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post #95641 of 97537 Old 07-19-2014, 05:52 AM
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Summer TCA Tour Notes
Showtime Chief on Reviving ‘Dexter,’ New ‘Penny Dreadful’ Villain
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com - Jul. 18, 2014

Showtime president David Nevins says there's a chance of bringing back Dexter Morgan, the serial killer at the center of “Dexter.”

Speaking at a Television Critics Association panel on Friday, he also revealed next season's villain on “Penny Dreadful” and that David Duchovny wanted to die in last month's “Californication” season finale. He also announced a Nov. 21 premiere date for the new Bob Dylan documentary “Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued.”

He denied speculation — as he did at the last TCA gathering in January — that Showtime insisted Dexter remain alive in his finale.

“No one even discussed the idea of killing Dexter,” he said, adding that the network is leaving open the possibility of bringing the character back in some capacity.

“It worked for Jack Bauer. It worked for the Bluth family,” he said of recent “24” and “Arrested Development” revivals. But he added that there is “nothing really actively happening.”

While there was no talk of killing Dexter, Nevins said, David Duchovny did want his character to die on “Californication.”

“He always thought Hank should go out in a blaze of glory,” Nevins said.

Nevins also said Helen McCrory, who played the eerie spiritualist Madame Kali on Season 1 of “Penny Dreadful,” will have an expanded role in Season 2 as the main antagonist of the lead characters. Nevins said he had seen scripts for the first eight episodes of the new season.

He also discussed the difficulty of choosing Emmy categories for Showtime shows. This year the network switched “Shameless” from the drama to comedy category, scoring a nomination for lead William H. Macy.

He said whatever categories the Emmys create, Showtime will “try to defy” them.

“Lost Songs,” produced by Oscar winner T Bone Burnett and Sam Jones and directed by Jones, chronicles the recording of new music from long-lost Dylan lyrics.

http://www.thewrap.com/showtime-chie...adful-villain/
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post #95642 of 97537 Old 07-19-2014, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Mark12547 View Post
Yes, "Cathode Ray Tube" (CRT) is the correct technical terminology, but the common term was "picture tube", occasionally shortened to "tube", e.g., "What's on the tube tonight?"

The slang term "boob tube" was probably derived from "boob" for stupid person + "picture tube" or "tube" for television, implying that television viewing was, on the most part, foolish or a wasteful use of time.

Yes, but you missed the point. The first use of "Boob Tube" wasn't until 1966 - nearly 20 years into the TV revolution. It was preceded by the terms you mention but those terms all referred to the "Cathode Ray Tube".
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post #95643 of 97537 Old 07-19-2014, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Mark12547 View Post
Yes, "Cathode Ray Tube" (CRT) is the correct technical terminology, but the common term was "picture tube", occasionally shortened to "tube", e.g., "What's on the tube tonight?"

The slang term "boob tube" was probably derived from "boob" for stupid person + "picture tube" or "tube" for television, implying that television viewing was, on the most part, foolish or a wasteful use of time.

I haven't heard anyone say "picture tube" or even "tube" in a very long time, except for the "Direct View (single tube) CRT Displays" forum here on AVSFORUM or from people reminiscing of the tele of decades ago.

Without "picture tube" or "tube" in common usage any more, "best tube bets" will become a verbal archaism, like "dialing" a telephone, watching a "film", or watching the "trailers", now that telephones no longer have dials, what we see in the movie screen (or TV screen) is most likely an electronic file instead of emulsion on a transparent ribbon, and the coming attractions have been moved from the trailers of the movie films to the leaders of the movie films (and now in the electronic equivalent, coming attractions are shown before the main feature).

So, here we are, wasting our time on a forum dedicated to foolish or wasteful use of our time by watching large high-definition boob tubes that, for most of ours, don't even use cathode ray tubes.

And I don't even miss the 8-in B&W boob tube of my younger years.

A "Picture Tube" is just one form of "Cathode Ray Tube," which by the way, was in use for more of my lifetime than any other form of video display. CRTs are also used for all sorts of waveform displays, radar displays, etc. Though I wasn't around during the invention of TV, I'd bet that the term "Cathode Ray Tube" either equals or predates "Picture tube."

And yes, CRTs are still in use, and may even still be in manufacture these days.
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post #95644 of 97537 Old 07-19-2014, 05:50 PM
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FRIDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog.
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post #95645 of 97537 Old 07-19-2014, 05:56 PM
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Summer TCA Tour Notes
Networks Urge Press To Abandon Live + Same Day Ratings Reports
By Lisa De Moraes, Deadline.com - Jul. 19, 2014

“If you were a sports reporter, you would not report the winner based on the third-inning score – that’s what you’re doing if you use Live + Same Day ratings,” CBS Research guru David Poltrack chastised Reporters Who Cover Television this morning. He was one of four number crunchers who ran the reporters through a “bar chart gauntlet” at Summer TV Press Tour 2014, by way of trying to convince them not to report on next day ratings for their networks’ programs. They came to preach the value of using Live + 3 stats at the very least, in light of how popular delayed viewing has become – particularly of scripted primetime series, with drama series leading the way.

“We all provide projections [for Live + 3 Day]. We understand your skepticism about using our projections,” Poltrack said. “The one thing you can be sure about our projections is that if one of us starts giving you a lot of ********, the other ones are going to let you know. You’ve got us to check each other,” he said.

Among the mind-numbing array of charts used in this morning’s pitch was one showing that, among the major broadcast networks, the demo ratings growth from Live + Same Day to Live + 7 averaged 40%. “What’s interesting is how long the tail has become,” Fox Research SVP Will Somers said. He displayed the numbers for his network’s fall-launch drama Sleepy Hollow, showing an overnight audience of 10.1 million viewers that grew by another 5.2 million when seven-day DVR viewing was added to the pot. And that number still is growing. “There are still people watching the first episode” this summer, he marveled.

Another graphic looked at Fox’s 24 franchise. This summer’s season opened with 8.1 million Live + Same Day viewers but grew to 12.4 million viewers with delayed viewing factored in, making it “one of the highest rated premieres of the show over the course of its nine seasons so far,” Somers said.

FX recently announced it no longer would issue Live + Same Day stats for its programs the morning after premiere telecasts. “We think five days for Live+3 is worth the wait to more accurately report the story,” the network’s EVP Research Julie Piepenkotter told reporters, while acknowledging that excepted reporting on viewing levels for sports, news, and live events. Before the gauntlet began, that network’s spokesman pointed out that many press reports put Fargo’s audience at 2 million viewers, based on Live + Same Day stats when, more accurately, the show averaged nearly 7 million viewers.

Poltrack began the session by noting that, historically, people would respond that they were watching less TV than the year before in surveys – though Nielsen results proved otherwise. Three years ago, he said, CBS began to see that trend reverse itself and recent surveys show just 17% of people say they’re watching less TV. “Now people take pride they watch television. This is the Golden Era of TV content,” he said.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/tv-n...live-same-day/

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Summer TCA Tour Notes
Casting Directors Say They’re Color Blind When Choosing Actors
By Anthony D'Alessandro, Deadline.com - Jul. 19, 2014

Amid gripes from American actors about the lack of diversity in TV and film, as well as the industry’s penchant for selecting British and Australian thespians for prolific roles, the casting directors at FX’s “Casting 101″ TCA panel assert they’re just looking for the best person for the part – and often it doesn’t matter how famous the person is.

Cami Patton, the casting director for Justified said, “Producers, showrunners and studio executives are used to looking at tape from other actors in other parts of the world. You don’t need an actor with an entire history (of credits).” One candidate, as pointed out by the group, was Matthew Rhys who plays the lead Soviet undercover spy Philip Jennings on FX’s The Americans. Only known to U.S. audiences through his turn on Brothers & Sisters, Rhys bowled casting directors over after they caught his Broadway performance in Look Back in Anger. Patton added that when she cast a fresh-faced British actor by the name of Damian Lewis in the role of U.S. Army Lt. Richard Winters in 2001′s Band of Brothers, “We were trying to match actors with the photos that we had of these real people. At the time he was doing Hamlet on stage with Ralph Fiennes. That’s how he got on our radar.”

For the role of Fargo police officer Molly Solverson, actress Allison Tolman came to casting director Rachel Tanner’s attention through her agency contacts in Chicago. Tanner saw over 600 women for the role and kept coming back to Tolman’s tape “as a palette cleanser” at the end of the day. “I would rewatch her tape to laugh and recenter myself,” said Tanner. Tapping global pools of actors and casting directors is just a means that makes casting directors’ jobs easier.

“Fargo wasn’t going to be heavy in the ethnic mix, just because of the types of regional people we were portraying,” said Tanner who cast Asian actress Susan Park as the second wife of Lester Nygaard (Martin Freeman) on the show, “But we wanted to bring in some different ethnicities aboard (whenever possible). Again, it boils down to whoever is better in the role.”

The Screen Actors Guild provides some production incentives to low budget films that demonstrate diversity in their casting, however, doesn’t grant similar perks to larger budget films and TV series. When the group was asked about the latest controversy with the casting breakdown for Straight Outta Compton which called for A-Girls of any color and C and D girls who were overweight and African American, Patton said, “That was shocking to read because we try to be sensitive to groups, not to mention, we don’t want to limit ourselves to the talent that could be out there. We try to keep our descriptions as mild as possible. If the script calls for someone to be ‘morbidly obese’, we’ll ask the producers to take that description out and use something along the lines of ‘heavy-set.’”

In regards to why there are so many female casting directors; whether they have a better eye then men when it comes to choosing actors, Patton expounded on the origins: “For years, it was the secretaries who were casting. It wasn’t the most respected job in the world. It took the industry 20 years to realize that it’s a big job. Everyone realizes now we have to have a business mind, that it takes a specific skill, that it’s about taste and working within a budget, especially when certain actors won’t work at certain rates.”

Also on FX’s panel were casting directors Rori Bergman (The Americans) and Wendy O’Brien (Sons of Anarchy/It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia).

http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/cast...nic-diversity/
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post #95646 of 97537 Old 07-19-2014, 06:00 PM
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TV Sports
Leaders Support Year-Round Olympic TV Channel
By Maane Khatchatourian, Variety.com - Jul. 19, 2013

Olympic leaders converged for a summit in Switzerland on Saturday to discuss reforming the Games, which would include the creation of a year-round Olympic TV channel.

The new network would use the National Geographic Channel as a model to promote Olympic events in the years between the Games, the Associated Press reports. Its goal is to feature sports that aren’t normally spotlighted and attract younger audiences.

The channel would be more akin to NFL Network and MLB Network, which are supported by a league, than a traditional net. The International Olympic Committee will act as a “curator or moderator” to develop digital content, but also ask sports federations, national Olympic committees, broadcasters, and sponsors to partake.

Comcast recently doled out an unprecedented $7.75 billion to continue broadcasting the Olympic Games on NBC and NBC-affiliated nets through 2032. The agreement covers six Olympics (from 2022 to 2032)

The fifteen officials — including U.S. Olympic Committee President Larry Probst — who met to discuss the IOC’s Olympic Agenda 2020 campaign recognized the new channel’s “potential to greatly increase the presence of sports and the promotion of the Olympic values year round and worldwide,” the IOC said in a statement.

“The IOC will contact all the relevant stakeholders in the coming months to further develop the concept,” the committee said. Members are scheduled to vote on the agenda in December.

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/year...el-1201265169/
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post #95647 of 97537 Old 07-19-2014, 08:06 PM
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Summer TCA Tour Notes
Networks Urge Press To Abandon Live + Same Day Ratings Reports
By Lisa De Moraes, Deadline.com - Jul. 19, 2014

“If you were a sports reporter, you would not report the winner based on the third-inning score – that’s what you’re doing if you use Live + Same Day ratings,” CBS Research guru David Poltrack chastised Reporters Who Cover Television this morning. He was one of four number crunchers who ran the reporters through a “bar chart gauntlet” at Summer TV Press Tour 2014, by way of trying to convince them not to report on next day ratings for their networks’ programs. They came to preach the value of using Live + 3 stats at the very least, in light of how popular delayed viewing has become – particularly of scripted primetime series, with drama series leading the way.
......................
Then why not use Live +7 Day? Wouldn't that be the most accurate?

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post #95648 of 97537 Old 07-19-2014, 10:24 PM
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Then why not use Live +7 Day? Wouldn't that be the most accurate?
It's not that simple.

Don't forget, the purpose of TV shows is to sell advertising time. The TV show is just there to get people to watch the ads. The ratings are there to show advertisers that people are watching and are likely to see their ads.

The problem is, the further out you go, the less effective those ads are, for two reasons:

1 - People watching time shifted programming tend to skip past the ads. While there are still plenty of people that will let the recording run, more and more are blowing by the ads and not seeing the products. This goes beyond people's ability to step out of the room during live ads - people avoid them completely. It would be like a driver not just failing to look at a billboard, but actively shielding their eyes from it as they pass. The message simply disappears.

2 - Ads become less relevant as time passes. A movie trailer for a film opening that weekend has less impact since the box office numbers will be the determining factor in future weekend grosses, since opening weekend success now determines the viability of a film. Ads targeted to specific sales or offers (like a holiday weekend or some other temporary discount) may be old news by the time someone watches a show a week later.

All this adds up to advertisers not wanting to rely on those numbers since they aren't covering the bread and butter of advertising: the live audience that cant skip the ads.

Another issue is the whole "camel's nose" syndrome. In other words, if you're going to count 7 days, why not 14 or even 30? What's so magic about watching within a week? There are plenty of viewers that if they don't watch in a week, might let a few episodes stack up before they watch them in a sort of mini-marathon. Some people end up several episodes behind for the entire season. Others wait to see if a show will survive the season before watching.

That's potentially a lot more numbers for a show, but the ones paying for the programming might not benefit from any of them.
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post #95649 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 03:59 AM
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And some people like me wait until the whole season has been recorded before watching. I usually only have an ad be seen or heard is when I take a bathroom break or go to kitchen for a drink or snack.

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post #95650 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 05:20 AM
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And some people like me wait until the whole season has been recorded before watching. I usually only have an ad be seen or heard is when I take a bathroom break or go to kitchen for a drink or snack.
Which is why shows that get a lot of watercooler buzz are more attractive to advertisers. You get shows such as "The Walking Dead" and it's hard to avoid hearing spoilers, so you try to catch up within a day or two. This is the reason the competition shows flourish, too. The hotspots for advertisers are the shows less-likely to sit on a DVR for very long if at all.

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post #95651 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 07:36 AM
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Ad $$ is basically based on the C+3 # which comes out essentially the same as the Live+SD # so this is them just wanting the press to report a meaningless inflated #....Shocking !!

Guess its why they like that the press still reports the higher total audience # instead of the lower but really more important 18-49 #.

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Ad $$ is basically based on the C+3 # which comes out essentially the same as the Live+SD.
A lot of shows can pick up over a million additional viewers in Live + 3 and Live + 7 viewing, so it's not "essentially the same." In an industry that sells ads in terms of cost-per-thousands, those additional eyes can attract a higher price. By reporting only the same-day ratings, it gets confusing for the advertiser, who suddenly thinks she's being screwed over. Live + 7 isn't as useful since a significant portion of television advertising is dated. Doesn't do Federated Department Stores any good to have someone watch back CSI the Monday AFTER the 3-day Macy's Weekend Sale is over. (commercial skipping notwithstanding). So having what the media reports actually match what's being sold helps tremendously.

But will it happen? Doubtful. The medium reporting on television generally competes against it. And there's a desire to know how a show did as early as possible. TV says they don't want overnight numbers published but they all can't wait to get those same overnight numbers. They could collectively get Nielsen to stop releasing anything but Live + 3. But they won't. They need the world to know they have a hit (if they have one) asap.

Of course, the problem will always be the spin put on the reporting. Got a kick at the reporting of the World Cup audience on ESPN following the first games. "Biggest in ESPN's history." Yeah, biggest SOCCER audience in ESPN's history. Those early World Cup games were still beaten by "Major Crimes" and "Rizzoli and Isles." It's all in the wording.

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post #95653 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 11:59 AM
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Yea Live+3/+7 gains viewers but thats different than the C+3....C+3 tracks the commercial viewing so its the most important.

Thats why the C+3 is about the same as Live+SD even though the Live+3 gains viewers.

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SATURDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog.
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post #95655 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 12:51 PM
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Obituary
James Garner of ‘Maverick,’ ‘Rockford Files,’ Dies at 86
By Richard Natale, Variety.com - Jul. 20, 2013

Amiable film and television actor James Garner, who starred in popular television series, “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files,” died Saturday at his home in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles. He was 86.

Like many popular leading men of Hollywood’s heyday, Garner boasted all-American good looks and a winning personality that carried him through comedy and drama alike. Garner won two Emmys and racked up a total of 15 nominations. He had his greatest impact in television, first on “Maverick” in the ’50s and then in the ’70s on “The Rockford Files,” for which he won an Emmy in 1977. He later appeared in several quality telepics including “Promise,” “My Name Is Bill W.” and “Barbarians at the Gate,” as well as the occasional strong feature such as “Victor/Victoria” and “Murphy’s Romance,” for which he captured his sole Oscar nomination for lead actor.

Garner found his way to showbiz through a friend, theater producer Paul Gregory: He was employed cueing actor Lloyd Nolan during rehearsals of the Broadway-bound “The Caine Mutiny Court Martial.” Garner eventually copped a nonspeaking role in the 1954 production, where, he said, he closely studied the play’s star, Henry Fonda. After studying with Herbert Berghof, Garner landed a role in the touring production of “Caine.”

Back in Los Angeles in 1955, he secured bit parts in the TV series “Cheyenne.” Impressed, Warner Bros. gave him a screen test and a contract at $200 a week. He paid his dues in supporting roles in “Towards the Unknown,” “The Girl He Left Behind” and “Shootout at Medicine Bend” as well as some TV assignments.

He was first really noticeable in a role as Marlon Brando’s pal in “Sayonara,” after which he was assigned a supporting role in “Darby’s Rangers.” When “Darby’s” lead Charlton Heston walked off the film, Garner inherited his first starring role, but reviews were mixed.

The real boost to his career came in a role now indelibly associated with him, that of Bret Maverick in the comedic Western that ABC debuted in 1957; the role and the series fit his wry personality like a glove. Originally the story was to alternate between the Maverick brothers played by Garner and Jack Kelly, but “Maverick” quickly became all about Garner’s character, who used his wits to get out of trouble. Other actors revolved in and out including Clint Eastwood as a vicious gunfighter. “Maverick” led to a long relationship between Garner and its creator, Roy Huggins. The actor stayed with the series until 1960, when he quit over a dispute with Warners.

“I’m playing me,” Garner said about the role. “Bret Maverick is lazy: I’m lazy. And I like being lazy.”

Lazy or not, the actor shared the Golden Globe for most promising male newcomer in 1958 and earned his first Emmy nomination in 1959 for “Maverick.”

In the meantime, Warners was serving him frustrating fare like “Up Periscope” and “Cash McCall.” Taking advantage of a suspension during the Writers Guild strike of 1960, Garner sued Warners for breach of contract — and won — allowing him to be a free agent and demand more for his services.

He appeared in specials before landing a supporting role in “The Children’s Hour” with Shirley MacLaine and Audrey Hepburn.

His roles in films got better: “Boys’ Night Out” and, especially, “The Great Escape” brought him his best notices. He said that he drew on his experience in the Korean War, during which he was the company scrounger, for the latter role.

For a time he seemed ready to inherit the aging Cary Grant’s romantic comedy leading man mantle with such films as “The Thrill of It All” (1963), “The Wheeler Dealers” and “Move Over Darling.” Arthur Hiller gave him a meatier assignment, in the satire “The Americanization of Emily,” opposite the then-red-hot Julie Andrews. He then nabbed the thriller “36 Hours” and a couple of indifferent comedies, “The Art of Love” and “A Man Could Get Killed.”

The films were now A-budget, but “Duel at Diablo,” “Mr. Buddwing” and “Grand Prix,” which gave him a yen for car racing, weren’t particularly memorable.

During this period he appeared in Westerns including “Hour of the Gun” (in which he played Wyatt Earp), comedy Western “Support Your Local Sheriff,” “They Only Kill Their Masters,” “Marlowe” and “Skin Game.” But television roles brought him more prominence, where after the brief NBC Western series “Nichols” in 1971, he hit paydirt with comedic detective skein “The Rockford Files,” which ran from 1974-80 and won him an Emmy in 1977 and another four nominations.

Huggins teamed with Stephen J. Cannell for the detective series recycling many of the plots from “Maverick.” Many of Garner’s friends had recurring roles in the series, including Joe Santos and Stuart Margolin as his buddies. Margolin said at the time that Garner worked long shifts, did his own stunts and stayed to do off-camera lines for the other cast members. But his old injuries and pay disputes led Garner to call it quits even though the show drew high ratings on NBC.

He again essayed “Bret Maverick” for one season in 1981. But a bad back, lawsuits with MCA TV over “Rockford” syndication payments (he eventually settled, reportedly for several million dollars) and, eventually, heart surgery curtailed his ability to endure the rigors of a TV series.

He reteamed with Andrews in the Blake Edwards musical “Victor/Victoria” in 1982, and he landed a plum role opposite Sally Field in the comedy/romance “Murphy’s Romance” in 1985. He essayed an older Wyatt Earp in Edwards’ “Sunset” opposite Bruce Willis as Tom Mix and did the underwhelming “Fire in the Sky” in 1983. In 1994 he took a small role in the bigscreen version of “Maverick,” with Mel Gibson in the lead, giving the star a run for his money in the likability department.

In 1996 he starred as an ex-president opposite Jack Lemmon in “My Fellow Americans.” The best of his later work, however, came in television in such TV movie dramas as “Heartsounds” with Mary Tyler Moore in 1984, directed by Glen Jordan, who also guided him through “Promise” in 1986. In 1989 he was acclaimed for “My Name Is Bill W.” with James Woods. In the 1992 HBO film “Barbarians at the Gate,” the actor offered up a standout chewy performance. Quieter, but no less effective, was “Breathing Lessons” opposite Joanne Woodward.

His bigscreen career continued in the 2000s with the Clint Eastwood-helmed veteran astronaut comedy “Space Cowboys,” chick pic “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood” and 2004 hit tearjerker “The Notebook,” in which Garner and Gena Rowlands played the older versions of a couple portrayed by Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams.

On the smallscreen, Garner recurred on the ABC comedy “8 Simple Rules for Dating My Daughter” from 2003-05. He also voiced God for the short-lived NBC series “God, the Devil and Bob,” played the chief justice in CBS’ Supreme Court drama “First Monday” and portrayed Mark Twain in a 2002 Hallmark adaptation of Twain’s novel “Roughing It.”

Born James Bumgarner in Norman, Okla., he left high school to become a merchant seaman before moving to Los Angeles, enrolling at Hollywood High and then returning to Norman, where he joined the Oklahoma State National Guard.

He briefly went to work in his father’s carpeting business in Los Angeles until being called for duty in the Korean War. He served more than a year in the Korean peninsula and was awarded the Purple Heart before his discharge in 1952. He studied business administration at the U. of Oklahoma but left after a semester, ready to move towards acting.

Garner starred with Mariette Hartley in a series of noted commercials for Polaroid in the 1970s.

He won the Screen Actors Guild’s Life Achievement Award in 2005.

Garner is survived by his wife, the former Lois Clarke, to whom he was married since 1956; daughter Greta “Gigi” Garner; and an adopted daughter, Kimberly, from Clarke’s first marriage.

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/jame...86-1201265361/
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post #95656 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 01:11 PM
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SUNDAY Network Primetime Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET)

ABC:
7PM - America's Funniest Home Videos
(R - Mar. 16)
8PM - Wipeout
9PM - Rising Star (LIVE)
10PM - Castle
(R - Jan. 13)

CBS:
7PM - 60 Minutes
8PM - Big Brother
9PM - Unforgettable
10PM - Regardless

NBC:
7PM - American Ninja Warrior (120 min.)
(R - Jul. 7)
9PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
(R - Feb. 26)
10PM - Chicago PD
(R - Feb. 26)

FOX:
8PM - American Dad
(R - May 11)
8:30PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - Mar. 10)
8PM - The Simpsons
(R - May 4)
8:30PM - The Simpsons
(R - May 11)
9PM - Family Guy
(R - Apr. 27)
9:30PM - American Dad
(R - Apr. 27)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Last Tango In Halifax
9PM - Masterpiece Mystery! Endeavor, Season 2: Neverland (90 min.)
10:30PM - Vicious

UNIVISION:
7PM - Aquí y Ahora
8PM - Bailando por un Sueño (120 min.)
10PM - Sal y Pimienta

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Movie - Ice Age: The Meltdown (2006)
9PM - Movie: Source Code (2011)
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post #95657 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 01:19 PM
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TV Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jul. 20, 2014

TRUE BLOOD
HBO, 9:00 p.m. ET

In its final season, True Blood has rejuvenated itself, pulsing with new life like a freshly fed vampire. Last week’s episode, in which Sookie (Anna Paquin) went on a rescue mission with many of the show’s most compelling characters: Bill (Stephen Moyer), Eric (Alexander Skarsgard), Sam (Sam Trammell), Jessica (Deborah Ann Woll), Jason (Ryan Kwanten) and my favorite character of all, Pam (Kristin Bauer van Straten). That hour had action, drama and blood galore – but it also had lots of what this show has lacked of late: a true, True Blood sense of humor. Pam and Eric running a video rental store in an Eighties flashback? Fangtastic. And tonight, on a less willing mission, Sookie hosts a mainstreaming party, luring both locals and vamps.

GUNSLINGERS
American Heroes, 10:00 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
This six-part series premieres tonight as a new nonfiction presentation – nonfiction that is, with lots of recreations – from what used to be called the Military Channel. This limited series about Old West Gunslingers – with a half-dozen episodes, it’s a proverbial six-shooter – isn’t very compelling as it builds to its recreated action scenes. They’re a mix between Wild West frontier tourist shows and Matrix-like slo-mo gunplay. But the people interviewed here (a motley crew including historians, enthusiasts and Tombstone actor Kurt Russell) are over-the-top entertaining, like a dose of Drunk History without the alcohol. And yes, you’re likely to learn something along the way, and not just that recreations are hard to pull off effectively.

THE STRAIN
FX, 10:00 p.m. ET

In tonight’s episode two, we learn more about the few passengers who were able to walk away, eventually, from that otherwise fatal flight. And we also learn about the plane’s mysterious cargo – a dirty little secret, having to do with dirt and a vintage box, that echoes one of the memorable myths from Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Welcome aboard, folks. Corey Stoll stars as the scientist trying to tie all these mysterious threads together.

THE LOTTERY
Lifetime, 10:00 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
As a one-shot telemovie, this futuristic drama might have worked: It’s not so much a remake of Shirley Jackson’s classic short story about violently and randomly dispensed justice as it is a sci-fi tale about a barren society in which 100 fertilized human eggs are put up for grabs by canny politicians. Marley Shelton stars as the scientist who makes the fertility beakthrough – and though this series quickly follows a derivative and less satisfying story line, it starts on rather strong footing – especially for Lifetime.

MASTERS OF SEX
Showtime, 10:00 p.m. ET

William Masters (Michael Sheen) begins a new job, which should put an end to a chance of any relationship, at least professionally, with Virginia Johnson (Lizzy Caplan) – but it won’t.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

TV Reviews
How I Shot Your Sitcom: One Camera, or Multi?
By Ed Bark, TVWorthWatching.com - Jul. 19, 2013

BEVERLY HILLS, CA -- Single-cam vs. multi-cam.

The look and feel of a prime-time sitcom greatly depends on these two basic delivery systems.

Multi-cam: filmed or taped in a single night before a live studio audience, with laugh track "sweeteners" deployed when deemed necessary. The humor tends to be broader. Which isn't to say it's automatically more sophomoric.

Single-cam: filmed in separate stages out of sight of a studio audience. The humor tends to be lower-key and perhaps more "natural." Not that belly laughs aren't welcome.

One network continues to thrive with the old school, multi-cam form dating all the way back to I Love Lucy. So it's no coincidence that this is still how CBS rolls.

NBC in part has tried to emulate CBS in hopes of generating more "mainstream" hit comedy classics such as the Peacock's studio audience-fueled Seinfeld, Cheers, Frasier and The Cosby Show. But that's been a bust of late. So NBC's new fall lineup has gone back to the single-cam play list with Marry Me, A to Z and Bad Judge after striking out in recent seasons with multi-cam sitcoms such as Sean Saves the World, Whitney and the Jimmy Fallon-produced Guys with Kids.

During network executive sessions this week at the ongoing Television Critics Association press tour, TV Worth Watching quizzed the entertainment bosses at CBS and NBC on why they do the things they do on the comedy series front.

CBS entertainment chairman Nina Tassler strayed onto the single-cam path last season with The Crazy Ones, which ended up being a high-profile cancellation starring Robin Williams and Sarah Michelle Gellar. But the network succeeded with two multi-cam sitcoms, The Millers and Mom. They'll be back for second seasons this fall along with prime-time's most popular comedy, The Big Bang Theory. It's also a multi-cam, as are CBS returnees Two and a Half Men, 2 Broke Girls and Mike & Molly.

"They're definitely harder to do," Tassler contends. "But for us, the emphasis on being able to craft and score with hard jokes -- we are particularly good at it. I think we have a very keen ability to identify those talents who can really deliver that kind of comedy."

CBS' lone new sitcom this fall, The McCarthys, began as a single-cam comedy before the network, in a sense, came to its senses.

"A lot of people are very seduced by the romance of a single-camera comedy," Tassler says. "But when we looked at the rhythms of The McCarthys (centered on a boisterous Boston family), it was much better served in a multi-camera format. Ultimately, for our network and for our audience, they resonate."

Is that because the still generally older CBS audience remains conditioned to reject sitcoms without a laugh track? Not really, Tassler said, citing the long-running success of How I Met Your Mother as "more of a hybrid comedy" that was filmed before a studio audience but "had its own rhythm."

Still, "our audience does appreciate the level of humor that multi-cams deliver," she said.

There's one other major factor -- producer Chuck Lorre. He's always worked in the multi-cam format, and he runs Big Bang as well as Two and a Half Men, Mike & Molly and Mom. You want to keep a guy like that happy.

"A lot of the work that's done in single-camera is post-filming, a lot in the edit room," Tassler says. "A multi-cam really cuts its teeth on its feet, on the stage. And that's why I think we're really successful with it."

CBS won't have any single-cam comedies on its schedule in the coming season. NBC will be without any multi-cams this fall.

"We talk about this all the time," says Bob Greenblatt, NBC's entertainment chairman. "We keep going back to the fact that some of the best shows on television (and also the biggest hits) were multi-cam comedies with live studio audiences. Yet, there's been a generation of shows that have moved away from that, from (NBC's) The Office to even (ABC's) Modern Family, which easily could have been a show with a studio audience in the way it was shot. But they chose not to do that."

Modern Family has been the biggest mass audience single-cam hit of the modern era. The Office also endured, but as more of a "demographic" darling with particular appeal among advertiser-prized 18-to-49-year-olds. NBC otherwise has struggled to find anything close to big audiences for critically praised single-cam comedies such as 30 Rock, Community and Parks and Recreation. That's principally why Greenblatt admittedly yearned to crack the multi-cam code and live large the way CBS has with top 10 hits such as Big Bang, Two and a Half Men and, before that, Everybody Loves Raymond.

But "there's a generation of writers and producers who have gone away from the multi-cam," Greenblatt says. "Nine times out of 10, they come in wanting to write a single-cam . . . There was such a cachet with The Office and 30 Rock. And there was a whole rash of (single-cam) shows that were Emmy-nominated or awarded. It kept being reinforced that single-cameras are the better form. And I really hope we can balance the scales a little bit."

Greenblatt notes that NBC plans to take another multi-cam shot at midseason with One Big Happy, a comedy whose executive producers include Ellen DeGeneres. And perhaps by next summer or fall 2015, a previously announced "multi-generational" multi-cam sitcom starring Bill Cosby will be ready to roll.

"That's an important show for us," says NBC entertainment president Jennifer Salke. "We're very committed to multis, but again it's who really wants to write one."

For the record, ABC has one freshman multi-cam sitcom, Cristela, for next fall, and two new single-cams (Black-ish and Selfie). Fox will take another shot at the multi-cam form with the new comedy Mulaney, while returning three of its "Animation Domination" series and a trio of live-action single-cam comedies.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogP...px?postId=7801
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post #95658 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 04:32 PM
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Maybe TV shows should go back to having advertisements incorporated into the shows, the way they were in the very early days of TV, when a plug for some product would be put into portions of the dialogue. Clever writers could do that pretty effectively for sitcoms and variety shows, but doing that for dramas would be tougher.
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post #95659 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 04:42 PM
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Maybe TV shows should go back to having advertisements incorporated into the shows, the way they were in the very early days of TV, when a plug for some product would be put into portions of the dialogue. Clever writers could do that pretty effectively for sitcoms and variety shows, but doing that for dramas would be tougher.
You mean you haven't seen the characters driving Chevrolets in Chevy-sponsored programs? TNT's very good at this. Wasn't a coincidence that Brenda Lee Johnson's favorite candy on "The Closer" happened to be the one in all the commercials within the show. Beer, chips, cars, even the FedEX trucks that just happen to drive by in several scenes. You see the actors using name brand products, odds are, that placement was paid for or bonused for buying a season's worth of commercial time.

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
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post #95660 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 05:29 PM
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You mean you haven't seen the characters driving Chevrolets in Chevy-sponsored programs? TNT's very good at this. Wasn't a coincidence that Brenda Lee Johnson's favorite candy on "The Closer" happened to be the one in all the commercials within the show. Beer, chips, cars, even the FedEX trucks that just happen to drive by in several scenes. You see the actors using name brand products, odds are, that placement was paid for or bonused for buying a season's worth of commercial time.
Yeah, but those are just visual product placements. I was thinking more along the lines of Gracie Allen marveling how the Carnation people could get such wonderful milk from a bunch of flowers. That was back when a show would have just one main sponsor.
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post #95661 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 05:32 PM
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Yeah, but those are just visual product placements. I was thinking more along the lines of Gracie Allen marveling how the Carnation people could get such wonderful milk from a bunch of flowers. That was back when a show would have just one main sponsor.
I recall seeing some episodes of "Bones" where they're actually talking about the nav system, don't recall the make of vehicle, but the focus was on the nav system itself. There's been many other shows that have focused on the vehicle itself or something about the vehicle, very obvious ones like a lingering shot on the grill of a Camaro, lots of stuff like that.
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post #95662 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 06:46 PM
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You see the actors using name brand products, odds are, that placement was paid for or bonused for buying a season's worth of commercial time.
"Hey, Chuck, before we go out to save the world, why don't we enjoy a delicious Subway sandwich? The bread is so hot and fluffy, I can't even imagine why you wouldn't want to get a toasted sandwich at Subway!"



Product placement and endorsements drive me nuts. At least the ones on Chuck were often amusing (and about the only reason the show continued at all), but the most egregious example I can think of was in the pilot for NBC's Grimm, where a female jogger died, and the police questioned someone like so:

"Do you recall what the victim was wearing?"
"She had pink Nikes and was carrying an iPod."
"What's that? She had pink Nikes and an iPod?"
"Why yes, she had pink Nikes and an iPod."

"Hey, guys, over here! I found a pink Nike and an iPod!"

It was so annoying that I almost stopped watching the show after one episode. Incorporating advertising into the show is the worst way to do it, because it causes a permanent corruption of the material. Plastering banners on top of the screen is annoying, but at least they're gone when you watch on DVD/Blu-ray/online. If the actors are forced to blather about a product during the episode itself, then the annoying irrelevant advertisement is preserved forever.
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post #95663 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 06:46 PM
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I recall seeing some episodes of "Bones" where they're actually talking about the nav system, don't recall the make of vehicle, but the focus was on the nav system itself. There's been many other shows that have focused on the vehicle itself or something about the vehicle, very obvious ones like a lingering shot on the grill of a Camaro, lots of stuff like that.
USA live on that stuff. Michael Weston spent as much time spying as he did extolling the virtues of disc brakes on the Hyundai Genesis.

On network Subway was a heavy plot element in both Chuck and Community. Of course Community also had a genius move in which KFC was the basis of the story for an entire episode.


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post #95664 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

Product placement and endorsements drive me nuts. At least the ones on Chuck were often amusing (and about the only reason the show continued at all), but the most egregious example I can think of was in the pilot for NBC's Grimm, where a female jogger died, and the police questioned someone like so:

"Do you recall what the victim was wearing?"
"She had pink Nikes and was carrying an iPod."
"What's that? She had pink Nikes and an iPod?"
"Why yes, she had pink Nikes and an iPod."

"Hey, guys, over here! I found a pink Nike and an iPod!"

It was so annoying that I almost stopped watching the show after one episode.
Ha, I only ever watched a couple of episodes and I remember that scene too!


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post #95665 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 07:24 PM
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I really don't understand how some of the commercial plugs are so horrible, products and such are discussed in everyday life all the time, it's not normally a major topic of conversation I guess, but brands and discussions about products do come up, so I don't understand why it is such a horrible thing.
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post #95666 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 08:09 PM
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I really don't understand how some of the commercial plugs are so horrible, products and such are discussed in everyday life all the time, it's not normally a major topic of conversation I guess, but brands and discussions about products do come up, so I don't understand why it is such a horrible thing.
Because the majority of the time it's written not as natural character dialog, but as a litany of marketing bullet points clearly influenced by the advertising partner's requirements.


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post #95667 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 08:46 PM
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"My (Nissan) Versa is right outside"...Chloe Sullivan on the show Smallville. "We can take my car" would've normally sufficed. And on another ep of the same show, Pete Ross eats kryptonite-exposed (Strident) gum and becomes Plastic-Man. I guess placement has its place, but this was way too "in the face".

"I knew you'd say that"...*BLAM!*
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post #95668 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 08:55 PM
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USA live on that stuff. Michael Weston spent as much time spying as he did extolling the virtues of disc brakes on the Hyundai Genesis.

On network Subway was a heavy plot element in both Chuck and Community. Of course Community also had a genius move in which KFC was the basis of the story for an entire episode.
Was that the red thing that Fiona was always driving? Yeah, it was always prominently featured as to how well it handled and how fast it was. It always reminded me of a giant ladybug.
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post #95669 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 08:59 PM
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Was that the red thing that Fiona was always driving? Yeah, it was always prominently featured as to how well it handled and how fast it was. It always reminded me of a giant ladybug.
Wasn't always red, but the spiel was the same.


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post #95670 of 97537 Old 07-20-2014, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by rezzy View Post
"My (Nissan) Versa is right outside"...Chloe Sullivan on the show Smallville. "We can take my car" would've normally sufficed. And on another ep of the same show, Pete Ross eats kryptonite-exposed (Strident) gum and becomes Plastic-Man. I guess placement has its place, but this was way too "in the face".
Not quite as in-your-face as the singing Texaco men or Lucy and Desi peddling smokes.
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