WGA (writers') Strike - where shows stand - Page 5 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #121 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 09:20 AM
 
bicker1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Burlington, MA
Posts: 8,289
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Or accept a stake in the show as full or partial payment for their investment of time working as a writer.
bicker1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #122 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 09:33 AM
Member
 
luckytwn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 199
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvthunder View Post

By financial interest I mean they put up some of the money to create the show.

Not to be harsh but you don't understand how TV shows are developed. For one thing, most shows are developed on spec and then sold to networks/production companies. That, in effect, is the writer putting up their own time (and money) to develop the show. Secondly, in regards to writers actually putting money into the production, no production company would want that as they are not going to dilute their own stake in the show. The pilot of something like Lost can cost $6-8 million dollars. Do you think Disney needs or wants a few dollars from a writer contributed to that total? What you're saying shows no sense of how the business works.
luckytwn is offline  
post #123 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 10:01 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
scowl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,436
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvthunder View Post

By financial interest I mean they put up some of the money to create the show.

Then "financial interest" is simply the wrong term to use. Writers do have a financial interest in the success of a show. Have you never been laid off?

In any case what we believe is irrelevant. How writers or musicians or any employees are compensated is between them and their employer. I don't think it's anyone's business but mine (and Uncle Sam's) about how my employer pays me or how much royalties I'm getting from some song I wrote a few years ago.

NOW: my post on AVS Forum.
NEXT: someone else's post on AVS Forum.
scowl is offline  
post #124 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 10:09 AM
AVS Special Member
 
lvthunder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 1,461
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytwn View Post

Not to be harsh but you don't understand how TV shows are developed. For one thing, most shows are developed on spec and then sold to networks/production companies. That, in effect, is the writer putting up their own time (and money) to develop the show. Secondly, in regards to writers actually putting money into the production, no production company would want that as they are not going to dilute their own stake in the show. The pilot of something like Lost can cost $6-8 million dollars. Do you think Disney needs or wants a few dollars from a writer contributed to that total? What you're saying shows no sense of how the business works.

Well maybe that way has to change. Isn't that the point of the strike. The writers feel they are getting the shaft. And look at how many other professions are going to be effected. Just look at how many people are going to be laid off because the writers are striking and the actors won't cross the line. People are being forced to either side with the writers or side with the rest of the staff. How do you think Jay Leno's makeup artist or videographer is going to feel towards him because he sided with the writers and they got laid off.
lvthunder is offline  
post #125 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 10:11 AM
AVS Special Member
 
lvthunder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 1,461
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Then "financial interest" is simply the wrong term to use. Writers do have a financial interest in the success of a show. Have you never been laid off?

In any case what we believe is irrelevant. How writers or musicians or any employees are compensated is between them and their employer. I don't think it's anyone's business but mine (and Uncle Sam's) about how my employer pays me or how much royalties I'm getting from some song I wrote a few years ago.

No I have never been laid off. I joined the company I work for when I was 18. I'm 29 now and I still work for the same company. They have been good to me.
lvthunder is offline  
post #126 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 10:19 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
scowl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,436
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvthunder View Post

Just look at how many people are going to be laid off because the writers are striking and the actors won't cross the line. People are being forced to either side with the writers or side with the rest of the staff. How do you think Jay Leno's makeup artist or videographer is going to feel towards him because he sided with the writers and they got laid off.

The same strike happened back in 1988 with no lasting repercussions. These people are adults (most of them anyway). Everyone knows it's about business and nothing personal.

NOW: my post on AVS Forum.
NEXT: someone else's post on AVS Forum.
scowl is offline  
post #127 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 10:38 AM
AVS Special Member
 
lvthunder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 1,461
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

The same strike happened back in 1988 with no lasting repercussions. These people are adults (most of them anyway). Everyone knows it's about business and nothing personal.

Try explaining this to the kids who want stuff for Christmas. Sorry Johnny we're tight on money because mom got fired because Jay Leno sided with the writers.
lvthunder is offline  
post #128 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 11:02 AM
Advanced Member
 
loco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 747
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Very interesting conversation going on here!

For those of you who are in support of the WGA, there's a great site that's trying to organize fans in doing whatever they can to help out. If you're interested, here's the link:

http://www.fans4writers.com/

They also have a forum where fans of all kinds of different shows are trying to get organized.
loco is offline  
post #129 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 11:15 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 27,875
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked: 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvthunder View Post

Try explaining this to the kids who want stuff for Christmas. Sorry Johnny we're tight on money because mom got fired because Jay Leno sided with the writers.

It's no different than any other industry that has unions or employee walkouts, there's nothing new or evil going on here, it's business as usual in the USA.
Keenan is offline  
post #130 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 12:45 PM
Senior Member
 
agregjones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Greenville, NC
Posts: 301
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

It's no different than any other industry that has unions or employee walkouts, there's nothing new or evil going on here, it's business as usual in the USA.

This is the choice you make working in a union system. Some parts of the economy are very productive without unions (i.e., Information Technology).

Greg Jones
agregjones is offline  
post #131 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 01:05 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
NetworkTV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: CT
Posts: 15,406
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by agregjones View Post

This is the choice you make working in a union system. Some parts of the economy are very productive without unions (i.e., Information Technology).

Unfortunately, working in a union system is seldom a choice if you want to work in film or TV. Unless you work for some of the very fewer non-union shops, you can't get a job without being in the union.

Personally, this is an example of just how unproductive unions have made things in this industry. Just look at ESPN (non-union) vs. ABC (union): who's more productive?
NetworkTV is offline  
post #132 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 02:13 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Rick_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Simi Valley, CA USA
Posts: 3,210
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
First of all this isn't just a writers strike. That is because whatever the writers get will then be demanded by the actors etc.

Why they get residuals at is is the nature of the entertainment business model. Two thirds of movies do not make money. As a result the participants are paid less with the understanding that if it is successful they will be paid residuals.

Just my $.02.

Rick R
Rick_R is offline  
post #133 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 02:18 PM
AVS Special Member
 
lvthunder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 1,461
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick_R View Post

First of all this isn't just a writers strike. That is because whatever the writers get will then be demanded by the actors etc.

Why they get residuals at is is the nature of the entertainment business model. Two thirds of movies do not make money. As a result the participants are paid less with the understanding that if it is successful they will be paid residuals.

Just my $.02.

Rick R

Yeah but how creative are the movie getting to say the movie didn't make money so they can get out of paying the residuals.
lvthunder is offline  
post #134 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 02:28 PM
AVS Special Member
 
doogiehowser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Unfortunately, working in a union system is seldom a choice if you want to work in film or TV. Unless you work for some of the very fewer non-union shops, you can't get a job without being in the union.

Personally, this is an example of just how unproductive unions have made things in this industry. Just look at ESPN (non-union) vs. ABC (union): who's more productive?

Wait a second. Are you saying if I want to work for ABC I would be forced to join a union or they would not hire me? That is such BS! I should be free to work wherever I want without being forced into a union.
doogiehowser is offline  
post #135 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 03:02 PM
AVS Special Member
 
doogiehowser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
What is the news with Las Vegas? How many episodes did they complete?
doogiehowser is offline  
post #136 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 03:32 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 27,875
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked: 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Unfortunately, working in a union system is seldom a choice if you want to work in film or TV. Unless you work for some of the very fewer non-union shops, you can't get a job without being in the union.

Personally, this is an example of just how unproductive unions have made things in this industry. Just look at ESPN (non-union) vs. ABC (union): who's more productive?

I don't know that that is a fair comparison, off the top, one is a pay channel the other free OTA, and they have different programming. I would think it would be too hard to make a point by point comparison of the two and how unions have affected one over the other.

There's bad unions and good unions, unreasonable demands and reasonable demands. As agregjones notes, if you choose to work in a particular environment, oh well...
Keenan is offline  
post #137 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 03:33 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 27,875
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked: 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick_R View Post

First of all this isn't just a writers strike. That is because whatever the writers get will then be demanded by the actors etc.

Why they get residuals at is is the nature of the entertainment business model. Two thirds of movies do not make money. As a result the participants are paid less with the understanding that if it is successful they will be paid residuals.

Just my $.02.

Rick R

Correct, the writers just happen to be the first at the plate regarding these issues, the others will follow.
Keenan is offline  
post #138 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 04:57 PM
Member
 
luckytwn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 199
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvthunder View Post

Well maybe that way has to change. Isn't that the point of the strike.

The point of the strike is to try and get the writers a little bigger piece of the pie. Nobody is suggesting that there is going to be a major change in how TV shows are developed and more importantly, paid for. Again, I understand that you're not in the industry but the suggestion that writers are going be personally involved in financing network TV shows is just not feasible or realistic.
luckytwn is offline  
post #139 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 05:03 PM
Member
 
luckytwn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 199
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick_R View Post

First of all this isn't just a writers strike. That is because whatever the writers get will then be demanded by the actors etc.

Why they get residuals at is is the nature of the entertainment business model. Two thirds of movies do not make money. As a result the participants are paid less with the understanding that if it is successful they will be paid residuals.

Just my $.02.

Rick R

That is incorrect. Whether or not a film makes money has nothing to do with residuals (though the studios would like it to be the case that no residuals are paid until the film breaks even).

Residuals start being paid as soon as the first dollar is made on the project.

You are mistaking the residuals with back-end payment based on net profits (what most people sign for unless they are a major star and command gross point). A back-end payment based on net profits is determined by how successful the film is. Writers/directors/actors do not automatically get back-end clauses in their deals, that is negotiated on a contract by contract basis and has nothing to do with the collective bargaining agreements.
luckytwn is offline  
post #140 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 06:19 PM
AVS Special Member
 
vfxproducer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 1,881
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytwn View Post

Not to be harsh but you don't understand how TV shows are developed. For one thing, most shows are developed on spec and then sold to networks/production companies. That, in effect, is the writer putting up their own time (and money) to develop the show.

This is a good point, but there is a flaw in the system. The creator of a show, say a Shonda Rhimes, David Kelly, Brian Fuller, Mathew Weiner, or Joss Whedon, develops their ideas on spec. They spend months or years working on a story premise and characters that would be engaging in an ongoing series. And for that effort, creating a franchise that makes a lot of money for a studio, they absolutely deserve some kind of residuals to share in the success. Without their initial efforts, the show wouldn't exist.

Where the system breaks down, I think, is that once a show is established, you have a room full of writers, all getting paid a very nice weekly salary (the minimum is more than $3,000/week), bouncing ideas off of each other. But the residual scale is the same for the episodes they write as for the creator of the show. At that point, I'm not sure the 8th writer in the room is really contributing more to the show than, say, the camera operator, production designer, wardrobe supervisor, gaffer, key grip, and construction foreman, none of whom make residuals, and get paid a lot less each week.

The same goes for features. Absolutely, the original creator of the Transformers should be cashing in on residuals for the success of that franchise over 20 years. But, should the guy who wrote the most recent version of that movie get the same residuals scale as the creator? That's a tough call. The characters and their motivations already existed. Plus, nobody went to see that movie for the script. The story was universally panned. What people went to see and made the movie a huge hit was giant transforming robots in a live action movie, and none of the animators and effects artists who brought those characters to life gets a dime after their weekly salary.

The whole residual issue, I think, needs a rethink. It's hard to imagine that the 2nd AD should get residuals, but not the heads of most departments. Likewise, it is tough to believe the director of a pilot episode should collect residuals on every episode filmed thereafter, whether he was involved after the pilot or not. I think there is room for discussion about who, and when, people are elligible and for how much as the industry evolves. It's just not the same business it was 50, or even 20 years ago. So why assume the same business model is automatically valid?

I generally support the writers, and I wish them well. But I think there are merits to both arguments, and the issue is too complex to just automatically assume that the writers are 100% right on every issue because they are on strike against big corporations. These guys need to talk to each other about where the business is going in the 21st century, and come up with a new model that works for everyone.
vfxproducer is offline  
post #141 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 06:30 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
fredfa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Antonio TX 78251
Posts: 49,069
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 50
I generally agree with your weel thought-out points, vfxp -- and something should be done about the actors, agents and others who get credit (and major payment) as executive producers, associate producers, etc.

They contribute little if anything but get paid every time the show airs.
fredfa is offline  
post #142 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 07:21 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
old64mb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 356
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by vfxproducer View Post

But I think there are merits to both arguments, and the issue is too complex to just automatically assume that the writers are 100% right on every issue because they are on strike against big corporations. These guys need to talk to each other about where the business is going in the 21st century, and come up with a new model that works for everyone.

Thanks, that's great insight on of some of the business model issues I was curious about. This and the syn-fin piece a week ago in the LA Times made me think a bit more about what's really going on, and while I think on some of the surface issues the writers are really getting the shaft, it's clear there's a lot more to it than that.
old64mb is offline  
post #143 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 07:56 PM
Member
 
luckytwn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 199
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by vfxproducer View Post

The whole residual issue, I think, needs a rethink. It's hard to imagine that the 2nd AD should get residuals, but not the heads of most departments. Likewise, it is tough to believe the director of a pilot episode should collect residuals on every episode filmed thereafter, whether he was involved after the pilot or not. I think there is room for discussion about who, and when, people are elligible and for how much as the industry evolves. It's just not the same business it was 50, or even 20 years ago. So why assume the same business model is automatically valid?

I generally support the writers, and I wish them well. But I think there are merits to both arguments, and the issue is too complex to just automatically assume that the writers are 100% right on every issue because they are on strike against big corporations. These guys need to talk to each other about where the business is going in the 21st century, and come up with a new model that works for everyone.

I'm an indie producer so I can certainly agree that some aspects of the residual system need to be rethought. I was responding to the earlier comment, which as I pointed out, was just incredibly way off base in regards to a suggestion that writers would be involved in financing TV shows. My remarks should not otherwise be construed to support or not support one side or the other.
luckytwn is offline  
post #144 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 08:11 PM
Member
 
TCAS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
These writers sitting in their home do work at their own pleasure and still make way over $200,000/year while average Joe straggle some times 12 hours a day work hardly to make ends need.
TCAS is offline  
post #145 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 08:14 PM
Advanced Member
 
loco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 747
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCAS View Post

These writers sitting in their home do work at their own pleasure and still make way over $200,000/year while average Joe straggle some times 12 hours a day work hardly to make ends need.

Everywhere I've read indicates the average yearly income of a WGA member is between $30,000-$50,000. And they live in L.A. and NY where the cost of living is very high. Sure, there are some writers who have other duties, such as producing, and they are doing very well, but most of them are not rich. At all.
loco is offline  
post #146 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 09:26 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
Keenan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 27,875
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked: 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCAS View Post

These writers sitting in their home do work at their own pleasure and still make way over $200,000/year while average Joe straggle some times 12 hours a day work hardly to make ends need.

Irrelevant.
Keenan is offline  
post #147 of 248 Old 11-15-2007, 11:59 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
NetworkTV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: CT
Posts: 15,406
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by doogiehowser View Post

Wait a second. Are you saying if I want to work for ABC I would be forced to join a union or they would not hire me? That is such BS! I should be free to work wherever I want without being forced into a union.

Pretty much. This is the response I got several years back when I applied for a position at the "Late Show with David Letterman". This was for a staff studio camera operator position:

"Thank you for your letter regarding a position at LATE SHOW.

As you may know, the position about which you inquired must be filled by a union member. These are posts hired by CBS through the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW). Late Show is prohibited from using freelance technicians.

Your interest in LATE SHOW is appreciated. Good luck with your future endeavors"


I ended up working on a non-IBEW, non-IATSE, non-WGA and non-SAG show. It was probably for the best since I'm still working despite the strike.
NetworkTV is offline  
post #148 of 248 Old 11-16-2007, 12:18 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
NetworkTV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: CT
Posts: 15,406
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

There's bad unions and good unions, unreasonable demands and reasonable demands. As agregjones notes, if you choose to work in a particular environment, oh well...

So would you also say that someone shouldn't do something to make mining safer with all the recent accidents that have occurred? I'm mean, if those folks choose to work in a particular environment, oh well...

I know that's an extreme comparison, but (while I'm not placed in any danger by them), if my career and livelihood can potentially be hurt by a union that I'm not a part of going on strike, that's bogus. TV jobs are tough to get. You can't just go to the next studio down the block and look for a sign in the window that says "help wanted".

However, I will agree with your first sentence. Some inion reps and even whole unions are better than others. Personally, felt dirty and used after once being a member of IATSE.
NetworkTV is offline  
post #149 of 248 Old 11-16-2007, 04:09 AM
 
bicker1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Burlington, MA
Posts: 8,289
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Unfortunately, working in a union system is seldom a choice if you want to work in film or TV. Unless you work for some of the very fewer non-union shops, you can't get a job without being in the union.

Which is why the certification of the unions themselves should bear far greater scrutiny, to ensure that the government isn't providing a free pass to engage in collusion that is being abused beyond the original intention of the laws created to grant de facto licenses for collective bargaining.
bicker1 is offline  
post #150 of 248 Old 11-16-2007, 04:38 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
archiguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 17,904
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Liked: 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvthunder View Post

Try explaining this to the kids who want stuff for Christmas. Sorry Johnny we're tight on money because mom got fired because Jay Leno sided with the writers.

How sad. And how different than: Sorry Sally, we're tight on money because the CEO of the company mommy worked for outsourced her job to India and fired her because she didn't have a union to collectively bargain on her behalf. But don't worry about him; he got a 13 million dollar bonus for eliminating Mommy and 10,000 other Mommy's jobs. Oh, and the company's stock tanked anyway; someday you'll know what that means. Here, have a piece of coal; Mommy's working in the mines now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bicker1 View Post

Or accept a stake in the show as full or partial payment for their investment of time working as a writer.

Right. That's essentially what a risidual is.
archiguy is online now  
Reply HDTV Programming

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off