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post #95761 of 95768 Old Yesterday, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post
In the articles about Under the Dome, they typically quote Les Moonves talking about how UNder the Dome is profitable for CBS before they even air it. And he is the CEO of CBS.
Which division of CBS, or CBS Corp as a whole? For CBS Corp as a whole, it more than likely is.

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post #95762 of 95768 Old Yesterday, 07:16 PM
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Which division of CBS, or CBS Corp as a whole? For CBS Corp as a whole, it more than likely is.
You can't buy shares of stock in just one unit or one division, you have to buy stock in the whole corporation. So, how much do the shareholders care about each unit within the company? And are shareholders always looking for short-term profit and not caring all that much about the company's long-term prospects?
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post #95763 of 95768 Old Yesterday, 09:19 PM
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You can't buy shares of stock in just one unit or one division, you have to buy stock in the whole corporation. So, how much do the shareholders care about each unit within the company?
Shareholders do care if a division is pulling down the corp. bottom line.

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And are shareholders always looking for short-term profit and not caring all that much about the company's long-term prospects?
Certainly seems that way sometimes (short term over long term).

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post #95764 of 95768 Old Today, 12:40 AM
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Comic-Con 2014 TV Notes
‘Penny Dreadful’ Showrunner John Logan Teases Season 2 & New “Human” Villain
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - Jul. 24, 2014

San Diego is about to get a Gothic horror visit from Victorian England today and John Logan is about to let Penny Dreadful get truly uninhibited. “A lot of Season 1, for me, was actually putting the playing pieces on the board,” says the Oscar nominated scribe of the Showtime series of 19th century iconic supernatural misfits he created. “Now I feel we’ve had 8 hours to do that, to establish the landscape and so now I really get to play,” the first time showrunner adds with a laugh. “I can create more and more complex patterns of the relationships of the characters and of the supernatural element as well,” the Gladiator and Skyfall writer says. “In terms of the second season, I’ve written all but two of the episodes. So, the last two are yet to be written. So I’m well ahead of the game there, and the actors will all be getting it the end of this month.

In just over a month since Dreadful’s rather spectacularly blood soaked Season 1 finale, Logan will be taking the stage in Ballroom 20 of the San Diego Convention Center this evening with cast members Harry Treadaway, Reeve Carney and Josh Hartnett. If he returns next year, he may be bringing a few more people with him and not just absent leads Timothy Dalton and Eva Green. “I’m teasing out from the characters I really love from last season, who had smaller parts, and adding a whole new set of new characters as well,” the playwright and Oscar nominee admits for Season 2. Careful to keep the poetic mystery that embodied the series since it’s May 11th debut, Logan is economical with his words about who those additions will be – though he does admit there will be more supernatural creatures and the main characters will leave London in Season 2.

The writer is less circumspect with Penny Dreadful’s new threat. “The biggest change for me in the second season, beyond the fact that it’s ten hours as opposed to eight hours, is we have a human antagonist,” he says. “Last season, we sort of had the vampire, the generic monster, Now we have a human villain played by Helen McCrory, who is Madam Kali in the, I hope memorable, séance episode earlier in the season.” What evil the new Dreadful villain will enact was scarcely hinted at in Madam Kali brief but preying appearance at the end of Season 1.

While Logan won’t reveal more of Penny Dreadful’s next season nor talk about the follow up to 2012’s Skyfall except to say the script for the next James Bond movie is done, he will speak in detail about the challenges of creating and running his first TV show. “One of the reasons I love it so much and find it so different that films or even theater is that I’m there every day on the set and obsessively writing it, working with the actors and editing,” the big screen vet says. “It’s a brand new challenge, and I am learning every single day. “Thankfully, my boss, David Nevins, is just an amazing sort of educator as well as supporting the more outlandish parts of my vision, which he certainly does next season,” Logan laughs.

Not that he didn’t plan Penny Dreadful out when the idea came to him several years ago and he spoke to his Skyfall director and now TV producing partner Sam Mendes about the idea. Showtime picked up the project from the frequent collaborators in January 2013 “Because this is my first TV show and I didn’t know if I’d be able to do it, I spent years thinking about it and charting out the cosmology, all the various forces of play around those characters,” Logan says. “I charted it up to the third season in terms of where I wanted to take the story, where I wanted to align to some of the classic novels that inspired it and some of the ways I wanted to variant those things.” Where that will be, we will have to discover, however for Logan that is part of the fun for himself.

“The second season, for me, is, in a way, more joyous to write because I know the voices in my head, and I know where I want to challenge the actors, and I know where I want to play to their sweet spots,” he says with a laugh. Indeed.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/penn...orror-villain/
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post #95765 of 95768 Old Today, 12:44 AM
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Comic-Con 2014 TV Notes
'Community' Star Joel McHale Never Doubted Revival Chances
By Philiana Ng, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Jul. 24, 2014

Community had an 11th-hour reprieve last month when Yahoo Screen revived the cult comedy for a sixth season, fulfilling the first half of the unofficial #sixseasonsandamovie mandate.

The stars and producers weren't shy about the unexpected save after an aggressive push by studio Sony Pictures Television. "Sony and Yahoo are giant corporations. Their tentacles reach — hail Hydra! — into every crevice," creator Dan Harmon told the Ballroom 20 audience during Thursday's Comic-Con session.

"Wherever the show is, people will find it — especially when it's on Yahoo Screen," added Harmon. "It's season six of Community. You'll be watching it the way you've always watched it — only now it's legal." Though no official announcement was made, Harmon and executive producer Chris McKenna said that Community will still have a traditional sitcom format, with the 13 episodes rolled out on a weekly basis, likely beginning after Christmas. (The writers' room kicks back up in the fall.)

Prior to Community's resurrection, Harmon was vocal about tempering expectations, even penning a blog post explaining his reasoning. "I didn't want [the fans] to be crushed," Harmon said. "I didn't feel that this was possible, so I didn't want them to get optimistic. I knew that, honestly, it was corporate politics. At a certain point the love is a commodity to them, which has been overly demonstrated. Then it's time to sit back and let them make something happen, and they did."

If there was one person who was confident about Community's return, it was Joel McHale, a major proponent for Harmon returning to the show in season five a year after his ouster. "I had no doubt we would be back," The Soup host said. "Much like a Japanese general in World War II, the only option was victory or suicide. As I've said a lot, I love the show."

McHale half-joked that if it came down to it, he "was ready to do a regional theater version of the show." If anything, the digital transition for the perennial bubble show — which has never been a ratings ballbuster — was kismet. "I know most of you watch on tiny little screens and now we're on one. F— you network television! Unless they want us back," McHale deadpanned.

Gillian Jacobs and Jim Rash revealed that they found out about news of Community's return on social media, Twitter specifically. "I definitely shed a tear when we were canceled. I cried in my car. I didn't want to let go of the show, because I think there are a few times in your life where you get to work on something as groundbreaking ... and heartbreaking as this show," Jacobs said. Added Rash, "It's been a blessing each season to go to a next [season] and to maybe see the hashtag come to reality."

When asked whether the shackles would be off now that Yahoo Screen would, Harmon joked, "I had a lot of anti-vaccination messages that I wanted to show."

Harmon emphasized the importance of maintaining the DNA of the show — with some tweaks. "The community that these guys recognize needs to be there and I need to be very careful about that," Harmon said. "I don't want to take the wheels off so much that people are like, 'This is a new show.'"

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/liv...-harmon-721012
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post #95766 of 95768 Old Today, 12:46 AM
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Comic-Con 2014 TV Notes
‘Hannibal’ Season 3 to Focus on Lecter Manhunt and Book Characters, But No Clarice Starling
By Laura Prudon, Variety.com - Jul. 24, 2014

NBC’s “Hannibal” took over Ballroom 20 at Comic-Con Thursday, with creator Bryan Fuller, EPs Steven Lightfoot and Martha De Laurentiis, director David Slade and cast members Caroline Dhavernas, Scott Thompson and Aaron Abrams on hand to tease the sure-to-be delectable developments ahead in season three.

Stars Mads Mikkelsen and Hugh Dancy were absent from the panel due to work commitments, but Mikkelsen sent his apologies via video from Denmark, while Dancy recorded a message from Australia, both thanking all the “Fannibals” for their support of the critically-acclaimed drama.

The biggest reveal from the panel? Raul Esparza will be “a huge part of season three” despite his character, Dr. Chilton, being shot in the face in season three. Esparza (who worked with Fuller on “Pushing Daisies”) said that he trusts the writer implicitly, because no matter what kind of awful mishaps befall the twisted psychiatrist, Fuller always reassures him that he’ll survive — and Esparza believes him (in part because Chilton plays such a major role in the books).

While the series will no longer be able to feature the delicious verbal sparring between Will Graham and Hannibal Lecter at the beginning of season three, Fuller compared the duo to R2D2 and C-3PO — who “don’t become less interesting” when you separate them. They’ll be introducing new characters for both leads to interact with, as well as revisiting some old favorites.

Star Eddie Izzard is set to return via flashback, and Kacey Rohl’s Abigail Hobbs will also appear in some form in season three. Fuller intends to introduce a number of major book characters next year, including Commander Apache in episode two; Lady Murasaki in episode three; Cordell in episode four and Francis Dollarhyde in episode eight.

Season three will start a year after the season two finale in order to join the characters at their “most active point,” according to Fuller. “We want to be very vague with who survived that bloody, bloody night.” Episode four will deal with the events of that missing year. “We’re telling the story emotionally as opposed to temporally.”

The show is also departing from the procedural structure of the prior two seasons, which often featured a case of the week among the character beats. “You only see the FBI in one episode in the first seven,” Fuller revealed, because the show will focus on the pursuit of Hannibal going forward.

The cuisine theme in the titles next season will be Italian, according to Fuller, which gives a big hint as to where Hannibal may end up after his plane lands.

While some shows are slow to embrace the appetites of their fanbase, Fuller admitted that he loves the art and fan fiction the series inspires. “I think the whole television show is fan fiction, we’re all adamant fans,” he pointed out. “What’s good for the gander is good for the goose.”

Still, fans shouldn’t expect Mikkelsen and Dancy’s characters to lock lips on the show any time soon. “They have love for each other… it’s not necessarily a sexual love, but they absolutely have a pure, genuine love for each other,” Fuller said. “The audience is already taking care of it, there is some fantastic art out there.”

De Laurentiis teased that Fuller already has a plan mapped out for upcoming seasons to include plots from “Hannibal,” “Hannibal Rising” and “Red Dragon.” Asked whether we’ll ever see Clarice Starling on the series, Fuller noted that MGM still retains the rights to all “Silence of the Lambs” characters and plotlines, but that they intend to launch a “full court press” to adapt the film, since Fuller appreciates the importance of telling a complete story.

Fuller also spoke of his passion for writing female characters, having switched the genders of Freddy Lounds and Alan Bloom from men in the novels to women in the series, just to include more female voices in the story. “I tend not to think about genitals when I’m writing a character, they’re people first and foremost,” he noted. “There’s something unique about the female experience that I think has an accessibility and an emotional resonance… I find writing for women to be no less complicated than writing for men, because I look at them as individuals.”

Fuller admitted to being excited to have more female characters in season three, including more of Gillian Anderson’s Dr. Bedelia Du Maurier and Lady Murasaki, Hannibal’s Japanese aunt, who has yet to be cast. “We think we’re doing some interesting things with the female characters… most of the female characters can see Hannibal clearer than the male characters… we’re going to be exploring more of that in season three,” he said.

As for whether we’ll ever see a musical episode of the already heightened series, Fuller demurred, but admitted, “I would love to see a surreal musical number in Hannibal’s mind palace. I want to see Mads Mikkelsen dancing like Christopher Walken in ‘Weapon of Choice.’”

“The man can dance,” Esparza agreed.

Anything can happen on “Hannibal.”

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/comi...-3-1201268807/
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post #95767 of 95768 Old Today, 12:50 AM
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TV Sports/Business Notes
ESPN's SEC Network Scores Carriage Deal With Time Warner Cable, Bright House
By Tony Maglio, TheWrap.com - Jul. 24, 2014

ESPN's SEC network is touching down on Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks.

The so-called Worldwide Leader in Sports has reached a carriage deal with the two cable providers for the channel's Aug. 14 launch. The first game of the SEC 2014-15 college football season — Texas A&M vs. South Carolina — kicks off on Aug. 28 at 6 p.m. ET.

With the addition of the two cable companies, the SEC Network will be available to approximately 60 million households nationwide.

“We know we have customers who want the SEC Network, and are pleased to bring it to them,” Andrew Rosenberg, senior vice president of Content Acquisition for Time Warner Cable, said in a press release. “This deal will help ensure that fans and alumni of SEC universities won't miss any important games.”

Added Sean Breen, Disney and ESPN Media Networks senior vice president, Affiliate Sales: “By delivering the SEC Network across Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks’ nationwide footprint, including key markets within SEC territory, we are meeting the demands of fans while also adding value to customers’ video subscriptions in advance of the network's launch next month.”

The SEC Network will air more than 1,000 live events in its first year, including at least 45 exclusive SEC football games, more than 100 men's basketball games, 60 women's basketball games, 75 baseball games, 50 softball games and events across all of the SEC's 21 sports.

http://www.thewrap.com/espn-sec-netw...-bright-house/
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TV Review/Notes
WGN America retells the story of the Manhattan Project
By Rob Owen, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Jul. 24, 2014

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – It’s difficult to imagine that the more sophisticated, adult drama “Manhattan” (9 p.m. Sunday, WGN America) comes from the same network that just a few months ago debuted the silly, supernatural drama “Salem.”

Perhaps WGN America, new to original scripted series, is pursuing a let’s-throw-anything-against-the-wall-and-see-if-it-sticks programming strategy because these two series could not be more different.

Both shows are rooted in history, but “Salem” posits an alternate history where witches were real and masterfully manipulated events in 17th-century Massachusetts.

Newcomer “Manhattan” takes the real history of the Manhattan Project and retells the story of the creation of the first atomic bomb with fictional characters.

“Manhattan” clearly seems to be positioned as a serious cable show, and although it lacks the psychological depth of “Mad Men” or the edgy vibe of “Breaking Bad,” this new drama is easily one of the best new summer series.

John Benjamin Hickey, who played Laura Linney’s brother on “The Big C,” stars in “Manhattan” as fictional Frank Winter, a science researcher on one of several teams trying to develop an atomic weapon under the direction of real-life figure Robert Oppenheimer (Daniel London) in a no-name town in New Mexico (Los Alamos).

Winter’s team is not the team preferred by Oppenheimer and the U.S. Army; they are the underdogs. But Winter doggedly pursues any approach that will shave time off the development of a weapon because he sees every passing hour reflected in an increased number of dead American service members. He’s so worried about ending the war that he even considers sacrificing a rule-breaking colleague in the pilot.

Charlie Isaacs (Ashley Zukerman) and wife Abby (Rachel Brosnahan) are new to “the Hill,” and Charlie, although an admirer of Winter’s work, is recruited by the rival team. Charlie is haunted by his own worries: Once America develops this weapon, what’s to stop another, less enlightened country from making a bomb of its own?

One researcher on the same team brags, “We have the highest combined IQ of any town in America and more Jews than Babylon. You’ll be wined and dined by the U.S. Army until Hitler and the Japs say uncle.”

The pilot episode, written by series creator Sam Shaw (“Masters of Sex”) and directed by Thomas Schlamme (“The West Wing”), offers some beautiful desert vistas and crane shots out of a Steven Spielberg film. It’s easily one of the most beautiful hours of television to come along this year. (As is often the case, a subsequent episode is less cinematic.)

The first hour is a little slow, somewhat pacey at times — it clocks in at 56 minutes, not the usual 42 minutes, and will run one hour and 10 minutes with commercials — but it does a fine job of setting up the story and introducing the characters. “Manhattan” is not just about the scientists, but also their wives.

Winter’s wife, Liza (Olivia Williams, “Dollhouse,” who can’t seem to shake her British accent), is the most anarchic wife, doing anything to ease her boredom. She has a doctorate but has put her career on hold for her husband. She takes newcomer Abby under her wing in episode two and shows her one way to get some kitchen equipment that involves trading tampons for peyote for a hot plate.

In two episodes made available for review, the homefront stories of the wives actually come off better than many of the lab scenes because the wives are better drawn. Winter’s lab is full of scientists, but viewers barely learn their names, let alone personalities, in these early episodes.

But Winter is a compelling character and the stakes of his work are high, which gives “Manhattan” a leg up on another summer workplace drama, AMC’s “Halt and Catch Fire,” which began with a strong premiere and immediately grew dull with no interesting places for its stories to go.

But will viewers who tuned in to “Salem” in large enough numbers for that series to get a second-season renewal be likely to come to the more historically plausible, reality-rooted “Manhattan”? If they don’t, WGN America may have an altogether different kind of bomb on its hands.

Producers on ‘Manhattan’

After a “Manhattan” press conference earlier this month, Mr. Schlamme said WGN America executives acknowledged there may not be a lot of crossover between the “Salem” audience and the “Manhattan” audience.

“What they wanted was a great show,” he said. “They’ve been unbelievably supportive. They said, ‘If we can get a quality television show, that is what we want to do.’ And honestly, they’ve never winked. It’s never been, ‘Well, we said that, but what we really mean is the other.’ ”

“Manhattan” was filmed at an old New Mexico U.S. Army hospital that was days away from being torn down. The production came in and took over 12 acres of buildings that were reconfigured for the show. Mr. Schlamme said 85-90 percent of the series is shot on that location and much of it is shot outdoors.

“We created a world,” he said. “And part of that hope was to create a world that [the actors] could walk into that didn’t feel like a soundstage. It’s what it would have felt like for the [real-life] men and women who were transported from their homes on the East Coast, on the West Coast, and just plopped into the desert.”

Ken Burns on ‘The Roosevelts’

PBS mainstay Ken Burns returns with his latest massive production, the 14-hour “The Roosevelts: An Intimate History,” airing two hours a night for seven nights the week of Sept. 14.

Mr. Burns said the Roosevelts — President Theodore Roosevelt, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and FDR’s wife, Eleanor — have played a part in many of his past films, including “The Civil War,” “The National Parks” and “Prohibition,” so he was eager to explore their roles in American history in a film of their own.

On Teddy Roosevelt, the film looks at his prolific letter writing. Mr. Burns said he penned hundreds of thousands of letters.

“He would not stop talking,” says commentator David McCullough, a Pittsburgh native and historian, in the film. “He was a one-man gas bag, but it was so interesting most people wouldn’t mind it.”

Mr. Burns said a sense of obligation to the betterment of America ran through the family, philanthropists who devoted both money and time toward the greater good.

“It wasn’t checkbook, it was actual, dedicated public service,” Mr. Burns said.

And despite their wealth, Americans of all social classes felt a kinship with them.

“They sense that those people somehow miraculously understood them, and exactly how that happened I think is one of the great mysteries,” said “Roosevelts” writer Geoffrey C. Ward. “But a man in the ’36 election said that FDR was the only president who ever understood that his boss was a son of a bitch. And that people really felt that way. And exactly how they did it is an alchemy.”

Channel surfing

The CW has pulled its Monday night summer comedies “Backpackers” and “Seed” after just two weeks, effectively canceling them. “America’s Next Top Model” will debut its 21st cycle at 9 p.m. Aug. 18, airing in a Monday time slot for six weeks before moving to 9 p.m. Friday on Oct. 3. … Comcast customers with X1 cable boxes can test-drive new features in the Comcast Labs section within the settings, including a lock the remote feature, a shuffle feature and a jump-to-the-next-episode feature for binge watchers.

http://www.post-gazette.com/ae/tv-ra...s/201407240272
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