HDMI destroys your gear - AVS Forum

AVS Forum > Video Components > Cable, Digital Cable - Non-HDTV > HDMI destroys your gear

Cable, Digital Cable - Non-HDTV

bluedog3's Avatar bluedog3
01:41 PM Liked: 0
post #1 of 8
07-26-2014 | Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 2010
We are always talking about the sound and picture quality of hdmi cables.The true untold story is how flexible is it ,what is is turning radius .When it comes to long cords over 25' , they can be to stiff or ridged putting extreme amounts of torque on the cards that are soldered into our A/V gear.Take it from me Im about to replace a Cambridge Audio $2000.00 receiver because of a stiff HDMI cord . Its time to make a better connection type.Id like to know how many people out there have had this same issue , Id love to see something done about it .
totesmuhgoats's Avatar totesmuhgoats
01:56 PM Liked: 11
post #2 of 8
07-26-2014 | Posts: 48
Joined: Jan 2014
I don't have gear that can compare to anything like what you have, but if you have concerns like that, maybe you could put some intermediary device to protect your gear? Like, if you are running the HDMI in wall, use a keystone jack, and then you can use a more lax HDMI cable from the wall to the device. Or, if it is just a long cable run, maybe plug the HDMI cable into a powered switch, and then run a lax cable from the switch to your very expensive components?
eljr's Avatar eljr
02:13 PM Liked: 1404
post #3 of 8
07-26-2014 | Posts: 4,382
Joined: Aug 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog3 View Post
We are always talking about the sound and picture quality of hdmi cables.The true untold story is how flexible is it ,what is is turning radius .When it comes to long cords over 25' , they can be to stiff or ridged putting extreme amounts of torque on the cards that are soldered into our A/V gear.Take it from me Im about to replace a Cambridge Audio $2000.00 receiver because of a stiff HDMI cord . Its time to make a better connection type.Id like to know how many people out there have had this same issue , Id love to see something done about it .
I can't understand how a ridge cable can injury a AVR.

Do you mean you did not allow for enough space for the cable length to naturally bend so it put continual pressure on the in jack? and it became loose?
mogrub's Avatar mogrub
02:19 PM Liked: 129
post #4 of 8
07-26-2014 | Posts: 572
Joined: Feb 2007
Some HDMI cables are definitely way less flexible than others. Some really don't give at all.

The Redmere cables from forum sponsor Monoprice, even at long lengths, are smaller diameter and very flexible. Might be worth a look for your set-up. They will take a return if you don't like it. http://www.monoprice.com/Category?c_id=102&cp_id=10255

The other thing that can help protect your hdmi sockets are the various swivel and pivot types of HDMI plug adapters. This is just one example: http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_i...seq=1&format=2

I had a favorite 65" plasma that floated inside a custom cabinet on a pivoting wall mount bracket. One time, turning the panel to access the rear of it, I accidentally tourqued the primary HDMI cable and HDMI input socket on the panel. When I noticed it, the plug was leaning at a bad angle, so I moved the panel back to a less acute angle. I got lucky and did no damage.

I installed a pivoting plug asap and it made that hook-up much more forgiving. Never had the problem again.
bluedog3's Avatar bluedog3
02:20 PM Liked: 0
post #5 of 8
07-26-2014 | Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by eljr View Post
I can't understand how a ridge cable can injury a AVR.

Do you mean you did not allow for enough space for the cable length to naturally bend so it put continual pressure on the in jack? and it became loose?
Some long cables,(Mono Price) are so ridged that it was naturally pulling upwards on the hdmi plug on the AVR , causing it to damage the connector inside the AVR , I've seen these before with TVs also , even when the cable had about 2' of slack on it
bluedog3's Avatar bluedog3
02:25 PM Liked: 0
post #6 of 8
07-26-2014 | Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 2010
I've bought a new cable with more flexibility and I'm sure I'll have better luck next time , I'm just very frustrated with the state of HDMI and think it causes more problems than solutions,
eljr's Avatar eljr
03:17 PM Liked: 1404
post #7 of 8
07-26-2014 | Posts: 4,382
Joined: Aug 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog3 View Post
Some long cables,(Mono Price) are so ridged that it was naturally pulling upwards on the hdmi plug on the AVR , causing it to damage the connector inside the AVR , I've seen these before with TVs also , even when the cable had about 2' of slack on it
ok, i understand

no one wants a foot of wire sticking out to be able to change its direction
blueiedgod's Avatar blueiedgod
08:29 AM Liked: 71
post #8 of 8
07-28-2014 | Posts: 1,583
Joined: Jan 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by totesmuhgoats View Post
I don't have gear that can compare to anything like what you have, but if you have concerns like that, maybe you could put some intermediary device to protect your gear? Like, if you are running the HDMI in wall, use a keystone jack, and then you can use a more lax HDMI cable from the wall to the device. Or, if it is just a long cable run, maybe plug the HDMI cable into a powered switch, and then run a lax cable from the switch to your very expensive components?

I second that! Not only from the functional aspect, but from visual aspect, as well. I do not want a hole in the wall with the wire sticking out of it. Especially if I am feeding it into a $2000 AVR.

I'm feeding mine into a $150 AVR and put wall plates with jacks for HDMI, optical and speakers, so that all the long wire runs are in the walls, and only use short patch cables to make connections. It is neater and does not put stress on the connectors.

Edit: Why replace the $2000 AVR and not fix it? Even if it is a couple hundred dollars, it is still cheaper than replacing.

Also, there are connectors with the correct angles for almost any application. Our TV is mounted so close the wall that straight HDMI cable can not be used, so we use 90° connectors.

Sounds like user error is the true culprit in the OP.
Reply Cable, Digital Cable - Non-HDTV

Subscribe to this Thread

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3