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post #1 of 11 Old 01-30-2012, 05:48 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi,
I am looking for a decently surge protector.
I live in a rental community.

this is my setup:

ATT Dvr
Pioneer VSX-1021k
Samsung 55" LED
Polk audio monitor 70s x2
Polk T15 x2

In the future i would be adding more speakers and blu-ray player etc.

Any ideas on surge protector or how many joules??

Thanks
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-30-2012, 11:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geronemo3 View Post

I am looking for a decently surge protector.
I live in a rental community.

Great! I've been looking for the holy grail in power protection for use in rental properties and just about any other situation where larger and more permanent protection can't be installed.

Quote:


this is my setup

I don't mean to be rude, but I really don't care. Also, it doesn't make any difference since raw power respects no brands.

Quote:


Any ideas on surge protector or how many joules??

My idea on Joules? Love 'em! Can't have enough spare Joules. As long as I'm their keeper...

The term "surge protector" is a vague and often misleading thing. Remember THE surge? As in "the surge worked [sic]"? If your idea of a surge is facing down tens of thousands of angry US forces for several months, I can't help you. Defending against anything with a duration that's recorded by calendar is far beyond the scope of any apartment dweller. Same thing for storm surges and other events that last longer than an instant. Some things are bigger and better prepared that we can be.

Most of the time when I see "surge" written by a layperson in this context, what they really meant to say was "transient". Transients can be dealt with, using something less than multiple divisions of personnel and materiel. Transients are over before you can lift a finger in response. Transients can be dealt with at the wall outlet!

The word transient itself means something that's brief in length. The word doesn't say anything about amplitude, but in the real world the brevity of the event tends to blunt amplitude to manageable levels. Although stuff like lightning gets the news coverage, lightning is more complex than a simple voltage spike, and (as with all "acts of God") is beyond human intervention. Longer power events are typically man-made, and best man-handled.

If you're interested in a "best effort" protection that you can plug into the wall, consider Brick Wall products. They meet my engineering specifications, and I haven't seen any real competition to this brand, although I'm still looking. I've used Tripp-Lite Isobar products as a "poor man's Brick Wall" with good results. The Isobar works similar to how a Brick Wall product does, except on a smaller level and without the industrial grade stuff like crowbar circuits. You get what you pay for, as the saying goes. And with these products you don't get less than what you pay for, which is important to bear in mind.

If you have time to count Joules, you have time to unplug stuff so the Joules don't get to them. Most of the products that proudly "fly their Joule flag" might be able to meet the claimed number once. But because they use sacrificial devices called metal oxide varistors, that number is null and void after the first MOV takes its first hit. And there's no reliable way of knowing what's left in reserve for Round 2. Although it doesn't hurt to throw in a couple of MOVs (they're dirt cheap), just don't count on them.

You get what you pay for.  For professional advice, pay the professional rate.
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-31-2012, 05:47 AM - Thread Starter
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You do know you could have just said "I've used Tripp-Lite Isobar products"

Anyhow that's what i was looking for initially.

What would be the main difference between Isobar and Tripp Lite TLP810NET, Tripp Lite TLP1008TELTV in layman terms or are they the same.


Thanks a lot.
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-31-2012, 07:28 AM
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I have found over the years, that Back-UPS make better surge protectors.

Regular surge protectors don't protect your equipment from undervoltage, and only have a limited number of "protections" before they become just a power strip with a fancy light.

Back-UPS, higher quality ones, will completely take your equipment off the grid when they sense under or over voltage, and they can do it as many times as you wish.

We have really bad power here, and the UPSes have saved my equipment a number of times. After the North-East black out in 2003, when my computer fried, and the surge protector manufacturer told me that there is a $500 deductible, and the computer was not worth $500, I told them to shove their surge protectors...

Every electronic device we have is on a Back UPS. Survived a few power outages, a week on the generator (usually you don't want to run your electronics off generator, unless it is inverter style, but good UPS can clean up the dirty generator power)


I would look for 1000VA to 1500VA Back-UPS. Or maybe 2 of them, 1 for the TV, and 1 for the AMP.

6 TV's in the house on FiOS and we only pay $4.99/month to connect them all!!! Power to the CableCard and WMC7!!!
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post #5 of 11 Old 01-31-2012, 08:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geronemo3 View Post

You do know you could have just said "I've used Tripp-Lite Isobar products"

Ha-ha!
Good observation. Now........ get ready for the whirlpool of wisdom to follow.
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post #6 of 11 Old 01-31-2012, 08:46 AM
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get ready for the cesspool of wisdom to follow

ftfy
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-31-2012, 06:01 PM - Thread Starter
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The UPS are out of my budget which is pretty much maxed out after getting everything else.

If you guys know the difference between Triplite Isobar and Tripp Lite TLP810NET, Tripp Lite TLP1008TELTV let me know as i will choose from these.

Maybe next yr i can get a UPS or 2.

Thanks alot.
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-31-2012, 06:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geronemo3 View Post

The UPS are out of my budget which is pretty much maxed out after getting everything else.

If you guys know the difference between Triplite Isobar and Tripp Lite TLP810NET, Tripp Lite TLP1008TELTV let me know as i will choose from these.

Maybe next yr i can get a UPS or 2.

Thanks alot.

ISOBARS are premium surge, spike and line noise protection units which costs more than the standard surge protectors you have listed. You can visit the Tripp-Lite site for more details.

Mitsubishi WD-92842, Onkyo HT-S9400THX, Oppo BDP-93, XBOX 360 w/Kinect, XBOX (modded), WD My Book Essential, FiOS Bundle
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post #9 of 11 Old 02-01-2012, 09:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geronemo3 View Post

The UPS are out of my budget which is pretty much maxed out after getting everything else.

If you guys know the difference between Triplite Isobar and Tripp Lite TLP810NET, Tripp Lite TLP1008TELTV let me know as i will choose from these.

Maybe next yr i can get a UPS or 2.

Thanks alot.

I understand budgetary constraints, but it seems silly to spend $40 on a surge protector now, only to toss it out next year to buy a $100 UPS.

6 TV's in the house on FiOS and we only pay $4.99/month to connect them all!!! Power to the CableCard and WMC7!!!
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post #10 of 11 Old 02-04-2012, 01:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueiedgod View Post

I understand budgetary constraints, but it seems silly to spend $40 on a surge protector now, only to toss it out next year to buy a $100 UPS.

You do have a valid point, but i've spend nearly 2K in the last 3 months on this system

I'll go with a isobar for now and get a good UPS next yr. at that time i can connect the isobar with my monitor+xbox setup.

Thanks
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post #11 of 11 Old 06-08-2013, 06:13 PM
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All surge protectors connected to a socket will still let threw voltage up to 330 volts or even more depending on the specifications of the surge power bar. Anything connected to a surge protector still uses 250%+ of the power requirement when there`s power surges.

Appliances and electronics not connected to a surge protector have no protection against any surges.

New technology high quality whole house surge suppressors can now clamp voltage at 130 volts. Improving life expectancy by up to 32% of all electronics including appliances, electronics with microprocessors and anything with a motor.

Research and detailed information about power surges, surge protectors and lightning strikes can be found on this page:

http://armur.webs.com/surge-suppression

According to industry standards, power line surges inside a building can be up to 6,000 volts, and 3,000 amperes, and deliver up to 90 joules of energy. Including surges from external sources.

Any surge protector offering protection over those specifications is extra for nothing, a gimmick.

Typically destructive surges are hundreds of thousands of joules. Lightning and other high-energy transient voltage surges can only be suppressed with a whole house surge protector.

Surge protectors can offer no protection against indirect or direct lightning and other high-energy transient voltage surges.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surge_protector
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