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post #79741 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by humdinger70 View Post

Well, there goes their playoff chances, right?

They Had Playoff Chances ???


Mike

JAZZ IS NOT DEAD IT JUST SMELLS FUNNY ; FRANK ZAPPA
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post #79742 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

History’s ‘Hatfields & McCoys’ Sets Cable Ratings Record With 13.9 Million Viewers

Hatfields & McCoys, a three-part, six-hour miniseries starring Kevin Costner and Bill Paxton

Yeah , Kevin Costner in a western style TV show is gonna bring a Huge amount of Eye Balls into play .
Bill Paxton is No slouch either @ bringing in Eye Balls as well ....
Add in that it's Costner 1st foray in to TV
I haven't watch it Yet .. DVR'd all to watch all @ once Looking Forward to watching it all on Saturday Nite when Nuttin' else is on ... that's usually my RedBox movie Time , saves me the rental of 2 Blu-Rays

Mike

JAZZ IS NOT DEAD IT JUST SMELLS FUNNY ; FRANK ZAPPA
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post #79743 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 10:05 AM
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TUESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media INsight's Blog
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post #79744 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 10:07 AM
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Nielsen Notes
'America's Got Talent' ties a season high
NBC reality show averages a 3.7 in 18-49s, up 12 percent
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - May 30, 2012

NBC's "America's Got Talent" tied a season high last night, becoming the highest-rated program since the May sweeps ended a week ago.

"Talent" averaged a 3.7 adults 18-49 rating at 9 p.m., according to Nielsen, up 12 percent from a 3.3 last week.

The show was undoubtedly helped by the weaker competition last night. Last week "Talent" faced the season finales of "Dancing with the Stars" and "Glee," which averaged a 3.3 and 2.9, respectively.

Last night the second-highest-rated show in the timeslot behind "Talent" averaged a 1.3.

"Talent" was easily the night's top show and drew the best rating for any broadcast program since the season finale of "American Idol" last Wednesday.

That led NBC to an easy victory on the night, finishing with a 2.3 average overnight rating and a 7 share. CBS was second at 1.4/4, ABC third at 1.3/4, Univision fourth at 1.2/3, Fox fifth at 1.0/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.5/1 and CW seventh at 0.3/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-four percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. NBC led with a 2.0 for a repeat of "Talent," followed by CBS with a 1.4 for a repeat of "NCIS." ABC was third with a 1.2 for the third-season finale of "Cougar Town." Fox and Univision tied for fourth at 1.0, Fox for repeats of "New Girl" and Univision for "Un Refugio Para el Amor." Telemundo was sixth with a 0.5 for "Una Maid en Manhattan" and CW seventh with a 0.3 for the premiere of "The Catalina."

NBC extended its lead at 9 p.m. with a 3.7 for a new "Talent," while CBS and Univision tied for second at 1.3, CBS for a repeat of "NCIS: Los Angeles" and Univision for "Abismo de Pasion." ABC was fourth with a 1.2 for "20/20," Fox fifth with a 1.0 for more "Girl," Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for "Corazon Valiente" and CW seventh with a 0.3 for "The L.A. Complex."

At 10 p.m. ABC and Univision tied for first at 1.5, ABC for more "20/20" and Univision for "La Que No Podia Amar." CBS was third with a 1.4 for "48 Hours Mystery," NBC fourth with a 1.3 for a "Grimm" rerun and Telemundo fifth with a 0.4 for "Relaciones Peligrosas."

CBS was first for the night among households with a 5.0 average overnight rating and an 8 share. NBC was second at 4.6/7, ABC third at 4.0/6, Univision fourth at 1.7/3, Fox fifth at 1.5/2, Telemundo sixth at 0.7/1 and CW seventh at 0.5/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art...ason-high-.asp
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post #79745 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 10:12 AM
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TV Notes
'Private Practice's' Tim Daly Not Returning for Season 6
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - May 30, 2012

ABC's Private Practice will return for a sixth season but it will be without one of its original cast members.

Co-star Tim Daly will not be returning to the Shonda Rhimes medical drama, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed.

Daly played Pete Wilder on all five seasons of the series, which was considered a bubble show heading into May's upfronts but skirted cancelation with an eleventh-hour renewal.

While the series was renewed, likely for a condensed episode count, sources noted it was unclear whether or not Daly could return to wrap up Pete's story line. In the Season 5 finale, Pete was sent to jail after mercifully killing one of his patients and later freed on bail.

"Wonderful fans of PPP. Shonda informed my agent today that Pete wont be returning for season 6. It was a great 5 yrs. R.I.P. Pete Wilder," Daly wrote on Twitter late Tuesday.

Since relocating to the post-Dancing With the Stars time slot on Tuesday nights to make way for Rhimes' freshman drama Scandal, Private Practice has had a mixed run. The Kate Walsh drama lost 19 percent of its viewership in its first week in the new slot, but rebounded afterward -- with Rhimes using spoilers in an active Twitter campaign to raise awareness for the show's new night in its fifth season. With its sixth-season renewal, the ABC Studios series will keep Rhimes busy with three series on ABC's schedule for the second year in a row. Her period drama pilot Gilded Lilys, meanwhile, was passed over at the network.

"I approached [final episode of the season] as if I was writing a season finale, not a series finale," Rhimes told THR earlier this month. "We did leave some questions unanswered and I think that was the only way for me to do it. I refused to go with the idea that this was the end of the show."

The series earlier this month lost writer/exec producer Craig Turk, who departed Private for an overall deal with CBS Television Studios, where he'll join The Good Wife as a consulting producer.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/liv...im-daly-330650
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post #79746 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 10:15 AM
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TV/Critic's Notes
TV makes poor case for demo decisions
Disregarding older viewers makes less and less sense
By Brian Lowry, Variety - May 30, 2012

As amusing as it is to poke fun at older people watching (or clapping on, heh heh) "Harry's Law" and "Jesse Stone," the anger unleashed by the decisions to end their runs exposes a serious point.

For a business built on communications, TV networks -- along with most consumer outlets covering them -- generally do a lousy job conveying the underlying rationale for relying on younger demographics, to the point of having practically given up trying.

The adults 18-49 demographic has served as the industry's primary sales barometer for so long, we take it for granted. Moreover, the one broadcaster that dared second-guess those criteria, CBS, is enjoying enough success relative to its competitors as to voice doubts regarding the status quo less consistently and forcefully.

From a PR standpoint, though, the formula appears to make even less sense now, what with the median age for every major network except Fox hovering around or above 50, effectively disenfranchising half their audience.

Although they may not like it, mature adults can probably comprehend why movies cater to teenagers, recognizing the importance of opening-weekend box office for blockbusters, even if they can't imagine seeing one "Twilight" movie, much less four.

By contrast, TV's relationship between eyeballs and income is less clear and direct.

Many shows skew older, but the divide is rarely quite as stark as those of "Harry's Law," which was NBC's most-watched drama but had a median viewing age above 60, or CBS' equally geriatric "Jesse Stone" movies, starring Tom Selleck. Like Selleck's series "Blue Bloods," the movies were a hit judged strictly by total audience, but the rating in adults over 50 was nearly 10 times the 18-49 cohort.

Still, canceling "Harry's Law" and discontinuing the "Jesse Stone" telepic series came as a shock to many fans, to whom the "We love the show but" alibis seem understandably feeble.

Yes, people who work in TV have likely heard why 18-49 reigns supreme: Younger people buy more stuff (fewer empty nesters); will hopefully buy it longer (see actuarial tables); are less brand loyal (not so set in their ways); and are harder to reach (media buyers covet most what they can't have).

Yet not everybody walks around with all that memorized, and the explanation is hardly obvious, particularly with so many 50-plussers currently supporting their grown kids.

For networks to yank such fare thus becomes the equivalent of a big-box store having a return policy most of its customers can't fathom. For that matter, failing to detail why the 50-plus crowd is devalued doesn't endear mainstream newspapers to their mostly-older readerships either.

Nor is the confusion limited to the public. Producers and talent often sound similarly mystified, especially if they deliver a respectable total-audience number that's discounted for missing the key-demo target.

Reflecting the stance of many in the creative community, Michael Brandman, who produced the eight "Jesse Stone" pics with Selleck, conceded the young-adult imperative has never completely made sense to him. "We both believe with the maturation of the TV audience and the diminution of the numbers in the 18-49 category, (the networks) had better challenge some of these ancient assumptions if they want to survive," he said.

Some have questioned the system, from CBS research chief David Poltrack to NBC, which tested those waters by coining the term AlphaBoomers to define the baby-boom generation's oldest segment, which began turning 65 last year.

For the most part, however, the networks have begun touting self-serving new metrics that only cloud the conversation further.

Faced with a 30% year-to-year ratings decline for "American Idol's" finale, for example, Fox responded by transparently seeking to change the subject, issuing a press release citing how the show established a "social TV" record.

OK, but how many of those posting comments and tweets were twentysomething, left-handed and earn over $100,000 annually?

Barring a shift in priorities, ad-supported TV and consumer media need to develop more convincing shorthand to address these issues -- other than blithely ignoring older viewers' preferences with actions reeking of ageism -- lest aging baby boomers start rummaging through closets, looking for their old protest signs.

Being treated like you're worth less than your kids is already insulting; blatantly being dismissed as plain worthless is that much harder to swallow.

http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118054754
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post #79747 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 10:19 AM
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Critic's Notes
Loyal and Loving Beyond Reason, and That's Just the Owners
By Neil Genzlinger, The New York Times - May 30, 2012

Dogs are having a television moment, with three very different programs about them turning up in the next few weeks on three very different outlets. Together they provide a dizzying display of reprehensible behavior, inordinate neediness and striking devotion. By humans.

CBS brings its version of dog whispering to prime time on Wednesday night with a series called Dogs in the City, which features a personable young man named Justin Silver, who has a keen sense of what is going on inside the canine head. There are other dog behaviorist shows, of course; this one's gimmick is that all of its dogs are in New York City.

Do you have to be crazy to own a dog in a heavily paved, exceedingly crowded place like New York? Apparently not, because, Mr. Silver says, one out of eight New Yorkers owns a dog; that many people can't be wrong. In the premiere Mr. Silver finds himself counseling a few who may not have lost their minds but have clearly lost their perspective.

For instance, a businesswoman named Elli insists on taking her dog, Charlotte, to work, even though the animal tries to attack anyone who walks through the door, and not in that friendly lick-your-face way. This is particularly problematic because work is some kind of talent agency, and models with dog bite scars are probably not all that marketable.

One of Mr. Silver's most amusing tricks is to go off somewhere with the misbehaving dog and have a private chat.

I know exactly what's going on up there, he tells Charlotte during their one-on-one. You think I don't know what it's like to have a codependent mother?

Charlotte genuinely looks as if she were taking it in.

The problem, naturally, is usually in the owner, not the animal.

What I do is, I pay more attention to the people, and I'm watching the way the dog is reacting to what the person is telling me, Mr. Silver explains while working another case, in which a man is giving his dog more attention than he gives his new wife. So my job, I'm really more of an interpreter between the dog and the person.

Dogs in the City, with its inherent reminder that it takes work to be a competent owner, serves as a useful counterpoint to Shelter Me, a film by Steven Latham that is showing on PBS stations in May and June (check local listings). Shelter Me is single-minded in its goal: It wants people to consider adopting a dog from a shelter.

Shelters, the program says, are overwhelmed with animals, especially now, when people are abandoning pets in a bad economy. Early on, Mr. Latham's camera lingers on a blunt sign at a Los Angeles shelter: Los Angeles Animal Services cannot guarantee placement of your animal. Animals turned into the shelter may be euthanized (killed) after the legal holding period.

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals says that is the fate of three million to four million dogs and cats each year. Shelter Me aims for the heartstrings in trying to change the numbers, showing shelter dogs that have been trained to help people with disabilities, and others that are filling an emotional void for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

A lot of people think that dogs from a shelter are there because they're bad dogs, because they've done something wrong, and that is a complete misconception, Cassian Sandeberg, an animal behaviorist, says in the film. A lot of these dogs are great dogs that people just can't look after anymore.

The film is so eager for people to adopt dogs that it doesn't address its own contradiction: that shelters are jammed partly because not everyone can be a successful owner. A more nuanced approach is used in One Nation Under Dog, a riveting film showing June 18 on HBO.

This film also encourages dog adoption, but the first of several factoids it displays on the screen is this: There are 4.7 million dog bite victims each year in the U.S. That introduces an unsettling segment about a New Jersey dog owner who fought draining legal battles in defense of his dogs after they were involved in several biting incidents. In one, a girl's ear was ripped off.

From this cautionary tale, the film grows even more stark, showing hard-to-watch footage of shelter dogs being thrown into large bins and gassed, then even harder-to-watch images from a raid on a wretched puppy mill in Tennessee.

We found dogs living with dead dogs, Scotlund Haisley, one of the animal rescuers at the scene, says. One dog was using the two dead dogs as a blanket.

The rescuers at the puppy mill, like the animal advocates in Shelter Me, seem somewhat overwhelmed by the cruelty they witness and the scope of the pet overpopulation problem. But it's heartening to see them keep plugging away. A special prize should go to John Gagnon of the rescue group PAWS New England, who in One Nation Under Dog visits a shelter and specifically asks to look at the dogs with behavior and health problems.

The joy on these animals' faces after he plucks them from the shelter, fixes what ails them and places them with new owners is undeniable and unrestrained.

Once you bring a dog like that into your home and into your life, they appreciate it, he says. They know what they've got, because they've been without.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/30/ar...ref=television
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post #79748 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 10:21 AM
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TV Notes
NBC gets more musical with 'The Winner Is'
By Yvonne Villareal, Los Angeles Times - May 29, 2012

It ain’t over till the fat lady sings — or until she runs out of singing cattle calls to try out for. NBC is adding yet another such show to its roster with “The Winner Is" -- making it the 256,236th singing-focused show on broadcast TV.

The series is being dubbed as a vocal game show, with singers of all ages competing in head-to-head singing duels. We’re guessing it’s a prolonged version of the battle rounds from the network's other singing series, “The Voice,” which recently wrapped its second season.

Contestants will be judged by a special in-studio panel led by one to-be-announced celebrity judge. And then it gets all "Let's Make a Deal" on us. There will be a “unique twist” in which contestants can negotiate a deal with their opponents. Without knowing the results, participants can choose to leave the competition in exchange for a predetermined cash prize or continue. The deals don't stop there. Contestants will also be able to make a deal after each singing duel.In the end, eight singers will duel and negotiate until two remain. After the final two perform, each will get the chance to walk away with $100,000, or they can choose to put their fate in the hands of the jury and viewers at home for $1 million.

No premiere date has been set. But we're sure you'll see your share of plucky singers in the meantime -- whether you like it or not.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/show...winner-is.html
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post #79749 of 97514 Old 05-30-2012, 11:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski View Post

Let me guess - that pained, furrowed-eyebrow, "lost puppy dog" expression.

Bingo!

Currently testing 3D with Sammy DLP, shutter glasses, and HTPC
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post #79750 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 01:37 AM
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
THURSDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Duets (120 min.)
10PM - Rookie Blue
* * * *
11:35PM - Nightline (LIVE)
Midnight - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Kathy Griffin; reality-TV star Emily Maynard; Gavin DeGraw performs)
(R - May 21)

CBS:
8PM - The Big Bang Theory
(R - Dec. 8)
8:31PM - Rules of Engagement
(R - Nov. 10)
9PM - Person of Interest
(R - Feb. 2)
10PM - The Mentalist
(R - Nov. 3)
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Jim Parsons; journalist Mika Brzezinski; Macy Gray performs; professional baseball player Jered Weaver presents the Top Ten List)
(R - May 28)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Carrie Fisher; Tony Hale)

NBC:
8PM - The Office
(R - Feb. 9)
8:30PM - The Office
(R - Feb. 16)
9PM - America's Got Talent
(R - May 28)
10PM - America's Got Talent
(R - May 29)
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (Scarlett Johansson; musician Blake Shelton; K'Naan performs)
(R - May 2)
12:37AM - Late Night with Jimmy Fallon (Will Ferrell; Ellie Kemper; AWOLNATION performs)
(R - May 10)
1:36AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Jason Isaacs; musician Sydney Wayser; Rachel Yamagata performs)
(R - Mar. 28)

FOX:
8PM - Touch (Season Finale, 120 min.)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - The 'This Old House' Hour (R - Dec. 1)
9PM - Frontline: Al Qaeda in Yemen
(R - May 29)
10PM - Independent Lens: Hell and Back (90 min.)
(R - May 28)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Abismo de Pasión
8:50PM - Fútbol: México vs. Bosnia (LIVE, 120 min.)

THE CW:
8PM - Breaking Pointe (Series Premiere)
9PM - The Catalina
(R - May 29)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Una Maid en Manhattan
9PM - Corazón Valiente
10PM - Relaciones Peligrosas

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Jim Parsons)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Author Jack Hitt)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Martin Short; Jon Bernthal; Dr. Dog performs)
(R - Feb. 28)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Tamra Barney and Gretchen Rossi from "The Real Housewives of Orange County")
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post #79751 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 01:45 AM
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TV Notes
Thursday's Highlights: 'Breaking Pointe' on KTLA
By Los Angeles Times' 'Show Tracker' Blog - May 30, 2012

[ALL TIMES LISTED ARE PACIFIC TIME]

A BALLET COMPANY in Salt Lake City is in the spotlight in the new docu-series Breaking Pointe, at 8 p.m. on KTLA.

SERIES

Touch:
This drama starring Kiefer Sutherland ends its freshman season with a two-hour episode (8 p.m. Fox).

Mary Mary: The reality series about the Grammy-winning gospel duo ends its season (9 p.m. WE).

Final Offer: There's haggling to be had in this new reality series about antiques buyers and sellers (10 p.m. Discovery).

Mountain Men: This new series salutes the hardy souls who make their livelihoods at higher elevations (10 p.m. History).

L.A. Hair: The day-to-day doings at a Hollywood salon-to-the-stars are the subject of this new workplace series (10 p.m. WE).

The Conversation With Amanda de Cadenet: Comic Sarah Silverman and commentator Arianna Huffington are among tonight's interviewees (11 p.m. Lifetime).

Watch What Happens: Live: The pop culture gabfest hosted by Andy Cohen ends its season (11:01 p.m. Bravo).

SPECIALS

2012 Scripps National Spelling Bee:
The young contestants who make it through this morning's semifinals will compete this evening in the finals of the annual event in Washington D.C. (7 a.m. and 5 p.m. ESPN2).

Life and Death in Venice: Learn all about the Italian city's famed canals in this new special (8 p.m. National Geographic).

MOVIES

Badlands:
An evening of classic crime dramas kicks off with director Terrence Malick's evocative 1973 fable starring Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek (5 p.m. TCM).

SPORTS

Tennis:
Play continues at the French Open, from Roland Garros Stadium in Paris (6 a.m. ESPN2; 7 a.m. Tennis; 2 a.m. early Fri., ESPN2).

College softball: The NCAA World Series gets underway in Oklahoma City (10 a.m., 12:30, 4 and 6:30 p.m. ESPN2).

Basketball: The San Antonio Spurs take on the Oklahoma City Thunder in Game 3 of the Western Conference Finals (6 p.m. TNT).

Baseball: The Dodgers host the Brewers (7 p.m. FS Prime).


http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/show...e-on-ktla.html
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post #79752 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 01:50 AM
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TV Notes
Disney's Bob Iger Gamely Defends ESPN Price Increases And Prospects For TV
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - May 30, 2012

Disney CEO Bob Iger had to know that he'd face the ESPN question this morning at the Sanford C. Bernstein Strategic Decisions Conference. The Wall Street firm has led the pack in warning that sports programming contributes to rising pay TV prices and that could become a big turn-off for consumers in a stagnant economy. ESPN is seen as a culprit because the network and its offshoot channels account for more than 26% of pay TV programming fees, but just 5% of the ratings. But Iger stood firm, taking a page from Franklin Roosevelt by saying in effect that the industry has little to fear but fear itself. Pay TV subscribers generally are pleased with the variety of programming that they get. He attributed the growing complaints about sports costs to the fact that it has been a rough economy over the last few years.

He adds that ESPN has been careful about its price increases to compensate for its aggressive investments in programming including rights for major sports matches. We're not trying to kill the golden goose. Indeed, the pay TV providers who criticize ESPN may be doing more to upset the status quo when they complain about costs instead of selling the value to the consumers. If they want to complain about sports costs, they should train their fire on regional sports networks. If you look at the cost of those channels vs the ratings they deliver, it's not even close to ESPN, he says. But at the end of the day he isn't concerned that ESPN Disney's cash cow will be whacked as pay TV providers begin to offer low priced services without sports. In a few cases where it's been tried (for example, Time Warner Cable offers a $40 a month package without sports) adoption is not particularly high.

Iger continued to voice no-worries on other TV matters. He doesn't fear that the shows he licenses to streaming services such as Netflix cannibalize conventional viewing. Many investors believe that ratings at Viacom's Nickelodeon have plummeted in part because kids watch the network's shows on Netflix. We can have our cake an eat it too, Iger says. Still, his policy for distributing shows to the Web has morphed a bit from super aggressive to slightly less aggressive than we were. He's upbeat about a TV Everywhere application for the Disney Channel that will be available next week to Comcast customers who want to watch shows on mobile devices. Another one will be out soon for ABC Family. We got paid by Comcast for what we called TV Plus capability.

The Disney chief also took a measured swipe at Dish Network's Hopper DVR which now can automatically skip past ads in recorded broadcast network shows. CBS, Fox, and NBC have sued Dish claiming the ad zapper violates their copyrights and programming agreements. Iger says Dish's initiative is harmful, both to our business and to theirs.But they don't seem to care about that. Dish filed its own complaint against the networks, including ABC, in an effort to establish that the Hopper is OK just an automated version of what DVR users already do. I'm confident in our position legally, Iger says.

He declined to forecast the television upfront ad sales market. Although sales in the scatter market have been pretty good for ESPN and ABC, it's too early to tell about the upfronts.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/05/disn...spects-for-tv/
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post #79753 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 01:54 AM
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Critic's Notes
Secrets of a May 'Nielsen Family'
By Bob Sellers, HuffingtonPost.com - May 29, 2012

Jerry Seinfeld has a joke about how men watch TV, remotes at the ready: "Men don't care what's on TV. Men only care what ELSE is on TV."

That observation rings in my head as I recount spending a week keeping a diary as a "Nielsen Family" during May sweeps. This is the four-week period that helps determine how much advertisers pay to run ads on a television network or local station. Based on my experience, it's a well-meaning but imperfect measuring system that suggests advertisers may be rolling the dice when they pay for ads designed to reach a particular audience.

First, I should make clear I considered it a privilege to keep the diaries -- one for each of the four sets in our house. As someone who spent 20 years as a television journalist, who reaped the rewards or suffered the consequences of ratings performance, I embraced the opportunity to see first-hand how the raw data was created for the highly anticipated "diary" portion of the ratings reports issued by the iconic Nielsen. (Overnight ratings "meters" keep track of viewing electronically.)

Keeping these old-school diaries requires you to write down the titles of the shows you watched in the formatted diary, plus the call letters, the channel numbers (with barely enough room for the four-digit HD channels), and list who in the family was watching and for how long -- "Anytime the TV is watched or listened to for 5 minutes or more." It's a pretty straightforward system and probably worked great in an era when you had to get up off the couch, walk over to the TV set and turn the knob to switch to one of the other three stations. (While there, you could reposition the rabbit ears and adjust the color contrast and hue.)

But in a remote control/DVR world, people no longer watch TV in such a static fashion. For instance, in the morning when we're getting ready for work, we "DVR" the Today show in the living room -- "DVR" is a verb now, right? -- as we go about our morning routine, which includes fixing breakfast for our twin 8-year-old daughters in the kitchen. I'll catch a headline story or two, and maybe see another segment while I'm passing through the room. At a certain point my wife and I will sit down on the couch for 10 minutes or so and drink our tea while we rewind or fast-forward to the segments we want to watch. But in the diary, it will record us as watching Today for a solid hour. That's not exactly how we watched it.

Since the Nielsen format is broken into 15-minute segments, I also wasn't able to log that I switched to Good Morning America and CBS This Morning to see what they were covering. I may have seen a decent package (story) on another network, but it won't show up in the diary because I had to make a single choice for the 15-minute segment. More than one network may have been watched -- maybe even for equal time -- but only one will show up in the Nielsen report. With the diary system, it's either 15 minutes or nothing.

By the way, it also strikes me that all three of the network morning shows appear to follow a similar format. By about 20 minutes after the hour they're finished providing any real content. Then at 27 minutes after the hour the local stations will do their two-minute "cut-ins," with news, weather and traffic (or as my father calls them, "break-ins"). You would think that at least one of the networks would offer counter-programming to that format. Why doesn't No. 3 CBS, knowing that people may be flipping channels during those local cut-ins and commercials, offer some network content that might capture new viewers?

I may be unusual in that I get up early -- 4 a.m. or 5 a.m. -- to get things done while my family is still asleep. And as a former CNBC anchor, I watch business shows like Squawk Box more often than the average person. This may be good news for CNBC since one of the criticisms of the Nielsen ratings system is that the sampling data is small, meaning one person can have an inordinate impact on the final results. Since I'm intrigued by politics, I'll also watch Morning Joe on MSNBC as I work on my laptop. I flip back and forth according to which show earns my sometimes drifting attention. But again, the Nielsen diary required me to log one or the other during each 15-minute period and only one will show up in the final diary.

Every programmer in television is interested in reaching the age 25-54 demographic, "the demo." The theory is that those are the active consumers who have not developed brand loyalty and consequently can be swayed by the right advertising. Leaving aside for a moment whether Madison Avenue should try to reach those viewers -- it's people over 50 with all the money -- I think the diary may not completely capture the demographic makeup of TV viewers (which, in all fairness to Nielsen, may be by design).

Take my wife (por favor). She was raised in San Antonio, Texas, the daughter of Mexican-American parents who spoke Spanish to each other but only English to their five kids. But in the "Step 1" section, the diary asks only about "the person [not persons] living here who owns or rents this home." The question asks, "Is this person of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin?" Well, I'm not -- so my answer was "no" -- but my Texas-born wife is. And she sees the world a little differently than I do. Just put on George Lopez or Paul Rodriguez and watch her crack up at references about growing up in a Latino community. But the diary doesn't ask specifically about her. And since our daughters aren't registered either -- except as to their age, how many hours they work and whether they speak Spanish -- there are three Hispanic people in our house who are not counted.

I also hate to admit it, but special programming during sweeps actually does work. For instance, Warren Buffett was on CNBC as a guest for three hours one day on Squawk Box. I DVR'd the show and watched all three hours later, fast-forwarding through anything non-Buffett. While I usually watch some Squawk Box, I never watch the entire three hours. But they lassoed me in with the Oracle of Omaha. Granted, CNBC is a cable network, and not as tied to May sweeps, but it is proof that one-off programming does work.

Recording favorite shows (like the nightly network news) and watching them at a convenient time was a constant theme in our household. And like many other viewers, we will record some shows and start watching them 10 or 15 minutes later and catch up to the live action as we fast-forward through the commercials. That's a difficult viewing interaction to log, even though the diary will allow you to list whether you watched a show live or recorded. Did we watch it live? Kind of. Did we record it and watch it later? Sort of.

Since I kept the diaries for just one week, there are a handful of shows that we recorded that won't show up. Among them, an HBO special called The Curious Case of Curt Flood. Curt Flood was an accomplished baseball player in the '60s who filed a court case that helped blaze a path toward free agency for professional ball players. I ended up watching it later (it was excellent), but wasn't able to get to it during that week, so it won't show up.

The diary-logging process can also reflect a built-in prejudice that viewers might have for or against a program or network. In an odd twist of fate, I was asked to participate in the Nielsens even though my contract was terminated by a local TV station (as an Emmy-winning news anchor) a year and a half ago. I told the Nielsen folks about it, but they only wanted to ensure that I was not currently employed by a TV station or network. I could have gone through the diary and written down my former station's competitor for every news show during that week, but I didn't. I've got better things to do with my time than seek retribution and fill myself with such negativity. I've moved on.

But the point is that there is nothing to keep the diary logger from listing their favorite shows or programs, whether they watched them or not. For instance, if a viewer switched back and forth between local news shows, they might be inclined to write down the station they've watched for years, even if they actually spent more time watching the competitor. Because of that built-in prejudice, the diaries might not match reality.

One of the things that advertisers may notice in my ramblings is how we avoided commercials. The effort is not made with any malice, but in the interest of saving time. (There are just too many of them.) We may watch them inadvertently, but when a commercial comes on, we often use that as a triggering event to see what else is on (Seinfeld was right). And since ratings are largely designed to set advertising rates, how accurate can the measurement be when the viewer has so many tools to avoid watching the ads?

The task of actually keeping track of what we watched was trickier than I thought. While I typically don't think consciously about what we watch and for how long, I had to do exactly that to keep the diary. I made a diligent effort to keep track of our viewing by concurrently writing it down, but with different family members going about their lives on different schedules (including when I wasn't home), I could see where the diary process could lead to some inaccuracies in the logging task. And it was a little odd to ask my wife, "Did you watch anything between 4 and 5?" "What about between 5 and 6?" "Did you watch anything else?" "Did you record The View?" "When did you watch it?" "Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?"

While the Nielsen diary process confirmed that our kids don't watch much TV, they do have an affinity for Sponge Bob. (Congratulations, Viacom.) But on the occasions when my wife told them they could watch it downstairs in the den, I had to piece together when that was. When I wasn't exactly sure, I guessed. And I could have written down a time that Mr. Square Pants doesn't even air.

It would be easy to suggest that Nielsen's automatic digital counters, "Set Meters" or "People Meters," would remedy the insufficiencies of the diary-logging process. But even those electronic boxes, which can record TV viewing minute by minute, would require active engagement for accurate data. And that belies the modern American tendency to use TV as background noise in the life of an active family. Even with a digital box, I suspect that somebody is out of the room when Dr. Phi" tells a guest for the thousandth time that he was born at night, but he wasn't born LAST night.

That's the beauty of the Nielsen diary system. It forces participants to think about what they're watching. And one of my conclusions is that I'm paying for a lot of channels that I don't watch. Admittedly we're not a huge TV-viewing family, but I counted the number of channels we watched during the ratings week and it totaled just twelve. And how many channels do we get? I stopped counting at 200.

I look forward to a day -- and I know well-paid media executives are testing out business models -- when I can buy programming directly from content providers like CNBC and ESPN and route them directly to my computer, TV or mobile device. Do I really need a cable company serving as a middleman, forcing me to subsidize hundreds of channels of drivel with my ever-increasing bill?

The times, like the channels, they are a changing.

Bob Sellers is an Emmy-winning journalist, TV talent agent at MediaStars, and Financial Adviser at R.W. Baird.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bob-se...l?ref=tv&ir=TV
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post #79754 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 01:58 AM
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TV Notes
Lifetime considers Marc Cherry's rejected ABC pilot
By Lynette Rice, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - May 30, 2012

One network's reject could be another's gain. Lifetime is kicking the tires of Devious Maids, Marc Cherry's pilot that starred Susan Lucci.

The sudsy drama that also starred Ana Ortiz and Grant Show is based on a Mexican format and follows four maids with ambitioNS and dreams of their own while they work for the rich and famous in Beverly Hills. Had the drama earned a pickup, it would have kept Cherry on the network now that Desperate Housewives has ended its run.

One key source stresses that talks are preliminary and that Lifetime is looking at a number of pilots that failed to pass muster with the broadcast nets this spring. Who can blame the cable net? We're still a little shell shocked that ABC passed on that nifty Portia de Rossi comedy. To check what else was left on the cutting room floor, click on our pilot list here.

http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/05/30/li...ted-abc-pilot/
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TV Sports
Dolphins coach says reality TV 'football decision'
By Michael Hiestand, USA Today - May 29, 2012

Finally, reality TV is part of the sport of football.

At least for the Miami Dolphins' Joe Philbin, who in his first year as a head coach will be trailed in training camp by a 24-person NFL Films crew for the HBO five-part series HardKnocks, which debuts Aug. 7.

But don't think the team, after going 6-10 last season and finishing 28th in the NFL in attendance, just wants the understandable publicity grab. No, Philbin said Tuesday it was "a football decision" without really explaining how he figures that and that team owner Stephen Ross "in no way, show or form forced us to make this decision." He added Ross "wanted to stay out of it."

Say what? Philbin, the Green Bay Packers' offensive coordinator before joining the Dolphins, will be the first first-year coach on Knocks as he this summer tries to settle on a starting quarterback. Three of the six teams that were on Knocks didn't make the playoffs in the seasons after the show. The others had arguably disappointing postseasons.

CBS analyst Bill Cowher on Tuesday said Knocks could help the Dolphins build its fan base. But Cowher thinks training camp TV is a bad idea: "Training camp is when you're building a foundation, coming together. Those are sacred moments. Tough decisions are being made things that don't need to be made public."

Sidelines stars: Pam Ward, who in 2000 became the first female football play-by-play announcer on national TV, says the vast majority of aspiring female sportscasters don't want to follow her: "Nineteen out of 20 women I talk to want to be sideline reporters, to be like Erin Andrews with a high profile and national commercials. That's become the glamour position."

Ward last week learned she will no longer work ESPN's college football. Ward on Tuesday didn't want to go into specifics about why she was dropped, leaving ESPN's Beth Mowins as the only football play-caller on national TV, but says "I think it's a long shot I will ever do it again at ESPN. I'd be open to it under the right circumstances. But I'm not holding my breath."

Ward, still on ESPN's college softball and basketball and WNBA, says she's talking to ESPN about calling women's college soccer. "That's something I'd love to get into," she says.

Running numbers: Fox's NASCAR Coca-Cola 600 drew higher national ratings than ESPN/ABC's Indianapolis 500 in seven of the past 10 years. But in overnight ratings out Tuesday, it was a tossup: The races, both airing on the Sunday of Memorial Day weekend, each drew 4.1 overnight ratings translating to 4.1% of households in the 56 urban markets measured for overnights. Mixed bag for NBA playoff ratings: ESPN's Boston Celtics-Miami Heat game Monday drew a 6.6 overnight, up 25% from an Oklahoma City Thunder-Dallas Mavericks game last year. ABC's Philadelphia 76ers-Boston Celtics game Saturday, a Game 7 in a series between big-market teams, drew a 5.5 overnight up 12% from comparable coverage of an Oklahoma City-Memphis Grizzlies game last year. TNT's Oklahoma City-San Antonio Spurs game Sunday, obviously not helped by having small-market teams Oklahoma City is the USA's 44th-biggest TV market while San Antonio is No. 36 drew a 5.7 overnight, down 23% from comparable coverage of a Miami-Chicago Bulls game last year.

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/colum...ion/55271366/1
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TV Notes
No doubt about it, cable's pawn-addicted
Discovery's new 'Final Offer' is yet another antiques/pawn show
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - May 31, 2012

What singing shows are to broadcast, pawn/antiques shows have become to cable. They're the hot thing right now.

Yet another one premieres tonight, joining a pack that already includes History's "Pawn Stars," truTV's "Hardcore Pawn" and A&E's "Storage Wars."

Discovery Channel's "Final Offer," airing at 10 p.m., follows four self-described top arts, antiques and collectibles dealers as they battle each other to bid on hot items.

Also like singing shows, the pawn/antiques genre shows no signs of burning itself out. The shows just have to be on the right network with the right audience.

History, truTV and A&E have all had success with such programs, which tend to skew male, much like History and tru; A&E's audience is split more evenly between men and women.

Last week "Stars" averaged 5.2 million total viewers for two episodes, finishing No. 6 and 7 on cable for the week. "Hardcore" averaged 2.2 million and was tru's top program. ("Storage" is on hiatus until later this summer.)

Not every pawn/antiques show succeeds, of course.

Fox's "Buried Treasure" bombed last summer. The likely reason is that as a broadcast network it reaches a diverse audience, not the niche audience of the sort you find on cable that accounts for the success of so many pawn shows.

There's no reason to think that "Final Offer" won't work on Discovery, a top-10 network across the major adult demographics.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art...n-addicted.asp
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[via press release from AMC]
AMC ANNOUNCES "THE WALKING DEAD" SEASON 3 PREVIEW WEEKEND ON JULY 7 & 8

July 7 & 8
Highlights include the world television premiere of the black and white version of "The Walking Dead" pilot episode.
---------------------------------------------------------------



Programming Event Features Marathon of All 19 Episodes From Emmy(R)-Winning Series' First Two Seasons Wrapped with Special Episodic Behind-the-Scenes Footage

Weekend Culminates with "Talking Dead" Live Primetime Special, Including Exclusive First Look Scene from "The Walking Dead" Season 3 and World Television Premiere of Black and White Version of Pilot Episode

Fans Can Enter "The Walking Dead" Watch to Win Sweepstakes

Read more at http://www.thefutoncritic.com/news/2...r15HVFE8lcC.99
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post #79758 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 10:56 AM
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Technology/Critic's Notes
Pushing All Our Buttons
By William Grimes, The New York Times - May 31, 2012

It started out in the 1950s as an effort-saving gadget, like the electric can opener or electronic car keys. It evolved into a necessity, a cultural magic wand that has transformed the relationship of viewers to their televisions, and the style and content of the programs on view.

Today, American television viewers click away at some 335 million TV remotes — nearly three per household. No longer a curiosity, the remote is as much a part of the American home as the personal computer or the cellphone.

The novelist Saul Bellow denounced it as a malign invention whose invitation to jump from channel to channel, scrambling stories, “makes mental mincemeat of us.” Ellen Goodman called it “the most reactionary implement currently used to undermine equality in modern marriage” in a 1992 column for The Boston Globe, noting its resemblance to a royal scepter and the tendency of men to dictate its use.

“It really changed, in a fundamental way, our interaction with technology and with each other,” said Edward Tenner, a historian of technology and culture and the author of “Our Own Devices.” “Think of the clickers that allow us to communicate with all sorts of electronic devices. The TV remote was the origin of that idea.”

No one foresaw the transformative power of the device when Zenith unveiled the first cordless remote, the Flash-Matic, in 1955. Created by Eugene J. Polley, who died May 20 at 96, it looked like a small ray gun. By directing a beam of light at four photo cells, one at each corner of the screen, the viewer could change channels up or down, and increase or decrease the volume.

The company’s advertisements proclaimed the Flash-Matic “a marvel of the electronic age that gives you remote control without wires, cables or cords.” Unlike the Lazy Bones, Zenith’s first remote, introduced in 1950, it did not have a wire connecting it to the television.

But it did have other drawbacks. The photocells could be activated randomly by bright sunlight during the day, and by the lights of passing cars at night.

Nevertheless, Mr. Polley regarded his device with satisfaction. “It makes me think my life was not wasted,” he told The Baltimore Sun in 2000. “Maybe I did something for humanity, like the guy who invented the flush toilet.”

Robert Adler, the inventor of the Lazy Bones, carried remote technology forward with an ultrasound device called the Space Command. Viewers could press one of four buttons on a box to turn the television on and off, change channels and adjust the volume. Each key, with a sharp click, struck an aluminum rod that sent ultrasound waves to the receiver in the set.

The Space Command was introduced in 1956 and lived on into the age of transistor technology in the early 1960s. With the arrival of infrared technology in the early 1980s, it became obsolete, but by that time the remote had already made deep inroads into American life.

In 1965, the first year that statistics were kept on sales of televisions with remote controls, only 1 in 20 sets came with a remote control, which, because it added to the cost, came only with color models. By 1985, half of all color sets came with a remote control, and by 1988, three-quarters.

For the big networks, the remote, the VCR and multiple cable channels formed an axis of evil. The ray-gun design of the Flash-Matic, it turned out, was a kind of omen. Programming executives now faced a world in which “the audience was armed,” as James Gleick put it in “Faster: The Acceleration of Just About Everything.”

Television began to change, rapidly and profoundly, as power shifted from corporate offices to increasingly fickle viewers. After a research team at NBC discovered that 25 percent of its audience changed channels when credits rolled, the network introduced the format known as “squeeze and tease” in 1999. Credits were consigned to a third of the screen, running simultaneously with promotional spots intended to keep the viewers hooked.

The networks either abandoned or modified strategies they had relied on for decades. Increasingly, television shows were “top-loaded.” That is, flashy production values were given prominence at the beginning of shows, to entice restless eyes, and commercials were moved to the middle. The transition from one show to the next became almost seamless, with viewers thrust into new narratives almost before they knew the old one had come to its end. The visual style of television became much faster and jumpier to stave off visual ennui.

Viewers, for their part, enjoyed a somewhat conflicted relationship with the handy little device, which often seemed to have a mind of its own. It showed an uncanny talent for concealing itself in the deepest recesses of a sofa or wandering off to points unknown. A thriving business in electronic television-remote finders grew up overnight.

As the remotes proliferated, so did the number of function keys. The devices that came with cable boxes, bristling with buttons, looked like personal massagers intended to break up cellulite.

The Tito who imposed unity on this Balkanized world was the universal remote, a superwand that could be programmed to control dozens of devices. But many consumers found that it simply added a new layer of complexity to their lives, and in some cases sent them running to professional consultants for an intervention.

“The problem is, there are a billion buttons and you have no idea what they do,” said Jeff Gernbacher, who supervises Geek Squad technicians for Best Buy in Minneapolis. “It puts people off the technology and makes them not want to use it.”

The visual appearance of the typical remote did not help matters. “The television remote is the iconic example of bad design,” said Bill Moggridge, the director of the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum and the author of “Designing Interactions.” “There was a great deal of original design thinking in the first modes. Flash-Matic, with its ray-gun look and red trigger, was very innovative, but modern remotes suffer from the Swiss Army knife problem. When there are as many features as possible, doing any one thing becomes very difficult and confusing.”

A new generation of universal remotes, like the Logitech Harmony series, tries to simplify matters by doing the programming automatically once users log on to a computer and, referring to an extensive menu, select the model names of the electronic devices they own.

THE remote control may have liberated viewers. But it has also produced anxiety, stress and even violent conflict. In April 2011, a woman in Wellington, Fla., attacked her husband with a remote, which the police characterized as a “deadly weapon.” And Exulam Holman, of Joliet, Ill., was charged in January with gouging out his uncle’s eyes and throwing him down a flight of stairs after a dispute over the remote.

But simmering resentment is more the norm. Social scientists became intrigued by the sexual politics of the remote as the device became ubiquitous in the late 1980s. Men and women, it seemed, used it differently. Men were obsessive clickers, flipping through channels out of boredom, restlessness, the sense that something better might be on elsewhere or because they wanted to watch two programs at once. Women tuned into a specific program, which they then watched.

Alexis J. Walker, who studies the sociology of the American family at Oregon State University, examined remote-control use among 36 couples in 1996 and finished up by interviewing her subjects. “I would say that the only thing that’s frustrating for me is when we first turn on the TV and he just flips through the channels,” one woman said. “It drives me crazy because you can’t tell what’s on, because he just goes through and goes through and goes through.”

But the day of liberation may be at hand. Industry experts agree that the all-powerful remote, and the complex pas de deux between thumb and button, faces obsolescence. David Mercer, a television analyst at Strategy Analytics, a research and consulting firm, has called the remote “the dinosaur of the consumer electronics industry.”

Voice-recognition and motion sensors are already being incorporated into new remotes like the Samsung Magic Touch, the LG Magic Motion and the Ident Gesture Remote. And for as little as $50, viewers can buy a small device that plugs into a smartphone and turns it into a remote control.

“At the moment, the candy-bar remote is still popular, but over the next few years you’ll see mobile devices replacing it,” said Dave Pedigo, the senior director of technology for the Custom Electronic Design and Installation Association, whose members install home theaters. And “in a decade, people will look at them as quaint. My daughter’s child will say, ‘What’s a remote control?’ ”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/31/ga...ref=television
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WEDNESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media INsight's Blog
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TV Notes
Showtime Renews 'Nurse Jackie' for Fifth Season
By Erin Carlson, The Hollywood Reporter - May 31, 2012

Former Dexter showrunner Clyde Phillips is taking the helm at Showtime’s Nurse Jackie.

With a new showrunner firmly in place, the dramedy starring Edie Falco has been renewed for a fifth season. The Emmy-nominated Phillips replaced co-creators Linda Wallem and Liz Brixius, who exited the New York-based series this year. Production on the season 5 will begin in late 2012.

“Clyde brings a unique combination of skills in both comedy and drama, and he is a master at making entertaining and compelling television,” Showtime entertainment chief David Nevins said of the show’s new hire, who joins Falco, Richie Jackson and Caryn Mandabach as an EP.

The news comes as Jackie’s fourth season nears its end. The season premiere garnered more than 1.1 million viewers, up 30 percent from a year earlier. Thus far this season, the series has been averaging 2.8 million total weekly viewers when you factor in on-demand, Live+7 and replays.

Phillips, who also is a best-selling mystery novelist with a fourth book titled Unthinkable to be published in January by Amazon, is repped by CAA.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...hillips-331698
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post #79761 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 11:01 AM
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Critic's Notes
Secrets of a May 'Nielsen Family'
By Bob Sellers, HuffingtonPost.com - May 29, 2012

Jerry Seinfeld has a joke about how men watch TV, remotes at the ready: "Men don't care what's on TV. Men only care what ELSE is on TV."

Every programmer in television is interested in reaching the age 25-54 demographic, "the demo."

"Women want to see what the show is before they change the channel so thats why men hunt & women nest."

Thats gold Jerry....gold !!

That was also the ep with "Eric the clown", what kind of name is that for a clown anyway ?

I thought 18-49 was the demo though.

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Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Unre-bark-able debut for 'Dogs in the City'
Averages a 1.3 in 18-49s, second in its timeslot
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - May 31, 2012

"Dogs in the City" didn't show much bite in its premiere.

CBS's new fur-focused reality show debuted to a ho-hum 1.3 adults 18-49 rating at 8 p.m. last night, according to Nielsen overnights, finishing second in the hour but still 1.1 behind Fox's leading "So You Think You Can Dance."

The show did decently among total viewers, topping "SYTYCD" by just over 100,000 with 6.66 million tuning in.

But the 18-49 rating came against minimal competition, including ABC's sitcom reruns and a low-rated opener to the Stanley Cup playoffs on NBC.

Of course CBS traditionally starts the summer slow and then builds when "Big Brother" returns to the schedule in a few weeks.

Meanwhile, "SYTYCD" averaged a 2.6 for a two-hour episode, up 8 percent from Thursday's premiere. The show will be airing only once a week, on Wednesdays, after airing biweekly in its first eight seasons.

Fox led the night among 18-49s with a 2.6 average overnight rating and an 8 share. CBS was second at 1.3/4, ABC and Univision tied for third at 1.2/4, NBC was fifth at 1.0/3, and Telemundo and CW tied for sixth at 0.5/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-four percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

Also, ratings for NBC's NHL coverage are approximate as fast nationals measure timeslot and not actual program data. They also do not take time zone differences into account; one of the squads in the Stanley Cup finals, the Los Angeles Kings, is from the West Coast.

At 8 p.m. Fox was first with a 2.4 for "SYTYCD," followed by CBS with a 1.3 for "Dogs." ABC was third with a 1.2 for repeats of "The Middle" and "Suburgatory." NBC and Univision tied for fourth at 1.0, NBC for hockey and Univision for "Un Refugio Para el Amor," Telemundo was sixth with a 0.5 for "Una Maid en Manhattan" and CW seventh with a 0.4 for a repeat of "America's Next Top Model."

Fox finished first again at 9 p.m. with a 2.8 for more "SYTYCD," while ABC and Univision tied for second at 1.3, ABC for "Modern Family" and "Happy Endings" reruns and Univision for "Abismo de Pasion." CBS was fourth with a 1.1 for a repeat of "Criminal Minds," NBC fifth with a 0.9 for hockey, CW sixth with a 0.6 for the season finale of "Top Model" and Telemundo seventh with a 0.5 for "Corazon Valiente."

At 10 p.m. CBS and Univision tied for first at 1.5, CBS for a "CSI" repeat and Univision for "La Que No Podia Amar." ABC and NBC tied for third at 1.1, ABC for repeats of "Don't Trust the B---- in Apartment 23" and "Modern Family" and NBC for more hockey, with Telemundo fifth with a 0.4 for "Relaciones Peligrosas."

CBS was first for the night among households with a 4.4 average overnight rating and a 7 share, followed closely by Fox at 4.3/7. ABC was third at 2.4/4, NBC and Univision tied for fourth at 1.7/3, CW was sixth at 0.8/1 and Telemundo seventh at 0.7/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art...-the-City-.asp
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post #79763 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 11:06 AM
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TV Notes
Dish Network wins first ruling against networks in ad-skipping case
By Meg James, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - May 30, 2012

Dish Networks landed the first punch in its fight against broadcasters ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC over whether its new ad-skipping feature called AutoHop is legal.

Wednesday, a federal court judge in New York granted Dish Network's request for a temporary restraining order preventing Fox and other networks from trying to advance their claims against the satellite television provider in lawsuits that were separately filed last week in Los Angeles.

Dish, which had filed its own suit hours earlier in New York, asked that the networks be prevented from separately pursuing their litigation in California until U.S. District Judge Laura Taylor Swain decides whether all of the court cases should be consolidated.

Swain scheduled a hearing for July 2 to consider that request.

Dish also asked the judge to slap Fox, the first network to file suit, with a temporary restraining order because the News Corp.-owned network had petitioned the courts for "extraordinary relief" so the case would be heard in California.

"This dispute belongs in New York," Dish said in its filing.

Although ABC has not yet filed suit against Dish, the other networks had hoped the high-stakes showdown would play out in Los Angeles, which falls in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, rather than in the 2nd Circuit in New York. The 9th Circuit has looked more favorably on TV network claims of copyright infringement.

Dish Network, however, was the first to file its suit May 24 -- before the three networks lodged their complaints in Los Angeles. The satellite TV provider, which is based in Englewood, Colo., selected New York, in part, because of a ruling several years ago that could buttress Dish's position that its AutoHop feature does not violate the networks' copyright.
In 2007, the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in a dispute between cable operator Cablevision Systems and Cartoon Network, owned by Time Warner Inc.

In that case, a group of film and television companies sued the cable provider for copyright infringement over a remote storage digital video recorder that allowed customers who did not have a stand-alone device to record shows for later viewing on Cablevision's hardware.

The trial court judge ruled in favor of the studios - and ordered Cablevision to stop operating the system until it obtained a license from the content holders. But the appeals court overruled that decision.

Dish welcomed Swain's action Wednesday.

We're pleased that the New York federal court has entered a [temporary restraining order] against Fox until the New York court decides whether the suits filed by Fox, CBS and NBC in California should be enjoined in favor of Dish's suit in New York, Dish General Counsel R. Stanton Dodge said in a statement. Dish looks forward to presenting its case and prevailing on the merits.
Fox, for its part, also released a statement: "We look forward to making our case in court against Dish for copyright infringement and breach of contract."

Dish customers with the device, which rolled out May 10, can record all of the prime-time TV programming on ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC for later viewing. Then when a commercial break appears, the screen goes black, and a few seconds later the program returns -- minus the ads. The feature becomes available the day after the programming first airs.

The AutoHop feature is available only to skip commercials in broadcast programming -- not cable network shows.

The outcome of the skirmish could influence what features will be available to consumers on their TV devices, as well as the price they pay for their monthly service.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...,6514328.story
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post #79764 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 11:07 AM
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By Michael B. Farrell
Globe Staff / May 31, 2012

Verizon Communications Inc.'s FiOS Internet service is getting a lot faster. The cable provider said Wednesday that it will double the top speed available to subscribers to its premium FiOS broadband service because of growing demand for video content over the Web.

The increase raises Verizon's fastest service to 300 megabits per second a rate the company said is more than twice the speed of any Internet service available to residential customers in the United States. At the top speed, customers can download a standard definition, two-hour movie in less than 40 seconds, according to a press release from the company.

But those speeds, which the company said will be available in June, will come at a price, which the company would not disclose Wednesday, saying it will announce fees for upgraded service next month. It now charges about $200 a month for 150-megabits-per-second Internet service, its highest current speed, and has 5 million FiOS Internet customers.

All broadband providers continue to upgrade the speed because customers want more, said Jeff Kagan, an independent telecommunications analyst. In reality, you can deliver more speed over existing networks as technology advances.

The FiOS upgrade is also designed to meet the increased demand for broadband service to Internet-connected devices such as smartphones and tablet computers.

Families won't have to say, Don't make that Skype call right now because we're watching a Netflix movie,'  said Richard Bennett, senior research fellow at the Washington think tank Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.

Verizon's maximum speed is indeed twice as high as what the cable companies can offer, Bennett said, which could give the company a marketing edge over competitors such as Comcast Corp.

Verizon will also increase speeds available on several less-expensive tiers of FiOS Internet service. FiOS is available in 112 Massachusetts communities and most of Rhode Island, but not in Boston.

Michael B. Farrell can be reached at michael.farrell@globe.com.
http://www.boston.com/business/techn...adband_speeds/
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post #79765 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 11:10 AM
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TV Notes
American Idol' and Its Owner to Undergo a Retooling
By Bill Carter, The New York Times - May 31, 2012

The company that owns the rights to the hit television series American Idol is reorganizing and changing its name in an effort to diversify as a broader-based media company, in recognition that its biggest moneymaker, Idol, has finally begun to lose momentum.

CKx, owned by the capital equity firm Apollo Global Management, will be rechristened Thursday as Core Media Group. Among its initial plans are a full-scale review, in conjunction with executives from the Fox network, of American Idol, where ratings dropped by more than 30 percent this season. Within the next few weeks, the company also plans to acquire what the new president of Core, Marc Graboff, described as a high-profile production company that has produced 25 series for cable networks.

Core also has plans for other parts of its eclectic portfolio, which includes the rights to the creative exploitation of Elvis Presley and Muhammad Ali. One plan for Ali includes a portable Ali Experience exhibit.

For Presley, plans include an upgrade of the Graceland museum devoted to him, and a potential drama series based on his early life. Core is also talking with Sony Records about a duets album (as has been done with artists like Frank Sinatra in the past) pairing Elvis with contemporary artists. Most ambitiously, the album may be accompanied by a tour with the other artists performing with Elvis as a hologram.

But Mr. Graboff, who joined CKx in January after a long career at NBC, acknowledged that the immediate focus is on American Idol and how best to protect what he said was by far the most important asset of the company.

Core owns the format rights to Idol, and controls the musical careers of most of the singers and all of the winners who perform on the show. That means managing them, booking their tours and selling their albums. (Mr. Graboff said that 100 million albums with performers from Idol have been sold worldwide.)

We will certainly manage Phillip Phillips and Jessica Sanchez, Mr. Graboff said of the two recent finalists. He also has plans to exploit the show further as either cable or digital programming, including a potential series based on behind-the-scenes video of the contest and this year's national tour.

Like executives from the Fox network, Mr. Graboff acknowledged the decline in Idol this season, pointing to the competition from similar singing shows, The Voice on NBC and The X Factor on Fox.

Idol' is still the gold standard, Mr. Graboff said. It's very viable, but it definitely needs to be refreshed and it will be.

To that end, he said he had recruited the format's creator, Simon Fuller, who departed in one of several changes in the management structure of CKx, to come back and submit ideas for how to tweak the Idol format. Some of these may be based on alterations instituted by international editions of the show. (It is sold in about 100 territories.)

One of the areas Mr. Fuller is closely looking at, Mr. Graboff said, is the voting process. As many critics have noted, the show has produced five similar winners in a row. They're being called W.G.W.G.'s white guys with guitars, Mr. Graboff said. These outcomes have been interpreted as a result of so many young girls voting for the cutest male performer.

As for changes in the judging panel, Mr. Graboff said those calls are Fox's to make.

Mr. Graboff would not quantify either in dollar figures or percentage how significant Idol is to Core's bottom line. He said, We hope it will stay as big a revenue stream as it has been, but no matter how big the stream is, my job is to diversify us away from it as much as possible.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/31/bu...ref=television
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post #79766 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 11:13 AM
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Nielsen Notes (Cable)
CNN Hits 20-Year Monthly Rating Low In May
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - May 30, 2012

The news just went from bad to worse at CNN. After the cable news network delivered its lowest-rated month in total viewers in over a decade in April, May became CNN’s worst month in primetime among total viewers in over 20 years. From April 30 to May 27, the cable news network attracted an average of 389,000 viewers in primetime. It was also CNN’s second-lowest-rated month in primetime among the 25-54 demographic (114,000) since October 1991. Only May 2000, with 104,000 viewers in the demo, did worse.

Piers Morgan Tonight received the lowest total viewer and 25-54 demo numbers that CNN has had in the 9 PM time slot in two decades. The interview show got only 417,000 total viewers and 117,000 among the 25-54 demographic. At 7 PM, Erin Burnett, another relative CNN newcomer, had the lowest 25-54 demo numbers in 20 years in the time slot for the network and the second lowest after June 2001, in two decades in terms of total viewership. Burnett’s show attracted just 89,000 viewers in the 25-54 demo from April 30 to May 27.

The latest numbers follow CNN hitting its lowest-rated weekday primetime in 20 years during the week of May 14-18.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/05/cnn-...-low-20-years/
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post #79767 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 11:38 AM
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Time Warner Establishes Prices For L.A. Sports Networks Launching Later This Year
By John Ourand, Staff Writer
Published May 31, 2012

Time Warner Cable has put a price to its planned RSNs in L.A., as cable systems within the L.A. DMA would pay $3.95 per subscriber per month, according to a source who has seen the offer sheet.
Cable systems in outlying areas -- north to Fresno, south to San Diego, east to the Arizona border and west to Hawaii -- would pay $1.25.

TWC execs would not comment on the price, but TWC Sports President David Rone said the value to distributors comes from the fact that it is launching two channels: Time Warner Cable SportsNet and Time Warner Cable Deportes. "These services are singular services," Rone told THE DAILY. "They are singular networks." The channels are scheduled to launch Oct. 1, with a programming lineup that will rely heavily on the Lakers. "Between October and June, we will have Lakers-centric nightly programming each of those nights," Rone said. That includes pre- and postgame shows, even when the Lakers game is on another network. It also includes Lakers shows on nights when the team is not playing.

The Spanish-language channel will have a nightly soccer show. Rone said he is on the lookout for more local sports rights, including college rights, but he would not specify which ones. "It's a competitive market," he said. He also said TWC would welcome a bid on the Dodgers TV rights when those come up. "We are hopeful that we will have an opportunity to speak with the new ownership," he said. "Those are conversations we are interested in having and prepared to have."

TWC has around 2 million subscribers in Southern California, which accounts for 40% of the pay-TV market in the L.A. market. The channels will be carried in those homes at launch. It is standard in the cable industry to wait until just before or just after a channel's launch to cut a carriage deal.

http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/D...Media/TWC.aspx

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post #79768 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

Maybe a new show about the Borsht Belt will replace No Reservations.

I can just see it now - slate of guests: Jackie Mason, Shecky Greene, Shelley Berman, Joan Rivers, Don Rickles, Sid Caeser and Mel Brooks.
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post #79769 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 03:53 PM
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TV Notes
American Idol' and Its Owner to Undergo a Retooling
By Bill Carter, The New York Times - May 31, 2012

One of the areas Mr. Fuller is closely looking at, Mr. Graboff said, is the voting process. As many critics have noted, the show has produced five similar winners in a row. They're being called W.G.W.G.'s white guys with guitars, Mr. Graboff said. These outcomes have been interpreted as a result of so many young girls voting for the cutest male performer.

Wow there's a shocker!

Who would have thought that the forgettable array of identikit winners the show produces, never gained their fame on the strength of their musical ability or songwriting proficiency?

Do we really need a television show to create more of these when it's clear the Justin Bieber pop-factory can still churn them out on a monthly basis?


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post #79770 of 97514 Old 05-31-2012, 04:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski View Post

I can just see it now - slate of guests: Jackie Mason, Shecky Greene, Shelley Berman, Joan Rivers, Don Rickles, Sid Caeser and Mel Brooks.

I'm IN!

All opinions expressed (unless otherwise noted) are the posters and NOT the posters employers. The poster in NO WAY is/will speak for his employers.
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