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post #96031 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 02:56 AM
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TV/Business Notes
Dish Network’s Budget Streaming Plan Could Serve An Entire Household — If Everyone Watches The Same Channel
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - Aug. 6, 2014

That’s one of the details Dish Network chairman Charlie Ergen dropped today about his widely anticipated personal streaming service, which he says will launch by the end of the year. A+E Networks yesterday said that it will support the plan, following an earlier deal Dish made with Disney. Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes said today that he’s open to offering his channels, but wants more information. Ergen told analysts he hopes to hook young viewers by selling them a low-priced package with some — but not all — of the channels in the conventional pay-TV bundle.

Dish Network logoThat package is expensive and “my concern is that today we’re missing that whole generation” of young viewers who find it too pricey, Ergen says. “They come home, turn on the Internet and watch something for free. The core industry is missing them.” The rate of potential customers refusing to buy the conventional package is growing by as many as 4M a year, he estimates. Still, the initiative “could be disruptive to the current ecosystem” if full pay TV subscribers switch to the less expensive service “so we’re going cautiously about it.”

A+E’s announcement raised questions by referring to “multi-stream rights” it agreed to offer for live and VOD programming. That seemed to indicate that Dish could serve multiple TVs or devices at a time; the thinking after the Disney deal was that Dish would just serve one device at a time. Ergen told analysts today that “we haven’t made all of the decisions” about the service. “It’s basically per home, but if everybody is watching the same channel…We call that single stream. That’s basically the approach. We should look at experimentation with that.”

Ergen’s also working out whether to offer the streaming service widely, or just to people who use the wireless spectrum that Dish is amassing. “It could be both,” although on his network he could ensure “a quality of service that’s consistent.” He’s especially eager to harness the data that wireless providers have and use it to target ads to people most likely to buy a product. “A few years from now you aren’t going to see ‘Fly the friendly skies’ in an ad,” he says. “You’re going to see, ‘Buy a ticket.’ And the difference in advertising revenue is dramatic.” He adds that wireless has potential beyond smartphones and tablets with devices linking “every car, pet, child, refrigerator, camera, security system, watch, machine…..You’re going to want to be connected and you’re going to be happy about it.”

http://www.deadline.com/2014/08/dish...deo-streaming/
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post #96032 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 02:59 AM
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TV Notes
'The Knick' will 'live beautifully' on new Cinemax
By Bill Keveney, USA Today - Aug. 6, 2014

Top-notch surgeon John Thackery doesn't mind Knickerbocker Hospital's rougher edges, because he gets free rein to practice cutting-edge medicine.

"It's like me and Cinemax," Oscar-winning director Steven Soderbergh jokes about The Knick (Friday, 10 ET/PT), a medical drama starring Clive Owen that puts the spotlight on a pay-cable network long hidden in the shadow of its more glamorous cousin, HBO.

Although most creative types want HBO's lustrous pedigree, Soderbergh (who directed last year's Behind the Candelabra) asked to be on Cinemax, envisioning wide-open creative space.

"I get to be off on this other playing field that isn't as crowded as the big one over at HBO," he says.

Michael Lombardo, programming chief for HBO and Cinemax, says the director's request reflects his "iconoclastic spirit" and was "like manna from heaven" in the effort to rebrand Cinemax, a longtime movie network whose racy late-night fare earned it the nickname "Skinemax." The company recently started redefining it by adding original programming, including action dramas Strike Back and Banshee, aimed at younger men, and was looking for a new offering.

With The Knick, "I couldn't have asked for a better show to put Cinemax out there in a new and fresh way. It's the first show on Cinemax that absolutely could live on HBO," he says.

Lombardo doesn't see Cinemax becoming "HBO Lite," however. "I think Cinemax will find its own groove in what the brand is," he says. "I don't expect The Knick to be a harbinger of other shows like it, but I think that's OK. It can co-exist with other shows that skew a little more action. ... The show will live beautifully on the network."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/t...emax/13658263/
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post #96033 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 03:03 AM
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TV Notes
FYI Renews Inaugural Series 'Married at First Sight'
By Michael O'Connell, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Aug. 6, 2014

EXCLUSIVE: Call it love at fifth episode. FYI has renewed one of its first original series, Married at First Sight, for a second season just a month into its run.

The A+E Network, formerly Bio, launched July 8 with Married at First Sight as its first offering. Initially improving the old time slot by 122 percent among adults 18-49, the reality show has steadily grown. Its latest episode pulled nearly triple its premiere audience in the younger demo.

"Married at First Sight has truly captured viewers' attention and garnered awareness for FYI following our successful rebrand,” said FYI and LMN president Jana Bennett. “The series reflects the authentic, relatable and universal journey — our search for true love. The quest will continue anew next year."

The prompt order — Married at First Sight's fifth episode only aired Tuesday — is for an 11-episode sophomore season set to premiere in 2015. This season is thus far averaging 470,000 total viewers and 239,000 adults 18-49.

Produced by Kinetic Content and based on a Danish format, Married at First Sight follows six singles who are suddenly thrust together and (as the title implies) legally couple off. The new season will tackle three more fresh pairings over the course of several weeks, until the couples ultimately choose to stick together or get divorced.

FYI debuts with an ambitious catalog already in the can. In the last month, originals Rowhouse Showdown, Tiny House Nation, World Food Championships, B.O.R.N. to Style and Epic Meal Empire also have premiered.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/liv...married-723818
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post #96034 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 03:18 AM
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TV Reviews
Gut Reactions
Gross-outs and grief in “The Strain” and “The Leftovers.”
By Emily Nussbaum, NewYorker.com - Aug. 4, 2013

Maybe it was that beating heart kept in a glass jar, like a pet tarantula. Maybe it was the moment that a villain hissed, “Gratitude! Vat an effective leasssssh.” Maybe it’s the damp summer weather, or one too many serious cable dramas, but somehow I succumbed to “The Strain.”

A new horror series on FX, “The Strain” is based on a trilogy of vampire books by Guillermo del Toro, the director of “Pan’s Labyrinth” and the terrific “Hellboy” series. It was adapted in collaboration with Carlton Cuse, whose earlier genre experiment, “Lost,” began with huge ambition and then took a late-season nosedive. Both creators are proud nerds, and del Toro in particular is one of the world’s more lovable cheerleaders for the power of the grotesque, in every medium. “The way your body needs the exercise, your brain needs to be exposed to the flight-and-fight instincts. And you seek it through a roller coaster, or some people seek it through extreme sports, or you can seek it in genres like noir, crime, horror,” he said, in a recent interview.

To find out whether “The Strain”—the type of roller coaster that would likely be shut down if the safety inspectors got a tip—will fulfill your brain’s needs, consult your brain. Certainly, the series doesn’t have the best pacing, or the best dialogue (“Well, if the mountain won’t come to Muhammad, we’re going to the morgue”), and in some areas it doesn’t even try: never has a show set in New York but filmed in Toronto felt more like a show set in New York but filmed in Toronto. (When Astoria appeared, full of burning garbage cans, all of Queens raised its eyebrows.) And yet the show overflows with greasy satisfactions, simply because it commits so fully to its own goofiness. It’s unpretentious even when its characters are being ultra-pretentious. Given time, I’m sure I could cobble together an intellectual case for liking “The Strain,” footnoted with the cross-cultural origins of vampire myths, or a deep analysis of class warfare in genre narrative. But why bother? It made me jump and it made me giggle and the lead actor is very charming—in July, maybe that’s enough.

“Try negotiating with a virus,” the amazingly named Ephraim Goodweather (everyone calls him Eph) sneers. Eph (Corey Stoll) is a Centers for Disease Control expert in infectious diseases, a cocky mastermind with a disenchanted soon-to-be ex-wife and a stock adorable son. A plane has landed mysteriously full of dead passengers, and Eph struts around, bickering with competing government agencies and assorted weak-minded individuals, as he struggles to solve the puzzle. Was it corporate sabotage? A disease that causes pus to well up inside corpses? Something to do with ammonia? Or possibly worms? Or Germans? Zombies? Vampires? Is there by any chance an immense wooden box carved with ancient runes? After the first few episodes, you come to appreciate the show’s all-of-the-above approach.

Eventually, a mythology unfolds, involving Upper East Side one-per-centers who, as Eph puts it, are intent on “rewriting human biology.” Infection spreads; mistakes are made. There’s an old enmity between Nazi-ish men in suits and a Holocaust survivor with a sword, a clash that leads to one of the bad guys announcing, “The Great Game is over, Jew.” In the immense ensemble, no cliché goes unturned: the cold career-woman litigator threatens to sue; the Latino thug says, “White boy.” A goth rock star celebrates being one of the plane’s few living passengers with a groupie foursome—although, in a nice satirical touch, he needs Viagra to participate. It’s a technique that becomes irrelevant once vampirism causes his penis to fall off.

There are a lot of high-end, super-gooey special effects of the sort that will be familiar to viewers of “The Walking Dead.” A friend of mine hates seeing animals suffer so much that those around her coined the label N.S.F.S.: Not Safe for Stacy. Stacy, don’t watch “The Strain.” The show is also not safe for anyone who dislikes dead-children plots, people with holes where their noses should be, or doctors who deliver graphic explanations for the word “cloaca.” “I just want to go on record: I do not think that this is a good idea,” a nebbishy C.D.C. employee sputters as Eph prepares for the world’s ickiest autopsy, which entails tugging drippy phallic tubes from the abdomen of a corpse. “A monster just tried to murder us,” Eph replies, eager to get to the part with entrails. “There are no records.”

Among the current glut of vampire stories, “The Strain” stands out for its devotion to old-school monstrosity, in which nobody broods or seduces; the undead are more like bugs than like bad boys. Instead, it’s the heroes who get all the charisma, notably Stoll, a specialist in redeeming roles that should feel ridiculous. In “House of Cards,” the actor played a working-class congressman who became a puppet in Frank Underwood’s schemes. Though the role was small, his story felt real and true: he got sober, he fell off the wagon, he died. Miraculously, Stoll lent his character such weight and intelligence that he became the only person worth mourning. In “The Strain,” Stoll is playing more of a contrivance, but he’s as nimble as Tigger, bouncing on his heels and justifying a wig that comes with a widow’s peak, sideburns, and a Bob’s Big Boy swerve. Rubbery-featured and cheerful, Stoll makes “You’re dead to me” sound as if he’d invented the phrase. Never before have I so sympathized with a cable drama’s sighing, exasperated wife character, the one who, despite herself, is charmed by her workaholic genius of a husband.

* * * *

Cuse’s creative partner on “Lost” was Damon Lindelof, who also has a new series out, “The Leftovers,” on HBO. From conversations I’ve had with viewers, I get the feeling that the show has left many people confounded, uncertain how to feel or what to think. Like “The Strain,” “The Leftovers” is obsessed with grief and terror—but, rather than make you jump, it makes you cry. As in its source—a novel by Tom Perrotta—the show’s premise is that an unexplained event has taken place: a Rapture-like disappearance. Two per cent of the population—kids, grownups, the Pope, Gary Busey—are gone, poof, vanished, into the blue. When the show begins, it’s three years later. The community left behind is still wrecked, in large part because no one has any answers. Some people repress the question. Others rage about it. The town celebrates the missing as “heroes,” but not everybody agrees with that interpretation.

Gradually, the show reveals the outline of a few characters, including a devastated family. There’s Kevin (Justin Theroux), a local cop prone to fits of violent anger, bad dreams, and—N.S.F.S.!—dog-shooting. His wife, Laurie (Amy Brenneman), has abandoned her loved ones and joined a cult called the Guilty Remnant. Their sulky daughter lives with Kevin; their son is out West, working for another cult leader, Holy Wayne, who offers up “healing hugs.” Over time, we learn more about the inner workings of the Guilty Remnant, whose members live together on the edge of town, dress all in white, and chain-smoke. They communicate only in writing. While their philosophy is unclear, they come across as nihilists, nonbelievers who refuse to let anyone move on: they infuriate people in the town by stalking them, hovering and staring, a reminder of the pain of the incident. If this sounds confusing, it is. The narrative flow is murky and chaotic, and at times it chokes up; initially, I kept mixing up sad brunettes who resembled Liv Tyler—among them Liv Tyler, as a young woman who leaves her fiancé to join the Guilty Remnant.

But “The Leftovers” builds in potency. As I watched the third episode—featuring an eccentric preacher (the terrific Christopher Eccleston) who believes that the “disappeared” were sinners—all my distance, and my distrust, crumbled. It was a morbid (and slightly “Lost”-like) fable about the preacher gambling to save his church, and losing. Much of the show is hard to describe, because it’s not about plot, the usual center of TV drama, but about images, with poetic sequences that capture the way that people who grieve differently smack into conflict. In one powerful sequence, the preacher offers compassion to the Guilty Remnant—only to have Laurie walk toward him blowing a whistle, the sound shattering the air with her refusal. In another sequence, cunningly edited, a baby doll is assembled in a factory, piece by piece, then bought, wrapped in swaddling clothes, and placed in a public crêche—and then, without explanation, it’s gone. Members of the Guilty Remnant sneak into people’s homes, steal their family photos, and leave empty frames. It’s not that these moments make sense, exactly; it’s that they stayed with me. Like laughing at comedy, or shrieking at horror, crying is another kind of review: it’s your body saying yes to the story.

There’s an argument to be made for TV shows that I call “three-eppers”: they take a few installments to convert you. Sometimes this is because they’re doing something novel; sometimes it’s because they’re doing something alienating. If, after you’ve watched three episodes of “The Leftovers,” you decide that it’s not for you, go ahead and bail. The show has a grandiose quality; it’s structured in a looping, musical way—to the point that it reminded me, oddly, of “Treme,” another series that evaded traditional TV formulas. But it captures the disorientation of grief in a way that is provocative and rare for television. It feels less like a puzzle than like a slow-fuse meditation on the nature of death itself—with or without the Rapture. Why them and not me? How could the ones we loved, or hated, be here, then gone? One scene, in which Laurie—whose silent face flickers with contempt—suddenly breaks down, broke me down, too, but it didn’t feel manipulative, as in a Lifetime sobfest, just cathartic. It also felt like being shoved underwater. “Lost” was a mystery that never got solved, leaving many viewers furious. “The Leftovers” is something new: it doesn’t promise answers. It just asks to be experienced.

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...4/gut-reaction
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post #96035 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 06:58 AM
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If I'm watching the Panthers play at home I usually mute the network guys and listen to the radio play-by-play. The problem comes when the radio broadcast is delayed by a few seconds and the play is already over when the radio announcer says its beginning. Makes it impossible to listen to the radio broadcast if I'm actually at the game, too. I've complained to the station, but to no avail.
I listen to the Skins radio broadcast via ESPN 980 (out of D.C.) through my computer (which I run into my AVR). There are a couple of ways around this. 1. Pause the on-field action until it catches up with the broadcast. For me that takes about one minute (it takes longer going through the computer vs the radio). I pause the game one minute prior to kickoff and fine-tune it from there. 2. There are several devices that you hook up to your AVR that will allow you to sync the game with the radio. This is how I used to do it until the local FM station stopped broadcasting the games. Too much feedback using AM so that's why I went to the computer.


Sport Sync.

This is what I have, but I don't know if it's still available. In any case, if you can't get the Panthers over the computer, it is well worth the money to buy one of these or any other device you can find that will delay the game.
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post #96036 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 09:24 AM
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So television always has that 7 second delay as well? I tells ya', I've seen some one-finger salutes and such that somehow sneaked past!
Some do, some don't. I think most depend on the network to handle that FOR them.

But Television has notable delays inherent with digitizing and/or compressing the signal for the backhaul, the fronthaul and the OTA transmission at your local television station and/or conversion at a cable headend PLUS your receiver. If you're watching via DSS, there's another trip to space and back. A non-HD radio station with no profanity delay is going to be damn near instant. Maybe a second, tops, depending on the method of backhaul. A TV station NOT running a profanity delay is still dealing with 5-8 seconds behind live.
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Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
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post #96037 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 09:39 AM
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Why does football have sideline reporters? Baseball doesn't have dugout reporters.
Injury updates.
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post #96038 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 09:55 AM
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TV Sports/Business Notes
Regulators Ready to Take the Field for Dodgers Dispute
By Ted Johnson, Variety.com - Aug. 6, 2013
How about only charge 2/3 the $$ price of what they are asking but only televise the 3rd thru 7th inning.

This way it gives the viewer the feel of actually going to a game with the dodgers fans by getting there late & leaving early as usual.
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post #96039 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by archiguy View Post
If I'm watching the Panthers play at home I usually mute the network guys and listen to the radio play-by-play. The problem comes when the radio broadcast is delayed by a few seconds and the play is already over when the radio announcer says its beginning. Makes it impossible to listen to the radio broadcast if I'm actually at the game, too. I've complained to the station, but to no avail.

This is probably what you want. I use their original DelayPlay..

http://www.sportsyncradio.com/index.html
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post #96040 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 03:11 PM
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This is probably what you want. I use their original DelayPlay..

http://www.sportsyncradio.com/index.html
You are seven and a half hours late. Look five posts above.
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post #96041 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 03:33 PM
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You are seven and a half hours late. Look five posts above.
That's quite a delay...
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post #96042 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 04:04 PM
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That's quite a delay...
And it would be unsyncable.
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post #96043 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 04:05 PM
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And it would be unsyncable.
Indeed!
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post #96044 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 05:42 PM
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NFL Redzone is doing 4 free previews....this isnt the directv version so Scott Hanson not Andrew Siciliano:
8/8 7:30pm -- 8/16 7:00pm -- 8/23 7:00pm -- 8/28 7:00pm.

Would guess every provider that has the channel which is basically all of them would do this.
Its preseason so 8/8 & 8/28 are rough with lots of backups but 8/16 & 8/23 the starters play alot more.
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post #96045 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 05:54 PM
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WEDNESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog.
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post #96046 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 05:57 PM
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Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
CBS’s ‘Extant’ slides to a series low
New drama posts a 1.0 in 18-49s in new timeslot
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Aug. 6, 2013

CBS’s new drama “Extant” continues to struggle.

The show fell to a series low in its new 10 p.m. timeslot, where it moved last week after failing to hold the big lead-in audience from “Big Brother” at 9 p.m.

“Extant” averaged a 1.0 adults 18-49 rating last night, according to Nielsen overnights, down a tenth from last week.

It still tied NBC’s “Taxi Brooklyn” for No. 2 in the timeslot in the demo and led the hour in total viewers with 5.91 million.

CBS had the night’s top show with “Big Brother” posting a 2.1 in 18-49s, off 9 percent from last week.

NBC’s “America’s Got Talent” was the night’s No. 2 program with a 2.0, also down 9 percent from last week and tying a series low.

The two reality shows fueled CBS and NBC to a first-place tie for the night.

The two networks each averaged a 1.4 overnight rating and a 5 share in primetime. Univision was third at 1.3/4, Fox fourth at 1.1/4, ABC fifth at 0.8/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.6/2 and CW seventh at 0.4/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-nine percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. CBS started the night in the lead with a 2.1 for “Brother,” while NBC, Fox and Univision all tied for second at 1.1, NBC for a repeat of “Talent,” Fox for “So You Think You Can Dance” and Univision for “Mi Corazon es Tuyo.” ABC was fifth with a 1.0 for repeats of “The Middle” and “The Goldbergs,” CW was sixth with a 0.5 for “Penn & Teller: Fool Us,” even to last week’s premiere, and Telemundo seventh with a 0.4 for “Reina de Corazones.”

NBC took the lead at 9 p.m. with a 2.0 for a new “Talent,” followed by Univision with a 1.4 for “Lo Que La Vida Me Robo.” ABC and Fox tied for third at 1.1, ABC for reruns of “Modern Family” and “The Middle” and Fox for more “Dance.” CBS was fifth with a 1.0 for a repeat of “Criminal Minds,” Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for “En Otra Piel” and CW seventh with a 0.2 for a repeat of “The 100.”

Univision was first at 10 p.m. with a 1.2 for “Que Pobres Tan Ricos,” with CBS and NBC tied for second at 1.0, CBS for “Extant” and NBC for “Taxi.” Telemundo was fourth with a 0.8 for “El Señor de los Cielos” and ABC fifth with a 0.4 for a repeat of the special “Nashville: On the Record.”

NBC finished first for the night among households with a 4.4 average overnight rating and an 8 share, followed by CBS at 3.6/6, Fox at 2.3/4, ABC at 2.1/4, Univision at 1.7/3, Telemundo at 0.8/1 and CW at 0.7/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/cbs...es-series-low/
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post #96047 of 98717 Old 08-07-2014, 05:59 PM
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TV/Business Notes
Les Moonves Says CBS Extended Its Netflix Deal And Talks CNN, Aereo, Ads, And Consolidation
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - Aug. 7, 2014

CBS chief Les Moonves swatted analyst questions so effortlessly in his quarterly call today that you might think he was a slugger taking batting practice. Here are a few of his disclosures:

– CBS has “a new, recently-completed extension with Netflix for our library programming here in the U.S,” he says. It covers fewer titles than the agreement from three years ago, but the company didn’t provide other details. Moonves crowed, though, about the Netflix deal announced last month for Zoo, an event drama to air next summer based on a bestselling novel by James Patterson.

– Moonves dismissed the possibility of CBS buying CNN now that Fox has withdrawn its offer for Time Warner. “It’s obviously something that’s not going to happen.” Some of the high valuations analysts put on the news channel were “sort of silly.” But it was all speculation. “It never became a serious conversation.” He opened his remarks noting that “these are very exciting times in the media business” but “through all the change and all the noise we remain confident in CBS’ growth prospects.”

– Next year the CEO expects more than 75% of his ads to be sold based on the number of people viewing over seven days, up from most deals today that cover viewing over three days. The change could lift ratings for some shows by 50%.

– The upfront market was kinder to CBS than it was to most other broadcasters. “I don’t think we sacrificed price,” Moonves says. “Our CPM growth was substantial.” The network sold 74% of its inventory, down from about 78% last year. “We are not worried because in 10 of the last 11 years [the scatter market] has been up and in some cases substantially from upfront pricing….We’re going to have no trouble selling our scatter.”

– Moonves took a swipe at Aereo following the U.S. Supreme Court’s rejection of its claim that it could stream broadcast programming without payment. “This removes any distraction” from broadcasters’ efforts to boost revenues from retransmission consent deals, he says. He added that the recent disclosure that Aereo has about 70,000 subscribers shows that there was “a lot of attention for a service that virtually nobody was using.”

– The CEO chided Time Warner’s Jeff Bewkes who said yesterday that he plans to increase spending on original programming in part because it’s more popular than syndicated reruns. “It’s ironic that Jeff would say that” because one of his top-rated shows is Big Bang Theory. “They’re running the sprockets off it.”

– Moonves is optimistic about Showtime’s digital future. Its Showtime Anytime mobile app “was a little behind HBO GO, but now we’ve caught up. We’re in most of the country.” He told analysts to look for Showtime to “expand on different platforms.”

http://www.deadline.com/2014/08/les-...consolidation/
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The Presidential news-flash this evening wasn't on every network. I happened to walk into one room where the TV was on FOX, and the picture was quite blurry. But to be sure, I went to the living room TV and it was the same. But a check of ABC showed a crisp clear pic. FOX looked like widescreen 400p; what was going on with that?

"I knew you'd say that"...*BLAM!*
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TV/Business Notes
Netflix CEO on Passing HBO Subscriber Revenue: ‘They Still Kick Our Ass in Profits and Emmys’
By Tony Maglio, TheWrap.com - Aug. 7, 2014

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings announced on Wednesday that his company passed HBO in subscription revenue for the last quarter, bringing in $1.146 billion to HBO's $1.141 billion.

Of course, that doesn't mean Netflix is more successful than the premium cable giant by every measure. ”They still kick our ass in profits and Emmys, but we are making progress,” Hastings wrote on Facebook.

“HBO rocks, and we are honored to be in the same league,” he added. Hastings concluded his post with a joke about one of HBO's Emmy-nominated shows: “Yes, I loved ‘Silicon Valley’ and yes it hit a little close to home.”

Netflix launched in 1997 as an online DVD rental service. After crushing the competition on the web and putting brick-and-mortar stores out of business, it began streaming movies and TV series online in 2007.

The company entered the original programming game in 2011 with “House of Cards,” which handed Netflix its first Emmy nominations.

This year, both “House of Cards” and “Orange Is the New Black” have received multiple Emmy nods.

Here's Hastings’ post:

Reed Hastings
Netflix · 320,192 followers · August 6 at 11:28am ·
Minor milestone: last quarter we passed HBO is subscriber revenue ($1.146B vs $1.141B). They still kick our ass in profits and Emmy's, but we are making progress. HBO rocks, and we are honored to be in the same league. (yes, I loved Silicon Valley and yes it hit a little close to home.)


http://www.thewrap.com/netflix-ceo-o...its-and-emmys/
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TV/Business Notes
Pay-TV Subscription Losses Are Leveling Off
Cable and satellite companies still under threat from cable-cutters
By Jason Campbell, AdWeek.com - Aug. 7, 2014

The cord-cutting trend appears to have been stemmed for the time being, at least according to recent MoffettNathanson figures, which show that Q2 pay-TV subscriptions fell by only 305,000—a sizable drop from last year’s second quarter loss of 387,000.

As the research firm’s chief analyst Craig Moffett noted, annualized cord-cutting rates stabilize at 400,000 when factored in with Q2 household-formation levels, all of which becomes minuscule in light of pay-TV’s roughly 100 million U.S. customers.

Still, the days of subscription television could be numbered in the long run, considering how most of the current revenue growth is due to the acceptance of rate hikes among pre-existing customers. Once that bubble bursts, pay-TV could see a mass exodus towards online options like Hulu and Netflix.

Hoping to prevent such a trend, cable providers like Comcast and Verizon are offering more flexible options to subscribers, including deals that feature one premium and several dozen basic channels at smaller rates than regular packages.

At the other end of this viewership tug-of-war, Netflix co-founder Reed Hastings drew attention to his company’s newfound lead over HBO in subscription revenues. However, the comparison could be dubious, considering the streaming service’s significantly higher operational costs.

http://www.adweek.com/news/technolog...eveling-159392
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TV Sports/Legal Notes
MLB's Civil War: An $800 Million TV Dispute Heats Up
By Eriq Gardner, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Hollywood, Esq.' Blog - Aug. 7, 2014

On July 29, The Hollywood Reporter broke news about bombshell litigation between the Baltimore Orioles, the Washington Nationals and Major League Baseball over TV money. New information has surfaced as part of a broadcaster's emergency motion for injunctive relief to prevent the Nationals from terminating baseball game telecast rights.

To quickly review what happened prior to Thursday's intervention by a New York judge, when the Montreal Expos became the Washington Nationals in 2005, Baltimore Orioles owner Peter Angelos was upset by the prospect of potentially losing market share to another team in his region. So a deal was worked out whereby the Orioles would hold a majority partnership profit interest in Mid-Atlantic Sports Network (MASN), which would get to telecast Nationals games at a substantial discount from 2005 to 2011. After that, MASN would be obligated to pay the Nationals "fair market value."

The parties went to arbitration to determine that "fair market value." According to documents that have recently surfaced, the Nationals demanded $118 million a year from 2012 to 2016. The Orioles-controlled broadcaster thought fees starting at $34 million and rising to $45.7 million were more appropriate. On June 30, an MLB committee privately adjudicating the dispute issued a decision favoring the Nationals.

The broadcaster refused to pay, though, leading the Nationals to send notice of default, and MLB commissioner Bud Selig to threaten to "impose the strongest sanctions available" if the parties went to court. Despite the warnings, the teams and their broadcasters filed papers in New York state court. The MLB was one of the named respondents. The court action came after the Orioles told MLB they would be seeking no less than $800 million in lost asset value, according to a letter obtained by THR.

After our story went public, a MASN spokesperson attempted to calm nerves by issuing a statement that read in part, "Our loyal viewers should understand this is a business dispute and will have no impact on the telecast of the Clubs’ games."

But things were certainly less settled with a default notice being floated. MASN's emergency motion made this explicitly clear. The broadcaster's court papers warned of the irreparable harm that would follow if the Nationals pulled their games:

"MASN's primary and essential programming -- the telecast and distribution of the Nationals' and Orioles' games -- can not be replaced. MASN immediately would be in breach of nearly 30 affiliate agreements for the distribution of Nationals' games and with advertisers and sponsors who have bought time for their products during Nationals' telecasts. MASN's exclusive right to telecast the games of two MLB clubs (the Orioles and the Nationals) within the same geographical television territory would be forever lost."

The broadcaster's memo also revealed something else not commonly known about the arrangement worked out inside the sanctum of professional baseball. If the Nationals got a hefty increase in the amount of TV fees, MASN would be contractually required to pay "the same rights fees" to the Orioles. And because of MLB's revenue sharing agreement, the Orioles would then have to pay up to 34 percent of that amount to the league.

In other words, giving the Nationals more money not only represents less profit to the Orioles, but as the Orioles view it, a "tax," which explains why Angelos was willing to defy Selig's order and litigate the issue. MASN also believes it can't afford this outcome. There's less-than-subtle hints that the dispute could blow up the broadcaster's business, leaving Orioles and Nationals telecasts in some gray zone.
The basis for why MASN believes the arbitration award should be vacated is two-fold. First, the broadcaster points to a clause in a settlement agreement that allegedly sets forth a specific methodology to determine the fair market value of telecast rights fees. The formula was developed by MLB consultant Bortz Media & Sports Group. During the arbitration, though, a panel comprising the chief operating officer of the New York Mets, the president of the Pittsburgh Pirates and the owner of the Tampa Bay Rays is said to have abandoned that formula for another, "thereby diverting MASN's profits to the Nationals and MLB and reducing MASN to an economically unsustainable 5 percent profit margin," according to the emergency motion.

Second, the broadcaster challenges the impartiality of the arbitrators, and — in court papers that bring up such things as MLB giving the Mets $25 million to deal with a cash shortfall after team owners did business with Bernard Madoff — accuses the league of "corruption" and "fraud." According to the broadcaster's papers:

"At the time of the sale, MLB informed the purchasers that despite the terms of the Settlement Agreement, MLB would use its power over the arbitral process to control the determination of the Nationals' telecast rights fees and thereby restructure the economics of MASN to the Nationals' benefit. MLB made these promises to secure a high price for the team and, indeed, MLB received a $340 million windfall when it sold the Nationals. At the very first opportunity to reset the telecast rights fees, MLB effectuated the scheme; it instructed the [Revenue Sharing Definitions Committee] to depart from the Settlement Agreement's charge to use the RSDC's established methodology. In a telling moment during the merits hearing, the Nationals' counsel stated the Nationals have been 'waiting seven years to get our rights back.' "

The Nationals filed their own legal papers in response to the emergency motion, which they paint as an attempt to "trample" and "eviscerate" their bargained-for termination rights and threaten the "balance of power between the Orioles, as majority partner, and the Nationals" as minority partner.

The team also argued that it was within the commissioner's powers to order MASN to pay the Nationals, and as for harm, the team referenced its payroll. The team spends nearly $135 million on players -- ninth most in the league. If the judge grants the broadcaster's request, the team warns, it "would be forced to make arrangements to finance their ongoing operations and salary obligations, notwithstanding that the Nationals are entitled to meet cash flow needs through the rights fee payments the Agreement requires."

A New York judge has now ordered respondents including Commissioner Selig to show cause as to why a temporary restraining order shouldn't be issued, and in the interim, has restrained the Nationals and MLB from taking any action to terminate MASN's license to telecast Nationals games. It might be the first time that MLB has been enjoined by a club.

The case continues as this is only the early innings.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr...r-a-800-723984
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post #96052 of 98717 Old 08-08-2014, 01:31 AM
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TV Review
Outlander Is No Game of Thrones, but That’s a Good Thing
By Matt Zoller Seitz, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Aug. 7, 2014

Outlander is already being positioned as a feminist answer to Game of Thrones, but I don't see much resemblance other than the fact that it's on pay cable, is based on a series of best-selling fantasy novels, and many of its characters ride horses and swing swords. This new Starz drama (premiering Saturday at 9:00 p.m.) from Ronald D. Moore is, like his brilliant and sometimes infuriating reimagining of Battlestar Galactica, defiantly its own thing: part romance-novel fantasy, part time-travel story, and part wartime drama (set across two time periods).

But its core is about the emotional and cultural differences between men and women, and how their relationships have and have not changed over the centuries. It contains violence, sex, nudity, rape, and all sorts of cruelty, and, as on Thrones, there are points where you cannot entirely defend the show's gender politics. (The core of its first few episodes is a captivity narrative involving a frequently shirtless Scottish hunk in a kilt who at one point tells the very feminist heroine, "I'll pick you up and throw you over my shoulder" — threat or promise?) No matter: Narrative pleasure doesn't obey rules of representational neatness, and the fact that this show's sensibility veers between Molly Haskell and Sir Walter Scott is fascinating.

The story starts in Scotland in 1945, not long after VE Day. Claire Randall (Caitriona Balfe), a former battlefield nurse, is on a second honeymoon and sightseeing trip with her beloved husband Frank (Tobias Menzies), a historian and ex–British Intelligence officer. Somehow she gets transported via druidic henge to 18th-century Scotland, which was then in open rebellion against the British Crown, and falls in with a roving band of Scottish soldiers, including the aforementioned kilted beefcake fantasy object, Jamie Fraser (Sam Heughan). As Claire comes to terms with the fact that she really, truly is stuck in another century, and that she has no obvious means of return, her chemistry with Jamie starts to morph into an actual relationship, though it would be unfair to describe the twists and turns of that journey in too much detail. She's a stranger in a strange land. People don't like or understand the way she talks to them, and they think her bra is some sort of corset (it kind of is).

Director John Dahl (Rounders, The Last Seduction) establishes the look and tone of this series, which is curiously gentle despite its often harsh content. Outlander is punctuated with savage violence (including a flashback in the second episode to a woman's violation and a man's torture) but rarely dwells on it, often cutting away from explicit sex or violence before anyone can accuse the filmmakers of being gratuitous. There's also a sense in which Outlander can be watched not just as an involving fish-out-of-water adventure, but also as a commentary on female audience's often thorny relationship to mainstream genre fiction, which tends to be centered on issues of pride, honor, and goal-oriented journeys that end with the hero winning glory and a woman.

Claire is no Conan type (although the way Balfe plays her, we never doubt that she has steel in her spine). She's unquestionably the protagonist of the story, and she's immediately put in a doubly defensive position and has to stay there for a while until she can get accustomed to her new circumstances. She's a woman in a highly militarized group defined by alpha-dog posturing, and a 20th-century woman at that; Outlander is never more engrossing than when a scene emphasizes Claire's reactions as she's forced to decide whether to say what she really thinks of a man's behavior or assertion or recitation of policy, or err on the side of silence. The show is similarly attentive to the symbolic value of sexual acts. Claire's husband goes down on her in one of the present-day sequences, and we're given to understand it in the context of their equal-for-1945 relationship; once she trips back in time and we realize that we're in a much more, shall we say, phallocentric world, that sex scene starts to feel like a glimpse of a long-gone paradise, but from the future rather than the past.

http://www.vulture.com/2014/08/tv-re...outlander.html
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post #96053 of 98717 Old 08-08-2014, 01:36 AM
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TV Review
'The Knick': Clive Owen And Steven Soderbergh's Bloody Medical Marvel
By Maureen Ryan, HuffingtonPost.com

Like a shot of adrenaline to the heart, "The Knick" arrives just in time to save us from the summer doldrums, and as a side bonus, it further enhances Cinemax's status as one of television's most consistently entertaining networks.

Let Cinemax's more ponderous corporate sibling, HBO, make gigantic investments in sprawling affairs like "Game of Thrones" and bet heavily on eat-your-vegetables programming like "The Leftovers." For the most part, HBO does what it is expected to do: It makes deals with A-list talent and up-and-comers with the right industry connections, and it dutifully fills its roster with the kinds of shows its well-heeled audience expects it to have. And of course, some of those shows are very good.

Where Cinemax is concerned, expectations are few, and thus, within certain budgetary and programming limits, it can have fun with friskier and riskier ideas, provided they're wrapped in the right kind of packaging.

In the last few years, Cinemax has unleashed slippery, smart genre gems like "Banshee," "Hunted" and "Strike Back" and quietly begun shedding its reputation as the cheesy Skinemax of yore. You'll still find regular displays of naked human flesh on the channel, but every single one of those shows is a whole lot smarter than it necessarily has to be. This is a canny strategy, because building passion among viewers over the long term is now the smartest play out there, wherever scripted television surfaces. A few years ago, Starz appeared poised to become the go-to source for deceptively smart pay-cable crowd pleasers, but, around the time "Spartacus" came to an end and its audience was casting about for another bloody, lusty adventure tale, the quality of Starz's shows fell off a cliff (the upcoming "Outlander" excepted).

Meanwhile, Cinemax stuck to its B-movie TV template and threw some of its money at Steven Soderbergh, who got Clive Owen and a cast of lesser-known actors to take a stab at the hospital-drama genre. Savvy move. The results of Soderbergh's latest foray into series television are frequently terrific.

"The Knick," which was written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler and directed in full by Soderbergh, raises the bar even higher for Cinemax, in part by skillfully straddling the line between Prestige TV and the artful execution of one of TV's most stalwart genres. The lead character of "The Knick" is a drug-addicted Difficult Man, cut from anti-hero cloth that's getting ragged around the edges, but Owen is tremendously charismatic in the role of Dr. John Thackery, and "The Knick" isn't so fancy that it disdains the kind of clandestine hookups and babies-in-peril subplots that are the hallmarks of any self-respecting medical drama. Anything you've seen on "Grey's Anatomy" may well turn up in "The Knick," but because the latter show is set in 1900, saws and hand-cranks are more common than fancy diagnostic machines and the medicines we take for granted. It's not difficult to raise the stakes when the doctors regularly root around inside patients' body cavities -- without gloves, of course.

In addition to the artful fusion of procedural chestnuts and Prestige Drama conventions, there's another combination that truly makes "The Knick" a real kick: It unites the cerebral observational powers of Soderbergh with subject matter that is literally visceral (never, ever watch this show while eating). There is always a sense of control in Soderbergh's exacting vision, even when characters and stories are spinning into chaos. The marriage of that rigorous intellectual sensibility to the pulsing, unpredictable life of a big-city hospital makes for a wonderfully lively concoction, one full of insight, curiosity and delightfully rich segues.

But there is a deep undercurrent of anguish that helps power this energetic series: "The Knick" is a piercing look at the discipline it takes to engage in the brutal task of saving lives while reining in one's own emotional reactions. Soderbergh's efficient, inventive camera work and the electronic score by Cliff Martinez work together to leave the viewer feeling slightly jarred much of the time, but that feels entirely intentional. None of what transpires has the sepia-toned sentimentality of a show like "Downton Abbey," and that dedication to palpable, pulsating realism makes the operations and painful dilemmas land with that much more impact. "The Knick" is the first show in a long time that truly reminded me of "Deadwood"; both are scuffed, dusty, lived in and fascinated by what it costs individuals to build a future in the face of endless greed and stupidity.

There's no doubt that Thackery and his staff do good every day, but they're working in a poor neighborhood full of desperate immigrants; disease and death remain overwhelming realities, and the staff's victories are drops in a bloody bucket. Yet turn-of-the-century New York also buzzed with a rich brew of colliding cultures, energies and inventions, all of which thrum through "The Knick" like the (often faulty) new electric wiring in the hospital. Thackery and his fellow doctors are intensely excited by the advances being made in surgery -- some of which they come up with themselves -- but the failure rate for every new procedure is high and disease still takes a terrifying toll, even among the wealthier classes. And yet, driven by a combination of terror and curiosity, the Knick's staff soldiers on.

It's no spoiler to say that Thackery takes refuge in drugs to take the edge off: The very first scene of the show depicts him stumbling out of an opium den at daybreak. Though the sly commentary on our modern medical system is one of the subtler attractions of "The Knick" (patients are, as ever, viewed as profit centers first), it's hard for me not to see the show as a metaphor for the entertainment industry: It's about people who are willing to take risks and perform their craft in front of audiences (most operations are observed by dozens of onloookers), and those who take the biggest risks are constantly beaten down by naysayers, doubters and disbelievers. Also, there's a lot of cocaine around. A lot.

Amist the propulsive energy and fine performances, there are some eye-roll-inducing moments. "The Knick," like so many before it, falls into some anti-hero TV traps: There are woefully underwritten, naked prostitutes wandering around, and a few other female characters don't fare much better. (One frustrated wife actually says, "You always want more!" which must be on Page 1 of the "The Ultimate Guide to Writing Female Characters on Anti-Hero TV Shows.")

But throughout its first seven episodes, "The Knick" -- like "Grey's Anatomy" and "ER" before it -- uses a series of sturdy hospital tropes to delve deeply into the complicated lives of a wide array of characters, and that may be its saving grace: Thackery is its center but not its sole point of view. Sharing extensive screen time with Thackery is Cornelia Robertson (Juliet Rylance), whose father is one of the hospital's chief benefactors and who hates the idea of giving up her beloved work when she eventually marries; Dr. Algernon Edwards (André Holland), an innovative Harvard graduate who faces ferocious racism yet matches Thackery in his dedication to his craft (and in his craftiness); Lucy Elkins (Eve Hewson), a new nurse whose demure facade masks a deep curiosity about urban life; and the Irish immigrant Sister Harriet (Cara Seymour), who runs the Knick's orphanage and sees up close how hard life is for immigrant families -- especially penniless mothers.

It's a world of saturated colors and crowded rooms; the homes of both the rich and poor are cluttered, and, no matter a family's class or status, it feels like the walls are closing in on them. In the wards of the hospital, however, there is wide open space and shining floors; there, the chaos and pain of the world are put into some kind of order. The operating theater itself is almost totally white, like Thackery's shoes. The purity, of course, is a lie: Thackery and his fellow doctors are often covered in blood, ripping and grasping and slicing in urgent attempts to save lives -- and to burnish their own reputations. Thackery never sees those things as mutually exclusive, of course.

The doctors emerge from that white space, where you can always hear the sound of water dripping, covered in blood, empty and spent, even if the procedure was a success. The next discovery, the next performance, may bring even more radically wonderful or harrowing developments.

If not, there's always more cocaine.

"The Knick" premieres 10 p.m. ET Friday, Aug. 8 on Cinemax.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...n_5640142.html
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post #96054 of 98717 Old 08-08-2014, 01:42 AM
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TV Notes
Shark Week is huge, and that's kind of a problem
By Ann Oldenburg, USA Today - Aug. 7, 2014

Sharks have come a long way since the menacing deep-sea creature days of 1975's Jaws.

They're even more menacing!

Or so it seems, as Discovery Channel kicks off its 27th annual Shark Week with more sensational shows, more social media and more pop-culture buzz than ever before.

A campy Rob Lowe promo showing the actor surfing on two sharks, with more leaping behind him, went viral last week — and he's not even featured in any Shark Week shows. Pop star Demi Lovato's excited Sunday tweet "IT'S ALMOST SHARK WEEK!!!!!!!" has already been re-tweeted more than 17,000 times. And Ad Age came up with a parody of suggestions for similar programming, among them: Shark Tank Week, in which ABC locks a contestant in a room with Mark Cuban for seven days.

It's all been leading up to Sunday's kickoff at (8 p.m. ET/PT) with Air Jaws: Fins of Fury, the first of 13 new shows airing through Aug. 16, when it all wraps up with Sharksanity (10 p.m.).

But to George Burgess, director of the Florida Program for Shark Research in Gainesville, the Shark Week frenzy is a "double-edged sword. I'm kind of disappointed, and I think most researchers are, too. It obviously is a big draw, but I'm afraid that the programs have gone more to entertainment and less to documentary over the years. It's kind of a shame, because they have the opportunity to teach good stuff in what's going on with science."

Sharks, he says, are "exciting enough that you don't have to go for least common denominators, which so often are blood and gore or animals performing tricks. I think a lot of people believe that what they see on Shark Week is all fact. A lot of times, the shows are poorly documented or poorly represented or things (are) done as pseudo-science."

Air Jaws filmmaker Jeff Kurr admits, "Yes, that's always the big question – how do you top yourself from year to year?"

He's been a part of Shark Week since 1991. In his latest project, he's searching for a 3,000-pound great white shark he calls Colossus. He first came across it two years ago — or rather, it came across him as the 14-foot-long fish breached above him as he was perched on a sea sled off the coast of South Africa. This year, he goes on a hunt to find Colossus again.

"We conducted research on great white migrations and had hunches of where it might be," Kurr says. "It took us to the bottom of the ocean in New Zealand in a tiny craft I invented called WASP (Water Armor Shark Protection)," an aluminum cage painted black and yellow and silver to attract the creatures.

"The results were incredible," he says. "Some of the biggest great whites I've ever seen are bumping it, biting it, knocking (expert) Chris (Fallows) around like he was a pinball. It was a little scary. He loved it."

And: "Spoiler alert: We saw sharks that were bigger than Colossus."

While Kurr is a veteran, Shark Week newbies include Australia-based shark attack survivor Paul de Gelder, who lost two limbs and his career as a Navy diver in a 2009 shark attack. He is host of this year's Great White Matrix, an investigation into an area that he describes as a "nursery" for great white sharks, an area where females are dropping off their pups.

Before he was attacked, he was "petrified" of sharks. Now, he says, "I have an extremely healthy respect" for them. "I've been given a lot of information about why they're necessary, and been to the U.N. to talk about shark issues. I realize they play an important role in our oceans. I'm happy to stand up and speak for sharks."

And now that he's part of Shark Week, de Gelder says, "I'm like everyone else on the planet. I think it's the best week of viewing all year. You rarely get that much insight to a world that is hidden."

Says Kurr: "Making sharks popular is really important. For the Jaws generation, the only good shark was a dead shark. Now they're talking and thinking about sharks. If you love sharks and are fascinated by them, you have a tendency to protect them." Plus, he says. "There are a lot of fish that are in trouble, but they don't have a week. Like the bluefin tuna. There may not be bluefin tuna in 10 years. The more we get them out there, the better for the species."

Shark expert Burgess has to agree with that. "It's bringing sharks to the attention of people. I suppose as any Hollywood star would say, any attention is good attention."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/t...side/13671745/
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post #96055 of 98717 Old 08-08-2014, 01:51 AM
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TV Notes
Best tube bets this weekend
The top draws on broadcast and cable and in sports
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Aug. 8, 2013

FRIDAY

Best bet on broadcast
: PBS, “Dick Cavett’s Watergate” 9 p.m.
A look at the Watergate scandal through the eyes of Dick Cavett.

Best bet on cable: Cinemax, “The Knick” 10 p.m. Series premiere. New medical drama directed by Steven Soderbergh and set in 1900s New York.

Top sporting event: NBCSN, “Major League Soccer,” 10:30 p.m. West Coast matchup between the Los Angeles Galaxy and San Jose Earthquakes.

SATURDAY

Best bet on broadcast
: CBS, “PGA Golf,” 2 p.m.
Third-round coverage of the PGA Championship.

Best bet on cable: Starz, “Outlander,” 9 p.m. Series premiere. New drama about a World War II combat nurse who is transported back in time to 1743 Scotland.

Top sporting event: Fox Sports 1, “UFC Fighting,” 8 p.m. Live coverage of UFC 167 from Las Vegas, featuring a welterweight title match between Georges St-Pierre and Johny Hendricks.

SUNDAY

Best bet on broadcast
: Fox, “Teen Choice 2014,” 8 p.m.
“Teen Wolf’s” Tyler Posey and “Modern Family’s” Sarah Hyland host the 16th annual event.

Best bet on cable: Discovery Channel, “Air Jaws: Fin of Fury” 8 p.m. A new special on the first night of the network’s long-running Shark Week.

Top sporting event: CBS, “PGA Golf,” 2 p.m. Final round of the PGA Championship, won last year by Jason Dufner.


http://www.medialifemagazine.com/bes...ts-weekend-44/

* * * *

Nielsen Notes (Cable)
Cable overnights: Big bow for ‘Skin Wars’
By Media Life Magazine Staff - Aug. 7, 2013

GSN’s first reality show bowed to solid numbers Wednesday night.

“Skin Wars” became the second-most-watched new series premiere in network history, according to Nielsen overnights, averaging 697,000 total viewers.

The show improved on the network’s 9 p.m. timeslot average for the previous four weeks by 150 percent among adults 18-49, where it averaged 252,000 viewers.

Elsewhere Wednesday, A&E’s “Duck Dynasty” was the night’s No. 1 cable show among total viewers with 3.38 million. It was also the top original program on cable with a 1.2 18-49 rating.

TBS’s “The Big Bang Theory” and two repeats of “Family Guy” on Adult Swim also averaged a 1.2.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/cab...bow-skin-wars/
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post #96056 of 98717 Old 08-08-2014, 02:02 AM
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
FRIDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Shark Tank
(R - May 2)
9PM - What Would You Do?
(R)
10PM - 20/20
(R)
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Kerry Washington; musician Tom Petty; Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers perform)
(R - Jul. 31)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
(R - Mar. 12)
9PM - Hawaii Five-0
(R - Feb. 28)
10PM - Blue Bloods
(R - Mar. 7)
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Joan Rivers; Keith Olbermann; Capital Cities performs)
(R - Jul. 8)
12:37AM - 2014 PGA Championship Highlights
1:07AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Daniel Radcliffe; comic Cathy Ladman)

NBC:
8PM - Running Wild With Bear Grylls: Ben Stiller
(R - Aug. 4)
9PM - Dateline NBC (120 min.)
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Jeff Bridges; Ali Larter; comic Andy Woodhull)
12:36AM - Late Night with Seth Myers (Chris Pratt; Laverne Cox; Big Data and Joywave perform)
(R - Jul. 30)
1:37AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Wil Wheaton; The Birds of Satan perform; producer Courtney Kemp Agboh)
(R - Jun. 2)

FOX:
8PM - MasterChef
(R - Aug. 4)
9PM - Bones
(R - Jan. 24)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Washington Week with Gwen Ifill
8:30PM - Charlie Rose: The Week
9PM - Dick Cavett's Watergate
10PM - Great Performances - Sting: The Last Ship (90 min.)
(R - Feb. 21)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Mi Corazón Es Tuyo
9PM - Lo Que la Vida Me Robó
10PM - Qué Pobres Tan Ricos

THE CW:
8PM - Masters of Illusion
8:30PM - Whose Line Is It Anyway?
(R - May 2)
9PM - Penn & Teller: Fool Us
(R)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Reina De Corazones
9PM - En Otra Piel
10PM - El Señor de los Cielos

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Chris Pratt)
(R - Jul. 31)
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Originally Posted by RemyM View Post
Injury updates.
And useless coach/player interviews.
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THURSDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog.
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Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Football preeemptions skew Thursday ratings
Games on ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC local stations throw off overnights
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Aug. 8, 2013

NFL preseason games across the country wreaked havoc with the overnight ratings Thursday.

Every Big Four network had at least one affiliate preempt regular programming to carry football, which artificially inflated last night’s ratings.

That means all four networks’ ratings will most likely be adjusted down when final numbers come out later today, as the overnights measure timeslot and not actual program data.

That said, CBS won an atypical night with an unusually strong 2.0 adults 18-49 rating and 7 share, according to Nielsen.

It had the night’s top show, “Big Brother,” which posted a 2.7, up from a 2.2. last week.

ABC also preempted some of its regular programming at 9:30 p.m. to carry President Barack Obama’s 10-minute remarks on the situation in Iraq, which again skewed the ratings results for its shows.

CBS led the night among 18-49s with a 2.0 average overnight rating and a 7 share. Univision was second at 1.4/5, NBC third at 1.0/3, Fox and ABC tied for fourth at 0.9/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.6/2 and CW seventh at 0.3/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-nine percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. CBS was first with a 2.1 for repeats of “The Big Bang Theory” and “Mom,” followed by Univision with a 1.3 for “Mi Corazon es Tuyo.” NBC was third with a 1.0 for a repeat of “Hollywood Game Night,” Fox fourth with a 0.8 for a “Sleepy Hollow” rerun, ABC fifth with a 0.7 for “The Quest,” Telemundo sixth with a 0.4 for “Reina de Corazones” and CW seventh with a 0.3 for a repeat of “The Vampire Diaries.”

CBS led again at 9 p.m. with a 2.7 for “Brother,” while Univision remained second with a 1.5 for “Lo Que La Vida Me Robo.” Fox and ABC tied for third at 0.9, Fox for “Gang Related” and ABC for “Rookie Blue,” with NBC fifth with a 0.8 for “Welcome to Sweden” (0.8) and “Working the Engels” (0.8), Telemundo sixth with a 0.6 for “En Otra Piel” and CW seventh with a 0.3 for a repeat of “The Originals.”

At 10 p.m. CBS and Univision tied for first at a 1.3 rating, CBS for a repeat of “Elementary” and Univision for “Que Pobres Tan Ricos.” NBC was third with a 1.2 for “Last Comic Standing,” ABC fourth with a 1.0 for “NY Med” and Telemundo fifth with a 0.9 for “El Señor de los Cielos.”

CBS was also first for the night among households with a 4.5 average overnight rating and an 8 share. ABC was second at 2.8/5, NBC third at 2.5/4, Fox fourth at 1.8/3, Univision fifth at 1.7/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.8/1 and CW seventh at 0.5/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/foo...rsday-ratings/
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TV Notes
BBC’s ‘Happy Valley’ Heads To Netflix
By the Deadline.com Team - Aug. 7, 2014

BBC’s hit crime drama Happy Valley will premiere in the U.S. and Canada on Netflix on August 20. The six-part series from BAFTA-winning Sally Wainwright (Last Tango In Halifax) stars Sarah Lancashire (Last Tango In Halifax) as a dedicated police woman in a small town where drunkards, drug addicts and teenage pregnancies are a way of life. Her world is turned upside down when the man she thinks is responsible for her daughter’s death, Tommy Lee Royce (James Norton), is released from prison. Steve Pemberton (Whitechapel), Siobhan Finneran (Downton Abbey), George Costigan (Scott & Bailey, Calendar Girls) and Joe Armstrong (Robin Hood) also star.

Happy Valley premiered on BBC One in the UK to 7.6 million viewers, winning its time slot. The series finale notched up an unprecedented 92.5 rating, BBC One’s highest-ever AI for a drama series. Nicola Shindler (Last Tango In Halifax) and Wainwright serve as executive producers. The series is a Red Production Company production for the BBC.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/08/bbcs...ds-to-netflix/
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