that he had undergone successful surgery. Four years later, questions about his health returned when he appeared at a company event looking gaunt. Afterward, he said he had suffered from a “common bug.” Privately, he said his cancer surgery had created digestive problems but insisted they were not life-threatening.

Apple began selling the iPhone in June 2007. Mr. Jobs’s goal was to sell 10 million of the handsets in 2008, equivalent to 1 percent of the global cellphone market. The company sold 11.6 million.

Although smartphones were already commonplace, the iPhone dispensed with a stylus and pioneered a touch-screen interface that quickly set the standard for the mobile computing market. Rolled out with much anticipation and fanfare, iPhone rocketed to popularity; by end of 2010 the company had sold almost 90 million units.

Although Mr. Jobs took just a nominal $1 salary when he returned to Apple, his compensation became the source of a Silicon Valley scandal in 2006 over the backdating of millions of shares of stock options. But after a company investigation and one by the Securities and Exchange Commission, he was found not to have benefited financially from the backdating and no charges were brought.

The episode did little to taint Mr. Jobs’s standing in the business and technology world. As the gravity of his illness became known, and particularly after he announced he was stepping down, he was increasingly hailed for his genius and true achievement: his ability to blend product design and business market innovation by integrating consumer-oriented software, microelectronic components, industrial design and new business strategies in a way that has not been matched.

If he had a motto, it may have come from “The Whole Earth Catalog,” which he said had deeply influenced him as a young man. The book, he said in his commencement address at Stanford in 2005, ends with the admonition “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”

“I have always wished that for myself,” he said.

Steve Lohr contributed reporting.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/06/bu...6.html?_r=1&hp


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How long until Apple sues someone to commemorate his death?
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post #72479 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 06:15 PM
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How long until Apple sues someone to commemorate his death?

Classy.

Always nice to have new members.


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post #72480 of 96839 Old 10-05-2011, 06:18 PM
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Classy.

Always nice to have new members.

The phrase "in poor taste" doesn't even come close.
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