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post #98641 of 98664 Unread Yesterday, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Why should I do the radio station's job?
Announcing the song and the artist should be a very simple thing to do, and yet the stations no longer do it.
My stations do. Maybe you should call to complain. I've never known stations to announce every single song title, since DJs don't usually talk between every song. Having that many interruptions would get too annoying.
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post #98642 of 98664 Unread Yesterday, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post
Honestly, it's not even a DOJ issue.

No company has any obligation to sell their products through any reseller. If Nike doesn't want their sneakers sold in KMart, they have no obligation to make a deal with them.

Forcing any company to do business with another company sets a dangerous precedent, especially when a company objects to the practices. Should Ertl be forced to sell models to Hobby Lobby if the object to their standpoint on certain issues? Should Kellogg be forced to sell their products to Walmart if they disagree with some of their practices?

Of course, in reality, money conquers a lot of moral objections, but to say TV companies have some need to do business with anyone they don't want to that has little existence in any other industry is bunk.

If Aereo wants to retransmit programming, they need to pony up the cash required to convince the media companies to play ball. Relying on the government to force the issue is exactly the opposite of where we should be headed.
Sony tried that sort of exclusivity by refusing to allow K-Mart to sell boom boxes. The FTC stepped in and said that they could not refuse to sell to a legitimate retailer. Apparently there are rules about doing business in the USA.

You can't discriminate on general principles. You have to have a good business reason, like maybe proper training for high end products. You can set standards but anyone who meets those standards has to have a chance to participate. The FTC's job is to guarantee an even playing field. My only thought is that the FTC should be stepping in, although the FCC probably has assumed control in this case, providing the same sort of regulation in broadcast that the FTC does with products.

So, yes, they can force Nike to sell to K-Mart but Nike can specify a level of service that a shoe store might supply but K-Mart can't. Minimum pricing for Ertl - sure. Display rack design for Kellogg - OK. But you just don't like the owner - nope: not a valid reason.

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post #98643 of 98664 Unread Yesterday, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Why should I do the radio station's job?
Announcing the song and the artist should be a very simple thing to do, and yet the stations no longer do it.
Um, because their job is what they make it, not what we think it should be. And to make this relevant to HOTP, it's not unlike why we don't have ala carte, because they don't want us to. Life would be so much better if companies did what we want them to.

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post #98644 of 98664 Unread Yesterday, 04:20 PM
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riginally Posted by dad1153 View Post
Washington Notes
FCC Opens Door to Cable Competition Delivered by the Web
Wheeler in his comments said Friday that the Internet opens up numerous opportunities for new competition to cable and satellite services, including the possibility of letting viewers choose the channels they want to receive. He said prospective completion has been stymied because new video services couldn’t get access to cable networks or broadcast competition.

“Big company control over access to programming should not keep programs from being available on the Internet. Today, we propose to break that bottleneck,” he said.

read more:

Some other FCC commissioners weren't quite as positive.

FCC Commissioner Michael O’Reilly called the move “particularly puzzling” and said the vibrant state of competition on programming doesn't need any interference from the FCC.

“The Internet — and online video in particular — has grown to where it is today outside of our regulatory clutches, and the FCC trying to jump into this space now, especially without clear direction provided by the Congress, is highly questionable,” he said in his comments. As a government agency with little-to-no authority over the Internet, the best thing that the commission can do is not get in the way.”

By Ira Teinowitz, TheWrap.com - Dec. 19, 2014
http://www.thewrap.com/fcc-opens-doo...ed-by-the-web/
It almost looks like FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in an about face is now taking marching orders from the Obama administration .

IIRC his current position is a change (if not outright reversal) from his earlier position .I guess he want's to keep his job he's probably tired of having to work for a living in the private sector .

Also Read: Obama, FCC Chairman ‘On the Same Page’ Regarding Net Neutrality

Quote:
However, at an FCC press conference on Friday, Wheeler suggested his agreement with the president on key net neutrality issues represents no change of position and stressed that he also shares Obama’s concerns.
“On the important question of paid prioritization and opportunity that is created by the Internet, the president and I are in agreement and always have been,” Wheeler said.
See photos: President Barack Obama Speaks at DreamWorks (Photos)
Last week during an appearance at Cross Campus, Obama expressed concern that without FCC action on net neutrality, Internet service providers could dramatically alter competition and create a fast lane for favored content providers. “My appointee Tom Wheeler knows my position,” he said.
Some have suggested that Obama’s words will increase pressure on the FCC to toughen open Internet rules it earlier proposed.
http://www.thewrap.com/obama-fcc-cha...et-neutrality/

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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
Why should I do the radio station's job?
Announcing the song and the artist should be a very simple thing to do, and yet the stations no longer do it.
No need to announce it, since with the digital broadcast, it scrolls across the radio display.

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post #98646 of 98664 Unread Yesterday, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post
No need to announce it, since with the digital broadcast, it scrolls across the radio display.
HD radio is a niche technology, but analogue radio apparently has the ability to send song titles, too, assuming you have a compatible radio.

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Originally Posted by tubetwister View Post
It almost looks like FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in an about face is now taking marching orders from the Obama administration .
I doubt Obama is solely responsible. The FCC received so many comments that its website crashed, after all. It just might be possible that the consumer backlash against a tiered Internet is having a result.
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post #98647 of 98664 Unread Yesterday, 06:38 PM
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.... The FCC received so many comments that its website crashed, after all. It just might be possible that the consumer backlash against a tiered Internet is having a result.
But if a tiered internet is a bad thing, what is the alternative? Is the alternative an internet that is clogged with streaming video because content that used to be sent via other means, such as OTA signals, is shuffled off to the internet, taking up precious bandwidth for things that really should not be considered all that important, and certainly not important enough that the government should intervene to keep the costs low?

What I mean is this: Will a bunch of NFL and college football games that I don't give a hoot about soon be clogging things up? Will Netflix also be clogging things up? And if they are clogging things up, shouldn't the people who use Netflix or are obsessed with football have to pony up the dough rather than seeking a de facto governmental subsidy that shifts the costs to other internet users?
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post #98648 of 98664 Unread Yesterday, 06:42 PM
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[quote=Aleron Ives;30094546]HD radio is a niche technology, but analogue radio apparently has the ability to send song titles, too, assuming you have a compatible radio.

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It almost looks like FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in an about face is now taking marching orders from the Obama administration .
I doubt Obama is solely responsible. The FCC received so many comments that its website crashed, after all. It just might be possible that the consumer backlash against a tiered Internet is having a result.

Like most federal officials ultimately Wheeler is going to look out for whomever is signing his check at the time .
Quote:
He (Wheeler) was appointed by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in November 2013. Prior to working at the FCC, Wheeler worked as a venture capitalist and lobbyist for the cable and wireless industry, with positions including President of the National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA) and CEO of the Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association (CTIA).-Wikipedia- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Wheeler

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Originally Posted by veedon View Post
What I mean is this: Will a bunch of NFL and college football games that I don't give a hoot about soon be clogging things up? Will Netflix also be clogging things up? And if they are clogging things up, shouldn't the people who use Netflix or are obsessed with football have to pony up the dough rather than seeking a de facto governmental subsidy that shifts the costs to other internet users?
The Internet as a whole isn't something you can "clog up". If your local ISP doesn't have enough bandwidth to service all of its customers, then it is up to the ISP to build out its network until it has enough capacity to serve everyone who is paying for its service. If it fails to do so, people will switch ISPs.

An ISP saying that Netflix subscribers should pay a premium for bandwidth would be like UPS saying that it refuses to buy enough delivery trucks to deliver all of its packages, so instead it's going to devote 90% of its existing trucks to high-paying customers who want their packages delivered on time, while the remaining 10% of their trucks will service everybody else who can't afford for their packages to take less than six months to reach their destinations.

They could indeed do that, but it wouldn't be a very wise business decision, as if one delivery company doesn't provide good service, people will start sending their packages via a competing service. If demand is high, it's in the company's best interest to provide enough supply to meet that demand, or else it will lose business to competitors.

The problem is that when it comes to ISPs, there isn't much competition in the US, so switching is harder than it sounds, because there aren't many alternatives, good or otherwise. Most markets have either DSL from the local phone company or cable from the local cable company, and that's about it. Compounding the problem is that the US is so spread out that ISPs see little reason to improve their networks, because it isn't economical to lay high-speed cables to service towns of ten people in the middle of nowhere (which describes the population density situation across the majority of the country's land mass). If you look at the Internet access situations in Europe, Japan, and other areas with high population densities, their access runs circles around anything available in the US, because it's worthwhile to build a fast network when you have millions of customers to reach in a single spot.

Since the limited competition that's already available hasn't solved the supply problem, and the barrier to market entry is so high (since building a competing network from scratch is prohibitively expensive), the proposed way to address this situation is to reclassify broadband providers as public utilities, so that they can't set prices to whatever they want. This line of thinking says that Internet access has become so fundamental to participation in modern society that it can't be solely left up to corporations to decide who gets Internet access and for what price, which is a decision that was made long ago for other services, such as telephone service, electrical service, and rail service.

ISPs of course don't want to be regulated in this way, because it will inhibit their ability to charge for service by the byte. They argue that regulation will stifle competition and investment in the Internet. The ISPs lobbying against regulation don't seem to have any answer to the question of where competition is going to come from when the ISP options are already so limited, but that's not exactly a question they feel obliged to answer.

At some point it's possible for what was once a novel luxury technology to become a necessity, and when that happens, the government has a historical precedent to regulate that technology to ensure that citizens receive equal access to it. It's up to the people to decide when a particular technology reaches the tipping point of moving from luxury to necessity and to ensure that the government knows when this threshold has been reached, because companies certainly won't give up their cash cows without a fight. The question we're asking now is whether the Internet has reached that tipping point.
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FRIDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insights' Blog.
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Nielsen Overnights
‘Amazing Race’ Ratings Fall In Finale, ‘Caught On Camera’ Debuts OK As NBC Wins Night
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - Dec. 20, 2014

On the eve of the Holiday week , there was a mix bundle under the primetime tree. Something new, something ending and a lot of repeats and news magazine shows. The something new was Caught On Camera With Nick Cannon (0.9/4). Fronting yet another show, one of the busiest men on TV last night premiered the first of this two part pretty self explanatory special series. With second place among adults 18-49 in the time slot and less viewers (4.66 million) than ABC’s Last Man Standing encore (4.94 million), it wasn’t exactly the kind of response Cannon is used to from America’s Got Talent. Maybe the December 26 broadcast will catch a few more eyeballs.

The only net to have all original programming last night, including a new Dateline (1.3/5) that was even with last week, NBC won the night in both the demo and overall viewership. The Peacock had a 1.2/4 demo result and 6.04 million watching.

The Amazing RaceOver on CBS, there were a lot of people watching – 6.50 million approximately – as the 25th cycle of The Amazing Race (1.3/5) reached the finish line last night. There were of course winners, including to some extent CBS who saw the vet competition series rise 8% from last week. In fact, last night’s TAR was the second best the show has down all season in overall viewers and a tie for its second best result of the cycle among the 18-49s.

However, compared to recent past seasons, it was a much hard road for TAR – in no small part to the Friday night spot and new time slot the network gave it this season. Last night’s finale was down 27% from the Season 24 ender of May 18, 2014 among the key demo. That Sunday night airing show also drew 8.22 million total viewers. Compared to the 2-hour Season 23 finale of December 8, 2013, also a Sunday, last night’s TAR stumbled a hard 38% among the 18-49s and was down 2.71 million in total viewership. Both those Season 24 and Season 23 finales were on much more competitive nights it should be noted. CBS’s annual A Home For The Holidays (0.5/2) was also a newbie on a Friday. Which in part may have been why the special was down 28% from its December 18 broadcast last year – a Wednesday.

Fox and ABC were all encores except for a new 20/20 (1.1/4) which was down 21% from last week. Happy Holidays!

http://deadline.com/2014/12/amazing-...20-1201331651/
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TV/Business Notes
Fox News Goes Dark on Dish in Carriage Standoff
By The Hollywood Reporter Staff - Dec. 20, 2014

Two Fox channels have gone dark to Dish customers.

The current deal between Dish and 21st Century Fox expired on Saturday at midnight, and contract negotiations between them have stalled.

This means that Fox News and Fox Business are not currently available on the satellite TV provider.

Fox News Channel executive vice president of distribution Tim Carry issued the following statement: "It is disappointing that, after nearly two decades without a blackout, Fox News Channel has been blocked by Dish Network. We care deeply about our viewers and hope that they will regain access to the number one cable news channel soon."

Carry added that Fox is still working to reach an agreement with Dish.

"This is the third time in as many months that DISH customers have suffered through a blackout due to Dish's intransigence," he said. "Dish's record speaks for itself, and makes its rhetoric about 'reasonable' agreements ring hollow."

The Dish Network issued a brief statement on Saturday night as well, which placed the blame on Fox for the breakdown in negotiations. "The media conglomerate," Dish said of Fox, "introduced other channels into negotiations despite those channels not being included in the contract up for renewal."

Watch more Jimmy Kimmel Asks Megyn Kelly to Air 'The Interview' on Fox News

It is not clear which channels Dish is referring to, but Fox has launched several new channels in the past year, including FXX and Fox Sports One, which are not listed on the Dish website as currently being available.

Fox has shown in prior negotiations that it recognizes the strength of Fox News, which is the highest rated cable news channel, and it appears to be using that to try and expand the number of channels it licenses to Dish.

Dish also said that it offered Fox a short-term extension of the current contract, but it was turned down. Dish has about 14 million subscribers.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...rk-dish-759769
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TV Notes
Hannibal Recast Shocker: Michael Pitt Out, Joe Anderson In as Mason Verger
By Michael Slezak, TVLine.com - Dec. 20, 2014

EXCLUSIVE: Michael Pitt will no longer be hearing the squealing of the pigs when Hannibal returns for Season 3.

The actor, who played sociopathic meat-packing magnate Mason Verger in Season 2, is not returning to the series and will be replaced by Joe Anderson (The Divide, The River), TVLine has learned exclusively.

The decision not to return was Pitt’s, according to sources.

The recast comes at a fairly convenient time in Mason’s story arc: When we last saw him, he was
Spoiler!


In October, TVLine reported that Season 3 of Hannibal will introduce a new recurring character named Cordell, the “quiet, very intelligent and definitely creepy” personal doctor to Mason. The late-thirtysomething character is described as “attentive and gentle with Mason, a professional who cares about his work, but we get a sense he might be as sadistic as his boss — and a perfect fit to become his potential henchman.”

Update: Anderson has posted a photo of himself on Instagram in full Mason Verger regalia — check it out below (if you dare).

http://tvline.com/2014/12/19/hanniba...-recast-mason/
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TV Notes
Cutting the Cord: Happiness is a cut cord, survey says
By Robert Bianco, USA Today - Dec. 20, 2014

Most pay-TV customers who cut the cord are happy that they parted ways with their cable company.

That's the finding of a new survey of cord cutters from management consulting firm cg42.

Nearly eight out of 10 cord cutters (77%) have no intention of returning to cable and are happy they dropped their pay-TV subscription, based on the 556 cord-cutters the firm surveyed last month. Those surveyed were past customers of the five major cable companies: Cablevision, Charter, Comcast, Cox and Time Warner Cable.

"We found it very interesting that more than three out of four cord cutters were happy with their decision to … leave cable entertainment behind," said Steve Beck, cg42 founder and managing partner. "This is an early indicator of the manifestation of the problems and frustrations people are having with their cable companies."

Another cg42 survey, released in June 2014, found 53% of frustrated consumers would leave their cable company if they had a choice among other providers. This latest survey, released Friday, found "a small and active group of consumers taking an step to do something about it," Beck said.

More than half of those surveyed (60%) had cut the cord within the last six months. While cord cutting is "on the rise a bit," Beck stops short of calling it a trend. "It's still a niche," he said. "I would say it's still early days."

Most cord cutters (70%) still get Internet service from their provider. And most use between two and four online video services for their entertainment content, Beck said.

Most popular service: Netflix, used by 73% of the survey respondents, followed by Hulu Plus (59%) and Amazon Prime (44%).

Very few of them – only 3% -- say they are getting most of their content for free. Cord cutters are not "averse to paying for content," he said. "It's that they are averse to paying for content that they don't need or watch. They want the things that they want."

On average, cable companies lost $811.74 in annual revenue from each cord-cutter, the survey found.

Comcast and Time Warner Cable reported third-quarter losses of 81,000 and 184,000 pay TV subscribers, respectively.

The message for the cable companies is that "this is small now, but ... it is time to start fixing the frustrations you created among your customers by treating them so poorly," Beck said. "Ultimately, (the cable providers) will face challenges and we are starting to see that in this industry."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/c...ness/20662845/
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Critic's Notes
We Now Conclude Our Broadcast Day
Recalling the Imperfect Radio and TV Reception of the Past
By Dana Jennings, The New York Times - Dec. 21, 2013

I miss the television snows of yesteryear. And I don’t mean easy nostalgia for the inevitable reruns of “It’s a Wonderful Life” or “A Charlie Brown Christmas.”

I’m talking real television snow, a longing for static, ghost images and the picture endlessly rolling and flip-flopping. While we’re at it, I ache for well-used vinyl crackling like bacon sizzling in a skillet ... and the eerie whistles and wheezes from terrestrial radio.

This eccentric pining for the primitive electric hiss and sputter of my 1960s childhood is an honest reaction to our modern culture’s unhealthy addiction to (apparent) perfection. We want it all, we want it now, and we want it sublime.

We not only demand our television, radio and music in unblemished HD on whatever device we choose, but also our weddings, children, houses and bodies. And in our heedless embrace of digital cosmetic surgery, we’ve forgotten that it’s the flaw that makes a thing all the sweeter — like the bruise on a peach.

One of my sharpest memories — HD in recollection, if not in reality — is of my father scrambling on the roof of our house in southern New Hampshire during a snowstorm, wrestling with the TV antenna. He was trying to coax a better picture from our TV for a Bruins hockey game out of Boston on WSBK (Channel 38). Both his beer and the game tasted even better after that epic and elemental struggle.

In those pre-cable, pre-digital days, the question wasn’t “Where’s the remote(s)?” but “Where’s the picture?”

Answering that query often involved the laying on of hands. After turning on the TV and waiting — waiting!!! — for it to warm up came the physical offerings to the reception gods: massaging and wooing antenna and rabbit ears, twisting coat hangers into Calder-like shapes then draping them from the TV, waltzing the box around the living room or, finally, just delivering a smack upside the tube. The latter usually didn’t work, but it made all of us feel better.

My sister and I, huddled together on the couch, blissfully watched TV in all kinds of screen conditions: total whiteout, moderate snow, mere flurries, staticky crosshatch. And, unknowingly, we developed a proto-punk, low-fi aesthetic, agreeing that monster movies (“Them!,” “Rodan,” “The Blob”) and spooky TV shows like “The Twilight Zone,” “The Outer Limits” and “Night Gallery” were far more terrifying when glimpsed and then decoded through the snow: almost like scrutinizing horrifying images from some unimagined dimension or two.

Even watching the white dot vanish after the TV was clicked off gave us a pleasurable chill.

Our on-demand world also blunts the tingle of anticipation, which is maybe why vinyl and turntables have made their modest comeback in recent years. Savoring the spit, hiss and pop of needle on vinyl is like relishing the predatory rumble of a hot rod before it peels out and lays rubber.

One of the shrewd things the rock band Gaslight Anthem did on its 2008 album “The ’59 Sound” was pepper it with vintage rasp and buzz: a punk squall that defies tame audiophile decorum.

And, as with the TV, the phonograph required touch: the piling of slick 45s on the spindle, blowing dust off the needle, taping a penny to the tone arm to keep that needle from skittering and skipping.

My radio needed the human touch, too. As I listened to Boston Red Sox night games, I’d grip the radio like a vise, its hot, orange guts stinging my hand; my skin would lobster up, but I didn’t care, because I could hear the game better. (That radio, a yellowing white Sylvania, also hummed constantly, kind of like the ringing in your ears hours after a Metallica concert.)

Then there was the utter delight of reeling in a far-away station late at night: from Montreal, from Wheeling, from Nashville. Even more bewitching were the otherworldly soundscapes to be found between station stops: eeps and boops, trills and squeals, shrill dronings from the ether that maybe signaled an alien invasion, or first contact with another galaxy.

And, to return to the blizzards of television, even better were the Saturday nights when Sis and I babysat for our little brothers. At 1 or 2 in the morning, we’d find a station that’d signed off (back when channels actually dared abandon the air for a few hours), that slept in snow mode. We’d then stare at the spectral black-and-white storm — giggling, trying to scare each other — seeking demons, poltergeists, radioactive beasts. All of it good, low-def fun, even better than counting the cars that zipped by on Route 125 or trying to make wooly-bear caterpillars race each other.

It makes me grin to think about those late nights now, and that’s why, when it comes to TV, I still say, “Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow!”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/21/ar...elevision&_r=0
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TV Notes
David Schwimmer Cast as Robert Kardashian in FX’s ‘American Crime Story’
By Elizabeth Wagmeister, Variety.com - Dec. 19, 2014

“Friends” star David Schwimmer has signed on as Robert Kardashian in FX’s upcoming miniseries “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson,” the network announced Friday.

Schwimmer will play O.J. Simpson’s attorney, starring opposite Cuba Gooding Jr. as Simpson. Sarah Paulson is set to portray prosecutor Marcia Clark.

The first episode of “The People v. O.J. Simpson” will be directed by “American Horror Story” creator Ryan Murphy. Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski will write the miniseries based on Jeffrey Toobin’s book “The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson.”

Murphy, along with Nina Jacobson, Brad Simpson, Alexander, Karaszewski, Brad Falchuk and Dante Di Loreto are executive producers.

“American Crime Story” is produced by Fox 21 Television Studios and FX Productions. Production begins in Los Angeles in 2015.

Schwimmer is represented by Gersh and attorney Michael Gendler of Gendler & Kelly, APC.

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/davi...ry-1201383917/
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SUNDAY Network Primetime Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET)

ABC:
7PM - The Sound of Music Sing-Along (1965)

CBS:
7PM - NFL Football: Regional Coverage (from 4:25PM, LIVE)
7:30PM - 60 Minutes
8:30PM - Undercover Boss
9:30PM - The Mentalist
10:30PM - CSI: Crime Scene Investigation

NBC:
7PM - Football Night in America (80 min., LIVE)
8:20PM - Sunday Night Football: Seattle Seahawks at Arizona Cardinals (LIVE)

FOX:
7PM - Mulaney (Time Slot Premiere)
7:30PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - Dec. 7)
8PM - The Simpsons
(R - Dec. 7)
8:30PM - Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(R - Dec. 3, 2013)
9PM - Family Guy
(R - Dec. 7)
9:30PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - Dec. 15, 2013)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Tales From the Royal Bedchamber
9PM - Masterpiece Classic: Downton Abbey Season 4
(R - Feb. 9)
10PM - Masterpiece Classic: Downton Abbey Season 4 (90 min.)
(R - Feb. 16)

UNIVISION:
7PM - Aquí y Ahora
8PM - Grandes Temas de Telenovelas (Special)
10PM - Sal y Pimienta

TELEMUNDO:
6:30PM - Movie: Home Alone 3 (1997)
8:30PM - Movie: Snow White and the Huntsman (2012)
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Obituary
Veteran soap opera director Larry Auerbach dies at 91
By David Colker, Los Angeles Times - Dec. 20, 2014

Emmy award-winning director Larry Auerbach, whose career was almost entirely in New York-based soap operas, died Saturday in La Jolla. He was 91.

The cause was complications of glioblastoma, said his son, Scott.

Auerbach was the director for the nearly 30-year run of "Love of Life," which debuted in 1951 as a live 15-minute show. Actors Warren Beatty, Christopher Reeve, Roy Scheider, Jessica Walter and Jon Voigt all appeared on the program.

And one of the show's fans, Sammy Davis Jr., guest stared in the 1970s.

The show's head writer at its end in 1980 was Ann Marcus, who went on to help create the soap opera spoof, "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman." She died earlier this month.

Auerbach also directed episodes of "All My Children," "Another World" and "As the World Turns." He won a 1984 Daytime Emmy for his work on "One Life to Live."

He was considered such a soap opera expert that Dustin Hoffman consulted with him on "Tootsie," in which actor played a soap opera star.

Auerbach also served on the national board of the Directors Guild of America and in 2004 was named an honorary life member of the guild.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...014-story.html
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TV Notes
'Peppa Pig' is fast becoming a hit for the preschool set on Nickelodeon
The animated show about a little girl pig originated in the U.K. and has been popular there for a while; its producers will make a bundle in merchandising
By Don Kaplan, New York Daily News - Dec. 21, 2013

She's a cute little slice of bacon — worth more than Fort Knox.

“Peppa Pig” might be only a children’s cartoon on Nickelodeon, but the creators of the U.K.-made kids’ show stand to rake in in more than $1 billion in global merchandising revenues in 2014.

The show consists of gentle five-minute shorts that follow a sweet pre-school aged pig named Peppa who loves jumping in mud puddles.

The little piggy lives with her parents and her little brother, George and enjoys playing with her best friend, Suzy Sheep, visiting Granny and Grandpa Pig, laughing, and making loud snorting noises.

“It’s an adorable show with a really strong female character, with a very specific point of view,” says Teri Weiss, executive vice president of Nickelodeon Preschool. “She’s got a tremendous amount of confidence and a real sense of self that I think both boys and girls respond to.”

Each episode features everyday activities and themes that preschoolers can relate to, such as going to the playground, swimming, riding bikes, visiting grandparents and having play dates.

It airs several times a day, but can regularly be found at 7 p.m. on Nick Jr.

The show, made in England, made its U.S. debut on Nickelodeon back in 2007, but had already been a big hit in the U.K. for three years.

It remains so popular in Europe that there’s even a theme park: Peppa Pig World in Hampshire, England.

In the U.S., even after a few years, “Peppa Pig” is growing, delivering a healthy 866,000 total viewers every day with ratings up double digits compared to only a few months ago.

Yet, despite its popularity , Nickelodeon doesn’t benefit much from the show’s merchandising, as the rights are still owned by its producers in the U.K.

Still, the show is a huge draw for the network’s preschool channel Nick Jr.

“I think that Peppa has a real relatability,” says Weiss of the cartoon character’s popularity. “She really captures the true voice of a child.

“One of the things that is so striking about Peppa is that she finds the extraordinary in everyday experiences,” says Weiss.

A favorite moment from the show, she says, is an episode in which it’s raining and Peppa is trapped in the house. By the end, she and her dad are outside jumping in mud puddles.

“Particularly for a young child, that is a true reflection of a great day,” says Weiss.

“Her ability to celebrate the everyday is so relatable to kids,and she does it with such charm and character that Peppa really captures the point of view of a child,” says Weiss.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertain...icle-1.2049921
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Critic's Notes
We Now Conclude Our Broadcast Day
Recalling the Imperfect Radio and TV Reception of the Past
By Dana Jennings, The New York Times - Dec. 21, 2013

I miss the television snows of yesteryear.
Having grown up about 9 miles SSW from Mt. Wilson and adjacent peaks where most TV stations and radio stations had their broadcast towers in the Smog Angeles (Los Angeles, California) basin, television snow was not a childhood memory. The earliest memories I have of television had channels 2 (CBS), 4 (NBC), 5, 7 (ABC), 9, 11, and 13; yes, seven clear channels and no ghosting. It could have been from that environment, watching wonderful monochrome ("black and white") on a 9-in screen where I first got addicted to television.

I do have memories of having to turn on the TV almost a minute before you wanted to watch anything because the tubes had to warm up. And when you turned it off, the image would collapse into a tiny dot dead center of the screen and stay there for about half a minute until finally fading away. And in those days, as a kid I never heard of color TV, and even now if you watch shows that were first aired in that time they are still in B&W.

I also recall in the early 1960s when we got our first color TV, a console with a much larger screen, about 21 inches (diagonal measurement) and two speakers. Still, most shows were initially in B&W, but some commercials and some of the Saturday morning cartoon lineup was in color. That was also our first TV that had a UHF tuner (so we could then get 28 KCET, the local PBS affiliate at that time), and occasionally 22, which often came in with ghosting. That TV was the first one we had with a remote control, using sound (not infra-red that more recent remotes use), so we could change the channel from the couch by either pressing a button on the remote or by the trash truck going down the street. Warm-up time had improved to 10 to 15 seconds, thanks to circuitry that kept the tubes partially warmed up when the TV was "off".

It was around 1965, the Fall 1965 TV season, when the world changed to color: suddenly the promos for TV shows would make a special point of announcing that they were in color (NBC: Now in living color!). I recall some shows started the season in B&W and ended the season in color, some shows were B&W one year and color the next. There were some hold-outs that went several years in B&W. It seemed like it took a good three years from when the TV listings would note which shows were "C" (in color) to to showing which shows were "BW" (in black and white). Now if you want to watch a B&W TV show you have to search one of the "retro" stations like MeTV, THiS TV, or Antenna TV, or rent an old TV series on DVD from Netflix. (Yes, Netflix still does DVDs and Blu-ray, but it seems that the streaming side has the advertisement dollars.)

Television snow? That was when I discovered channel 22 (which more often than not had poor reception where I lived), or after I had moved away from east of Los Angeles. Same with scarcity of channels.

But there are some things I don't miss from those days. If you wanted to watch a show in the 1950s through the 1970s, you pretty much had to be at your TV when the show aired, and hopefully another must-see show wasn't on a competing channel at the same time. And with so many vacuum tubes, it seemed that about every other month you would have no picture or no sound, so it was time to unplug the TV, feel around for an obviously cold tube or, worse, unplug a bunch of tubes and take them to the tube tester at the grocery store and test them out and, often, you would have to buy a different tube designation from a different manufacturer and try to remember what the original tube number was so you would know what socket to plug it in.

It wouldn't be until more recent times that VCRs would become affordable so you could watch TV on your schedule and even FF past commercials, later the DVR, and eventually the digital transition and the birth of plasma and LCD TVs that allowed TV sizes to grow to where one wouldn't have to drive halfway across town to appreciate a movie.

However, the modern 50-in HDTV does have one distinct disadvantage: if you watch some of those old 1950s and 1960s sci-fi shows, you can see some of the shortcomings of special effects, sometimes clearly seeing how some of them were done with strings or wires, as well as the limitations of the original recording methods, stuff you can clearly see on the 50-in HDTV that were invisible on the original 9-in B&W screen.

Snow? In my childhood I never dreaded it on the TV screen. As an adult now living in an area where it sometimes snow (the crystalline water type of snow), in this age of DVDs, Blu-ray discs, and digital cable, the only snow I see on TV is what the camera operators show flakes fluttering down from the skies or piling up on the ground.

Still, I don't feel deprived by not having TV snow in my childhood.
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My very humble setup:
Man Cave:Vizio E500i-A1 "Smart TV" (50-in 1080p 120Hz LED/LCD, has Netflix app.), Blu-ray player (Sony BDP-S3100), Roku (the original model: N1000), PC (Windows 7), Comcast Internet (29Mbps/6Mbps).
Bedroom:LG 32LV3400-UA TV (32-in 768p 60Hz LED/LCD), HD DVR (Motorola RNG200N), Xfinity Comcast cable (Digital Starter Package), DVD/VHS player.

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TV Notes
Cutting the Cord: Happiness is a cut cord, survey says
By Robert Bianco, USA Today - Dec. 20, 2014

Most pay-TV customers who cut the cord are happy that they parted ways with their cable company.

That's the finding of a new survey of cord cutters from management consulting firm cg42.

Nearly eight out of 10 cord cutters (77%) have no intention of returning to cable and are happy they dropped their pay-TV subscription, based on the 556 cord-cutters the firm surveyed last month. Those surveyed were past customers of the five major cable companies: Cablevision, Charter, Comcast, Cox and Time Warner Cable

"We found it very interesting that more than three out of four cord cutters were happy with their decision to … leave cable entertainment behind," said Steve Beck, cg42 founder and managing partner. "This is an early indicator of the manifestation of the problems and frustrations people are having with their cable companies."

Another cg42 survey, released in June 2014, found 53% of frustrated consumers would leave their cable company if they had a choice among other providers. This latest survey, released Friday, found "a small and active group of consumers taking an step to do something about it," Beck said.

More than half of those surveyed (60%) had cut the cord within the last six months. While cord cutting is "on the rise a bit," Beck stops short of calling it a trend. "It's still a niche," he said. "I would say it's still early days."

Most cord cutters (70%) still get Internet service from their provider. And most use between two and four online video services for their entertainment content, Beck said.

Most popular service: Netflix, used by 73% of the survey respondents, followed by Hulu Plus (59%) and Amazon Prime (44%).

Very few of them – only 3% -- say they are getting most of their content for free. Cord cutters are not "averse to paying for content," he said. "It's that they are averse to paying for content that they don't need or watch. They want the things that they want."

On average, cable companies lost $811.74 in annual revenue from each cord-cutter, the survey found.

Comcast and Time Warner Cable reported third-quarter losses of 81,000 and 184,000 pay TV subscribers, respectively.

The message for the cable companies is that "this is small now, but ... it is time to start fixing the frustrations you created among your customers by treating them so poorly," Beck said. "Ultimately, (the cable providers) will face challenges and we are starting to see that in this industry."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/c...ness/20662845/
I'm coming up on the eighth anniversary of the date I cancelled my Pay-TV subscription. I do not miss it at all. I haven't seen any survey that mentions WHY people "cut the cord" but five gets you ten they cancelled their subscriptions for the following:

1. Cost. Month after month, the cost of subscribing has done nothing but climb, climb, climb, at twice the rate of inflation. In my town a basic subscription goes for over $120.00 a month.

2. Quality.- As prices continue to skyrocket, the quality of what's being shown has done nothing but head south. These are among the following:

A. Advertising. Once upon a time, a TV Show was sponsored by one or two sponsors. These sponsors got the lions share of the time allotted for advertising, which consisted of eight to ten minutes per hour. Today it's a whole different ball game. No longer do shows have an "official" sponsor or two. Today all shows have multiple sponsors, many of which INSIST their ads be shown every ten minutes or so. The amount of commercials shown has increased to insane levels. While watching a show, you are BOMBARDED with commercials, which have increased to the point where people forget what they are watching.Older shows are "Time Sped" which means they are run at a faster speed, just so more commercials can be stuffed in. Believe me, you can tell when a show 's being time-sped, because the caricatures speak in a higher tone, and the background music changes a little. If that isn't enough, older shows are cut to ribbons to make room for even more commercials. The Commercials themselves are another reason, why do advertisers believe their products be shown in the most obnoxious and/or offensive manner possible? I read this year was the "tipping point" for time-shifting, more than half the population now records a show they want to watch and view it later (fast-forwarding through most, if not all the commercial breaks). You can't get away from advertisers between the commercial breaks, since ads are shown during the show itself. "Pop-Ups" Banners and Scrolls run constantly during a show obscuring up to a third of the screen. Then there is my biggest peeve - Age-Inappropriate Commercials. Advertisers don't care WHO is in front of the TV when an ad for their product is shown. "Adult Products" such as sex pills, contraceptives, and woman's hygiene products, among other things are shown morning noon and night. Even children's shows are immune from these kinds of commercials!

B. Programming Quality. Back when I was a child, the month of September was a "double-edge sword" for me. The bad news was Summer Vacation was over, but it also meant new shows were coming on TV. What happened if a show flopped? The final episode would air in December or January, and a new show would take its place. Today a show often gets cancelled after two or more weeks have passed. And what kind of show replaces it? One that's "unscripted" (that's "reality" shows for those of you in Rio Linda!) Even the "scripted" shows are shoddily produced, and one or more episode has some king of political "sermon" in it. The number of channels available are a joke as well. What good is 200+Channels? There are times when you can watch the same episode of the same show 15 times a day on just as many channels.

I once looked forward to Cable TV In my childhood years Cable TV was something only those who lived in the boondocks had access to, and the only "special" channel they had was one that showed the Time and Weather via a series of dials that a camera scanned to and fro. Things changed in the 1970s. Word got out that the the hicks (Those who lived in the boonies) were now getting all kinds of special channels, including channels that showed movies UNCUT and WITHOUT commercials? Us city-slickers were green with envy. It took a few years before we got access to the same programming (The Local TV Stations and Movie Theaters put up some massive opposition to Cable TV service in the areas they served (There was a "Save Free TV" message the Theaters ran before a movie asking for people to sign a petition which would be given to the legislature asking them to ban Pay-TV - look it up on Youtube - you know something? they were RIGHT!) In October, 1980 my town FINALLY got Cable-TV, and it was CHEAP. $7.95 a month got "basic" coverage while $6.95 a month got you a "movie channel".( There were three movie channels available (HBO, Showtime and The Movie Channel) and if you subscribed to two of them the third was tossed in for free) $21.00 a month, and the days of "nothing on TV tonight" were ERADICATED (My friends and I had a "Cable TV Party" about a week after we were "hooked up". Then President Jimmy Carter had a news conference scheduled that evening, and when the conference started we CEREMONIOUSLY changed the channel and watched a movie on HBO). Great time they were, alas it wasn't to last. On January 2, 2007 I decided paying to watch programming via a "service" was no longer worth it, so I switched "providers". I still pay to watch TV (Before this week is out I will acquire more than 500 hours of programming. I like my new Pay-TV service. It also offers TV Shows, Movies and other programming, uncut and devoid of any commercials. And the cost of this service? It actually goes DOWN in price as the time goes by. A Show that costs you $50.00 a Season when it first comes out can often be had for $10-15.00 if you wait a few months. Wait another six months and the price drops to $5.00. Reruns? yes, my service has those, but you get to determine when you view a program, because after you watch a program, YOU TO KEEP IT!!! I'm not saying I've reached perfection, but I have a system, and it works.
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An ISP saying that Netflix subscribers should pay a premium for bandwidth would be like UPS saying that it refuses to buy enough delivery trucks to deliver all of its packages, so instead it's going to devote 90% of its existing trucks to high-paying customers who want their packages delivered on time, while the remaining 10% of their trucks will service everybody else who can't afford for their packages to take less than six months to reach their destinations.

They could indeed do that, but it wouldn't be a very wise business decision, as if one delivery company doesn't provide good service, people will start sending their packages via a competing service. If demand is high, it's in the company's best interest to provide enough supply to meet that demand, or else it will lose business to competitors.
Bad analogy since that's exactly what UPS doesn't do and that's why the Post Office is still in business despite their huge losses. UPS, FedEx, etc., only deliver to profitable routes, the rest is shuffled off to the Post Office because they have to deliver to every mailing address no matter how unprofitable it may be to do so. And now that includes Sunday package delivery in some areas, like here in Phoenix. I can't tell you how many UPS, FedEx, DHL, etc., packages I delivered when I was a letter carrier for a few years. Another analog is that we all pay gas tax for highway maintenance, but who tears up the roads more, my little Prius or someone's huge 18-wheeler? Shouldn't they pay more? And if they do via the tax on diesel fuel, then all those with small diesel-powered cars/trucks pay the same as those 18-wheelers, fair?


Anyway, making an ISP upgrade their equipment to handle your traffic is an added cost that someone has to pay for, the argument is who? No ISP is going to eat that cost, so it gets passed to all its customers, including those who don't subscribe to Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, etc. If the ISP gets to charge Netflix, et al, then Netflix will have to raise its rates and only it's customers pay. Those of us who use Netflix probably already pay more because we subscribe to the higher speed tier. It's the same argument for/against ala carte cable TV service, spread the cost for most channels over all customers or make those who want the specific channel pay more for it. In many ways, your analogy says we should all get HBO and everyone should have to pay for it. To be sure, I have no sympathy for cable, but it's not as cut and dry as some make it seem. That said, I'm all for net neutrality because I consider it a utility, like you said. Even those who don't use it, reap some benefits from it, just like we all reaped the benefits of Tang from the space program.

Cheers, Dave

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I'm coming up on the eighth anniversary of the date I cancelled my Pay-TV subscription. I do not miss it at all............................... I still pay to watch TV (Before this week is out I will acquire more than 500 hours of programming. I like my new Pay-TV service. It also offers TV Shows, Movies and other programming, uncut and devoid of any commercials. And the cost of this service? It actually goes DOWN in price as the time goes by. A Show that costs you $50.00 a Season when it first comes out can often be had for $10-15.00 if you wait a few months. Wait another six months and the price drops to $5.00. Reruns? yes, my service has those, but you get to determine when you view a program, because after you watch a program, YOU TO KEEP IT!!! I'm not saying I've reached perfection, but I have a system, and it works.
Well then, you didn't actually cut the cord, did you? And neither did most others who say they have. As long as you use a service like Netflix, DVD's or whatever, you are benefitting from those of us who pay the full-freight. Without us, most channels wouldn't exist and most shows would never get made these days. Only then would you truly have cut the cord on Pay TV. IMHO, cutting the cord is going OTA-only and even then you'd benefit from the rest of us because I don't think TV itself would exist today without the fees from cable/sat, and now Netflix, Hulu etc.
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Why should I do the radio station's job?
Announcing the song and the artist should be a very simple thing to do, and yet the stations no longer do it.
Maybe you should buy a new radio.. one made in this millennium . CBS stations all have a policy of announcing songs, especially new or otherwise unfamiliar tunes. I mean, saying, "That's 'All About The Bass' by Megan Trainor" is kinda unnecessary, now, dont'cha think? Again, only half serious.

We send title and artist out over analog; title, artist, iTunes tagging and album cover over digital radio and web streams. So, we're doing our "work," thank you very much.

I've never understood why people who buy new televisions for the latest features, new cell phones for the latest features and new computers/tablets for the latest features balk when it comes to upgrading their 20-year-old radios. Not directed at you, just a general rant. Granted, I'm in the business, but even the 14-year-old receiver in my home theater will display title and artist, though I rarely use it to listen to the radio. Both cars display title and artist. One will do tagging. And even the little pocket FM I carry around shows the album cover of the current song.

But I digress...

Walking the fine line between jaw-dropping and a plain ol' yawn.
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