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post #97081 of 97094 Old Yesterday, 11:34 AM
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Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Big premiere bumps for ‘Family Guy’ and ‘Once’
Fox series posts a 4.5 in 18-49s with 'Simpsons' crossover
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 29, 2014

Take note, other Big Five networks: Last night Fox and ABC proved that big event broadcasting still works.

Both networks saw surges for their signature Sunday shows with events that had been hyped for weeks leading up to their season premieres.

Fox’s “Family Guy” was the big winner on the night. A highly anticipated crossover with “The Simpsons” boosted “Guy” to its best numbers in four years, posting a 4.5 adults 18-49 rating for an hour-long episode at 9 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights.

That was the top scripted show of the night on broadcast and bettered last season’s premiere by 73 percent.

The entire Fox schedule performed well with a strong NFL lead-in at 7 p.m. The season premiere of “Simpsons” at 8 drew a 3.9, up 34 percent from last year and its best season debut in three years.

And “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” making its Sunday premiere after airing on Tuesdays last season, averaged a 2.6 at 8:30, its best rating since last year’s series bow.

Meanwhile, ABC’s “Once Upon a Time” soared to a nearly two-year high in its season premiere, posting a 3.4 at 8 p.m. The reason? The addition of characters from the wildly popular Disney animated movie “Frozen.”

The show surged 31 percent from last year’s premiere, and it hit series highs among teens 12-17 and kids 2-11, “Frozen’s” biggest fans.

The rest of ABC’s evening was mixed. At 9 p.m. “Resurrection’s” premiere drew a 2.2, its best rating since early April though down a tenth from what “Revenge” averaged in the hour the same night last year.

“Revenge” posted a 1.4 at 10 p.m., tying its best rating since March and finishing in a tie for second in the timeslot. But it marked a new season premiere low for the fourth-year show.

CBS’s lineup was delayed 15 minutes by NFL overrun in a number of markets, so ratings are not accurate. But based on what’s available, new drama “Madam Secretary” averaged a 1.4 at 8 p.m., off 30 percent from last week’s debut.

It held up better in total viewers, falling by only 14 percent to 12.66 million and finishing as the night’s No. 1 scripted show.

“Secretary’s” 9 p.m. lead-out “The Good Wife” fell a tenth from last week, to a 1.3, and at 10 p.m. the season premiere of “CSI” slid to a series low of 1.4 on its new night, though that was even to what “The Mentalist” averaged in last year’s premiere in the same timeslot.

Of course, as usual, NBC dominated the night with “Sunday Night Football.”

NBC led the night among 18-49s with a 6.1 average overnight rating and an 18 share. Fox was second at 4.9/14, ABC third at 2.1/6, CBS fourth at 1.3/4, Univision fifth at 0.8/2, and Telemundo sixth at 0.3/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-nine percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

Also, ratings for NBC’s NFL coverage and CBS’s entire NFL-delayed lineup are approximate as fast nationals measure timeslot and not actual program data.

Fox started the night in the lead with a 7.1 at 7 p.m. for NFL overrun and “The OT,” followed by NBC with a 2.4 for “Football Night in America.” ABC was third with a 1.5 for a “Time” recap, CBS fourth with a 1.1 for “60 Minutes,” Univision fifth with a 0.5 for “Aqui y Ahora” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.4 for the end of the movie “Twilight Saga: New Moon.”

NBC took the lead at 8 p.m. with a 6.8 for NFL pregame and the start of “Sunday Night Football,” while ABC moved to second with a 3.4 for a new “Time.” Fox slipped to third with a 3.3 for “Simpsons” (3.9) and “Brooklyn” (2.6), CBS was fourth with a 1.4 for “Secretary,” Univision fifth with a 0.8 for “Va Por Ti,” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.4 for “Yo Soy el Artista.”

At 9 p.m. NBC was first with a 7.8 for football, with Fox second with a 4.5 for “Guy.” ABC was third with a 2.2 for “Resurrection,” CBS fourth with a 1.3 for “Wife,” Univision fifth with a 1.0 for more “Va Por Ti” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.3 for more “Artista.”

NBC was first again at 10 p.m. with a 7.2 for more football, while ABC and CBS tied for second at 1.4, ABC for “Revenge” and CBS for “CSI.” Univision was fourth with a 0.8 for “Sal y Pimienta” and Telemundo fifth with a 0.2 for “Suelta la Sopa Extra.”

Among households, NBC was first for the night with a 9.6 average overnight rating and a 16 share. CBS was second at 6.9/11, Fox third at 6.7/11, ABC fourth at 4.0/7, Univision fifth at 1.2/2, and Telemundo sixth at 0.4/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/big...ps-family-guy/

* * * *

TV/Nielsen Notes
For ‘NCIS: Los Angeles,’ going it alone
Hit show moves to Monday night, away from the show it spun off of
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 29, 2014

It’s never easy to take off the training wheels, but for “NCIS: Los Angeles” it’s definitely time.

The drama premieres its sixth season tonight at 10 p.m. on CBS, a new night and time for the first “NCIS” spinoff.

Up until now, “LA” aired right after its parent show, “NCIS,” on Tuesdays at 9 p.m. It did extremely well there, too, averaging a 2.4 18-49 rating and 14.8 million total viewers last season, according to Nielsen.

It has long ranked as broadcast’s No. 2 drama in total viewers behind “NCIS,” and it regularly won its timeslot among 18-49s.

But CBS wanted to give “NCIS’s” latest spinoff, “NCIS: New Orleans,” strong support for its first season, and so it moved “LA” to Monday and put “Orleans” in the latter’s old Tuesday slot.

So far the plan has worked.

“Orleans” premiered to a solid 2.5 rating last week and 17.2 million total viewers, the latter the best for any new show this season.

CBS hopes that viewers will follow “LA” to Monday, which could solve another problem for the network. It struggled in the 10 p.m. Monday hour last season, with new dramas “Intelligence” and “Hostages” both drawing low ratings.

If “LA” can maintain most of its Tuesday audience in its new timeslot, the network won’t have any more worries about Mondays at 10.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/for...oing-it-alone/
With NCIS LA at 10:00 PM it now is up against Castle and the Blacklist. We like all 3 shows so it is DVR/OnDemand time to watch them all. Hope they all survive.
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post #97082 of 97094 Old Yesterday, 07:25 PM
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Critic's Notes
Growling by Comcast May Bring Tighter Leash
By David Carr, The New York Times' 'Media Equation' Column - Sep. 29, 2014

The company named names, plenty of them: Netflix, for complaining about interconnection plans it freely negotiated with Comcast;

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/29/bu...ref=media&_r=0
I bet Netflix was just thrilled to negotiate freely to keep from having their product turned into total crap by the ever loving Comcast.
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post #97083 of 97094 Old Yesterday, 09:22 PM
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TV Notes
Empire Renewed
‘Star Wars Rebels’ Emulates the Trilogy of Old
By Brooks Barnes, The New York Times - Sep. 28, 2013

“It’s a love-hate thing,” explained Tyler Blevins, a 22-year-old “Star Wars” addict who attended Comic-Con International in July wearing a full-body Stormtrooper costume. “We love Disney. But we don’t yet trust that they love us, the fans, and that this big global conglomerate truly understands the ‘Star Wars’ DNA.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/28/ar...elevision&_r=0
Yeah, and how was George Lucas doing with all that?

In all the years, he failed to give the fans what they really want: a proper release of the unaltered original Star Wars. Instead, he gave the world Jar Jar Binks and managed to make Darth Vader into the most miserable little spoiled brat in the universe.

Even Disney would have to work extra overtime to top that BS.

The fact is, based on what I've seen with Marvel, I'm certain - at the very least - they'll pull off something that manages to do the franchise justice. It may not be exactly what the fans are hoping for, but it reaally can't get any worse than where Lucas was taking it.

Then again, Star Wars fans aren't happy unless they're unhappy.
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post #97084 of 97094 Old Today, 12:35 AM
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Nielsen Notes (Cable)
‘Ray Donovan’ Finale Ratings Hit Series High; ‘Masters Of Sex’ Down
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - Sep. 29, 2014

One Showtime series saw a kid’s birthday party and some partnerships come to an end, while the other heralded the beginning of John F. Kennedy’s presidency. However, Ray Donovan and Masters Of Sex wrapped their second seasons last night with one way up and one not so much.

With 2 million watching the 9 PM show, the Season 2 finale of Hollywood fixer series Ray Donovan was up 40% from the 1.41 million who tuned in for the Season 1 ender on September 22 last year, which benefited from following the record-breaking series finale of Dexter. Even with the announced departure of creator-showrunner Ann Biderman, this season has seen Ray Donovan hit new highs on a couple of occasions. The show’s September 14 airing drew a series-high 1.8 million viewers — and that’s against NBC’s powerhouse Sunday Night Football. Last night’s multi-story finale jumped 61% from the 1.22 million who watched its Season 2 opener on July 13.

Now at 10 PM and paired with Ray Donovan instead of its Season 1 partner Homeland, the tale of sexuality pioneers William Masters and Virginia Johnson didn’t get as much love for its Season 2 finale. Watched by 889,000 viewers, the drama starring Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan was down 25% from the 1.2 million who saw its freshman season finale on December 15. Comparing finale to premiere, the Season 2 ender Sunday rose from the 825,000 viewers who watched the season opener in its new slot in mid-July.

Both Ray Donovan and Masters Of Sex were renewed for a third season back in late August and are expected to return in mid-2015.

http://deadline.com/2014/09/ray-dono...owtime-842971/


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post #97085 of 97094 Old Today, 12:38 AM
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TV Notes
ABC Family Renews Comedy ‘Young & Hungry,’ Orders First Procedural ‘Stitchers’
By Jethro Nededog, TheWrap.com - Sep. 29, 2014

ABC Family has renewed comedy “Young and Hungry” for a second season. Additionally, it has ordered its first procedural drama, entitled “Stitches.”

“Stitches” comes from writer Jeffrey A. Schechter (“Overruled”). It follows a young woman recruited into a covert government agency to be “stitched” into the minds of the recently deceased using their memories to investigate murders and decipher mysteries that otherwise would have gone to the grave.

Schechter will serve as an executive producer alongside Jonathan Baruch and Rob Wolken.

“Young & Hungry,” which stars Emily Osment as feisty personal chef Gabi, was renewed after ranking as basic cable's No. 1 telecast in its time period in Adults 18-34 and Women 18-34, as well as other key demos.

The show is produced by David Holden, Ashley Tisdale, Jessica Rhoades, Caryn Lucas, Eric Tannenbaum and Kim Tannenbaum in association with CBS Television Studios. Gabi Moskowitz, a San Francisco based food blogger of BrokeAssGourmet.com, contributed to the development of this project. Along with Osment, the show stars Jonathan Sadowski, Aimee Carrero, Kym Whitley and Rex Lee.

ABC Family has also confirmed that the Tori Spelling and Jennie Garth series, “Mystery Girls,” is cancelled, though the cancellation was reported by multiple media outlets earlier in September.

http://www.thewrap.com/abc-family-re...ral-stitchers/


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post #97086 of 97094 Old Today, 12:45 AM
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TV Review
Netflix’s ‘Peaky Blinders’
By Brian Lowry, Variety.com - Sep. 29, 2014

Handsome but hollow, “Peaky Blinders” is another one of those classy-looking British imports that networks and streaming services (in this case, Netflix) are using to help keep their shelves stocked. Yet while that worked extremely well with the recent “Happy Valley,” despite the meticulous period trappings this feels like a slightly wan wannabe – in part because there’s scant connection with any of the characters. Featuring Cillian Murphy and Sam Neill in the marquee roles, it’s a respectable but chilly effort, fine for those who choose to invest the time but hardly a loss should one turn a blind eye.

In one sense, the program approximates the British answer to “Boardwalk Empire,” coming as it does on the heels of World War I. But if you have the first, frankly, there’s not much need for the second, and the tone is actually somewhat closer to “Gangs of New York,” offering an interesting window into an under-chronicled period, yes, but, much like Cinemax’s “The Knick,” practically daring all but the most intrepid viewers to stick with it.

The idea sounds better than the execution: Set in Birmingham, England in 1919, Murphy plays World War I veteran Tommy Shelby. World weary and plagued by vivid nightmares from the war (a device that needs a good long vacation), he presides over his family, who lead the gang responsible for the show’s title, a name derived from the razor blades they sport under the brims of their caps (and brandish with gory precision).

Involved in various illicit activities, Tommy sees an opportunity to expand the family’s power when he acquires a crate of guns, whose whereabouts have prompted Winston Churchill – then a young government official – to dispatch Neill’s Chief Inspector Campbell to retrieve them.

With various constituencies – including the IRA, communists and rival gangs – eager to acquire the weapons, Tommy sets plans in motion to gain leverage from the contraband. Campbell, meanwhile, exhibits his own ruthlessness — a Javert type, eager to please those back home.

Yet while Murphy brings a steely-eyed intensity to the role, the rest of the family barely registers, and even Tommy comes across as a fainter echo of Michael Pitt’s U.S. war vet Jimmy in “Boardwalk.” The same applies to Annabelle Wallis as the woman with the potential to thaw Tommy’s hardened heart.

Certainly, there’s ample drama to be found in this particularly tumultuous moment in British history, and some will no doubt appreciate the unhurried pacing. But too much about “Peaky Blinders” (created by writer Steven Knight, directed by Otto Bathurst and Tom Harper, and counting Caryn Mandabach among its producers) is steeped in heavy-handed flourishes, from the contemporary score to the use of slow motion surrounding the fight sequences.

Netflix has two seasons (or a dozen episodes) available, with the second flight to premiere in November. Still, for aficionados of a genre as rich in tradition and options as gangster fare, a weak-tea alternative – even armed with razor blades – doesn’t quite cut it.

Netflix's 'Peaky Blinders'
Netflix, Tue. Sept. 30


http://variety.com/2014/tv/reviews/t...rs-1201314584/


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post #97087 of 97094 Old Today, 12:52 AM
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TV Reviews
When your heroines are too bad or not bad enough: ABC's 'Selfie' & NBC's 'Bad Judge'
One show is too obsessed with social media, while the other show isn't about anything at all
By Alan Sepinwall, HitFix.com - Sep. 29, 2014

Even in the era of Walter White, Don Draper and the gang from "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," broadcast network executives are still obsessed with the idea of likable and admirable heroes, especially when it comes to comedy. You'll occasionally find your questionable morality in network dramas like "Scandal" and "The Good Wife," but sitcom protagonists tend to have their rough edges sanded off as quickly and artlessly as possible.

One new network comedy debuting this week illustrates why the suits tend to freak out about likability, while another demonstrates the pitfalls of trying to tone down bad behavior. ABC's "Selfie" (Tuesday at 8 p.m.) features a heroine so obnoxious that one wishes the network had stepped in to soften her up, while NBC's "Bad Judge" (Thursday at 9 p.m.) stripped away many of its heroine's most questionable traits from the original pilot and didn't bother replacing them with anything worth watching for.

The "Selfie" pilot was available online for a while (albeit in a slightly longer form than what will air tomorrow), so some of you may have already had the misfortune to endure the introduction of Eliza Dooley (Karen Gillan), a one-time ugly duckling who has transformed herself into a beautiful and utterly vapid swan, incapable of thinking or speaking without references to hashtags, cat gifs and her 263,000 social media "insta-acquaintances." When she flirts with a co-worker, she tells him, "I know it's intimidating to fall for a girl with a strong pelvic floor and an advertising presence on her Facebook page." Upon suffering a very public — and immediately tweeted — humiliation in front of all the co-workers who rightfully despise her, she laments in voiceover, "I'd spent years laughing at stupid idiots on the internet, and now, that stupid idiot was me."

Eliza, as the name suggests, is inspired by the heroine from "Pygmalion" and "My Fair Lady," with John Cho as Henry, a repackaging expert at her company whom she recruits to change her image. What it winds up being, though, is "Pygmalion" in reverse: instead of a woman whose inner beauty is hidden under a filthy and low-class exterior, we have a rotten person wrapped up in beautiful (if drastically overdone) packaging.

It's also in many ways the inverse of creator Emily Kapnek's last ABC comedy, "Suburgatory," which took a three-dimensional heroine and dropped her into a cartoon world. Here, it's a cartoon character trying to make her way through something resembling the real world. Kapnek's a smart writer and "Suburgatory" was at times a terrific show, but it was also wildly uneven and tended to stumble the more it focused on its most ridiculous parts; here, Kapnek's put her biggest weakness front and center. Eliza is such a broad caricature of everything Kapnek finds annoying about social media that she's unbearable — and not just to the other characters on the show.

And the thing is, as often happened even in the bad episodes of "Suburgatory," the "Selfie" pilot offers glimmers of a show that can work. John Cho is very good: understated and wry and charming. Karen Gillan seems game for anything — even if it seems a terrible idea to force her to play American(*), since her Scottish accent is so appealing and so often funny — and the few moments where Henry and Eliza are just bantering and flirting (even as he denies that this is what's happening) are relaxed and assured in a way that the scenes like the one where Eliza pictures hashtags floating above her neighbor's head are not.

(*) Kapnek has argued that a show where a Scottish woman is shunned by her American co-workers means something different than if they're all Americans. As with most examples of having a foreign actor play American (to varying degrees of believability), it seems like a problem that could be finessed in one or two lines of dialogue that would never have to be dealt with again, and in so doing give Kapnek and her writers access to so many more things that their leading lady can make funny.

Obviously, there's an evolution with a show like this, as Henry tries to "fix" Eliza — even as she's drawing him out of his own repressed shell — but the pilot digs such a deep hole for Eliza that Kapnek might have been better off creatively ditching the social media premise and just doing a show with these two as mismatched co-workers.

Unfortunately, that show would have much less of a shot of getting on the air, since the networks pretty much only greenlight high-concept sitcom pilots, even if those shows then have to awkwardly ditch those high-concepts by episode 2 — or, in the case of "Bad Judge," by the time the final version of the pilot airs.

The original pilot that critics saw in the summer was by no means good, but it at least had an idea behind it, as suggested by the title: Kate Walsh is a judge with a messy personal life and a cavalier approach to her job that makes you wonder how she ended up with it in the first place. She risks missing important work functions to play drums in her rock band (called Ladycock, no less), has sex in her chambers between cases, annoys everyone she works with, and is clueless why a little boy calls for her help at school until he reminds her that she put both of his parents in prison.

After the pilot was made, "Nurse Jackie" co-creator Liz Brixius was brought in to run the show, but the version of the pilot that you'll see reflects less the sensibility of a producer whose previous series was about a reckless, self-destructive painkiller addict than it does the paranoia of NBC executives who suddenly didn't want their judge to be so bad. They didn't just throw out the original pilot and start over(**), but they changed or abandoned whatever they could. Rock band? Gone. Unprofessional behavior? Minimized. The little kid? Now, the judge not only knows who he is, but has a long-standing relationship with him, because her new flaw is that she just Cares Too Darned Much about the loved ones of the people she puts away. About the only questionable things remaining are her sex life and wardrobe — because, hey, they need something to put in the ad campaign — and the '70s panel van she drives. And guess what gets destroyed by the end of episode 2? (Hint: it is not her collection of bustiers.)

(**) I don't know if the final version will play as clumsily to people watching the series for the first time, but the funniest part to me was watching the struggle to stitch together the new and old scenes, which results in Walsh's character seeming schizophrenic more than anything. It's all so random that it smacks of a creative team that threw up its hands before the task was even done, knowing there was no way to salvage this mess they'd inherited.

Walsh is an appealing, versatile performer, and her stint on "Fargo" earlier this year was a reminder of just how funny she can be, particularly playing a disreputable character. Like I said, the original "Bad Judge" pilot wasn't all that funny, but a show with the guts (and the appropriate channel placement) to go full "Bad Santa" with her as the lead could work very well. Instead, "Bad Judge" has been noted into oblivion. She's no longer quite so bad, but she's also not anything else. She's just... there.

And one of the few things more potentially fatal to a network sitcom than having an unlikable main character is having a forgettable one.

GRADES:
"Selfie" C-
"Bad Judge" D+


http://www.hitfix.com/whats-alan-wat...nbcs-bad-judge


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TV Review
‘Manhattan Love Story,’ by the numbers
ABC's new romantic comedy scores with some of its jokes
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 29, 2014

If a show is going to have a gimmick, it probably should feel novel. ABC’s new sitcom “Manhattan Love Story” has a gimmick that not only is old but also fails to make it stand out from other TV romantic comedies.

The show comes across as yet another story of how two cute young people meet and fall in love. Except for the principals’ cuteness, the show offers little to make us feel the need to follow along at home.

Airing this Tuesday, Sept. 30, at 8:30 p.m., the premiere episode tells how Peter (Jake McDorman) and Dana (Analeigh Tipton) first started dating. The gimmick is that we can hear their thoughts, in voice-over.

This gimmick can be traced back at least as far as Eugene O’Neill’s 1928 play “Strange Interlude,” if not as far back as the asides and soliloquies in Shakespeare. It was also used in the definitive Manhattan love story, Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall,” albeit via subtitles.

What’s more, many current single-camera comedies use major doses of voice-over in which the characters tell us what they’re thinking. So the comic possibilities of this device have been thoroughly explored.

Nonetheless, some of the jokes make an impression.

In the opening scenes, Peter walks past a series of women, thinking “yes” to almost all of them. Then we see Dana walking on the same block, thinking, “Hello, Gorgeous. I don’t believe we’ve met, but I’ve got to have you.” It turns out she’s checking out another woman’s purse.

In the second episode, Peter makes a big speech in which he tells Dana, “I wish I could just put you in a freezer.” She says, “That’s…,” then thinks to herself “…terrifying,” and then says, “…terrifying.”

Beside the voice-overs, the show is standard issue. As usual in this sort of comedy, the lovers have married friends who serve as coaches and cheerleaders. Peter and Dana are set up by Peter’s brother, David (Nicolas Wright), and David’s wife, Amy (Jade Catta-Preta), who is Dana’s former sorority sister. Dana is staying with them while starting her new job in a publishing company.

Trying to get Peter interested, David tells him that, according to a rumor that Amy won’t confirm, “they used to get drunk on appletinis and hook up.” Asked to specify the term “hook up,” David says, “illegal-in-Texas, full-sapphic debauchery.”

Although it’s a little creepy for a brother to share that information about his wife, it sets up a funny scene in which David tries to get Dana drunk so she’ll at least spill some details.

Also typically for this kind of show, the depiction of the characters’ work life makes one think that the creator, Jeff Lowell, has never set foot in an office. At Dana’s first day of work as a junior editor — a title that doesn’t exist, by the way — a co-worker hazes her in a way that would get him fired.

Peter and David work for their father (Kurt Fuller) in a family business that makes trophies. This allows Peter gets to talk amusingly about how business has boomed ever since kids’ teams started giving trophies to every player. Their sister Chloe (Chloe Wepper), who also works there, gives them sarcastic but sensible advice.

The second episode features a subplot in which the brothers fight over who got the bigger bonus. This feels like filler intended to allow the show to stretch out the romance longer.

Both workplaces are generic, as is the depicition of New York City. Since most TV comedies seem to choose their location by spinning a wheel on which America’s 20 largest cities are written, this would be forgivable if the title didn’t allude so strongly to another of Woody Allen’s site-specific romantic comedies, “Manhattan.”

Oddly, Peter lives in Brooklyn. Where Amy and David live is unclear.

As in most recent romantic comedies, social media loom large. Early on, Dana mistakenly updates her Facebook status to Peter’s name. In the second episode, after she learns that Peter is seeing other people, she uses a dating app to meet a guy, who tries a move he learned on Buzzfeed.

The two lead actors have decent romantic chemistry. Since Peter is supposed to be a jaded ladies’ man, we tend to root more for Dana, who is endearingly vulnerable.

The first two episodes suggest that she’s going to teach him to love, maybe for the first time, while she becomes more confident and independent. We don’t need to read their minds to see that coming.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/man...y-the-numbers/


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TV/Technology Notes
Where do the most people go for TV online? YouTube
A Magid survey found more people report going to Google's video site to watch television shows than Netflix or Hulu.
By Joan E. Solsman, CNet.com (UK)

Netflix calls itself the world's leading Internet television network, but as is often the case, who's leading really depends on whom you ask.

Frank N. Magid Associates, a research and consulting firm, asked 2,400 people to check off a list of online sources they use to watch TV shows, and found the most common response -- with 38 percent of respondents -- was YouTube.

That compares with 33 percent who listed Netflix, 17 percent for Hulu, and 14 percent for Amazon Prime, according to data from a June survey released exclusively to CNET by Magid.

(Note that doesn't mean that the time spent watching TV on Google's massive site necessarily exceeds time spent on any of those other services.)

"The joke in the industry is it's all babies burping and cats meowing, and maybe YouTube was that," said Mike Vorhaus, president of Magid Advisors. "When they actually go and use it, people are surprised by the breadth of content that's there."

Online television viewing is growing -- the number of people who say they watch video online daily jumped 10 points to 32 percent in two years, according to Magid. The services with the most eyeballs will have the best shot not only at cashing in on new status quos for watching video, either through advertising or subscriptions, but also at getting the most coveted content to bring to viewers.

Vorhaus also noted a trend of consolidation in how consumers approach online video, with "the big guys getting bigger and not many new guys coming in."

In rankings for the sources people turn to for TV and movies, iTunes came in relatively low for both: seventh for movies and eighth for TV, despite the platform's massive reach -- Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook earlier this month touted the platform's more than 500 million customers when the company released U2's new album to all of them free of charge.

But cost is likely a factor in iTunes' low stature in the survey responses, Vorhaus said. Sites like YouTube and Hulu are free with advertising, and Netflix and Amazon Prime are inexpensive subscriptions given the amount of content and services they deliver. Under iTunes' model of selling and renting shows and movies individually, the costs of watching video there can add up quickly.

Respondents of the Magid survey also called out YouTube as a top source for viewing movies, with 24 percent of those surveyed saying they go there for film. Netflix was No. 1, at 35 percent, with Amazon Prime, Hulu, and HBO Go trailing YouTube.

"If you think of these services as brands, the brand of YouTube has the most people," Vorhaus said. "The big message I get is that people have changed their brand perception of YouTube."

That change, from a Google point of view, is one in the right direction. And the company's announcement last week that it would start paying its "YouTube stars" to stay there takes on a whole new light.

http://www.cnet.com/uk/news/where-do...nline-youtube/


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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
TUESDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Selfie (Series Premiere)
8:30PM - Manhattan Love Story (Series Premiere)
9PM - Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
10PM - Forever
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Martin Short; animal trainer Dave Salmoni; Steve Aoki performs with Waka Flocka Flame and Travis Barker)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - NCIS
9PM - NCIS: New Orleans
10:01PM - Person of Interest
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (John Oliver; Maggie Q; Bleachers performs)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson (Don Rickles; Eiza González; comic Daniel Sloss)

NBC:
8PM - The Voice (120 min.)
10PM - Chicago Fire
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Tyler Perry; Miles Teller; Lucinda Williams performs with The Roots)
12:36AM - Late Night with Seth Myers (Nathan Lane; singer Weird Al Yankovic; writer Garry Marshall)
1:37AM - Last Call With Carson Daly (Author Dennis Lehane; Cerebral Ballzy performs; comic Annie Lederman)

FOX:
8PM - Utopia
9PM - New Girl
9:30PM - The Mindy Project

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates, Jr.: Born Champions
9PM - Makers: Women in Comedy (Series Premiere)
10PM - Frontline - League of Denial: The NFL's Concussion Crisis (90 min.)
(R - Oct. 8)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Mi Corazón Es Tuyo
9PM - Hasta El Fin del Mundo
10PM - La Malquerida

THE CW:
8PM - iHeartradio Music Festival Night 2 (120 min.)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Reina De Corazones
9PM - Los Miserables (Series Premiere)
10PM - Señora de Acero

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Ben Affleck)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Jeffrey Tambor)
12:01AM - At Midnight (Adam Newman; Mike Lawrence; Heather Anne Campbell)

TBS:
After the MLB Playoff Game - Conan (Jesse Tyler Ferguson; comic Bill Burr; Chrissie Hynde performs)


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Washington Notes/TV Sports
F.C.C. Appears Poised to Loosen Sports Blackout Rule, Despite Protests by the N.F.L.
By Edward Wyatt, The New York Times - Sep. 30, 2014

WASHINGTON — For decades, football fans in various markets wondered whether, come Sunday, they would be able to watch their lamentable but beloved team on television. If tickets to that week’s game were not sold out, the National Football League could keep the game off television in the local market as a way to protect gate receipts.

But the Federal Communications Commission appears ready to loosen some of those restrictions on Tuesday, allowing cable and satellite providers to show the game regardless of the number of tickets sold — and upsetting the N.F.L. in the process.

Ending the F.C.C.’s so-called blackout rule, now nearly 40 years old, would allow cable and satellite companies to get around league rules that call for a team’s game to be blacked out on the local broadcast channel if the game is not sold out.

The league rule would remain in effect, however, so it remains unclear how far-reaching the effect of an F.C.C. repeal would be. If a cable provider wants to show a game blacked out on the local broadcast channel — for example, if a Houston cable provider wants to show the local broadcast from Denver — it will require permissions that might be hard to come by.

When the N.F.L. rule was first put into effect, ticket sales were a much bigger contributor to a team’s overall income than they are today. Some markets, like Houston, regularly had blackouts.

Now, a majority of teams’ revenue comes from television rights, and barely a handful of games are blacked out each season, or even threatened with a blackout. In 2013, two of the N.F.L.’s 256 regular-season games were blacked out. In 2011, 16 games were blacked out locally, all of them happening in one of four cities: Buffalo, Cincinnati, San Diego and Tampa Bay.

Because of the growth of the league, the F.C.C. says that the blackout rule “has become outdated.” Repealing it, the commission says, would eliminate unnecessary regulation and leave the rules “to private solutions negotiated by the interested parties.”

The commission is expected to vote on the proposed change on Tuesday.

Although the rule is applicable to all sports leagues, it almost exclusively affects the N.F.L., in part because football is the only one of the four major leagues that negotiates its television contracts as a group. In baseball, basketball and hockey, each team negotiates its own contracts for local television coverage.

The N.F.L. nevertheless is fighting desperately to keep the F.C.C. rule intact, saying that it actually increases the availability of games on broadcast television.

“By ensuring that televising games will not reduce live attendance, the sports blackout rule encourages sports leagues to reach deals with broadcast networks,” the N.F.L. wrote in its pleadings to the commission. If cable and satellite carriers were able to get around the league’s blackout policy, the league said, “the eventual result likely would be a decrease in the amount of professional sports on broadcast television.”

Advocates for repealing the F.C.C. rule, including the National Cable and Telecommunications Association, the cable industry group, say the N.F.L.’s argument has major holes. Few games are blacked out, they say, and the N.F.L. could easily take measures like lowering ticket prices if sales are sluggish, much like hotels and airlines do with unsold rooms and seats.

The advocates for repeal calculated that the threat of blackouts increased league attendance by about 41,000 fans in 2012, or one-quarter of 1 percent. Many fans stay away because of high ticket prices, they argue, and in many cases they have already contributed to the local team through taxes subsidizing its stadium.

Supporting the N.F.L. is the National Association of Broadcasters, which points out that football is the only major team sport whose regular season games are televised mostly on free broadcast stations. Cable system operators could reap rewards for importing a blacked-out game’s broadcast and selling local advertising spots.

But that retransmission would require the permission of the remote station broadcasting the game, which might be reluctant to anger the N.F.L. or might have other contractual restrictions to prevent it from agreeing. People who do not pay for cable would still be unable to watch.

That loss of control could lead broadcasters to pay less for television rights, making contracts with pay-television channels more lucrative for teams and making it harder for many Americans, particularly low-income fans, to view their team.

In any case, the N.F.L. faces long odds in protecting the blackout rule. Both Republican commissioners and Tom Wheeler, the commission’s chairman, already have voiced their support for removing what they call an unnecessary regulation.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/30/bu...html?ref=media


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