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post #94141 of 95910 Old 05-06-2014, 09:28 AM
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Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Decent return for Fox’s ’24′ reboot
Averages a 2.5 in 18-49s, boosting network to No. 2 for the night
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - May 6, 2014

Jack Bauer’s still got it.

“24” returned from a four-year layoff last night with the premiere of the new miniseries “24: Live Another Day.”

The show posted a solid 2.5 adults 18-49 rating from 8 to 10 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights, finishing second in the timeslot and also lifting Fox to No. 2 for the night behind usual victor NBC, which once again won all six timeslots on the evening.

The miniseries is a reboot of the successful drama, which aired for eight seasons before wrapping up in 2010.

The series finale four years ago drew a 2.8, and last night’s episode was only down 11 percent from that rating, impressive considering how viewership has eroded for broadcast since then.

Fox’s Monday rating more than doubled versus last week, when it posted a 1.2.

NBC’s “The Voice” was the night’s top show with a 3.0, even to last week, while lead-out “The Blacklist” was the night’s No. 2 program with a 2.7, also even to last week.

“24” appeared to take a toll on ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars,” which plummeted 31 percent from last week’s season-high 2.6 to a 1.8. CBS’s “2 Broke Girls” also took a hit, off 17 percent from last week to a series-low 1.9 at 8 p.m.

NBC was first for the night among 18-49s with a 2.9 average overnight rating and a 9 share. Fox was second at 2.5/8, ABC third at 1.8/5, CBS fourth at 1.3/4, Univision fifth at 1.2/4, and Telemundo and CW tied for sixth at 0.4/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-nine percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

NBC finished first during each hour of the night, beginning with a 2.8 at 8 p.m. for “Voice,” followed by Fox with a 2.6 for “24.” CBS was third with a 1.8 for “Girls” (1.9) and “Friends With Better Lives” (1.6), ABC fourth with a 1.7 for “Stars,” Univision fifth with a 1.2 for “Poe Siempre Mi Amor,” Telemundo sixth with a 0.4 for “La Impostora” and CW seventh with a 0.3 for “Star-Crossed.”

At 9 p.m. NBC was first with a 3.1 for more “Voice,” followed again by Fox with a 2.5 for “24.” ABC was third with a 2.0 for more “Stars.” CBS and Univision tied for fourth at 1.5, CBS for “Mike & Molly” (1.8) and a repeat of “Mom” (1.2) and Univision for “Lo Que La Vida Me Robo.” Telemundo was sixth with a 0.5 for “En Otra Piel” and CW seventh with a 0.4 for the season finale of “The Tomorrow People.”

NBC led at 10 p.m. with a 2.7 for “The Blacklist,” with ABC second with a 1.6 for “Castle.” Univision was third with a 1.0 for “Que Pobres Tan Ricos,” CBS fourth with a 0.8 for a repeat of “NCIS: Los Angeles” and Telemundo fifth with a 0.5 for “Camelia, La Texana.”

ABC finished first for the night among households with a 7.6 average overnight rating and a 12 share. NBC was second at 6.6/11, Fox third at 4.6/7, CBS fourth at 3.4/6, Univision fifth at 1.6/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.7/1 and CW seventh at 0.6/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/decent-return-foxs-24-reboot/

* * * *

TV Notes
For CBS, in need of new comedies
Upfront preview: The network's Monday sitcoms need an overhaul

One year after finishing first in adults 18-49 for the first time in more than a decade, CBS has seen sizable year-to-year declines.

Part of that is due to the Super Bowl, which the network carried in 2013 but not this year.

But it’s also seen big declines for a number of scripted series, including Monday night comedy veterans “2 Broke Girls” and “Mike & Molly,” as well as long-running dramas such as “Person of Interest” and “Criminal Minds.”

CBS will likely finish in second or third place for the season in 18-49s, depending on how much further Fox declines over the next two weeks, but it’s also on pace to finish behind NBC in its key demo, 25-54s, which is of greater concern.

For CBS to move back atop the ratings, it will need to shore up its ailing Monday and start finding some new dramas to replace its aging older ones, preferably shows that are not spun off of existing hits.

Upfront presentation date
Wednesday, May 14

Season-to-date rating
CBS ranks third among 18-49s on broadcast with a 2.4 rating and 7 share, according to Nielsen. That’s down 17 percent from last year.

Top-rated show
“The Big Bang Theory,” which is averaging a 5.2 adults 18-49 rating this season.

MVP
“How I Met Your Mother,” the network’s No. 2 program, which ended its run with a series high in March and kept CBS competitive on Monday nights with its otherwise troubled lineup.

Biggest disappointment
“Hostages,” a serialized drama that was better in theory than in execution. It debuted to surprisingly low ratings and struggled throughout its limited run last fall airing Mondays at 10.

Biggest strength
Thursdays, which CBS continues to dominate on the strength of “Bang.” It’s an important night for advertisers, and CBS has the most consistent lineup of the Big Four.

Biggest problem night
Monday, where it hasn’t launched a strong new show since “2 Broke Girls” two years ago. New comedy “Mom” has done merely okay, though it earned a second-season pickup, and “Girls” has seen ratings decline leading off the night as the new anchor show at 8, replacing “Mother.”

What it needs for next season
CBS has one major advantage over its competition heading into the fall: It won rights to a Thursday night NFL package that will air for two months at the start of the season. It’s guaranteed to draw huge ratings.

That also means that the network can temporarily move “Bang,” which usually airs Thursdays, to another night to jump start new shows, if it so chooses.

The most obvious idea would be to put it on Mondays, where it could launch the network’s rejiggered lineup before returning to Thursday in time for November sweeps.

But launching some strong new comedies is only half of what CBS needs. The network also has to stop relying on aging procedurals for ratings, because these shows cannot last forever.

It has spinoffs of “CSI” and “NCIS” in contention for fall but instead it should concentrate on developing new franchises with longevity rather than milking everything it can out of programs that have been on the air more than a decade.

Bubble shows most likely to be renewed
None (the network renewed the bulk of its programs in March)

Bubble shows most likely to be canceled
“The Crazy Ones,” “The Mentalist”

Season grade B-
CBS remains the most consistent network and should see a nice ratings bounce from the NFL next year. But to compete with NBC among 18-49s or 25-54s, it needs to address the Monday lineup that was its biggest strength just two years ago.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/cbs-need-new-comedies/
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post #94142 of 95910 Old 05-06-2014, 09:30 AM
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Crap! I've been watching and liking both of those shows.
I gave up on "Believe" after the third episode when it became a "good deed of the week" formula. Guess I was expecting more telekenetic bells and whistles. It has those, but the sappy I'm-supposed-to-get-teary-eyed moments were a little over-the-top.

"Crisis" I do hope they burn off, somewhere, though. I do want to see how this wraps up, though it also was becoming repetitive.

I do find it interesting how Mark Valley seems to be kryptonite for whatever show he's on.

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
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post #94143 of 95910 Old 05-06-2014, 09:32 AM
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TV Notes
Steve Capus, former NBC News chief, to produce 'CBS Evening News'
By Meg James, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - May 6, 2013

Steve Capus, who earned his stripes at NBC News as wingman for anchors Tom Brokaw and Brian Williams, soon will be piloting the cross-town rival "The CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley."

CBS News announced Tuesday it had hired Capus, former president of NBC News for eight years, for a smaller position as the executive producer of the "CBS Evening News." Capus begins at CBS on July 7.

Capus, 50, replaces Patricia Shevlin, who left her position at the end of March to switch to CBS' flagship news magazine "60 Minutes."

Capus, who will report to CBS New President David Rhodes, will also carry the title executive editor of CBS News and work with other news units.

"The 'Evening News' is an excellent broadcast, and we believe under Steve's leadership it will get even better," CBS News Chairman Jeff Fager said in a statement. “He is a real pro with an extraordinary record, and we are fortunate to have him joining us at CBS News.”

Capus is currently serving as executive in residence at IESE Business School, a role he will continue.

Capus resigned from his position at NBC News early last year.

While serving as president of NBC News, Capus was responsible for broadcast, digital, cable production and distribution as well as talent and international partnerships. The news programs turned in strong ratings during much of his tenure.

He served as executive producer of "NBC Nightly News" for four years. In that role he was credited with helping pave the way for a smooth handoff from Brokaw to Williams in 2004 and had a good working relationship with Williams at NBC.

However, NBC News' "Today" show handoff from Meredith Vieira to Ann Curry and then to Savannah Guthrie was badly botched.

“Everyone at the 'Evening News' is excited about the opportunity to work with Steve,” Pelley said in the statement. “The breadth of his experience is unmatched. His principles, values and leadership make him an ideal fit.”

"CBS Evening News" has been gaining viewers but remains in third place. The show has been averaging nearly 7 million viewers a telecast, according to Nielsen numbers.

"NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams" averages 9 million viewers a night, while "World News with Diane Sawyer" on ABC draws about 8 million viewers a telecast.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-chief-steve-capus-cbs-evening-news-20140506-story.html
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post #94144 of 95910 Old 05-06-2014, 09:36 AM
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Nielsen Notes (Cable)
‘Game Of Thrones’ Draws 7.2 Million Viewers On Sunday, ‘Silicon Valley’ & ‘Veep’ Hit Highs
By The Deadline.com Team - May 6, 2014

HBO‘s Game Of Thrones hit another serieshbo45 high on Sunday drawing 7.2 million viewers at 9 PM and 8.6 million viewers for the night. Season-to-date, GoT is averaging 17.8 million viewers per episode. up +24% compared to 14.4 million last season.

Meanwhile, Silicon Valley averaged 1.8 million viewers at 10 PM, its best performance since its debut. Combined with its second replay, Silicon Valley delivered 2.1 million viewers for the night. Season-to-date, the series is averaging 5.4 million viewers per episode.

Veep tallied a season-high of 1 million viewers at 10:30 PM. Combined with its second replay, the series drew 1.4 million viewers. Season-to-date, Veep is averaging 4.5 million viewers per episode, up 17% compared to last season’s average of 3.9 million viewers, and making it the most watched season for the series.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/05/game-of-thrones-draws-7-2-million-viewers-on-sunday-silicon-valley-veep-hit-highs/
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Business Notes
Moviefone Will Add Broadcast and On-Demand TV
By Brooks Barnes, The New York Times - May 5, 2014

Lloyd Braun, the owner of Whalerock Industries, a digitally focused Hollywood company

Serenity now. Insanity later.

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post #94146 of 95910 Old 05-06-2014, 09:51 AM
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TV/Business Notes
Why Fox’s Kevin Reilly Is Canceling Pilot Season
By Josef Adalian, New York Magazine - May 6, 2014

Despite the tectonic shifts in the TV business over the past decade, the process by which most broadcast shows are developed hasn’t changed much since I Love Lucy. Every summer, the networks take pitches from hundreds of producers and writers, with each ordering 100-plus comedy and drama scripts. By Valentine’s Day, they’ve each begun production on 20 or so t*emplate episodes (a.k.a. “pilots”). Dozens of would-be TV shows then emerge from the primordial goo almost simultaneously, all competing for the same resources — actors, directors, set builders, video editors — with finished products due within about two months. Days (or sometimes even hours) after the pilots get turned in, network suits quickly decide which lucky six to ten projects will become full-fledged series, trotted out to advertisers at their annual “upfront” presentations the second week in May. The leftovers? They get locked away in vaults, million-*dollar paperweights never to be seen again. The TV industry calls the whole process “pilot season.” Kevin Reilly, Fox’s chairman of entertainment, calls it a waste of time and money.

In his horn-rimmed glasses and Brooks Brothers uniform, Reilly, 51, doesn’t look much like a revolutionary. And yet he’s been sounding a little like one these past few months. “I’m trying to set a bomb off,” he calmly told me last fall, previewing a January speech to TV critics in which he pretty much did. Standing next to a giant video screen carrying the image of a gravestone marked “R.I.P Fox Pilot Season,” Reilly announced that Fox was ditching network TV’s compressed development schedule in favor of a year-round model, with projects incubating longer and being green-lit as they’re ready, rather than when the calendar dictates. While careful to stress that he’s anti–pilot season and not pilots themselves (“They can be a very useful thing”), of the roughly 18 projects Reilly has in the works at Fox, only 6 are traditional pilots. Eight have been green-lit straight to series without shooting a single frame, such as the Will Forte comedy Last Man on Earth and an Egyptian fantasy epic called Hieroglyph. With four others, including the Octavia Spencer drama Red Band Society, Reilly is paying writers to do additional scripts before he officially signs off on production. As rival networks spend the first weeks of May hurriedly deciding on a fall schedule, Reilly already has a pretty good idea of what Fox’s new lineup will look like. “Rather than make 20 things and throw them at the wall and hope you get 6 that maybe feel like keepers, why not focus?” he says. “At a time when consumer behavior is changing, to have a business where a manufacturing process hasn’t really changed in a fundamental way for almost 40 years — that seems insane to me.”

It’s an unusually warm early-April afternoon when I meet Reilly in Las Vegas. He’s flown in for the day to give a quick presentation to Fox affiliates in town for the National Association of Broadcasters convention. We meet up at La Cave inside Steve Wynn’s namesake resort, where he chooses a chicken Milanese sandwich with Sriracha and then proceeds to spend nearly two hours passionately making a case for his new model. Even as cable continued to steal away viewers (and buzz) at least in part by eschewing pilot season in favor of more focused development, Reilly notes, network development rhythms remained largely unchanged. “It’s always been this strange point of pride, like going through boot camp,” he says. Execs knew how inefficient it all was, but there wasn’t much reason to adjust: “We had a monopoly. If you wanted to do television, you were coming to network television first.”

But broadcast hegemony, of course, is now a thing of the past. TV’s so-called Big Four networks — ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox — seem to hold on to that title almost ironically. Among adults 18 to 49, the demo group most desirable to advertisers, broadcasters have watched their collective market share slip from just over 50 percent during the dawn of George W. Bush’s administration to barely 30 percent today. The number of scripted series on cable has increased sixfold in the past decade, to well over 100, with one of them — AMC’s The Walking Dead — in its second year as TV’s top-rated show in the demo. More recently, nonlinear networks such as Netflix and Amazon have gotten into the game, serving up shows every bit as good as those on traditional TV. “I found myself getting bypassed by top-tier talent, because they looked at the broadcast network system and said, ‘It doesn’t make a lot of sense,’” Reilly laments. “Even though broadcast still has the biggest economic upside, a lot of that talent said, ‘Yeah, but I don’t want to work in that system.’”

Like Forte, whose film career was heating up after Nebraska premiered at Cannes last year and who “had no interest in doing a pilot,” says Reilly. But he committed to Last Man on Earth when Fox agreed to give it a straight-to-series order. Forte says not having to work under the gun of pilot season’s tight deadlines has made it easier to create a fully formed show, since all of the first season’s scripts will have been written before shooting begins. That will allow episodes to be improved as the writers gain a better understanding of the characters and tweak early scripts with the knowledge of what’s to come later. “It’s nice. You can take your time in growing something,” says Forte. “I can’t imagine thinking the traditional way is better.”

And yet some do: “The traditional pilot season still works for us,” says CBS entertainment chairman Nina Tassler, who’s helped make the Eye the most watched network for 11 of the past 12 seasons. While CBS has experimented with series orders (last summer’s hit Under the Dome skipped the pilot process), she argues that pilot season brings “an incredible rush of energy and an infusion of ideas,” while also serving as a dry run for actually making shows. “Think about what television production looks like,” she says. “It’s tough. You’re dealing with eight or nine days shooting per episode. You’ve got to be at the top of your game every single episode. Pilot season mirrors being able to work on that schedule.” Veteran agent Ted Chervin, a partner and board member at ICM Partners, notes that NBC, Sony, and his agency put together The Blacklist in under nine months, with star James Spader cast just a few weeks before filming began. “And it became a massive, out-of-the-box hit,” Chervin says. “Clearly the traditional model worked.”

Still, says Chervin, Reilly might be on to something: “It’s legitimate to ask these questions and try to come up with solutions." Likewise, CBS’s Tassler isn’t opposed to shaking up the system on a case-by-case basis, as Dome and the upcoming Extant (a Halle Berry sci-fi drama that was ordered straight to series) demonstrate. “I completely embrace the idea that [TV] is not one-size-fits-all,” she says. But she also takes a not particularly subtle swipe at Reilly’s vocal salesmanship on behalf of his particular vision: “We really prefer not to make grand proclamations about the state of the business,” Tassler says. “Our goal is not to perfect pilot season. It’s to create hit television.”

Some have charged that Reilly’s plan is just a way to distract from Fox’s plummeting ratings this season. (Factoring out the *Super Bowl, the network will be down around 10 percent this year, owing to the painful decline of both American Idol and Glee, plus massive audience defection from Tuesday comedy anchor New Girl.) But Reilly has been playing with off-cycle development since he got to Fox, putting Glee together outside of pilot season in 2008. Its success made Reilly think he was close to changing the system, but instead, “everybody made their way back to the old way,” he says. “So finally I said, ‘I’m going to literally have to will this into happening unilaterally, and then the rest of the town joins us or they don’t.’”

Reilly ended up pushing Fox out of pilot season using a very old-school Hollywood tool: an open checkbook. Starting last year, he began spending big bucks putting together those “event series” — giving blind orders to a 24 reboot, an American version of the British crime hit Broadchurch (now called Gracepoint) and the M. Night Shyamalan–produced miniseries Wayward Pines. He then outbid other networks for in-demand projects such as Gotham, the D.C. Comics–produced series about Batman villains. “All of a sudden, I had this portfolio of things, and said, ‘You know what? Just lean into this a little bit,’” Reilly explains. Around September, he pitched his boss, Fox Networks Group CEO Peter Rice, on the idea, and even briefed Rice’s boss, 21st Century Fox co-chief operating officer James Murdoch. “Everybody said, ‘This makes a lot of sense. We should go do this,’” Reilly said. It helped that Reilly didn’t need to ask for a budget increase to execute his plan. “Frankly, in the short-term, we saved a lot of development money,” he says. But rather than pocket the cash that would’ve gone to buying more scripts and making more pilots, “We’re having the highest spend on content, really, in the history of the network.”

While Reilly’s method isn’t financially much of a risk, it leaves him vulnerable should it fail to produce more hits than the old way. Reilly counters that it’s not like the current system is yielding much success. Even when networks do manage to find a show that connects, viewers are proving more fickle than ever, with freshman hits such as 2 Broke Girls, Revenge, and New Girl struggling by season three. “We can’t do any worse in terms of the failure rate and the amount of money we’ve been flushing down the toilet,” Reilly says. “I think you’re going to see adoption of this, by even some of my competitors who are criticizing it.”

Reilly, Tassler, and their peers probably find it a bit harder to get up every morning these days, what with overnight ratings reports regularly touting yet another record low for one show or the other (“I’m in a fetal position half the time,” Reilly jokes). Broadcast and cable execs alike are also waging a fierce war to get Nielsen to better tabulate their viewership (by more accurately counting online streams of shows) and to then better monetize that audience (by convincing Madison Avenue to recognize the legitimacy of people who watch recorded shows more than three days after they first air). But “the good news,” Reilly says, is that “people are still loving television. It was only a [few] years ago where there were some pundits that said television as we knew it was going to be over. That it was short form, gaming, interactive, user-generated content, all of these other things, that were going to displace television. And they haven’t. Narrative storytelling is wired into our humanity.”

What worries Reilly most is that the explosion in original content will reach a saturation point: “I do not believe there’s an infinite amount of capacity,” he says, for the existing TV ecosystem to support so much programming. “A lot of these [cable networks and streaming] services are going to find it impossible to recruit an audience.” And while broadcasters like Fox still have a competitive advantage, Reilly knows that won’t be the case forever: “Do I think there will always be four broadcast networks that look exactly like they do today? Unlikely, probably. So my job is not just to put on shows people will want to watch; it’s also to shepherd in this new era of how people watch television. I’m trying to be a broadcaster and have a big cultural impact. Trying to find big hits has always been a needle-in-a-haystack endeavor. Now the size of that haystack has quadrupled.”

http://www.vulture.com/2014/05/kevin-reilly-on-fox-pilot-season.html
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post #94147 of 95910 Old 05-06-2014, 09:58 AM
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TV/Business Notes
Why Fox’s Kevin Reilly Is Canceling Pilot Season
By Josef Adalian, New York Magazine - May 6, 2014

Among adults 18 to 49, the demo group most desirable to advertisers, broadcasters have watched their collective market share slip from just over 50 percent during the dawn of George W. Bush’s administration to barely 30 percent today.

Thanks Obama. tongue.gif

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post #94148 of 95910 Old 05-06-2014, 11:11 AM
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I gave up on "Believe" after the third episode when it became a "good deed of the week" formula. Guess I was expecting more telekenetic bells and whistles. It has those, but the sappy I'm-supposed-to-get-teary-eyed moments were a little over-the-top.
Same here.

It just seemed like the main characters weren't trying to hide at all and the implausible slips away from hired guns, the police and the FBI felt sloppy. It seemed like the entire show revolved around the most obvious procedural formula ever:

- Start traveling to safe house via public transportation in full view of themselves appearing on the news.
- The safe house isn't safe at all, so they have to bail.
- Hide on somewhere where there happens to be someone the kid can help.
- The kid disobeys her father, runs off and somehow that gets them past pursuers.
- Hugs and weeps all around.

Personally, if I were on the run, I'd get myself to Mars.....Pennsylvania or maybe Jupiter....Florida and find a quite place to blend in working on someone's farm. Either that, or I'd stick to smaller metropolitan areas...you know, TV markets 100 or smaller. There'd be enough people to hide among, but it would be unlikely there would be a massive amount of police or surveillance infrastructure.

Once things cool off, get some fake IDs made and slip across the Canadian border on a Casino bus.

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"Crisis" I do hope they burn off, somewhere, though. I do want to see how this wraps up, though it also was becoming repetitive.
It was starting to get a bit too much teen angst in it. I have no problem ditching the last episode I haven't watched.

Honestly, I thought the kid the secret service agent rescued was one of the more interesting characters. The father that was running things was about the least interesting.
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I thought the only good thing about Believe was the young lead, Johnny Sequoyah, I expect we'll be seeing more of her in the future.
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I thought the only good thing about Believe was the young lead, Johnny Sequoyah, I expect we'll be seeing more of her in the future.
I'm sure she's a perfectly good actress, but it was hard to tell with this show. Her character annoyed me far too much.
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I'm sure she's a perfectly good actress, but it was hard to tell with this show. Her character annoyed me far too much.
She was, but I think a lot of that was her character. What I saw was a young actress who seemed very comfortable in her job, most young actors are not as smooth or play their roles as seamlessly as Sequoyah. You has great screen presence and actually overshadowed the rest of the cast.
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TV Notes
'Da Vinci's Demons' gets third season, new show runner on Starz
By Patrick Kevin Day, Los Angeles Times' 'Show Tracker' Blog - May 6, 2014

As Starz's Leonardo Da Vinci drama "Da Vinci's Demons" approaches its second season finale, the premium cable channel has renewed it for a third season.

Along with the renewal, the channel announced a behind-the-scenes change. Series creator and show runner David S. Goyer is handing the reins over to new show runner John Shiban, whose past credits include "The X-Files," "Breaking Bad" and "Hell on Wheels."

Goyer, who is also involved with the big-screen "Man of Steel" sequel tentatively titled "Batman vs. Superman," will remain on the series as an executive producer.

The show's second season has expanded the scope of the story beyond Rennaisance Italy and taken it to South America, where young Da Vinci encounters the kinds of Incan death traps usually reserved for Indiana Jones.

Tom Riley plays Da Vinci, as a young and passionate free thinker.

The show's second season finale will air May 31. The third season will likely air sometime in 2015.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-da-vincis-demons-season-3-starz-20140506-story.html
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post #94153 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 01:21 AM
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Nielsen Notes (Cable)
‘Louie’ Season 4 Premiere Bests Season 3 Average, Falls Shy of ‘Anger Management’-Fueled Season 3 Start
By The Deadline.com Team - May 6, 2014

After a 19-month hiatus, the Season 4 premiere of FX comedy Louie came in 19% above the show’s Season 3 average (941,000 vs. 791,000) and up 26% in adults 18-49 (635,000 vs. 505,000). FX argued that placing “any major significance” on season-to-season premiere episodes comparisons “makes little sense” because the Season 3 premiere of Louie got “overly inflated” by the heavily promoted premiere night of Anger Management that night — June 28, 2012. FX’s launch of Charlie Sheen starrer Anger Management nabbed a whopping 5.6 million viewers in the 9 PM hour, powering Wilfred to 2.53 million, followed by the Louie season kickoff, which clocked 1.43 million viewers.

For comparison sake, last night’s Season 4 debut of Louie outperformed its half-hour lead-in audience – 9:30 PM’s Horrible Bosses — by 16% (941,000 vs. 809,000) in total viewers. The second Louie episode of the new season grew its demo crowd by 3% (651,000 vs. 635,000) compared with the first episode and retained 97% of the overall audience (910,000 vs. 941,000).

Compared with its Season 3 average, Season 4 of Louie is up 17% in overall audience (925,000 vs 791,000) and 27% in the demo (643,000 vs. 505,000).

http://www.deadline.com/2014/05/louie-season-4-premiere-bests-season-3-average-falls-shy-of-anger-management-fueled-season-3-start/
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post #94154 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 01:26 AM
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TV Notes
NBC Orders Comedy 'Marry Me,' Katherine Heigl Drama 'State of Affairs,' 'Allegiance,' 'Odyssey' to Series
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - May 6, 2014

NBC has picked up its first comedy pilot to series, handing out a series order to Casey Wilson starrer Marry Me and adding spy drama Allegiance, thriller Odyssey and Katherine Heigl drama State of Affairs.

Of NBC's whopping 18 comedies, David Caspe comedy Marry Me emerged as the network's clear frontrunner. The single-camera entry about a couple (Happy Endings' Wilson and Ken Marino) who get engaged -- only to quickly realize that it's harder than it looks -- had been drawing stellar reviews for its script and the finished product. Also working in its favor is the art-imitates-life aspect of the show's behind-the-scenes story, with real-life couple Caspe and Wilson's Happy Endings romance as much of a draw as the story itself.

Sarah Wright, John Gemberling, Tymberlee Hill and Tim Meadows co-star, with Scandal Emmy winner Dan Bucatinsky having a guest role in the series.

From Sony Pictures Television and executive producers Caspe, Jamie Tarses and Seth Gordon, the single-camera comedy joins previously ordered half-hours, including Mr. Robinson; Ellie Kemper starrer Tooken, which is now titled Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt; and acquired series Working the Engels at the network.

This past pilot season was a big one for the cast of Happy Endings, with Wilson also producing her own NBC comedy pilot, Mason Twins, and the cast all lining up new gigs following ABC's decision to pull the plug on the beloved comedy.

Allegiance, meanwhile, hails from writer-director George Nolfi (The Adjustment Bureau). It revolves around Alex O'Connor, a young, idealistic CIA analyst specializing in Russian affairs, who learns a shocking secret, and his close-knit, affluent family that's about to be split apart when it's revealed that his parents, Mark (Scott Cohen) and Katya (Hope Davis), are covert Russian spies deactivated decades ago. But today the Kremlin has re-enlisted them into service as they plan a terrorist operation inside the U.S. border that will bring America to its knees. Years ago, Russian-born Katya was tasked by the KGB to recruit American businessman Mark O'Connor as a spy, and the two fell in love. A deal was struck: As long as Katya remained an asset for Russia and it was agreed that her services could be called on in the future, she would be allowed to marry Mark and move to America. After years in America building a happy life and without word from Moscow, they thought they had escaped. Now it seems that the new Mother Russia has one more mission -- turning Alex into a spy. For these anguished parents, the choice is clear: betray their country or risk their family.

The drama is based on the Israeli format The Gordin Cell and hails from Universal Television, Keshet Media and Yes. Gavin Stenhouse, Margarita Levieva, Morgan Spector, Alex Peters, Kenneth Choi and Annie Ilonzeh co-star in the drama, which was written, directed and exec produced by Nolfi and Avi Nir (Homeland).

For its part, State of Affairs marks Grey's Anatomy alum Heigl's return to series television. Described as Scandal meets The West Wing, the drama revolves around a maverick CIA officer (Heigl) who was plucked from the field to become the president's (Alfre Woodard) daily briefer, assuming responsibility for targeting America's most critical threats while navigating the unique lifestyle that comes with such a high-powered job.

Alexi Hawley penned the script alongside Joe Carnahan, who directed the pilot for the Universal Television entry. Heigl, her mother Nancy Heigl, Bob Simonds, Sophie Watts, Henry Crumpton, Julia Franz and Rodney Faraon exec produce.

Finally, Odyssey is described as a Traffic-like thriller that centers on three families who are torn apart when a stranded female soldier (Pushing Daisies' Anna Friel), a disillusioned corporate attorney (Nurse Jackie's Peter Facinelli) and a disrespected political activist (The Carrie Diaries' Jake Robinson) are pulled into the same shocking international military conspiracy. From Universal Television, Fabrik Entertainment, Red Arrow Entertainment, Treat Williams, Daniella Pineda, Elena Kampouris, Jim True-Frost and Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje co-star. The drama, from writers Adam Armus and Kay Foster and exec producer/director Peter Horton, screened well and comes as conspiracy dramas continue to be all the rage among broadcast and cable networks.

Allegiance (which was previously known as Coercion), Odyssey and State of Affairs join a roster of new NBC dramas that include limited-entry Emerald City.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/nbc-orders-casey-wilson-comedy-701837
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post #94155 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 01:34 AM
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TV Notes
Steven Spielberg's ‘Red Band Society’ Picked Up by Fox
By Tony Maglio, TheWrap.com Team - May 6, 2014

Fox has picked up hospital dramedy “Red Band Society” to series.

Steven Spielberg and Margaret Nagle (“Boardwalk Empire”) will executive produce, along with Justin Falvey and Darryl Frank (both of “The Americans”) and Sergio Aguero (“No Reservations”). Nagle penned the pilot.

Alfonso Gomez-Rejon (“Glee”) will direct.

“Red Band Society” follows a diverse group of teenagers who become unlikely allies and friends in the high school drama, set in the pediatric wing of a hospital.

Octavia Spencer and Dave Annable star in the series, along with Griffin Gluck, Charlie Rowe, Rebecca Rittenhouse and Zoe Levin.

Minutes before announcing the pickup of “Red Band Society,” Fox ordered hip-hop drama “Empire” to series. On Monday, the network predictably ordered the Batman prequel “Gotham” to series.

http://www.thewrap.com/red-band-society-steve-spielberg-picked-up-fox

* * * *

TV Notes
Fox Picks Up Lee Daniels’ ‘Empire’

Fox has ordered hip-hop drama “Empire” to series.

“Empire” is a 13-episode family drama set in the world of a hip-hop empire featuring original and current music. Lee Daniels, Danny Strong, Brian Grazer and Francie Calfo are producers, with Daniels directing the pilot.

Terrence Howard, Gabourey Sidibe, Taraji P. Henson, Jussie Smollet and Macy Gray will star in the project.

“Empire” comes from Imagine Entertainment, in association with 20th Century Fox Television

Yesterday, Fox picked up its Batman prequel “Gotham,” to the surprise of no one.

The network has also ordered 10 more episodes of the multi-camera comedy “Mulaney,” from writer/director/creator John Mulaney (“Saturday Night Live”). The series, which now has a total order of 16 episodes, centers on a rising stand-up comic trying to take his career to the next level and the friends and mentors who lift him up, hold him back and push him around.

Lorne Michaels, David Miner, Dave Becky, Jon Pollack, Andrew Singer and Andy Ackerman are executive producing, with Ackerman directing the pilot.

http://www.thewrap.com/empire-fox-lee-daniels-terrence-howard-taraji-p-henson-gabourey-sidibe
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post #94156 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 01:45 AM
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
WEDNESDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - The Middle
8:30PM - Suburgatory
9PM - Modern Family
9:31PM - Mixology
10PM - Nashville
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Pharrell Williams performs)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - Survivor
9PM - Criminal Minds
10PM - CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (Season Finale)
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Mariah Carey; reality-TV star Rick Harrison; The Whigs perform)
12:37AM - Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Patton Oswalt; Megan Boone)

NBC:
8PM - Revolution
9PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
10:01PM - Chicago P.D.
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Zac Efron; TV personality Guy Fieri; football defensive end Jadeveon Clowney; Sarah McLachlan performs with The Roots)
12:36AM - Late Night with Seth Meyers (Sarah Jessica Parker; fashion journalist Anna Wintour; sportscaster Rich Eisen; The 1975 performs)
1:37AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Comic Marc Maron; Kaiser Chiefs perform; singer-songwriter Chuck E. Weiss)

FOX:
8PM - American Idol (120 min., LIVE)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Nature: Shark Mountain (R - Nov. 14, 2004)
9PM - NOVA: Why Sharks Attack
10PM - Nazi Mega Weapons: Jet Fighter Me262

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Siempre Mi Amor
9PM - Lo Que La Vida Me Robó
10PM - Qué Pobres Tan Ricos

THE CW:
8PM - Arrow
9PM - The 100

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - La Impostora
9PM - En Otra Piel
10PM - Camilia La Texana

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Seth Rogen)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Journalist David Remnick)
12:01AM - @ Midnight (Marc Maron; Nate Bargatze; Natasha Leggero)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Sharon Osbourne; comedian Paul F. Tompkins; comedian Emily Heller)
Midnight - The Pete Holmes Show (Comedian Jerrod Carmichael)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Arianna Huffington)

SYNDICATION:
Check Local Listings - Arsenio (Bill Cosby; Jerrika Hinton)
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post #94157 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 01:53 AM
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Critic's Notes
On Why I Still Love Friends, 10 Years After the Series Finale
By Margaret Lyons, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - May 6, 2014

A few months ago, I found out my friend Steve had never really watched Friends. I discovered this while we were watching a rerun of "The One With the Tiny T-Shirt," which comes just a few episodes after Ross and Rachel break up for the first time. "Ross and Rachel dated, right?" he asked. And then he gave me possibly the best gift any friend has ever given me: He asked me to explain the history of Ross and Rachel. And boy, did I! I only edited down parts of it because we had to attend a wedding, but given the chance, I'd probably still be explaining the ins and outs of being lobsters. (Yes, I did Phoebe's hand gesture to help illuminate the concept.) "Wow, you were, like, really into Friends," Steve said. Yes. I was. I am. I remain very into Friends! I will probably never be as devoted to another show as I am to Friends.

Part of that is timing: I started watching Friends when I was in middle school, an age when your brain and spirit are sort of designed to get obsessed with things. I got obsessed with Friends. (Among other shows, particularly Melrose Place, Chicago Hope, and ER.) Another part is pervasiveness: Friends reruns are on at pretty much all times and have been for what feels like forever. Anyone can be devoted to new episodes, but the true fan is one who watches episodes over and over. And that's easier for Friends than it is for any show other than, maybe, Sex and the City. But the biggest reason Friends made such an impact on me at the time and why the show continues to hold such a place of high regard is that Friends has my favorite thing any show can have: It's about people who like each other.

This is not as common as you think. Many, many comedies — good comedies, sometimes even great comedies — are not about people who genuinely care for one another. That's what soured me on later seasons of How I Met Your Mother, and why as much as I can respect Curb Your Enthusiasm, I will never actually love or enjoy it: These people do not like each other. Not every show has to be about happy people, and the TV landscape would be plainer and less interesting if all shows were, but I picked up social anxieties from Seinfeld that I don't think I'd have otherwise. "Big salad" — i.e., accidentally taking credit for bringing or giving something to someone? That haunts me.

Friends does not haunt me. Friends comforts and delights me now just as it did when I started watching it. I wish Friends were streaming on Netflix, so I wasn't reduced to the crappy syndicated versions that sound weird because they're sped up. I wish I could believe in the idea of a reunion episode, because it would be nice to have something to dream of. I wish there were more Friends knockoffs still happening, because even though people like to say lightning doesn't strike twice, that's wrong — that's what goddamn lightning rods are for, for lightning to strike a bunch of times.

Until then, though, my Friends love endures on its own. On the penultimate episode of the first season, when Monica holds her newborn nephew Ben for the first time, she says, "I'm your Aunt Monica. I will always have gum." I know now that that points to Monica's fear that she's not much of an adult, but at the time, tweenage Margaret thought "that's a good idea, I'm going to make that my thing, too." Guess what? It's 20 years later, and I always have gum. And yes, gum would be perfection.

http://www.vulture.com/2014/05/friends-finale-10-year-anniversary-why-i-still-love-it.html
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post #94158 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 01:58 AM
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TV Review
‘Good Morning America,’ to dress with
The ABC morning show is best watched while doing other things
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazibe - May 6, 2014

If someone uses a product in a way it’s not intended — for example, using chocolate sauce as window cleaner — then one wouldn’t trust that person’s product review.

The morning news shows are intended to be consumed by viewers in small chunks while the viewers are doing something else — getting dressed, making coffee, packing school lunches. A reviewer, who has to watch the entire show, in order, will notice flaws that are irrelevant to normal consumers.

Taken as intended, ABC’s “Good Morning America” is an enjoyable distraction while getting ready for the day. The show provides a decent, digestible package of news and features, delivered by a news team with believable chemistry.

If one complained that the anchors’ rapport sometimes overshadows what they’re reporting, and that their choice of stories tends toward the trivial or sensational, the producers would probably reply, “Those aren’t flaws, they’re features.”

Except for those rare occasions with breaking news of great importance, we’re less likely to remember the content of the major stories than Robin Roberts’ charisma, Lara Spencer’s manic but contagious enthusiasm, Ginger Zee’s pluckiness and George Stephanopoulos’ lightweight aplomb.

Last Friday’s show kicked off with a series of newsworthy stories: increased unrest in the Ukraine, the continuing controversy over the racist remarks made by the owner of the L.A. Clippers, a thwarted mass shooting in a high school in Minnesota.

But sneaked in was the news that Princes William and Harry were in Memphis to attend a wedding and a story about a home invasion by guys dressed in ninja garb that was likely included only because there was surveillance-video footage.

Before the first commercial break, the anchors did a tease for a story about “realtors gone wild,” with surveillance-video footage of a man kissing a woman in a kitchen. It turned out that the segment was a long tease for a segment airing that night on ABC’s “20/20.”

The episode was unusually plug-filled. Ginger Zee’s weather reports were from Orlando, Fla., where she promoted a new Snow White-themed attraction at Disney World, as well as a new bracelet that makes it easier to spend money fast at the park. An onscreen graphic eventually told us that Disney World is owned by ABC’s parent company.

The show still follows the 50-50 split that dates back to the origins of the “Today” show in the early ’50s, when it made more sense. The first hour, starting at 7 a.m., emphasizes hard news for the daddies who haven’t yet left the house for work. The second hour keeps mommies happy with light features about celebrities, entertainment, fashion and cooking.

But like alcoholics who can’t quite wait until 5 o’clock, the “GMA” folks sneak in a little pop-culture fun before 8. Around 7:50 a.m., the anchors introduced the “Play of the Day” segment, which usually features a viral video. This one showed a bunch of U.S. Marines singing along to “Frozen,” the animated hit created by Disney-Pixar.

After 8, the show’s newscaster, Amy Robach, presented a briefer rundown of the news stories we’d already heard. But the focus had definitely switched to the lighter side, with a heavy emphasis on Disney products.

We learned that the stars of ABC’s D.C.-set drama “Scandal” will be attending the White House Correspondents’ Dinner and that the actress Candace Cameron Bure was having a hard time dealing with her perfectionism on ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars.”

As part of an ongoing series of stories, Ginger Zee took her turn pitching a product to the panel on ABC’s “Shark Tank.” That segment closed with a plug for an inside-”Shark Tank” special airing that night.

Finally just as we were begging for mercy, we also got a tease of Disney XD’s upcoming animated series “Star Wars Rebels”

Last Thursday’s show, to be fair, featured far less intra-Disney promotion. It also featured the show’s new occasional cast member, Michael Strahan, the former football player who is also co-host of “Live With Kelly & Michael.”

Although Strahan may have been added to adjust the testosterone-estrogen balance after the departure of the show’s youthful and handsome newscaster Josh Elliott, he feels redundant. With Roberts and Spencer, the show already has a deep bench in light news.

Strahan had the unenviable task of passing off a story to a reporter in the show’s deservedly ridiculed Social Square, a separate set that is supposed to gather news from social media. The unfortunate reporter, whose name was made unintelligible by Strahan’s slight lisp, did a segment on an inspiring contestant on “Wheel of Fortune,” but she made the mistake of accusing the anchor team of cheating when they guessed a clue correctly. Strahan nearly managed to cover the awkwardness with a good ad-lib.

Later in the show, Spencer went into the Social Square and had Carla Hall, a star of ABC’s cooking show “The Chew,” pull a crank to generate a presumably random question from the viewers at home. After Hall answered the question, Spencer told her to pull the crank again, and an off-camera voice had to tell them there was only one question available.

But such mishaps are surprisingly rare for such a fast-paced and segment-filled show. With the slight exception of Robach, a relatively new hire, the stars project ease and comfort.

Although some viewers might prefer more Ukraine and less Candace Cameron Bure, those same viewers are probably too busy and distracted to complain. “Good Morning America” manages to deliver some news without adding stress to an already tense part of the day. If it doesn’t send us on our way fretting about a potential world war, that shows it’s working.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/good-morning-america-dress/
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post #94159 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 02:02 AM
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Business Notes/TV Sports
Examples of How Clippers Could Benefit From League Takeover
By Richard Sandomir, The New York Times - May 7, 2014

When Tom Schieffer became Major League Baseball’s on-site monitor of the Los Angeles Dodgers three years ago, he did not expect huzzahs at Chavez Ravine, least of all from the combative Dodgers owner Frank McCourt. Commissioner Bud Selig’s concerns over McCourt’s financial dealings and personal life had led Selig to take control of the Dodgers. McCourt was enraged.

“I told Frank and others that if I were in their positions, I wouldn’t want me there, either,” Schieffer said Tuesday in a telephone interview. “McCourt argued about it, but to me, that was pretty much irrelevant. Selig had the authority to do it in the best interests of baseball. We tried to cauterize the wound, and we did a pretty good job of it. I think it was helpful. We brought order out of chaos.”

It should come as no surprise that leagues have little interest in taking over the day-to-day operation of their franchises, and almost always do so reluctantly. Such arrangements are routinely borne out of scandal or mismanagement, and stepping in to resolve them can leave commissioners open to criticism from all sides — accusations of authority overstepped; of favoritism; of micromanagement, or the opposite, from above.

“No league wants to take over a team,” said Don Garber, the commissioner of Major League Soccer, who recently oversaw the league’s acquisition of its most troubled franchise. “It’s a move of last resort after you’ve exhausted every effort to turn things around.”

Fortunately for N.B.A. Commissioner Adam Silver, who is preparing this week to hire an executive to run the Los Angeles Clippers while he begins the process of stripping the owner Donald Sterling of his franchise, recent history offers a variety of examples of how to navigate such a takeover. That history could offer him a road map, but also a way to avoid potential problems.

“You try to be a source of calm,” Schieffer said, “and someone who can listen to people and try to figure out the problems and help them solve them.”

Silver can look to recent N.B.A. history for an example of large-scale league intervention. When George Shinn, who had taken the Charlotte Hornets southwest to New Orleans, could not find a viable buyer for the team in 2010, the league bought the team for $318 million and hired Jac Sperling, a Minnesota Wild executive, to run the Hornets until a buyer could be found.

In late 2011, while the league owned the Hornets, David Stern, then the commissioner, blocked a trade engineered by team executives that would have sent the superstar guard Chris Paul to the Los Angeles Lakers, and instead rejiggered the transaction and sent him to the Clippers. Four months later, Tom Benson, the New Orleans Saints’ owner, acquired the Hornets for $338 million.

In Garber’s case, he determined over several months that M.L.S. could not let Chivas USA languish any longer. He thought that Jorge Vergara and Angelica Fuentes, the married owners of the franchise, which is based in Los Angeles, were too distracted by other businesses and would not be able to solve problems in ticket and sponsorship sales or integrate their team into the sprawling city’s fabric.

“I think we were a bit surprised at the lack of any plan that existed when we got in there,” Garber said.

The league acquired the franchise in February and installed a league executive, Nelson Rodriguez, as its president.

Other leagues have taken similar, if not identical, actions. When the Buffalo Sabres’ owners were charged with bank and securities fraud in 2002, they gave the N.H.L. their proxy to operate the franchise; the team eventually filed for bankruptcy protection. The league oversaw the team until it was sold out of bankruptcy court in 2003 to Tom Golisano. The league went further in 2009, buying the Phoenix Coyotes out of bankruptcy and running them until a group led by George Gosbee acquired them last year. The league did not install a trustee to run either team.

Bill Daly, the N.H.L.’s deputy commissioner, said in an email, “Fortunately in both cases, existing club management did a fabulous job.”

The N.F.L. took seats on the board of the New England Patriots when the owner Victor Kiam had personal financial problems in 1991, and did the same eight years later when debts began to overwhelm the Baltimore Ravens’ longtime owner, Art Modell. The league’s actions led to Kiam’s selling the Patriots to James Orthwein and to Modell’s selling a minority stake to Steve Bisciotti, who eventually bought the rest of the team.

But the league stopped short of directly running either team.

The most famous example of league control of a team was baseball’s decision to buy the Montreal Expos in 2002 from Jeffrey Loria. Initially, it was thought that baseball was going to contract the Expos out of existence. That never happened. The league hired a president (Tony Tavares), a general manager (Omar Minaya) and a manager (Frank Robinson). It moved 22 home games in 2003 and ’04 to Puerto Rico. It set player payroll.

In 2005, the Expos relocated to Washington, and a year later, M.L.B. sold the franchise to Ted Lerner.

“There were times when I told Tony I’d like to do this or that and he’d have to bring it to the commissioner,” Minaya said by telephone Tuesday. “I’d make trades within our budgets, and I never went to Tony with a deal where Bud said no.”

A decade later, Silver and the N.B.A. are in a different situation. Whomever Silver appoints as the Clippers’ chief executive will be in charge of an ascendant team. Sterling’s exile means he cannot meddle in team business, although any legal challenges he attempts could delay Silver’s plan to sell the Clippers.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/07/sports/basketball/examples-of-how-the-clippers-could-benefit-from-a-takeover.html?_r=0
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post #94160 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 02:09 AM
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Nielsen Notes
Nielsen says people pay for far more channels than they watch
By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - May 6, 2014

A new study by Nielsen shows that while the typical American household has almost 200 channels to choose from, viewers typically only watch about 17 networks on a regular basis.

The number of channels available to pay-TV subscribers has grown tremendously over the last decade. In 2008, the average home received 129 channels. Now that same home gets 189.

However, the study also confirms that more channels does not necessarily mean more channel surfing. The 17-channel figure has remained in place despite the increase in outlets to choose from.

"This data is significant in that it substantiates the notion that more content does not necessarily equate to more channel consumption," Nielsen said.

The study will also give more ammunition to media watchdogs and consumer activists who argue consumers should have more choice in determining what channels they receive.

The television industry has resisted calls for so-called a la carte programming, arguing it would not necessarily lower bills unless programming costs went down too.

If a cable network were suddenly in 30% fewer homes, it would need to find a way to make up for that lost revenue and the easiest approach would be to just charge the people who still get the channel even more.

However, the rising cost of sports programming is starting to lead to louder calls that at least some content should be sold to consumers who want it and not forced on everyone.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-17-channels-nielsen-20140506-story.html
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post #94161 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 06:58 AM
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TV Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - May 7, 2014

MODERN FAMILY
ABC, 9:00 p.m.

Among the stories in tonight’s episode are a squabble about the value of hand-me-down children’s clothing, and an attempt to cash in on the value of an old comic book – in particular, The Amazing Spider-Man #3, a vintage issue from the Sixties. Which reminds me: Somewhere out there is a guy named Randy Silverman, a former Florida resident and Nova High School graduate, to whom I sold my entire collection of Marvel Comics – a complete collection, at the time I sold it to him in seventh grade in 1967, for $75. My comics stash, at the time, included mint or near-mint copies of the first issues of The Fantastic Four and X-Men, and even the #15 issue of Amazing Fantasy, which introduced Spider-Man in 1962 just before he got his own comic. A copy of that Amazing Fantasy issue alone sold three years ago for $1.1 million. Randy, if you read this, I hope you’re happy. And wealthy.

NOVA: WHY SHARKS ATTACK
TBS, 9:00 p.m. ET

Three or so decades ago, Nova and Disney and the National Geographic specials pretty much had this undersea territory all to themselves, until Discovery Channel discovered the submerged gold mine that was “Shark Week” and changed the nature TV landscape. Tonight, Nova attempts to reclaim some former territory by visiting some familiar territory. Among tonight’s stories: an increase in reported shark attacks off the shores of Cape Cod, the place where Steven Spielberg filmed Jaws back in the Seventies. Why are sharks so mad all of a sudden, and in that specific location? Maybe, after all these years, they’ve finally seen the Jaws sequels. But that’s just my theory. The experts interviewed in tonight’s documentary have some others. Check local listings.

NASHVILLE
ABC, 10:00 p.m. ET

n tonight’s new episode, Rayna (Connie Britton) learns that Luke was injured while on tour in Afghanistan – a victim of a detonated IED – and organizes a benefit concert at Fort Campbell. Among the guest stars making an appearance: First Lady Michelle Obama.

CSI: CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION
CBS, 10:00 p.m. ET
SEASON FINALE:
Tonight’s new episode says goodbye to one veteran cast member (Paul Guilfoyle, who plays Captain Brass), while saying hello to a guest star who might be returning next season in a recurring role: Treat Williams, playing a former investigator turned security guard, whose approach and knowledge regarding a CSI cold case impresses Ted Danson’s D.B. Russell.

THE AMERICANS
FX, 10:00 p.m. ET

We’re getting near the end of this harrowing season, and the questions are only increasing as the episodes wind down. One question: How many more disguises will Elizabeth and Phillip adopt before the season is out? And will neighbor Stan (Noah Emmerich) unknowingly reveal valuable information to his latest inquisitor? That would be Elizabeth and Phillip’s son Henry, who thinks Stan’s job is interesting enough to conduct an interview for a school assignment.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
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post #94162 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 07:01 AM
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TV/Nielsen Notes
Leading ABC’s recent surge: ‘Family’
The network has now won three straight weeks in adults 18-49
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazibe - May 7, 2014

Ratings for “Modern Family” are down this season.

But with so many other shows also seeing steep ratings declines, “Family” remains one of the top programs on broadcast and has helped fuel ABC to a surprising three-week win streak among adults 18-49.

“Family,” which airs tonight at 9 p.m., averaged a season-low 2.8 adults 18-49 rating last week, according to Nielsen, well off its 3.6 season to date rating, which is off 14 percent from last year.

Still, it was the No. 3 show on broadcast for the week, behind only CBS’s “The Big Bang Theory” (4.5) and NBC’s “The Voice” (3.0). “Family” was one of four ABC shows in the top 10 last week, more than any other network.

That boosted ABC to a first-place tie with CBS for the week ended May 4.

That’s a bit of a surprise, considering ABC has been mired in fourth place for much of the season, plus the network’s No. 2 program, “Scandal,” aired its season finale several weeks ago.

ABC’s streak is just as much a reflection on the other networks’ weakness, though. Fox has struggled throughout the spring with “American Idol’s” ratings down, and NBC is always weaker after “Saturday Night Football” goes off the air.

In tonight’s episode of “Family,” Cam and Mitchell try to figure out how they’re going to pay for their lavish wedding.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/family-leading-abcs-unexpected-surge/
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Nielsen Notes
Nielsen says people pay for far more channels than they watch
By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - May 6, 2014

Is this really news to Mr. Flint?

When news breaks...we fix it.
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NBC signed a deal to keep Olympics thru 2032 so thats the next 9.

9:00pm tonight NFLN Mike Mayock Mock Draft -- its hard to nail the pix but he gives good info on the players.

Then 8:00pm tomorrow night finally find out where "Johnny Football" goes. biggrin.gif
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Nielsen Notes
Nielsen says people pay for far more channels than they watch
By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - May 6, 2014

 

 

And in other news from the Obvious Department, Nielsen insists that their ratings systems are still relevant and that their studies still matter. Film at eleven.

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post #94166 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 12:15 PM
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Nielsen Notes
Nielsen says people pay for far more channels than they watch
By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - May 6, 2014

If a cable network were suddenly in 30% fewer homes, it would need to find a way to make up for that lost revenue and the easiest approach would be to just charge the people who still get the channel even more.

Works for me. If a channel produces enough quality content then it either survives because it has a lot of viewers or because it's so good that the few who do watch don't mind paying more for it. I mean, I pay for all the other crap, just so I can pay for HBO!

The majority of channels that produce quality content would have no problem surviving. They get all the viewers now anyway. I don't see much in the way of redeeming qualities to justify the survival of the rest. I eliminated hundreds of channels from my guide listing to be left with about 60 and at least half of those (like Cooking and NatGeo Wild) are only in the guide for the rare occasion I might be surfing and they are showing something that may be interesting. However, I cannot even remember the last time I even flipped onto them by accident.


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post #94167 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 12:29 PM
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Nielsen Notes
Nielsen says people pay for far more channels than they watch
By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - May 6, 2014

A new study by Nielsen shows that while the typical American household has almost 200 channels to choose from, viewers typically only watch about 17 networks on a regular basis.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-17-channels-nielsen-20140506-story.html
A couple of things:

1 - Are we talking the same 17 channels throughout the entire year? Were those channels the same ones those people watched last year? I know my "go to" channels change each season as cable shows start and end. For example, more number 1 and 2 channels used to be USA and TNT. Now I'm watching more on AMC and FX. At one point, I didn't even look at SciFi (or syfy). Now, there are a couple of shows I watch. Networks like TBS only get my business when they pick up marathons of shows I never watched before, but decided to catch up on all at once. Even the broadcast channels I watch change from season to season. BBCA only gets views for part of the year when the couple of shows I watch there are on.

2 - One household's favorite channels are another household's junk. Why does that matter? There are a whole lot of people helping insure Mad Men is paid for and stays on the air so I can watch it. Without those dollars, it wouldn't exist on cable channel budget. The same goes for The Americans and a bunch of other shows where only 1-3% of the US audience actually tunes in. Since a lot of people who don't watch my favorite shows are propping them up, the least I can do is pay for the reality crap someone else watches.

3 - Which channels are people watching vs not watch. It makes a difference, because come of the highest rated channels are the highest priced. That means, many of the channels that you don't watch may be less than $.15/sub. While it's great to think we might save a ton of money dumping all those channels, the reality is, the savings would be very little and offset by higher rates on the channels we want to make up for lost subscriber fees.

Now, if you do only watch the locals plus a few standard cable networks, the Ala Carte really would save you money. However, anything over 10-12 channels and the difference between ala carte pricing and a package starts getting really small. Don't forget, the cable company wants its revenue, too. They'll likely find a way to charge you a fee so you don't get the channels you don't want.

One thing I don't want is for this to end up being mandated by the government. For one, when was the last time a government mandate didn't make things more expensive or be full of exceptions? Number two, these are private businesses. They have the right to buy and sell the product (channels, content, etc) any way they want. It's up to the consumer to figure out if it's worth the price.

The fact is, this isn't gas, food, electricity, etc. This is optional entertainment with many alternatives. Some of those alternatives might not be as convenient or as quick to get new content, but that's the way the market has shaken out.

For those who want to save money, they should pursue those options and stop feeding the beast. Only then will things change.
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post #94168 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 12:45 PM
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TUESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
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TV Sports/Business Notes
Comcast And Olympics Organizers Take A $7.65B Leap Of Faith On Future Games
By David Lieberman and Lisa De Moraes, Deadline.com - May 7, 2014

The International Olympic Committee didn’t take competitive bids the way it did in 2011 — when Fox and ESPN joined the fray — before accepting Comcast’s $7.65B offer to carry the games in the U.S. through 2032. But the $1.4B increase in the outlay by the owner of NBCUniversal “is not small” for the IOC its president, Thomas Bach, said today in a conference call. NBC has handled 23 Olympics beginning with the Tokyo games in 1964 and the IOC wanted to build on this long term partnership with NBC so we could be sure, and we are sure, that the Olympic games will be presented in a way the Olympic spirit requires.” He vowed that more than 90% of the revenue will go to organizers of future Olympics, giving planners financial security.

Comcast chief Brian Roberts says he felt comfortable making the offer, even though he doesn’t know where the future games will be held, after his company recorded a profit from London and Sochi. Plans to combine the cable company’s “technology leadership and X1 platform” with NBC’s storytelling expertise mean “we’ve only begun to scratch the surface,” Roberts says.

Th execs began their private talks to extend their partnership at a private dinner in NYC in November, and continued the conversation at Sochi. Bach says he was so eager to work with a trusted collaborator that he was satisfied with a handshake, although “the lawyers insisted that we even sign some papers.”

Execs offered few additional details about the terms, including whether NBCU’s Telemundo might air the games in Spanish.

While Roberts says he’s confident that his bet will pay off, NBC’s success with the Sochi games wasn’t a given — especially as the U.S. came in fourth in the number of gold medals, and was No. 2 in total medals. The 2014 Sochi Games were the lowest-rated primetime Olympics ever among 18-49 year olds. The Walking Dead beat the Olympics three Sundays in a row for NBC’s target audience. From the start to the Closing Ceremony, the 17 total days of Winter Games drew a 5.5 rating in the key demo with 21.4M viewers on average. If you take away the pre-Opening Ceremony bonus day – an Olympics first — the demo rating stayed the same for NBC, but the average audience dipped a bit to 21.3M. Full days to full days, and apples-to-apples, that’s down 16% from Vancouver’s 6.6 rating and almost 10% from the previous low of Torino’s 6.1. In terms of viewers, Sochi was behind the 24.4M who watched the Vancouver Games but a nose ahead of the 20.2M million who tuned for the Torino Games.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/05/comcast-and-olympics-organizers-take-a-7-65b-leap-of-faith-on-future-games/
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post #94170 of 95910 Old 05-07-2014, 12:52 PM
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TV Notes
HBO Renews ‘Vice’ For Two More Seasons
By Andrea Seikaly, Variety.com - May 7, 2014

Good news for “Vice” watchers – the news magazine series has been renewed for two more seasons, HBO programming prexy Michael Lombardo announced Wednesday.

The show’s third season on the premium cabler is slated to premiere 2015 with 14 episodes, followed by season four in 2016. The 14-episode order is an increase from the previous 12-episode seasons.

Along with host and “Vice” magazine founder Shane Smith, “Vice” correspondents travel the world to bring viewers overlooked and under-reported stories in a documentary style. The topics explored range from civil unrest and terrorism to government corruption and environmental catastrophes.

“The success of ‘Vice’ on HBO proves that people are hungry to be engaged in world events when the storytelling is not packaged into sound bites,” Lombardo said in a statement. “’Vice’s’ smart, honest, in-depth approach to news coverage is a perfect complement to HBO’s programming.”

“We would like to say a big ‘thank you’ to HBO for letting us do what we love for another two seasons, and for providing the best platform in television where the stories we work so hard on can live,” added Smith. “’Vice’ on HBO has transformed our brand. It has forced us to get better, to try harder and now, with two new seasons, we will keep striving to be better still. We promise to report on the underreported, to tell the forgotten stories and to remain committed to uncovering the truth about our planet in peril. Here we come.”

The second season of HBO’s “Vice” is exec produced by Smith, Bill Maher, Eddy Moretti and BJ Levin, along with consulting producer Fareed Zakaria.

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/vice-renewed-1201174294/
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