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post #98641 of 98649 Unread Today, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Why should I do the radio station's job?
Announcing the song and the artist should be a very simple thing to do, and yet the stations no longer do it.
My stations do. Maybe you should call to complain. I've never known stations to announce every single song title, since DJs don't usually talk between every song. Having that many interruptions would get too annoying.
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post #98642 of 98649 Unread Today, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post
Honestly, it's not even a DOJ issue.

No company has any obligation to sell their products through any reseller. If Nike doesn't want their sneakers sold in KMart, they have no obligation to make a deal with them.

Forcing any company to do business with another company sets a dangerous precedent, especially when a company objects to the practices. Should Ertl be forced to sell models to Hobby Lobby if the object to their standpoint on certain issues? Should Kellogg be forced to sell their products to Walmart if they disagree with some of their practices?

Of course, in reality, money conquers a lot of moral objections, but to say TV companies have some need to do business with anyone they don't want to that has little existence in any other industry is bunk.

If Aereo wants to retransmit programming, they need to pony up the cash required to convince the media companies to play ball. Relying on the government to force the issue is exactly the opposite of where we should be headed.
Sony tried that sort of exclusivity by refusing to allow K-Mart to sell boom boxes. The FTC stepped in and said that they could not refuse to sell to a legitimate retailer. Apparently there are rules about doing business in the USA.

You can't discriminate on general principles. You have to have a good business reason, like maybe proper training for high end products. You can set standards but anyone who meets those standards has to have a chance to participate. The FTC's job is to guarantee an even playing field. My only thought is that the FTC should be stepping in, although the FCC probably has assumed control in this case, providing the same sort of regulation in broadcast that the FTC does with products.

So, yes, they can force Nike to sell to K-Mart but Nike can specify a level of service that a shoe store might supply but K-Mart can't. Minimum pricing for Ertl - sure. Display rack design for Kellogg - OK. But you just don't like the owner - nope: not a valid reason.

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post #98643 of 98649 Unread Today, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Why should I do the radio station's job?
Announcing the song and the artist should be a very simple thing to do, and yet the stations no longer do it.
Um, because their job is what they make it, not what we think it should be. And to make this relevant to HOTP, it's not unlike why we don't have ala carte, because they don't want us to. Life would be so much better if companies did what we want them to.

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post #98644 of 98649 Unread Today, 04:20 PM
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riginally Posted by dad1153 View Post
Washington Notes
FCC Opens Door to Cable Competition Delivered by the Web
Wheeler in his comments said Friday that the Internet opens up numerous opportunities for new competition to cable and satellite services, including the possibility of letting viewers choose the channels they want to receive. He said prospective completion has been stymied because new video services couldn’t get access to cable networks or broadcast competition.

“Big company control over access to programming should not keep programs from being available on the Internet. Today, we propose to break that bottleneck,” he said.

read more:

Some other FCC commissioners weren't quite as positive.

FCC Commissioner Michael O’Reilly called the move “particularly puzzling” and said the vibrant state of competition on programming doesn't need any interference from the FCC.

“The Internet — and online video in particular — has grown to where it is today outside of our regulatory clutches, and the FCC trying to jump into this space now, especially without clear direction provided by the Congress, is highly questionable,” he said in his comments. As a government agency with little-to-no authority over the Internet, the best thing that the commission can do is not get in the way.”

By Ira Teinowitz, TheWrap.com - Dec. 19, 2014
http://www.thewrap.com/fcc-opens-doo...ed-by-the-web/
It almost looks like FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in an about face is now taking marching orders from the Obama administration .

IIRC his current position is a change (if not outright reversal) from his earlier position .I guess he want's to keep his job he's probably tired of having to work for a living in the private sector .

Also Read: Obama, FCC Chairman ‘On the Same Page’ Regarding Net Neutrality

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However, at an FCC press conference on Friday, Wheeler suggested his agreement with the president on key net neutrality issues represents no change of position and stressed that he also shares Obama’s concerns.
“On the important question of paid prioritization and opportunity that is created by the Internet, the president and I are in agreement and always have been,” Wheeler said.
See photos: President Barack Obama Speaks at DreamWorks (Photos)
Last week during an appearance at Cross Campus, Obama expressed concern that without FCC action on net neutrality, Internet service providers could dramatically alter competition and create a fast lane for favored content providers. “My appointee Tom Wheeler knows my position,” he said.
Some have suggested that Obama’s words will increase pressure on the FCC to toughen open Internet rules it earlier proposed.
http://www.thewrap.com/obama-fcc-cha...et-neutrality/

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post #98645 of 98649 Unread Today, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Why should I do the radio station's job?
Announcing the song and the artist should be a very simple thing to do, and yet the stations no longer do it.
No need to announce it, since with the digital broadcast, it scrolls across the radio display.

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post #98646 of 98649 Unread Today, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post
No need to announce it, since with the digital broadcast, it scrolls across the radio display.
HD radio is a niche technology, but analogue radio apparently has the ability to send song titles, too, assuming you have a compatible radio.

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Originally Posted by tubetwister View Post
It almost looks like FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in an about face is now taking marching orders from the Obama administration .
I doubt Obama is solely responsible. The FCC received so many comments that its website crashed, after all. It just might be possible that the consumer backlash against a tiered Internet is having a result.
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post #98647 of 98649 Unread Today, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post
.... The FCC received so many comments that its website crashed, after all. It just might be possible that the consumer backlash against a tiered Internet is having a result.
But if a tiered internet is a bad thing, what is the alternative? Is the alternative an internet that is clogged with streaming video because content that used to be sent via other means, such as OTA signals, is shuffled off to the internet, taking up precious bandwidth for things that really should not be considered all that important, and certainly not important enough that the government should intervene to keep the costs low?

What I mean is this: Will a bunch of NFL and college football games that I don't give a hoot about soon be clogging things up? Will Netflix also be clogging things up? And if they are clogging things up, shouldn't the people who use Netflix or are obsessed with football have to pony up the dough rather than seeking a de facto governmental subsidy that shifts the costs to other internet users?
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post #98648 of 98649 Unread Today, 06:42 PM
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[quote=Aleron Ives;30094546]HD radio is a niche technology, but analogue radio apparently has the ability to send song titles, too, assuming you have a compatible radio.

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It almost looks like FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in an about face is now taking marching orders from the Obama administration .
I doubt Obama is solely responsible. The FCC received so many comments that its website crashed, after all. It just might be possible that the consumer backlash against a tiered Internet is having a result.

Like most federal officials ultimately Wheeler is going to look out for whomever is signing his check at the time .
Quote:
He (Wheeler) was appointed by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in November 2013. Prior to working at the FCC, Wheeler worked as a venture capitalist and lobbyist for the cable and wireless industry, with positions including President of the National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA) and CEO of the Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association (CTIA).-Wikipedia- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Wheeler

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post #98649 of 98649 Unread Today, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
What I mean is this: Will a bunch of NFL and college football games that I don't give a hoot about soon be clogging things up? Will Netflix also be clogging things up? And if they are clogging things up, shouldn't the people who use Netflix or are obsessed with football have to pony up the dough rather than seeking a de facto governmental subsidy that shifts the costs to other internet users?
The Internet as a whole isn't something you can "clog up". If your local ISP doesn't have enough bandwidth to service all of its customers, then it is up to the ISP to build out its network until it has enough capacity to serve everyone who is paying for its service. If it fails to do so, people will switch ISPs.

An ISP saying that Netflix subscribers should pay a premium for bandwidth would be like UPS saying that it refuses to buy enough delivery trucks to deliver all of its packages, so instead it's going to devote 90% of its existing trucks to high-paying customers who want their packages delivered on time, while the remaining 10% of their trucks will service everybody else who can't afford for their packages to take less than six months to reach their destinations.

They could indeed do that, but it wouldn't be a very wise business decision, as if one delivery company doesn't provide good service, people will start sending their packages via a competing service. If demand is high, it's in the company's best interest to provide enough supply to meet that demand, or else it will lose business to competitors.

The problem is that when it comes to ISPs, there isn't much competition in the US, so switching is harder than it sounds, because there aren't many alternatives, good or otherwise. Most markets have either DSL from the local phone company or cable from the local cable company, and that's about it. Compounding the problem is that the US is so spread out that ISPs see little reason to improve their networks, because it isn't economical to lay high-speed cables to service towns of ten people in the middle of nowhere (which describes the population density situation across the majority of the country's land mass). If you look at the Internet access situations in Europe, Japan, and other areas with high population densities, their access runs circles around anything available in the US, because it's worthwhile to build a fast network when you have millions of customers to reach in a single spot.

Since the limited competition that's already available hasn't solved the supply problem, and the barrier to market entry is so high (since building a competing network from scratch is prohibitively expensive), the proposed way to address this situation is to reclassify broadband providers as public utilities, so that they can't set prices to whatever they want. This line of thinking says that Internet access has become so fundamental to participation in modern society that it can't be solely left up to corporations to decide who gets Internet access and for what price, which is a decision that was made long ago for other services, such as telephone service, electrical service, and rail service.

ISPs of course don't want to be regulated in this way, because it will inhibit their ability to charge for service by the byte. They argue that regulation will stifle competition and investment in the Internet. The ISPs lobbying against regulation don't seem to have any answer to the question of where competition is going to come from when the ISP options are already so limited, but that's not exactly a question they feel obliged to answer.

At some point it's possible for what was once a novel luxury technology to become a necessity, and when that happens, the government has a historical precedent to regulate that technology to ensure that citizens receive equal access to it. It's up to the people to decide when a particular technology reaches the tipping point of moving from luxury to necessity and to ensure that the government knows when this threshold has been reached, because companies certainly won't give up their cash cows without a fight. The question we're asking now is whether the Internet has reached that tipping point.
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