WGA (writers') Strike - where shows stand - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 02:42 PM - Thread Starter
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As it looks very much like we're about to go nuclear, a very interesting article by the LA Times on how long we have before we go into reruns. This is more of a HOTP-type post, but given it does have detailed show information thought it deserved its own thread.

Hopefully this becomes irrelevant quickly for the right reasons.

Portions copyright Los Angeles Times, November 3, 2007

The TV Grid
The writers' strike would take an immediate toll on television viewers' favorite programs, dealing a setback to shows that are written day-to-day -- such as Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show" -- as well as scripted programming already underway or about to go into production.

Soap operas would theoretically start disappearing from the airwaves soon, since most have episodes to last them only until the end of the year. But during the 1988 strike, producers wrote in place of striking writers, and soaps stayed on the air.

Prime-time scripted series have episodes through mid-January or early February, depending on how many reruns they space out in the next few months. Unscripted shows -- such as "Survivor," "The Amazing Race," and, when it returns in January, "American Idol" -- would continue uninterrupted.

Here's a look at where many shows stand:

Late Night
"Colbert Report", "The Daily Show", "SNL" Will go into repeats immediately.
"The Tonight Show" and"The Conan O'Brien Show" Will go into repeats immediately.
Letterman, Craig Ferguson - going into repeats immediately [from Nikke Finke's Hollywood Daily blog]
"Jimmy Kimmel Live" Staffed with WGA writers, so it would probably go to repeats. But Kimmel could also decide to wing it and do the show himself.
"Nightline" Will remain live and in originals.

ABC
"Desperate Housewives" Has nine episodes written, which should last through the first week of December. [Report: production shut down 11/7]
"Grey's Anatomy" 13 episodes of 23 episodes written, 11 of which have been shot and six have aired. This means there are five more episodes in the can. [Report: production shutting down this week]
"Ugly Betty" 13 of 24 episodes completed.
"Boston Legal" Will have 14 or 15 of 22 episodes completed.
"Big Shots" Will have 13 of 13 episodes written. Shooting its ninth episode Nov. 7.
"Lost" Expected to have eight out of 16 episodes ready. Midseason, none have aired yet
"Cavemen" Expected to have 12 out of 13 episodes completed; has not received an order for a full season.
"Men in Trees" Has five episodes left over from last season, 10 new episodes shot, four more scripts to shoot; adds up to 19 out of 27 for the season.
"Cashmere Mafia" Will have seven episodes out of an order of 13; premiere delayed.
"The View" Will continue uninterrupted, according to a spokesman.
"Dirty Sexy Money" Expected have between 11 and 13 episodes completed.
"Brothers & Sisters" Expected to have either 11 or 12 episodes completed.
"Eli Stone" Will have 13 of 13 ordered. Midseason premiere date is undetermined.
"The View" Will continue uninterrupted, according to a spokesman
"Pushing Daisies" [Report production will stop shortly.]

CBS
"CSI Miami" Will have 13 out of 24 episodes completed.
"Moonlight" Expected to have 11 out of 12 episodes completed; has not received an order for a full season.
"Criminal Minds" Will have 12 of 22 episodes completed.
"Cane" Expected to complete all 13 episodes; has not yet received an order for a full season.
"Jericho" Will have seven of seven episodes.
"New Adventures of Old Christine" [Report: production halted.]
"Two and a Half Men" [Report: production halted.]
"Big Bang Theory" [Report: production halted.]
"Rules of Engagement" [Report: production halted.]

NBC
"My Name is Earl" 13 of 13 episodes completed.
"Law and Order: SVU" 14 of 22 episodes completed. [Report production will stop shortly.]
"Medium" Will have 9 of 22 episodes completed.
"30 Rock" Has nine out of 22 episodes completed, with several days of shooting for the 10th episode scheduled for this week.
"Friday Night Lights" Expected to complete 15 of 22 episodes.
"Scrubs" Expected to complete 12 of 18 episodes.
"Journeyman" Expected to complete 13 of 13 episodes; has not yet received an order for a full season. [Nikke Finke reports an agent says they shut down production 11/5 - or maybe not.]
"The Office" [Production shut down 11/7 - see youtube video.]

CW
"Everybody Hates Chris" Expected to complete 22 of 22 episodes.
"Gossip Girl" Expected to complete 13 of 22 episodes.
"Supernatural" Has 10-12 episodes completed;
Those shows also have roughly five scripts that are ready to shoot.
"America's Next Top Model," "Beauty and the Geek" and new shows such as "Crowned" (the mother-daughter beauty contest) Three of a number of reality shows that have already been ordered up, meaning they are covered for the rest of the season

Fox
"24" Will have eight or nine out of 24 episodes completed. Midseason, none have aired yet. [11/7 - On hold, Fox will not air 24 until all 24 episodes completed]
"Back to You" Will have nine episodes completed out of 24 total episodes ordered. [Report - production halted.]
"K-Ville" Will have 10 of 13 episodes completed.
"Til Death" [Report: production halted.]

USA
"In Plain Sight" New show, episodes are nearly wrapped
"Psych" and "Monk" Enough scripts in hand to guarantee a full second half of each season
"Law and Order: Criminal Intent" Enough for first half of the season (10); the second half (12) will be affected (meaning not enough scripts to guarantee production start as scheduled.)
"Burn Notice" Scheduled to start production of Season 2 in January
"Starter Wife" Scheduled to start production in March

Sci-Fi
"Stargate Atlantis" Expected to go on as scheduled.
"Battlestar Galactica" Has 10 hours of episodes, plus a two hour movie to air this Fall.
"Eureka" Will be affected.

FX
"Thirty Days" Completed, not expected to be affected.
"Nip/Tuck" 5th season, the 22 episodes were planned for two cycles: 14 to run from now to February and eight next year. All 14 in the first cycle have been written. So, only the second cycle could be affected.
"The Shield" The final season is written, no date set for airing.
"Dirt" Production is underway and could be affected.
"The Riches" 7 of 13 episodes, reportedly good through Dec 10
"Rescue Me" 5th season, just announced, would be affected since production is expected to start in early '08.
"Damages" No word yet on whether it would be picked up

HBO
"Entourage" and"Big Love" Are currently in the writing stages and were scheduled to air in the summer of 2008.
"True Blood" and "12 Miles of Bad Road" Have begun production.
"The Wire" Completed and will air as scheduled.
"In Treatment" New series will air as scheduled.

Showtime
"Dexter," "Weeds," "Californication" and "Brotherhood" Have ended or will be ending their season runs.
"The Tudors" Second season returns in late March, completed production Nov. 1 on 12 episodes.
A new Tracey Ullman series Five-episode series is shot.

Lifetime
"Army Wives" Production on hold.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-s...6966.htmlstory

Updated: How many shows are actually left? Check here. (Thanks Marcus Carr)
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post #2 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 03:12 PM
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Survivor....unscripted? Say it aint so....

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post #3 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by old64mb View Post

"Battlestar Galactica" Has 10 hours of episodes, plus a two hour movie to air this Fall.

Hello, split season. Not so nice to meet you.
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post #4 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 05:18 PM - Thread Starter
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Actually, the other random thought here is that shows that would otherwise be at great risk for getting pulled after episode 7 or so may make it to the full 13 - if only because there's nothing there to replace them and they're already scripted...
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post #5 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 05:49 PM
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This is kind of disappointing for shows like Scrubs that are on their final season. Other shows that will likely have a season next year can just pick it up where they left off, but shows that are ending will likely just be left hanging.

~Tighr: Not helping the situation since 1983

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post #6 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 06:14 PM
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I don't know a lot about the particulars of this strike but I assume it has to do with money. I can't help but wonder that not only do we miss out on our favorite shows and movies by them being stopped. When an agreement is made it would seem that a price hike across the board to make up the difference so everyone can get there money and not cut into current profit margins is what is to come. So I guess we as the consumer get boned even further. Can't wait for that $15 movie ticket price

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post #7 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 06:41 PM
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Thanks for the list, I was kind of curious where certain shows stood in the event of a strike.
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post #8 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 06:46 PM
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What about Heroes and Chuck?
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post #9 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 07:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbiscuit View Post

What about Heroes and Chuck?

This was posted in the HOTP thread yesterday: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...9#post12094589

TV Notes
The WGA Strike: NBC Shuts down production on Heroes
(Posted by the always reliable Travis Yanan in Marc Berman's Programming Insider blog)

I've heard that NBC has shut down production on Heroes. They were in the middle of shooting Episodes 13 and 14. They were asked to reshoot the ending to Episode 11 (which ends the "Generations" volume) to be a season-ender.

http://pifeedback.com/eve/forums/a/t...10238#20010238
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post #10 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

This was posted in the HOTP thread yesterday: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...9#post12094589

TV Notes
The WGA Strike: NBC Shuts down production on Heroes
(Posted by the always reliable Travis Yanan in Marc Berman's Programming Insider blog)

I've heard that NBC has shut down production on Heroes. They were in the middle of shooting Episodes 13 and 14. They were asked to reshoot the ending to Episode 11 (which ends the "Generations" volume) to be a season-ender.

http://pifeedback.com/eve/forums/a/t...10238#20010238

Are we sure it wasn't shut down on the basis of it having already jumped the shark after one season?
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post #11 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 10:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

This was posted in the HOTP thread yesterday: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...9#post12094589

TV Notes
The WGA Strike: NBC Shuts down production on Heroes
(Posted by the always reliable Travis Yanan in Marc Berman's Programming Insider blog)

I've heard that NBC has shut down production on Heroes. They were in the middle of shooting Episodes 13 and 14. They were asked to reshoot the ending to Episode 11 (which ends the "Generations" volume) to be a season-ender.

http://pifeedback.com/eve/forums/a/t...10238#20010238

That dosen't make sense. If they were in the middle of shooting then that means they should at least have the script out. Finish what they started.
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post #12 of 248 Old 11-03-2007, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by chitchatjf View Post

That dosen't make sense. If they were in the middle of shooting then that means they should at least have the script out. Finish what they started.

But they probably wanted to be prepared to have Heroes go on hiatus, so while the writers were available, they wanted to work ep. 11 into a good breaking point, since cutting off the show in the middle of the second arc (which is what they may have to do if the strike goes on too long) wouldn't make fans too happy.
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post #13 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 03:27 AM
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We should go to Hollywood and be 'scabs'!! We write crap all the time, look at the time we spend on AVS forums!

BTW, why is Stargate Atlantis continuing normally, do they already have all their episodes in the can, or are their writers not taking part in the strike?
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post #14 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by chitchatjf View Post

That dosen't make sense. If they were in the middle of shooting then that means they should at least have the script out. Finish what they started.

Well, basically they are finishing what the started. "Volume II: Generations" of Heroes is set to end with episode 11 anyway, so the episodes they were starting on are part of Volume III. Once the strike is resolved, they can pick up and finish Volume III and it can air uninterrupted.

Rocky
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post #15 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 06:39 AM
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Originally Posted by cavalierlwt View Post

We should go to Hollywood and be 'scabs'!! We write crap all the time, look at the time we spend on AVS forums!

BTW, why is Stargate Atlantis continuing normally, do they already have all their episodes in the can, or are their writers not taking part in the strike?

I'm guessing it's because most, if not all, of the writers are Canadian, and the entire production takes place in BC. Hooray for Vancouver!
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post #16 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by cstmstyle View Post

I don't know a lot about the particulars of this strike but I assume it has to do with money.(

From what I have read it stems from a disagreement about how to allocate the revenue from "other" media such as DVD sales and online viewing.

Example: Currently, they get $.036 from a $15 DVD of a show and they want $.072 per $15 DVD.

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post #17 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 07:48 AM
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I'm guessing it's because most, if not all, of the writers are Canadian, and the entire production takes place in BC. Hooray for Vancouver!

I don't know about Stargate, but while Smallville is shot pretty much exclusively in Vancouver, all the scripting is done in L.A. I noticed it wasn't listed under The CW in the above list, so maybe they've got the entire season on scroll already.

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post #18 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 08:00 AM
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From what I have read it stems from a disagreement about how to allocate the revenue from "other" media such as DVD sales and online viewing.

Example: Currently, they get $.036 from a $15 DVD of a show and they want $.072 per $15 DVD.

Actually, I believe they currently get NOTHING from DVDs at all.
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post #19 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 08:05 AM
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Yep, SGA is entirely done in Canada, in fact most of the the actors are Canadian as well. I think I may move to Canada, they got the best stuff up there!
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Actually, I believe they currently get NOTHING from DVDs at all.

That is not the case. The writers are actually looking to double what they get from DVDs.
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post #21 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 08:38 AM
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The Business of Television
Writers convene to finalize strike plan
About 300 'captains' who will serve as leaders on picket lines -- if a deal with studios isn't reached before Monday -- show up for a meeting at the Writers Guild of America West headquarters.
By Alana Semuels and Richard Verrier Los Angeles Times Staff Writers November 4, 2007

The headquarters of the Writers Guild of America West became the command center for strike preparations Saturday as guild members met there to finalize plans for the walkout set to begin at midnight tonight.

About 300 strike captains -- guild members who will serve as leaders on the picket lines -- streamed into the building in Los Angeles' Fairfax district to get their marching orders from guild leaders.

Their cars crammed the parking lot of the Writers Guild, and when it was full, the captains parked in nearby lots meant for customers of Kmart and Ross Dress for Less.

"People were pretty united," said Steve Skrovan, a writer for " 'Til Death." "This is it. This is the time in history that a stand has to be made."

The strike preparations came three days after contract talks between writers and their employers broke down amid disputes over the amount of money writers should receive from DVDs and from shows distributed online. The writers' three-year contract expired Wednesday.

Saturday's high turnout gave a glimpse of what is expected to be well-organized and widespread picketing Monday. It is the culmination of a months-long strategy by chief negotiator David Young to mobilize the union's rank and file and prepare them for a possible strike.

Since being named executive director of the Writers Guild of America West last year, Young has borrowed heavily from his background as an organizer of garment workers, carpenters and construction laborers, employing what he calls a "classic shop floor" approach.

Strike captains are a key part of the effort. Young has heavily relied on captains not only to update guild members about negotiations but also to rally them.

The captains, each of whom are responsible for calling designated groups of writers by shows or geographic area, recently played an important role in the record turnout by guild members who voted by a 90% margin to authorize their leaders to call a strike. Captains contacted members who had not voted and urged them to do so.

The guild also established a phone bank in the headquarters Saturday to call members and alert them of developments, captains said. They left the two-hour-plus meeting to alert members of the plans for Monday, saying they had little faith that any progress would be made in last-ditch negotiations between the guild and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers that was scheduled for this morning.

Guild members are being asked to sign up for a shift beginning at 9 a.m. or 1 p.m. and will be given signs, chants and red T-shirts emblazoned with "United We Stand" when they arrive on site, captains said. Each member is expected to picket four hours every day. Of the guild's 12,000 members, about 8,000 are in WGA West, with the remainder in WGA East, which plans to picket in New York.

Many of the members will picket outside the studios in which the shows they were working on are made, while others will be assigned to locations based on where they live.

Although several of the strike captains leaving the building said they had been asked by guild leaders not to talk to the media, others spoke passionately about the need for action.

"These are some of the most important issues writers have faced in many years," said Dan E. Fesman, a writer for "NCIS." "If we don't get these protections now, then we don't know what our futures are going to be."

Other captains talked about the message the strike would send to other unions, which they said have been largely defeated in the last few years.

"It's the middle class versus the CEOs -- maybe the middle class can win one this time," said Sivert Glarum, who has written for shows such as "Rules of Engagement" and "King of the Hill."

"This is union-wide. If we go down, they all go down."

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-m...la-home-center
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post #22 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 08:41 AM
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OK - new thread here for strike discussion:

Writers Strike Status

Was going to just direct people to this thread, but this is focused on the actual show status and would be best to keep it that way. New thread can be used for discussion of the strike itself.
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post #23 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 10:48 AM
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Hollywood Set for Last-Ditch Labor Talks

Nov 4 01:03 PM US/Eastern
By GARY GENTILE
AP Business Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) - A federal mediator was scheduled to meet with Hollywood writers and studio representatives at an undisclosed neutral location Sunday in a last-ditch effort to prevent a strike.
Both sides agreed to the meeting a day before writers say they will picket studios and movie locations. The writers' contract expired Oct. 31.

The writers want more money from the sale of DVDs and a share of revenue generated by the sale of TV shows and films over the Internet. The studios say the demands are unreasonable and would hamper attempts to experiment with new media.

The last time writers went on strike was in 1988. The walkout lasted 22 weeks and cost the industry about $500 million.

Writers Guild of America board members voted unanimously Friday to begin the strike at 12:01 a.m. Monday unless studios offered a more lucrative deal. The two sides have been meeting since July.

"The studios made it clear that they would rather shut down this town than reach a fair and reasonable deal," Patric Verrone, president of the western chapter of the guild, said at a news conference.

The union said it would stage its first pickets in New York and Los Angeles.

J. Nicholas Counter, president of the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, called the writers' strike "precipitous and irresponsible" in a prepared statement.

Producers believe progress can be made on other issues but "it makes absolutely no sense to increase the burden of this additional compensation" involving DVDs and the Internet, he said.

The first casualty of the strike would be late-night talk shows, which are dependent on current events to fuel monologues and other entertainment.

"The Tonight Show" on NBC will go into reruns starting Monday if last- ditch negotiations fail and a strike begins, according to a network official who spoke on condition of anonymity because the person lacked authorization to comment publicly.

Comedy Central has said "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" and "The Colbert Report" would likely go into repeats as well.

Daytime TV, including live talk shows such as "The View" and soap operas, which typically tape about a week's worth of shows in advance, would be next to feel the impact.

The strike would not immediately affect production of movies or prime- time TV programs. Most studios have stockpiled dozens of movie scripts, and TV shows have enough scripts or completed shows in hand to last until early next year.

Talks between writers and producers will likely affect upcoming negotiations between the studios and unions representing actors and directors.

All those unions believe revenue from content offered on the Internet, cell phones and other platforms will grow tremendously in the years ahead, even though it's now minuscule compared to DVD sales.

Consumers are expected to spend $16.4 billion on DVDs this year, according to Adams Media Research. By contrast, studios could generate about $158 million from selling movies online and about $194 million from selling TV shows over the Web.

Studios argue that it is too early to know how much money they can make from offering entertainment on the Internet, cell phones, iPods and other devices.

Producers are also uncertain whether consumers prefer a pay-per-view model over an advertising-supported system. They want the economic flexibility to experiment as consumer habits change in reaction to technology.

____

AP Television Writer Lynn Elber contributed to this story.

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php...cle=1&catnum=0

Larry

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post #24 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 01:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

TV Notes
The WGA Strike: NBC Shuts down production on Heroes
(Posted by the always reliable Travis Yanan in Marc Berman's Programming Insider blog)

I've heard that NBC has shut down production on Heroes. They were in the middle of shooting Episodes 13 and 14. They were asked to reshoot the ending to Episode 11 (which ends the "Generations" volume) to be a season-ender.

I suggest you get your news from sources that know what "fact checking" means.
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post #25 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by vfxproducer View Post

I suggest you get your news from sources that know what "fact checking" means.

I made it clear where the info came from, why did you decide to selectively edit the part about where I said it was posted in the Hot Off the Press Thread?
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post #26 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 04:09 PM
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TV Notes
How Much Will WGA Strike Hurt?
Writers want a piece of new-media money
By Ben Grossman and Marisa Guthrie Broadcasting & Cable 11/5/2007

As the Writers Guild of America (WGA) prepared to go on strike at 12:01 a.m. Monday, two critical issues emerged: How long can the networks hold out? And how much of the damage be irreparable?

The writers voted to walk last week in their contract dispute with TV networks and studios, as well as the movie business. Issues center around better compensation for content migrating to new platforms and better residuals from the sale of DVDs.

Barring an unexpected turn of events over the weekend, the long-anticipated writers strike is now on.

“In the past you'd figure you'd just wait it out, take a hit, and then get back to where you were before,” says one studio chief. “Now you don't know if that will be the case.”

The 12,000-member WGA called for the strike after talks broke down Wednesday with the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers. The current contract expired last Thursday. Neither side reported being close on any major issue.

A fundamental disagreement over payments to writers for DVD sales caused the sides to stop talking last week, but a long and rabid negotiating run-up had already made a work stoppage a foregone conclusion for many in the industry.

While the guild was preparing to hunker down, the network and studios were putting on their bravest faces that they could wait for the right deal.

“We continue to engage in serious negotiations and hope that an agreement is reached soon,” said Leslie Moonves, president and CEO of CBS Corp. earlier in the week. “But make no mistake, we are prepared.”

Some industry executives wondered quietly late last week if this would be a chance for the industry to bring costs under control and actually help the business in the long term (see Left Coast Bias, page 6).

But if history provides a guide, the strike will likely be costly to everyone involved.

Enduring pain

The last time WGA members went on strike, networks lost an estimated $500 million and 9% of their audience. That was in 1988 before there was a digital superhighway that was moving at warp speed with the potential to make real-time road kill of traditional media.

The 1988 strike lasted 22 weeks—from March into August. Some “bubble shows” never really recovered. Moonlighting is one of the more noteworthy examples and Hill Street Blues also took a hit that it never really shook off. But the strike occurred near the end of the broadcast network's high season and during the summer Olympics (which ran on NBC).

Also significant: Viewers had few alternatives then. Broadband and streaming video were just telecom pipe dreams.

Cable was still in its nascent stages with only 78 nationally delivered cable channels in 1988. There were 531 in 2005, according to the most recent data from the FCC, and Nielsen says the average home receives 104.2 of them. In 1988, the average home received just 27.7.

With such a vast and esoteric media landscape, and YouTube and other Web diversions, this time if large networks lose viewers it will be that much harder to lure them back.

In 1988 networks filled their schedules with reruns, news hours and hastily produced variety shows.

“There were a surprising number of Bugs Bunny and Garfield cartoons in primetime,” says Tim Brooks, television historian and author.

One of the main sticking points in the current tussle between the WGA and producers is the proliferating platforms on which writers' work appears. Writers want payment for online distribution of TV shows as well as union representation for Webisodes and other new-media content writers.

Producers contend those platforms have yet to generate significant revenue. The irony of the argument over the digital domain, of course, is the very real threat that digital will fill at least some part of the content void generated by a strike.

“Digital media may be the one [medium] that stands to gain the most from all of this,” said Brad Adgate, director of research at Horizon Media.

Indeed, consumers have more choice than ever and they may just turn their sets off and opt instead for their laptops, iPods or video phones.

Says Adgate: “This could be the tipping point.”

Where the networks stand

The networks have enough episodes of scripted series in the can to take them to January and they may spread original episodes out to take them even further, which means viewers may see a rerun or two in November where traditionally all original episodes of weekly shows aired. December is always an unimportant month marked by re-runs and holiday specials. But whatever the networks' strategy for spreading out original content, if the strike persists into early next year, the cash and viewer hemorrhage will be considerable.

CBS, NBC and ABC are enlisting their news divisions, readying more installments of newsmagazines and specials, which have always been used to plug holes in primetime schedules.

Look for reality and game shows to proliferate—they don't fall under the WGA umbrella for now.

ABC has Oprah's Big Give and Dancing With the Stars spinoff Dance X. NBC has its celebrity edition of The Apprentice ready for January and could possibly cherry-pick fare from its stable of cable networks including Project Runway from Bravo. And with a little creative editing, CBS could extend the run for the sixth installment of Amazing Race (which debuted Sunday).

Fox is perhaps in the best position. With American Idol set to return in January, the network could easily milk the franchise for more hours of the always-popular audition episodes.

Daytime syndication should continue, and perhaps thrive in a landscape largely populated by reruns. Soap operas will face real script cliffhangers by December. The genre is already struggling and weeks of reruns or “best of” installments could be the death knell.

Late-night comedy shows including NBC's Tonight Show with Jay Leno, CBS's Late Show with David Letterman, Comedy Central's The Daily Show and The Colbert Report would go into reruns immediately. (In 1988 then-Tonight Show host Johnny Carson was able to cut a deal with the Writers Guild so that he could return to the airwaves in May. David Letterman's Late Night soon followed, coming back in June—without writers.)

Last week, Letterman warned viewers that if there was a strike, Late Show would be dismal with him writing it. (In fact, the show will air reruns.)

A strike would be particularly damaging to new shows that have yet to build a core audience and anthology series that rely on a weekly fix to keep viewers hinged to their intricate plot lines. If last season's winter hiatus strategy is any indication (CBS' Jericho and ABC's Lost never really recovered their post-hiatus viewer levels), long breaks do nothing to generate anticipation. And with such intricate plot turns, crashing scripts has not been a viable option.

“We never prepared for” a strike, Heroes creator Tim Kring said in a recent conference call with reporters. “Once that train starts rolling, there's not a whole lot you can do to speed it up or slow it down.”

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/ind...leID=CA6497189
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post #27 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 04:18 PM
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TV Notes
The WGA Strike
Negotiations are underway; so are plans to picket

By Richard Verrier Los Angeles Times in the Show Tracker blog 11/5/2007

With a strike deadline looming, negotiators for Hollywood's film and TV writers and major studios are hunkered down in last-minute talks to avert a debilitating walkout that would begin Monday.

The Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers are making a last-ditch effort to reach a deal. Talks between the parties broke off last week when the writers' three-year contract expired.

Negotiations are at an impasse largely over sharing revenue from DVDs and shows distributed on the Internet and other new media platforms. Elsewhere, the WGA was organizing efforts to get members out on the picket lines early Monday morning. The strike is set to begin at 12:01 a.m. Monday, although picketers aren't scheduled to fan out across the county until 9 a.m.

Guild members are being asked to sign up for a shift beginning at 9 a.m. or 1 p.m. and will be given signs, chants and red T-shirts emblazoned with "United We Stand" when they arrive on site, captains said. Each member was expected to picket four hours every day. Pickets were also planned for New York.

"These are some of the most important issues writers have faced in many years," said Dan E. Fesman, a writer for "NCIS." "If we don't get these protections now, then we don't know what our futures are going to be."

"It's the middle class versus the CEOs -- maybe the middle class can win one this time," said Sivert Glarum, who has written for shows such as "Rules of Engagement" and "King of the Hill."

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/showtracker/
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post #28 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 05:15 PM
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Topics merged.

'Better Living Through Modern, Expensive, Electronic Devices'

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post #29 of 248 Old 11-04-2007, 10:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

I made it clear where the info came from, why did you decide to selectively edit the part about where I said it was posted in the Hot Off the Press Thread?

I kept the part that was truly relevant - the original source: the always reliable Travis Yanan in Marc Berman's Programming Insider blog, and again I 'd reccomend getting your news from people who check their facts.
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post #30 of 248 Old 11-05-2007, 12:21 AM
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Well, they're striking. Anyone one wanna take an over under on how long it will last? The last one in '88 lasted 22 weeks.

hd-dvd vs blu-ray: whoever wins... we lose.
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