Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 3249 - AVS Forum
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post #97441 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by MRinDenver View Post
Oh really? Then you weren't there when the word ... couldn't be used in I Love Lucy episodes, and others.

In the Eisenhower years, oppression might be too strong a word, but the fact that adults ... was not a fit topic for conversation, on TV or in a living room. Keep it quiet, please.
OK, maybe the Ricardos were a bit strait laced, but how about the Burnses and the Mortons? From the AntennaTV episode guide for "Burns and Allen", there's a 1952 episode entitled "Gracie and Blanche Hire Two Gigolos to Take Them Out". I think the word had a slightly different meaning back then, but, still, TV was not as strait laced back then as you think. Of course, 1952 was still Truman, so maybe Ike cleaned things up in 1953.
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post #97442 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 11:27 AM
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Originally Posted by tomhunter8 View Post
With The Walking Dead and The Good Wife on at the same time, we usually watch TWD first, TGW second. Zombies devouring people, then lawyers devouring people.
Speaking of lawyers, whatever happened to "L.A. Law" (the show with Susan Dey, Jimmy Smits, and others)? I have never seen that in syndicated re-runs over the years, but it was such a good show during at least the first half of its run on NBC. I liked the original "Law & Order" with Sam Waterston, too, but later on it seemed as though there was a new L&O series cropping up every year. I lost track of them all and couldn't see what the purpose was in having several shows under the same branding.
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post #97443 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
I lost track of them all and couldn't see what the purpose was in having several shows under the same branding.

iReally?

IPhone, iPod, iPad, iMac, iTunes, iareyouserious?



Sent from a mobile device.
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post #97444 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by leebo View Post
iReally?

IPhone, iPod, iPad, iMac, iTunes, iareyouserious?



Sent from a mobile device.
OK, then. It's all about hype, I guess.
I don't own anything from icompany.
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post #97445 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
What I meant is that in order to have a streaming service or streaming package that is affordable to the masses, people will have to actively resist the idea that ads are bad.
In this context "bad" really means "colossal waste of my time." Time that continues to grow shorter with each passing day. Should I really be forced, Clockwork Orange style, to forfeit 1/4 of my "prime-time" life?
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post #97446 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by HDTVChallenged View Post
In this context "bad" really means "colossal waste of my time." Time that continues to grow shorter with each passing day. Should I really be forced, Clockwork Orange style, to forfeit 1/4 of my "prime-time" life?
OK, then just understand that if you want to avoid ads, you're going to have to pay for that privilege, and you probably won't be able to get live streams of the programming that the local affiliates are sending out over the air.

I kind of like the old model of limited choice, mass audiences, primetime lineups decided by network programming executives, a TV year that began in September and ended in May (with re-runs in the summer), a certain amount of self censorship via the networks' standards and practices departments, and a fair bit of regulatory authority for the FCC, including the regulation of content to some extent.

In other words, I have not been impressed by the trends in TV in the United States over the past twenty five years. The high definition pictures are gorgeous, but the overall quality of the programming and the overall viewing experience have declined.
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post #97447 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
OK, then just understand that if you want to avoid ads, you're going to have to pay for that privilege, and you probably won't be able to get live streams of the programming that the local affiliates are sending out over the air.
Don't have a problem with that. I've been begging for direct "OTA" network feeds for decades now. I'm already paying for it either way.

All of the major network conglomerates could *easily* put up "+" style, commercial-free (or at least commercial non-interuptive) feeds. CBS owns Showtime for pete's sake! Etc, Etc, Etc.

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post #97448 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
In other words, I have not been impressed by the trends in TV in the United States over the past twenty five years. The high definition pictures are gorgeous, but the overall quality of the programming and the overall viewing experience have declined.
I "Liked" your post overall, but don't agree with some of it. It's easy to think quality has decreased. However, there are so many more offerings today that it's easy to forget that TV used to be limited to just 3 networks with 3 hours of content each for a total of 9 hours per night. And even then, we were limited to viewing only 3 of those hours. I guarantee I can find 3 hours of quality content that doesn't offend my sensibilities and I can watch them with my grandkids. And none of us will be subjected to an hour of Lawrence Welk, no offense to Larry.
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post #97449 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 01:41 PM
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Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post
I "Liked" your post overall, but don't agree with some of it. It's easy to think quality has decreased. However, there are so many more offerings today that it's easy to forget that TV used to be limited to just 3 networks with 3 hours of content each for a total of 9 hours per night. And even then, we were limited to viewing only 3 of those hours. I guarantee I can find 3 hours of quality content that doesn't offend my sensibilities and I can watch them with my grandkids. And none of us will be subjected to an hour of Lawrence Welk, no offense to Larry.
So people are willing to pay around $80 (or more) every month for "basic cable" to get quality programming? Tell me, where is the quality? A&E and History are dreadful and have completely abandoned their original premises. Food Network is a bunch of lousy competition shows, not true cooking shows. There is almost no educational programming on basic cable. As for movies, TCM is the only basic cable channel that shows decent movies. ESPN, TNT, and TBS are full of useless sports programming featuring sports that have declined in skill level over the years. And the athletes are poor role models, often getting into trouble.

PBS looks more and more like an amazing value.
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post #97450 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
So people are willing to pay around $80 (or more) every month for "basic cable" to get quality programming? Tell me, where is the quality? A&E and History are dreadful and have completely abandoned their original premises. Food Network is a bunch of lousy competition shows, not true cooking shows. There is almost no educational programming on basic cable. As for movies, TCM is the only basic cable channel that shows decent movies. ESPN, TNT, and TBS are full of useless sports programming featuring sports that have declined in skill level over the years. And the athletes are poor role models, often getting into trouble.

PBS looks more and more like an amazing value.
That's your opinion and you are entitled to it. However, if the Emmys are any indication, there is more quality programming on cable than on the networks. Personally, I enjoy aspects of both.
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post #97451 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 02:01 PM
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That's your opinion and you are entitled to it. However, if the Emmys are any indication, there is more quality programming on cable than on the networks. Personally, I enjoy aspects of both.
Maybe I just have unusual tastes. I dislike any show or movie that involves crime, forensics, firearms, macho guys, edginess, swagger, etc. ( I did like "Key Largo", though, mainly because of Lauren Bacall).

I used to like the Emmy Awards, but over the years the awards have shifted away from mainstream tastes and toward the "hip" shows.
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post #97452 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 02:32 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Maybe I just have unusual tastes. I dislike any show or movie that involves crime, forensics, firearms, macho guys, edginess, swagger, etc. ( I did like "Key Largo", though, mainly because of Lauren Bacall).

I used to like the Emmy Awards, but over the years the awards have shifted away from mainstream tastes and toward the "hip" shows.
It sounds like you would like ABC Family Channel and Hallmark Channel. They are both cable channels but carry family programming exclusively.

http://www.hallmarkchannel.com/

http://abcfamily.go.com/

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post #97453 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 02:36 PM
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That's your opinion and you are entitled to it. However, if the Emmys are any indication, there is more quality programming on cable than on the networks. Personally, I enjoy aspects of both.
Agree, though Emmy's are no barometer for me. I enjoy what I like regardless of awards or critics. And when it comes to wholesomeness, I think shows like Parenthood are more wholesome and relevant than many from the past. If one is hung up on Andy and Lucy and Opie, then I guess today is not for them....oh wait, those are still available in reruns. Yes, I watch/watched some violence (Sons of Anarchy, Hell on Wheels, Justify, Chicago PD), sex (Rome, Spartacus, The Borgias) and plenty of bleeped out language (Jon Stewart and Jeff Dunham on Comedy Central). Heck, I even watch cartoons (Star Wars Rebels), but the quality is still there. I also watch some stuff with my granddaughter (Jesse, Dog With a Blog, Wizards of Waverly Place and anything to do with fairy princesses). The realism, writing, acting and set designs are all 2nd to none and worth every dollar I pay, though I wish it were cheaper.
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post #97454 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 03:18 PM
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It sounds like you would like ABC Family Channel and Hallmark Channel. They are both cable channels but carry family programming exclusively.

http://www.hallmarkchannel.com/

http://abcfamily.go.com/
No, not really. Some of the "family" stuff is pretty boring, and ABC Family has the 700 Club, which I regard as just a way to get money from gullible people by distorting the faith.

I miss the old variety shows and bemoan the lack of music shows on TV. PBS still has "Austin City Limits", but the music on that show has drifted away from what it was back in the 1980's.
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post #97455 of 97464 Unread Yesterday, 10:01 PM
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The 700 Club is an embarrassment that ABC Family is stuck with due to buying the cable channel. I bet they'd like to banish it to some 700 level channel never to be seen again.
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post #97456 of 97464 Unread Today, 02:41 AM
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TV Review
‘Star Wars Rebels,’ kids’ stuff
3D-animated series, airing on Disney XD, will surely wow children
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazine

One of George Lucas’ most brilliant moves in the original “Star Wars” movie was taking conventions from kids’ entertainment and reminding adults how much fun they could be.

Hundreds of other movies and TV shows — including Lucas’ own “Star Wars” sequels and prequels — have since tried the same trick, with diminishing returns.

Lucasfilm’s new 3D-animated series “Star Wars Rebels” may be counting on the theory that there’s always a new cohort of children to whom the conventions will still be fresh.

Unlike the original movie, the series won’t be fun for the whole family. But the two-dimensional dialogue, characters and plots should keep sci-fi-minded kids entertained.

Like Lucasfilms’ previous animated series “Star Wars: The Clone Wars,”“Star Wars Rebels,” which airs Mondays at 9 p.m. on Disney XD, is set between two of the six feature films, in this case between “Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith” and “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope” (in other words, the original movie).

The Empire, having nearly exterminated the Jedi Knights, is consolidating its control of the galaxy. But the crew of the starship Ghost, led by a space cowboy named Kanan (voiced by Freddie Prinze Jr.), is still fighting.

In the first two episodes, which ran as a one-hour “movie” on Oct. 3, the crew crosses paths with a teenage street kid named Ezra (Taylor Gray) when they simultaneously try to steal a shipment of weapons from a group of Imperial storm troopers.

They wind up joining forces.

After being taken prisoner, they try to escape from the Imperial star destroyer commanded by Agent Kallus (David Oyelowo), whose entrances on-screen are often accompanied by deep notes reminiscent of Darth Vader’s theme music. But the former Anakin Skywalker is nowhere to be seen in the first hour.

Even casual fans will be tickled by the references and allusions to the films. For example, TIE fighters streak across the screen, and Grand Moff Tarkin is name-checked.

When young Ezra comes across a light saber, we start wondering which, if any, of the regulars will have the Force. The answer is unsurprising.

The action — a combination of shoot-‘em-ups and space chases — is constant but unimaginative. It’s nothing we haven’t seen in one or another of the movies, but without the humor that sneaked through in episodes IV to VI.

Similarly, the characters feel familiar. Ezra could be Luke Skywalker’s older brother. Kanan feels like a cross between Han Solo and the young Obi-Wan Kenobi.

Kanan’s crew includes Sabine (Tiya Sircar), an action babe and possible love interest for Ezra who sometimes wears a Boba Fett helmet, and Zeb (Steve Blum), a burly, gruff alien who has been cloned from generations of burly, gruff sidekicks.

When Ezra asks Zeb at one point where they’re going, Zeb replies, “If I told you, I’d have to kill you. Oh, and I might just kill you anyway.”

As that line suggests, the dialogue is merely workmanlike. The variations on “Who is that guy?” get tiresome quickly. We know what the characters are feeling because they tell us, but we usually could have figured it out without the help.

The design and quality of the animation are similar to those of “The Clone Wars.” That is, adequate but far from cutting edge. This is doubly disappointing since the original “Star Wars” was such a leap ahead technically when it premiered.

But that was a long time ago in what seems like a galaxy far, far away. People who marveled at the original in theaters are a generation too old for this show. But their kids and — gulp — grandkids, unencumbered by nostalgia, could have a good time.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/sta...ls-kids-stuff/

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TV Review
Twins, Raised in Different Worlds
‘Twin Sisters’ From China Stay in Touch
By Mike Hale, The New York Times - Oct. 20, 2014

Everything about the Norwegian film “Twin Sisters” seems too good to be true. The stars are a pair of adorable 10-year-olds as energetic as they are well-adjusted. The supporting players look like the four nicest, most supportive parents you could meet. The story hinges on a set of fateful coincidences that profoundly change the lives of everyone involved. “Twin Sisters” is a documentary, though, so there’s no need to suspend disbelief.

Mona Friis Bertheussen’s film, showing on Monday night in the PBS series “Independent Lens,” is an Asian-adoption story. Movies in that genre are typically about grown-ups, often the filmmakers themselves, seeking out the biological families they’ve never known. “Twin Sisters” turns that narrative on its head.

Ms. Bertheussen — taking advantage of how Western fathers film and photograph every step of their trips to adopt Asian babies — economically sketches out the amazing background to her story. A Norwegian couple and an American couple arrive in the same Chinese city on the same day to collect their new daughters. There’s no reason for them ever to meet, but a delay in paperwork and a matching pair of red-gingham baby dresses — one carried from Norway, the other from California — bring them together. They notice that their babies look very much alike.

The film then jumps ahead 10 years, to the current lives of Alexandra Hauglum in a tiny, snowbound Norwegian village and Mia Hansen in a leafy Sacramento suburb. Each has known all her life that she has a twin halfway around the world whom she hasn’t been able to grow up with. In the course of the film, they have a rare reunion, when the Hansens make the trip to tiny Fresvik.

Ms. Bertheussen lays out the huge differences in the girls’ lives: Mia is heavily scheduled, plays with life-size dolls and, because of her mother’s safety fears, is driven everywhere; Alexandra tends a pet mouse, tromps around the mountain paths alone and walks to school down a country road before sunrise. Then she shows us how remarkably similar they are, and how symbiotic, despite the impediments of language, culture, distance and time. “Twin Sisters” is short (53 minutes), modest, straightforward and — without being exploitive or overly sentimental — a complete emotional wipeout. It’s gently devastating.

Independent Lens: Twin Sisters
On PBS stations on Monday night (check local listings).


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/20/ar...ref=television

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post #97458 of 97464 Unread Today, 02:56 AM
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TV Notes
David Letterman Cue-Card Man: I Was Fired After Fight
By Darel Jevens, Chicago Suntimes - Oct. 19, 2014

The David Letterman cue-card man nicknamed “Big Ink” got into a big stink that reportedly cost him his job.

Tony Mendez, who had held up jokes for the “Late Show” host for 21 years, tells the New York Post that he was fired after grabbing a staff writer during an altercation.

“I know I shouldn’t have put my hands on him,” said Mendez, 69. “But this has been coming for a long time.”

Mendez, a frequently seen presence on “Late Show,” said he had argued with writer Bill Scheft during rehearsal on Oct. 8 over control of the gags on the cue cards.

“Bill was always undermining me — making himself out as Dave’s No. 1,” Mendez said. “Trying to pretend that I wasn’t even in the room . . . little passive-aggressive things.”

The next day, he said, he confronted Scheft and “grabbed him by the shirt.” He was ordered out of the theater and fired last Monday, he told the Post.

Scheft, CBS and Letterman’s company Worldwide Pants declined comment. Another staffer could be seen holding cue cards on “Late Show” episodes last week.

Letterman and his team had cultivated Mendez as a star in his own right, even giving him his own web series at cbs.com/lateshow. A favorite “Late Show” bit had him cussing out those who crossed him in angry, rapid-fire Spanish.

http://entertainment.suntimes.com/en...n-fired-fight/

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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Dancing With the Stars (LIVE, 120 min.)
10:01PM - Castle
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Ice Cube; "Science Bob" Pflugfelder; Bush performs)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - The Big Bang Theory
8:31PM - The Millers (Season Premiere)
9:01PM - Scorpion
9:59PM - NCIS: Los Angeles
* * * *
11:35AM - Late Show with David Letterman (Robert Downey Jr.; Sarah Paulson; Lizzo performs)
(R - Oct. 7)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson
(R)

NBC:
8PM - The Voice (120 min.)
10PM - The Blacklist
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Jason Segel; Steve Harvey; Alicia Keys)
(R)
12:36AM - Late Night with Seth Meyers (Connie Britton; Ben McKenzie;Vance Joy)
(R)
1:37AM - Last Call with Carson Daly
(R)

FOX:
8PM - Gotham
9PM - Sleepy Hollow

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Antiques Roadshow: Jacksonville
9PM - Antiques Roadshow: Atlantic City, New Jersey
(R - Jan. 25, 2010)
10PM - POV: Twin Sisters

UNIVISION:
8PM - Mi Corazón Es Tuyo
9PM - Hasta El Fin del Mundo
10PM - La Malquerida

THE CW:
8PM - The Originals
9PM - Jane The Virgin

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Reina de Corazones
9PM - Los Miserables
10PM - Señora de Acero

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Bill O'Reilly)
(R)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Neil Young)
(R)
12:01AM - At Midnight
(R)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Alan Cumming; Casey Wilson; Pentatonix; Joe Perry)
(R)
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TV Notes
Hackers have broken into mainstream TV
By Ann Oldenburg, USA Today - Oct. 19, 2014

Hackers are hot.

Yes, they tend to be villains in real life, making headlines for tapping into Target to steal credit card data, breaking into the cloud to snatch nude celebrity photos, and even breaching government firewalls to commit all sorts of top-level cybercrimes.

But on TV? They're the new heroes.

"Hackers are often unfairly portrayed as super-bad people, super-evil people," says Nick Santora, executive producer of Scorpion, CBS's new hit about hackers who help solve high-tech threats. "The truth is, hackers can provide a valuable service. They can uncover government misdeeds, unfair corporate practices. Hackers have a skill set that most people don't have. It's a skill set that's really useful and important. They're the watchers of the watchers."

Scorpion, airing Mondays at 9 p.m. ET/PT, premiered to a lot of its own watchers in September with a healthy 13.8 million viewers and is the No. 2 new show this fall, behind NCIS: New Orleans. And, according to a study released last week, the show has had the most positive word of mouth of all the new fall broadcast network series.

In a reflection of our increasingly digital world, more TV series are featuring cyberpunk story lines. Plots are centering on tech-savvy computer wizards who can figure out a way into anything, anywhere, often to save the day.

"I like showing these guys are heroes," Santora says. "When you hear the word 'hack,' it has a negative connotation in society. But in society I believe there are many more people who are hoping to do good than to do bad. It's the same with hackers."

The Blacklist, Person of Interest, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Homeland, Scandal — even Sunday's episode of The Good Wife — have included some form of hacking, a trend that has been steadily evolving and spreading, just like a computer virus.

Remember how exciting it was in 2003 when 24's computer-whiz sidekick Chloe O'Brian (Mary Lynn Rajskub) first began hacking into a security camera line, allowing us to watch every step of Jack Bauer's terrorist-fighting action as it unfolded?

Criminal Minds also has had a favorite hacker, Penelope Garcia, played by Kirsten Vangsness. Pauley Perrette's Abby Sciuto on NCIS has become a global computer nerd favorite. And a hacker turned from villain to would-be hero on FX's The Strain.

In the works for midseason is CBS's CSI: Cyber, starring rapper/actor Bow Wow (real name Shad Moss). His character is described as "cyber-intrusion savant" named Brody "Baby Face" Nelson.

Being a "savant" has become a standard part of the hacker stereotype. Hackers are usually misfits. Super-smart. Socially inept. Offbeat.

"The neck-beard fat guy living in his mom's basement and holding a pillow with a picture of a Japanese girl," says Gregg Housh, a Boston-based hacker who is connected with the group Anonymous. Those "cartoonish" stereotypes, he says, are just one type of hacker.

"In Hollywood, now they've got this guy who's maybe socially awkward and now maybe refined, drinking his wine, and he has his nice leather couches, trying to act like he had grown up rich. There are people like that in the hacker scene. I know a guy who after his first few major hacks got a Porsche and did it up. Man, did his place look nice."

As with any stereotype, it's easy to be wrong. "Most of the best hackers, you'd never imagine that's what they do."

On Scorpion, the main character, based on self-proclaimed hacker Walter O'Brien, is played by Elyes Gabel. "It's difficult to think of Walter as anything but a hero," says Gabel, noting that O'Brien's company, Scorpion, is "based "celebrating the misfits."

While the characters are colorful, geeks huddling around a screen do not make for great television. "We try to avoid getting them behind the keyboard as much as possible," Santora says.

He proved that in the Scorpion pilot, which featured a high-action scene in which Walter drove a Ferrari under an airplane so that his cohort, Paige (Katharine McPhee), could download data from the plane's onboard computer to her laptop.

While that was an especially unrealistic stunt, Santora says, the more mundane hacks aren't realistic, either.

On TV, "they can hack into anything in 10 seconds," he says. "It's kind of a cheat. We want to respect the hacker world. We understand when we're showing it, it's not entirely accurate."

Housh says that's probably the biggest flaw. "You've got to do research. You can't just see a system and five minutes later you're in. A lot of what they do on these shows would take weeks."

But Housh, who consulted on Season 2 of House of Cards, knows it's entertainment.

"One of the problems with Hollywood is that they have to play to a general public that doesn't understand the finer details that come along with hacking and what we have to do," Housh says. "It gets our adrenaline going, because we know what is going on on those screens but it's very boring. I know how much fun I'm about to have, but watching the same screen, it's like typing into Notepad."

On House of Cards, Housh works with actor Jimmi Simpson, who plays a hacker activist forced to work with the FBI.

"They asked me what his room would look like, his desk. They asked all these questions," he says. "I finally said, 'I'm just going to take pictures of my desk.' I sent them over." And they re-created it, right down to a piece of art hanging above his workstation.

With one modification: "I've got much bigger screens."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/t...n-tv/17432191/

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TV Review
‘Private Violence'
HBO's new documentary brings home some disturbing truths about domestic abuse
By David Hinckley, New York Daily News - Oct. 20, 2014

The frustrating part about this latest first-rate documentary on domestic violence is that it’s unlikely to reach the one group that could stop the epidemic.

The ones who could stop it, of course, are the ones who perpetrate it. The rest of us, notably including the criminal justice system, can at best try to discourage it by making it clear domestic abusers will pay the same price any other criminal pays.

“Private Violence,” sadly, offers little assurance that happens.

The featured subject here, Deanna Walters, was systematically beaten for four days by her truck driver husband Robbie as he hauled her and their 2-year-old daughter across country.

When Deanna finally notified police, they got her to a hospital and didn’t detain Robbie.

Deanna learned two things.

First, it would be hard to prosecute because she wasn’t sure in what state she was being beaten.

Second, because she was only battered black and blue, with no broken bones or internal injuries, the beatings were at most a misdemeanor.

Kit Gruelle, an advocate for abused women, talks about facing that reality almost daily.

Gruelle also acknowledges, from personal experience, that too many abused women cannot or will not leave their abuser — often for a reason as simple and chilling as his assertion he will track her down and kill her.

“Private Violence” proposes no easy solutions. But maybe, just maybe, we will reach a point where the law is on the side of the victim — which is always the best way to stop bullies, because what all bullies hate most is a fair fight.

‘Provate Violence’
Network/Air Date: Monday at 9 p.m., HBO
Rating: ★★★★ (out of five)


http://www.nydailynews.com/entertain...icle-1.1978279
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TV/Nielsen Notes
For ‘American Dad,’ new start on cable
The long-running Fox animated series moves to TBS
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Oct. 20, 2014

It is unusual but definitely not unheard of for a show to migrate from broadcast to cable. TBS got “Cougar Town” from ABC, and years ago “Friday Night Lights” went from NBC to DirecTV.

Now “American Dad” is becoming the latest to make the switch, going from Fox to TBS, where it makes its premiere tonight at 9 p.m.

“Dad,” created by “Family Guy’s” Seth MacFarlane, follows the Smith family. Pop Stan is a CIA agent as well as being the titular average American dad, and the show follows the family as they navigate life.

It debuted in 2005 and is in its 11th season.

“Dad” was never a hit like “Guy” or the other Fox Sunday animated staple, “The Simpsons.” But it drew okay viewership, averaging a 2.0 adults 18-49 Nielsen rating last season.

That made it an attractive program for cable, where audiences tend to be smaller. When it became clear that Fox was open to letting “Dad” go, TBS pounced and lured producers with the promise of fewer script restrictions.

The new “Dad” on cable will have more swearing and raunchier storylines, or so the ads on TBS have promised. That might be enough to draw in some curious viewers to tonight’s premiere.

But if the show draws even half of what it did in the demo on broadcast, that will still be a decent audience for cable, where most of the top scripted comedies draw well below a 2.0.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/ame...w-start-cable/
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TV Sports/Technology Notes
N.F.L. Stands by Its Push to Connect to Fans Digitally
By Ken Belson, The New York Times - Oct. 20, 2014

The N.F.L. media machine rolls on, Mark Cuban be damned.

Earlier this year, Mr. Cuban, the maverick owner of the Dallas Mavericks, said that the N.F.L. was saturating the airwaves and the Internet and was in danger of crumbling in a decade.

The league has shrugged off his criticism. Naysayers have made similar points in years past and been proved wrong. Despite grim news about domestic abuse, concussions and other issues that have embarrassed the league, television ratings for N.F.L. games have risen, not dipped, this season.

Besides, there is money to be made.

This month, the N.F.L. renewed its rights deal with DirecTV, which will pay an average of $1.5 billion a year from 2015 to 2022 to continue carrying the NFL Sunday Ticket package of out-of-market games, a 50 percent jump compared with the current deal, which expires this season.

Forever thirsty, the N.F.L. has also pushed further into the next frontier, mobile video. In August, the league unveiled NFL Now, which provides game highlights, fantasy updates, news and classic footage to tablets, smartphones and Xbox One game consoles. The content is free, though users can pay $1.99 monthly to skip some advertisements.

“Our view is we know that’s where the world is going, so we made sure we had the property rights to populate a new video service,” said Brian Rolapp, executive vice president for media for the N.F.L. “This is our direct way to talk to fans and for fans to talk to us.”

The league said NFL Now had been visited more than nine million times since its launch in August, but declined to say whether that was more or less than it had expected. The league also did not say how much time visitors had spent on NFL Now.

According to the league, people with wireless devices like tablets and smartphones have made up 55 percent of the visits to NFL Now, while those using connected devices like the Xbox have consumed 45 percent of the minutes spent on the service. Fans using NFL Now with connected devices watch nearly twice the number of videos and spend three times as much time per visit as those who access the service from wireless devices, the league said. That suggests that fans on wired devices are spending more time digging into NFL Now’s library of documentaries, shows and other long-form content than those using wireless devices.

“It’s a bit of blend,” said Perkins Miller, the league’s chief digital officer. “On Sundays, Mondays and Thursdays, people use NFL Now as a second screen. On Tuesdays through Fridays, people are flipping over to Apple TV and Xbox for long-form content.”

However they watch, NFL Now raises compelling questions about the league’s push to provide content directly to fans and compete with the television networks and cable and satellite providers that pay the league billions of dollars in rights fees. NFL Now reuses highlights of games broadcast by CBS, Fox and other networks as well as news conferences and interviews produced by the 32 teams and the more than 100 million feet of film in the NFL Films library.

“There’s a careful balancing act that is necessary,” said Ed Desser, a former N.B.A. executive who is a sports media consultant. “On the one hand, leagues have been exceptionally successful about getting guaranteed rights fees. On the flip side, the leagues create more content than all the Hollywood studios combined. The trick is not to siphon too much value out of the pot being purchased by your rights holders.”

While NFL Now is aimed at hard-core fans and fantasy football players, the league has tried to include something for everyone. The service includes news updates, game highlights and “Can’t-Miss” play compilations. Fans with more time can view episodes of “A Football Life” or “Hard Knocks,” or documentaries on Super Bowl champion teams. The service also includes exclusive reality shows like “Finding Giants,” which follows the scouting department of the Giants. NFL Now can also be personalized so fans will be fed videos of their favorite teams.

Whether the service will make money is a separate question. The N.F.L. declined to say how many fans had chosen to pay $1.99 a month for the premium version. But Jonathan Kraft, the son of the New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and co-chairman of the league’s digital media committee, said NFL Now would be “self-sustaining very quickly,” partly because it is produced at the NFL Network studios in Los Angeles, a move that has helped keep costs down.

The longer-term benefits of NFL Now are just emerging. In time, the N.F.L. could use the service to distribute live programming or lure fantasy football fans away from ESPN or Yahoo Sports. And because users can customize NFL Now, the league can learn what users like and sell advertisements that target their interests.

“You have to experiment and see what the audience embraces,” Mr. Desser said. “Anything that enhances the experience of N.F.L. football is good for your brand.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/20/sp...html?ref=media
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
So people are willing to pay around $80 (or more) every month for "basic cable" to get quality programming? Tell me, where is the quality? A&E and History are dreadful and have completely abandoned their original premises. Food Network is a bunch of lousy competition shows, not true cooking shows. There is almost no educational programming on basic cable. As for movies, TCM is the only basic cable channel that shows decent movies. ESPN, TNT, and TBS are full of useless sports programming featuring sports that have declined in skill level over the years. And the athletes are poor role models, often getting into trouble.

PBS looks more and more like an amazing value.
If you completely ignore all the great shows that are on cable, sure. But you'd be in the minority here, just look at all the threads in this forum.

And don't even get me started on sports, obviously you're not a college football or NASCAR fan (ESPN family) for example.

This argument is going to go nowhere, same as all the other cord cutter ones.
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