Converting Cat5e phone jacks to network lines - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 32 Old 03-15-2011, 12:55 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
skarlekar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Hello,

I am getting a new home built where the builder is going to use Cat5e cabling for the phone lines. The builder stated that they home will be able to support four phone lines (I am thinking that as the Cat5e consists of four twisted pairs, they are going to use one pair for each phone line - I am not a phone/network guy and I am just making this assumption).

In any case, I use Vonage VOIP for my phone solution at home and do not have much use for the phone lines. I want to convert the phone jack (RJ11) to network jacks (RJ45). I am aware that I have to replace the wall plates.

I need guidance on how to convert the four phone lines into one network connection. As the RJ11 have four wires (two pairs), I am not sure how these two pairs must be mapped to the four pairs of the RJ45 jack.

Any guidance or pointers will be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
skarlekar is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 32 Old 03-15-2011, 01:00 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Why not have the builder install what you want? Phone wiring is often done differently than network wiring.

Just a word of advice. If you don't have standard phone jacks, you may have trouble selling the place in the future. Why not have both?
Colm is offline  
post #3 of 32 Old 03-15-2011, 03:38 PM
AVS Special Member
 
MrBobb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 16
Since this is a new build, why not just order a separate network wiring instead of fumbling with the voice wires? Plus where the phone cable terminates may not be proper for a network "closet."

Solution: FREE. Explanation: I will have to charge$ you.

MrBobb is offline  
post #4 of 32 Old 03-15-2011, 03:50 PM
Member
 
iimig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: White Salmon, WA
Posts: 190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Agreed, would recommend additional wiring dedicated for the network. If that is not an option though, an RJ11 can be exchanged for an RJ45 keystone insert rather easily. There are usually colored indicators that show where each conductor goes on the insert. You will use all 8 conductors.
iimig is offline  
post #5 of 32 Old 03-15-2011, 04:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by iimig View Post

...an RJ11 can be exchanged for an RJ45 keystone insert rather easily.

Yes, as long as the cables are home runned from each jack to a central point. If they are daisy chained, it won't work.

While we are on possible technical snags, be aware that there is 2-pair Cat 5e cable...
Colm is offline  
post #6 of 32 Old 03-17-2011, 01:18 PM
Member
 
fridaylights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Everyone here is giving good advice. Now is not the time to cheap out on the prewiring. It is so cheap to run wire. It will be much more expensive for you to change the telephone terminations to be data terminations if you call someone in. Or, it will be very expensive or impossible if you want to add additional wiring or make changes in the future.

Just run 2 CAT5e cables to each room (one for telephone and one for data) and determine also where you want coax for TV. To finish it off, tell the prewiring guys that you want a structured wiring cabinet. This will force them to properly home run all your telephone, data, and coax to a central location so you can easily make changes in the future. In the end, this is best course of action and is not much more expensive -- plus you will not have any regrets in the future.

When my house was built using CAT 5e, I did not run two CAT 5e runs to each room but put in a structured panel. I later had some of my telephone lines converted to data only (1000BASE-T). I also had some telephone lines converted to share phone and data (100BASE-TX) on the same line with no ill effects on the data. The cost to get the prewiring guys to come back and do this extra work ended-up much more expensive to just run extra wiring to begin with from the start. I also have a problem where I want gigabit speed in one room but can not have a telephone line. This happens to be an office so I'm resorted to using a cordless which I don't like. Finally, another problem that I discovered in converting one of the CAT 5e lines from telephone to data is that it is not gigabit speed because one of the twisted pairs in the wiring was damaged during construction so I only have 100Mbps here. But if I would have run an extra CAT 5e run to that room, I wouldn't have that problem.

Basically, I think everyone here would advise to just run extra wire since it is cheap and still possible to do before the walls go up.
fridaylights is offline  
post #7 of 32 Old 03-17-2011, 02:35 PM
Member
 
Rob Greer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 175
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 15
I did this in the house that I recently purchased. The house was already in-wall wired with CAT 5 for phone to every room in the house and terminated in a box on an outside wall. To make it work, I clipped all the ends at each box, put on new termination ends per instructions and tools I found on the Internet. Then I ran the wires from the outside box through the wall into my garage where I clipped and fixed those as well. Then I installed an 8-port switch on the wall and hooked it all up. Instant network.

But the other people here are right. And make the guy install CAT6e not CAT5. You never know how much bandwidth you're going to need in 5+ years.

"By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death.... He that dies this year is quit for the next." -- William Shakespeare, Henry the Fourth, Part II
Rob Greer is offline  
post #8 of 32 Old 03-17-2011, 03:42 PM
Member
 
fridaylights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Agreed. I guess the material cost of CAT 6e is not much more than CAT 5e now. Even if they don't properly terminate to CAT 6 specifications, you can always easily do it later. With CAT 6e, you will be future-proofed for anything coming that is 10 gigabits per sec.
fridaylights is offline  
post #9 of 32 Old 03-18-2011, 11:17 AM
AVS Special Member
 
MrBobb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 16
When they say in 2011, "I am going to run a CAT5 for you in the phone wiring..."

And u immediately think, oh what a good deal!

It's really not. I mean in the sense that, NOBODY these days use the old 2 pair phone wires anymore. CAT5 is so prevalent, they get these things in bulk and really, if they don't wire CAT5 for all new wiring I'd be surprised.

CAT6 is another matter, he WILL charge u more. Then u have to decide whether the extra$ is worth it to ya.

CAT6 termination: The only thing I have found says to NOT to un-twist the pairs more than 4(?) inches at the termination. Shouldn't be that hard to comply.

Solution: FREE. Explanation: I will have to charge$ you.

MrBobb is offline  
post #10 of 32 Old 03-18-2011, 03:31 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Colm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 88
4 inches is way too much...
Colm is offline  
post #11 of 32 Old 03-18-2011, 06:17 PM
Member
 
FreeFire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Norman, OK
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
For network use, either Cat 5E or Cat 6 shouldn't be untwisted more than 0.5".

If you're only using it for networking, it's unlikely you'll utilize the extra bandwidth of Cat 6 in the next 5 years. Cat 5E will do Gigabit, and most houses aren't running cables anywhere near the 100 meter max length.

Cat 6 would have advantages if you ever attempt to run video over it using baluns, or if you try to go to 10Gb.
FreeFire is offline  
post #12 of 32 Old 03-19-2011, 08:02 AM
Advanced Member
 
Beemer533's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm View Post

While we are on possible technical snags, be aware that there is 2-pair Cat 5e cable...


As far as I am aware, there is only 2 pair CAT5 not CAT5e. CAT5e only comes in 4 pair...

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Over.....
Beemer533 is offline  
post #13 of 32 Old 03-19-2011, 10:25 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 7,893
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beemer533 View Post

As far as I am aware, there is only 2 pair CAT5 not CAT5e. CAT5e only comes in 4 pair...

Belden 1588A

http://www.markertek.com/Cables/Bulk...F6HU1000.xhtml

Although if someone is running Belden 2-pair cable to save a few cents over an inexpensive 4-pair Cat5e, they're doing it wrong!

Jeff


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
 -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

jautor is online now  
post #14 of 32 Old 03-22-2011, 02:23 PM
Advanced Member
 
Beemer533's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Interesting, I've not run across that stuff. I guess it's not surprising when it costs the same as 4 pair CAT5e...

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Over.....
Beemer533 is offline  
post #15 of 32 Old 05-14-2013, 10:02 AM
Member
 
Nukenbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Gulf Coast, Alabama
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I am in a similar situation. I have cat 5 (or maybe cat5e) cable run to phone jacks around my apartment (that I just bought). It is wired back to a central sport and punched down on this block:

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=xmlx1d&s=5

What I would like to do is bridge two wires from a bedroom with my office to the living room with my entertainment center at the central spot (perhaps on the same punch down block?) and then put in new wall plate connectors. I am concerned though that the wires may just be spliced and not all be direct runs.

What would be the easiest way to determine if I have direct runs, and if so, what would be the easiest way to bridge the two runs.
Nukenbar is offline  
post #16 of 32 Old 05-14-2013, 12:32 PM
AVS Special Member
 
AV_Integrated's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Northern, VA - Washington, DC
Posts: 2,990
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 166 Post(s)
Liked: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nukenbar View Post

I am in a similar situation. I have cat 5 (or maybe cat5e) cable run to phone jacks around my apartment (that I just bought). It is wired back to a central sport and punched down on this block:

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=xmlx1d&s=5

What I would like to do is bridge two wires from a bedroom with my office to the living room with my entertainment center at the central spot (perhaps on the same punch down block?) and then put in new wall plate connectors. I am concerned though that the wires may just be spliced and not all be direct runs.

What would be the easiest way to determine if I have direct runs, and if so, what would be the easiest way to bridge the two runs.
Kind of lost one what you are trying to do exactly. More specifically about what you are hoping to achieve.

I would expect, that every wire you showed on the photo to be Cat-5e, but you will want to look at markings on the cable jacket to determine exactly what type of cable it is.

The 66 block is ideal for jumpering wires together...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/66_block

But, it is not a network switch, and is not ideal for a Ehternet network. It is designed for home phone wiring, a baseline electrical connection.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Theater, whole house audio, and technology installation in the Washington DC metro area.
AV_Integrated is online now  
post #17 of 32 Old 05-14-2013, 12:47 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 7,893
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nukenbar View Post

What I would like to do is bridge two wires from a bedroom with my office to the living room with my entertainment center at the central spot (perhaps on the same punch down block?) and then put in new wall plate connectors. I am concerned though that the wires may just be spliced and not all be direct runs.

It appears on that block you have wiring to four rooms. Are there 5 or more cables coming to that block? It would be very odd for a partial "daisy chain" to exist unless the unit had retrofit wiring done. From a phone wiring perspective, it would be all or none (all wired in a star, or all daisy chained).
Quote:
What would be the easiest way to determine if I have direct runs, and if so, what would be the easiest way to bridge the two runs.

Count the wires and the jacks. Make sure at the jacks that there's only one wire coming to it (and not another one leaving). Highly unlikely there's a splice anywhere else except the jack locations.
Quote:
What I would like to do is bridge two wires from a bedroom with my office to the living room with my entertainment center at the central spot (perhaps on the same punch down block?) and then put in new wall plate connectors.

To do what, exactly? If you're trying to bring Ethernet from one room to another, via the wiring closet, you can certainly do that. You'll need to connect the two rooms' wires together at that punch block, which can be done. But you could also just terminate those connections and install an Ethernet switch instead, which would give you network capability in the other rooms, potentially, as well...

Jeff


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
 -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

jautor is online now  
post #18 of 32 Old 05-14-2013, 12:52 PM
Member
 
Nukenbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Gulf Coast, Alabama
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Sorry for being unclear.

Basically the apartment is wired for phone jacks that I don't use. After opening the plates, I noticed that they are wired with what looks to be at least Cat5 cable, but since the cables are so dirty, I could not tell exactly what they say. The wires come back to a central box where the outside line looks to be wired to a box next to it (which would be shut off, because I am not using it).

What I am attempting to do it use the wiring that is already in place to in effect create a long cable run that I can connect the living room outlet to a bedroom outlet.

Obviously, I would have to change out the RJ11 keystones with RJ45's, but I was wondering what would be the best solution to bridge the two wires in the central location short of using a full patch panel? Also I am concerned that the phone jacks are daisy chained together because there does not seem to be enough wires in the central box, but I'm not sure what to look for,
Nukenbar is offline  
post #19 of 32 Old 05-14-2013, 12:59 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 7,893
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nukenbar View Post

What I am attempting to do it use the wiring that is already in place to in effect create a long cable run that I can connect the living room outlet to a bedroom outlet.

For Ethernet? Regardless, yes you can do that.
Quote:
Obviously, I would have to change out the RJ11 keystones with RJ45's, but I was wondering what would be the best solution to bridge the two wires in the central location short of using a full patch panel?

You can re-punch the two rooms onto the same side of the block to splice them together. Or put a switch there instead like I said above.
Quote:
Also I am concerned that the phone jacks are daisy chained together because there does not seem to be enough wires in the central box, but I'm not sure what to look for,

The punch block is labeled for four rooms. You should see four wires plus the incoming phone line wire. Are there more than four phone jacks? Open up the ones you care about, it will be obvious if there's another wire spliced at that point.

Jeff


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
 -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

jautor is online now  
post #20 of 32 Old 05-14-2013, 01:09 PM
Member
 
Nukenbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Gulf Coast, Alabama
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

Are there more than four phone jacks? Open up the ones you care about, it will be obvious if there's another wire spliced at that point.

Jeff

There are two phone jacks in each room, but it makes sense that there is a run to each room and then a daisy-chain to secondary outlet. I'll investigate when I get home and report. Thanks for the help.
Nukenbar is offline  
post #21 of 32 Old 05-14-2013, 02:49 PM
AVS Special Member
 
AV_Integrated's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Northern, VA - Washington, DC
Posts: 2,990
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 166 Post(s)
Liked: 291
If you just want to make it Ethernet to go from one room to another through the closet, you can terminate the ends in the closet to a RJ45 connector, then just use a RJ45 coupler. This would provide you a solid cat-5 Ethernet connection that is extremely reliable.

I'm not sure if simply punching down the wires into the 66 block will provide the necessary connection required for Ethernet, but it may very well work fine to do that as well.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Theater, whole house audio, and technology installation in the Washington DC metro area.
AV_Integrated is online now  
post #22 of 32 Old 05-16-2013, 09:28 AM
Member
 
Nukenbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Gulf Coast, Alabama
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated View Post

then just use a RJ45 coupler.

Can you send me a link to what you are suggesting. A quick search on monoprice for "RJ45 coupler" doesn't seem to be the right stuff. Thanks
Nukenbar is offline  
post #23 of 32 Old 05-16-2013, 12:58 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 7,893
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked: 357
Monoprice calls them "Cat5e couplers", which is odd, but anyway:

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10519&cs_id=1051902&p_id=7284&seq=1&format=2


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
 -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

jautor is online now  
post #24 of 32 Old 05-16-2013, 02:22 PM
Member
 
Nukenbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Gulf Coast, Alabama
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Ah, I see that now. However that might not be the best for me as I just have the bare wires and I would rather punch down the wires onto something instead of crimping on a RJ45 connector.
Nukenbar is offline  
post #25 of 32 Old 05-16-2013, 07:47 PM
AVS Special Member
 
AV_Integrated's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Northern, VA - Washington, DC
Posts: 2,990
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 166 Post(s)
Liked: 291
If your intent is to use Ethernet across this cable, then use two of these instead...
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10513&cs_id=1051308&p_id=5371&seq=1&format=2

And use a short piece of cat-5 cable between the two connectors...
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10208&cs_id=1020801&p_id=4974&seq=1&format=2

Ethernet has some pretty serious tolerance considerations, so that would be the best way to do things IMO.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Theater, whole house audio, and technology installation in the Washington DC metro area.
AV_Integrated is online now  
post #26 of 32 Old 05-17-2013, 06:27 AM
Member
 
Nukenbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Gulf Coast, Alabama
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated View Post

If your intent is to use Ethernet across this cable, then use two of these instead...
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10513&cs_id=1051308&p_id=5371&seq=1&format=2

And use a short piece of cat-5 cable between the two connectors...
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10208&cs_id=1020801&p_id=4974&seq=1&format=2

Ethernet has some pretty serious tolerance considerations, so that would be the best way to do things IMO.

That's what I decided on. Thanks for the help and I'll report on my successor failure this weekend.
Nukenbar is offline  
post #27 of 32 Old 07-13-2013, 08:52 AM
Member
 
sarahd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I have a similar problem. The house has 6 cat5e lines that go everywhere except behind the TV where one is needed. There is a phone line by the TV. The phone lines are hooked into a box:


The wires have the following markings:
CAT5 to TIA/EIA 568-A High Data Rate 100 MHz 24 AWG.

Is it practical to use the Monoprice connectors referred to above to connect these wires to allow for an Ethernet connection so I can add a switch to the outlet by the TV to allow my devices to connect with the internet?

All of my cables that I currently use to connect my devices are Cat 5e. If I use this phone cable for ethernet to the location by the TV can I still use the 5e cables to connect my devices? Would it be better just to run a new cat 5e cable to the location by the TV?

Thanks
sarahd is offline  
post #28 of 32 Old 07-13-2013, 09:34 AM
AVS Special Member
 
AV_Integrated's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Northern, VA - Washington, DC
Posts: 2,990
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 166 Post(s)
Liked: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahd View Post

I have a similar problem. The house has 6 cat5e lines that go everywhere except behind the TV where one is needed. There is a phone line by the TV. The phone lines are hooked into a box:


The wires have the following markings:
CAT5 to TIA/EIA 568-A High Data Rate 100 MHz 24 AWG.

Is it practical to use the Monoprice connectors referred to above to connect these wires to allow for an Ethernet connection so I can add a switch to the outlet by the TV to allow my devices to connect with the internet?

All of my cables that I currently use to connect my devices are Cat 5e. If I use this phone cable for ethernet to the location by the TV can I still use the 5e cables to connect my devices? Would it be better just to run a new cat 5e cable to the location by the TV?

Thanks
Try to separate the cable from the use of the cable.

Those aren't 'phone' cables.

Those are cat5e cables which are being used for phone lines.

The box they are currently connected to is a phone distribution hub, which can't be used at all for Ethernet. So, if you do want to use those cables then remember...

1. You must pull any cables used for Ethernet off the telephone hub. Telephone communications != Ethernet communications.
2. You can use the Monoprice connections, or any RJ45 connections to couple one wire to another wire to extend it.
3. If you have multiple cat5e cables you terminate that you want to use for networking in your home, then put a network switch in your telephone closet to allow for this.

There is no advantage to adding a new cat5e cable by your TV if you already have a cat5e cable there. If you want to, and it is convenient enough, then by all means. But, if not, then use what is there. Either way is fine.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Theater, whole house audio, and technology installation in the Washington DC metro area.
AV_Integrated is online now  
post #29 of 32 Old 07-13-2013, 03:21 PM
Member
 
sarahd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 33
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Thanks for the quick response. A couple of follow-ups:

The existing Cat 5e cables near the box (not connected to the phone hub or shown in the picture) appear to have thicker shielding and are marked as 350MHz but the phone hub Cat 5 cable is marked as 100 MHz. Will there be a noticeable performance difference between the two cables? Would the shielding on the cables be the same? Don't want to convert the cables if I'm going to end up needing to run a thicker Cat 5e cable with the higher MHz.

I think you answered this when you indicated that you can use any RJ45 connections. So when I go to the termination spot for the existing Cat5 outlets (using the thicker 350MHz cable) the box is orange and is marked as Cat 5e. Most of the phone RJ45 boxes that are using the phone hub cable are also marked Cat 5e but are just white- So I assume there is no difference other than the color?

Any tips on how a novice could detect which of the current 10 phone lines would go to the living room (TV) outlet. Or does one just play line lottery? Since I don't use a wired phone service anymore I suppose I could just convert all of the phone lines into Cat 5e connectors and then test each one until it works. I have a multimeter but little else. Appreciate any advice you might have. If all else fails I can hire a cabling expert to sort it all out more efficiently.

Appreciate your help.
sarahd is offline  
post #30 of 32 Old 07-14-2013, 10:08 AM
AVS Special Member
 
AV_Integrated's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Northern, VA - Washington, DC
Posts: 2,990
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 166 Post(s)
Liked: 291
If cables aren't marked, then it is a game of hunting.

If you have additional wires which go to outlets, then you can use those instead, cat-5e isn't all identical in build quality, but should serve you just fine.

If using the wires which aren't punched down already, then you can go to the location where you want to run the network, strip the wire jacket back to show the wire pairs, then strip some insulation off of one of the pairs (the blue pair for example) and then tie those two blue copper wires together. At the telephone closet location, use your multi-meter set for a continuity check and strip back the jacket and insulation to expose the copper on the blue wire pairs, and check for continuity. When you find the pair which is not open, that should be the ones you have tied the wires together on.

They also sell wire toners which can be had online for around $30 or less.

This is what I have...
http://www.lowes.com/pd_166440-1781-ET4220L_4294722453__?productId=3127907&Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1

I think I got it from Lowes, and it was about $40 which is what it shows to me on their website. You strip back a couple of wires, put this device (more accurately called a wire toner or wire tracer) and go to the other end and touch each wire. It will start beeping loudly when you have the correct wires.

Then PUT A LABEL ON IT!!!

It is ridiculous in this day and age that all wires aren't properly labeled when the wiring is installed. But, it is what it is I suppose.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 0 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Theater, whole house audio, and technology installation in the Washington DC metro area.
AV_Integrated is online now  
Reply Home A/V Distribution

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off