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post #181 of 235 Old 06-01-2016, 08:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donwuann View Post
FRight now the setup is patch panel, gigabyte switch, router than modem. Currently the router is in downstairs closet which is the worse spot in the whole house.

Should I get another router for access point?
A cheap router that can be switched to "access point" mode would do (turns off the router/DHCP functions) - may be cheaper than a dedicated access point (because of the sales volume).

Quote:
Hook up modem directly to patch panel and relocate the router original spot?
No, that won't work. Must be modem->router->switch(if needed)->ports/devices

You could relocate your modem and router to another room, so that you connect the coax in that room to the modem, then a single cat5e from a router port back down to the wiring enclosure where you'd have your Ethernet switch to feed the rest of the rooms...

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post #182 of 235 Old 06-01-2016, 08:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donwuann View Post
Right now the setup is patch panel, gigabyte switch, router than modem. Currently the router is in downstairs closet which is the worse spot in the whole house.

Should I get another router for access point?
That or a dedicated WAP (Wireless Access Point). The Ubiquity AP-AC-Lite is about the price of a decent router and is probably a better WAP than any router at that price point would be.

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Originally Posted by Donwuann View Post
Hook up modem directly to patch panel and relocate the router original spot?
That only works if you have two ethernet cables going to the spot you put the router. One for the connection to the modem, the other for the connection back to the switch. You can't connect the modem directly to the switch.
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post #183 of 235 Old 06-01-2016, 07:27 PM
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Just a little comment about my wireless and wired system. Was having trouble with speed and some sites not even loading up, especially my favorite, AVS. Purchased a Netgear N900 Router. My old router was 10 + years old. Speed increased big time on wired and wireless.

Should of did this a long time ago.

(LCD - Sony KDL -52 XBR4) (Receiver - Yamaha RX-A1040)(Blu Ray - Oppo BDP-83) (PS3)( Comcast X1) Speakers (L & R - Paradigm Studio 20) (Center -Paradigm CC-470) (Surrounds & Back Surrounds - Paradigm SA-15R in walls) (Subwoofer 1 - Sunfire HRS-12) (Subwoofer 2 - Paradigm PW-2100)
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post #184 of 235 Old 06-01-2016, 07:53 PM
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Assuming where most structured wiring is placed puts routers in horrible spots.

Will eventually upgrade to a nighthawk or something in near future if I can find a good craigaliat deal.

Router I have now is a mid tier Linksys router but my 5 GHz network range is horrible . Once I wire up my desktop I'm hoping to turn my wifi adapter to an wifi repeater but I know that will eventually lead to problems.

Thanks again.



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post #185 of 235 Old 06-05-2016, 07:20 AM
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I am still confused about the order of modem-router-patch panel- switch-port and additionally what type of switch. The purpose of the network will be to interface with the internet, to distribute and store files and to connect with OTA TV and netflix.

I am thinking of signing up for google fiber and running it to a central distribution point in an equipment cabinet with google fiber's modem+router with four ports. I first considered that I wanted to run the four router ports to wall plates via Cat6a to the four rooms.

But then I began to wonder where in the chain I will attach devices that I would like to make available to the four rooms. The devices include network attached storage. a HDHomerun, (HDHR3-which may be replaced with TIVO) and down the road a UHD blu-ray player, and (a TIVO Bolt or Roamio which I assume will be attached to an ethernet switch with minis in the four rooms).

To further complicate this I am actually running what I think of as two additional networks. 1. An RG6 coaxial OTA network from an antenna to a splitter in the equipment cabinet and from there to the four rooms and to the HDHomerun to be distributed over the network. 2. Two additional Cat6a cables which will eventually be used to carry UHD from the blu-ray player to wall plates in the four rooms.

Please suggest the order of modem-router-patch panel- switch-port and additionally what type of switch.

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post #186 of 235 Old 06-05-2016, 12:47 PM
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There's is only ONE possible order. It HAS to go modem<->router<->switch. Additional devices can be connected to the router (if it has more than one LAN port) and the switch. If you have multiple devices in one location that all need to be connected, add a switch at that location. Generally, the modem and router are located at the patch panel, but not required if that's inconvenient. Locating the modem and router at different locations is possible, but requires additional cables that you might not have. The patch panel is not a device in the chain, it's just a way to connect the actual devices.

There are lots of good, cheap, gigabit switches out there. I usually get Trendnet or TP-Link. http://www.amazon.com/TRENDnet-Unman.../dp/B00C2H0YUA

Your RG-6 (coax) cabling for OTA has nothing to do with your network cabling. Don't even think of them together. The cables might go through the same cabinet as the ethernet cables, but they're not dependent on each other.
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post #187 of 235 Old 06-05-2016, 02:24 PM
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Thanks for your response which also led me to the forum on Home Theater Discussion and Review-networking, media servers and content streaming-Help with wiring. I had not been aware of this forum.

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post #188 of 235 Old 06-06-2016, 07:07 AM
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Similar problem

Firstly, thank you to everyone who contributed to this post. I have been searching the internet a while on this topic; nothing has come closer to helping me clear this hurdle than this thread. Tried to comprehend each person's problem and the solution but by page 5/6 my head was swimming a bit.

jautor, Skytrooper, FlyingDiver, I have learned a lot from reading your posts. Thank you.

Current house was built in 2013 and prewired for ethernet use. Modem set up in one of the rooms (den), I'd like to keep it there and connect two possibly three other rooms to "activate" their wall plugs. Have comcast / xfinity internet only. Connectivity "hiccups" a lot and not sure if it's a wireless thing, modem thing (Skytrooper's post about getting a new modem made me think), or what.

Pictures below show my set up. My guess is it's pretty bare bones compared to other set ups, noting the lack of a network plate/patch panel. nothing is labeled either (no final handwritten description of which number corresponds to which room), so I think I will need to find a cable tester and label both ends. I have a crimping tool and some ends, have done that before.


My mental stumbling block is this:

On my wiring block, what is the 'LINE IN' and where does it come from? I thought the Xfinity signal comes in via coax.

So trying to apply what I've learned from this thread, if my den (for arguments sake) is number '3' on my wiring block, I need to cap that end, plug it into the input jack on a switch and then find the other three rooms I want to connect, pull their wires from the block, cap and plug into the output jacks on the switch?

It just feels like i'm adding something unnecessary with the switch. Wouldn't the wiring block act like a switch if I got my den line (#3) moved over to the "line in" block? I may be making an assumption about the wiring block that isn't true.

Now that I'm thinking a bit more, perhaps line-in is for a phone, but I don't use an in-house phone, so this may not be necessary for me?

thanks in advance!
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post #189 of 235 Old 06-06-2016, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FLwired View Post
My guess is it's pretty bare bones compared to other set ups, noting the lack of a network plate/patch panel.
Nope, yours is a very typical setup. Coax splitter and telephone (telco) distribution block. Very rare to see a network block / patch panel installed by the builder unless it was specifically ($$) added by request.

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On my wiring block, what is the 'LINE IN' and where does it come from? I thought the Xfinity signal comes in via coax.
It's a telco block - that's the incoming telephone line from the street - aka a "land line". If you have phone service from Xfinity, the signal is coming from another room. For telephone, the block is just a wiring convenience - all wires are connected in parallel, it doesn't matter where the signal comes from. This is completely different than Ethernet networking.

Quote:
So trying to apply what I've learned from this thread, if my den (for arguments sake) is number '3' on my wiring block, I need to cap that end, plug it into the input jack on a switch and then find the other three rooms I want to connect, pull their wires from the block, cap and plug into the output jacks on the switch?
No, you need to pull any of those rooms off the telco block and punch them down onto a network block/patch panel, then connect those jacks to an Ethernet switch.

Quote:
It just feels like i'm adding something unnecessary with the switch. Wouldn't the wiring block act like a switch if I got my den line (#3) moved over to the "line in" block? I may be making an assumption about the wiring block that isn't true.
An Ethernet switch is a networking device that re-transmits bi-directional signals from all connected devices. The telco block is just a fancy wire nut. A network patch panel is just providing you with jacks instead of bare wires...

Quote:
Now that I'm thinking a bit more, perhaps line-in is for a phone, but I don't use an in-house phone, so this may not be necessary for me?
Ding ding ding! (ya could have edited the post instead of making me type all that... )

Your setup is just like every other one in this thread.


Jeff
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post #190 of 235 Old 06-06-2016, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

No, you need to pull any of those rooms off the telco block and punch them down onto a network block/patch panel, then connect those jacks to an Ethernet switch.

I don't use home phone and don't see myself doing so in the future. Is my telco block redundant and should I just remove it and plug all my wires into a network block/patch panel?



So my steps are:

1. trace all lines and label

2. purchase a network block/patch panel (any recommendations or brands to avoid?)

3. purchase ethernet switch (any recommendations or brands to avoid?)

4. cap all lines I want connected (and the modem source room line) and plug them into network block/patch panel

5. run short lines from network block/patch panel into the switch
Does the switch have input output dedicated jacks or do they all act as input/outputs?


thank you for the quick reply!
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post #191 of 235 Old 06-06-2016, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FLwired View Post
I don't use home phone and don't see myself doing so in the future. Is my telco block redundant and should I just remove it and plug all my wires into a network block/patch panel?
Sure. Just keep the telco block around, in case you (or someone else) change your mind in the future...

Quote:
2. purchase a network block/patch panel (any recommendations or brands to avoid?)
Get the matching brand/model for your enclosure so it fits and attaches to the mounting holes.

Quote:
3. purchase ethernet switch (any recommendations or brands to avoid?)
Any cheap Gigabit switch will be fine.

Quote:
5. run short lines from network block/patch panel into the switch
Does the switch have input output dedicated jacks or do they all act as input/outputs?
Most switches these days don't care. Old switches may have a dedicated "uplink" jack.

The router is a different story - the "WAN" (or similarly labeled) connection goes to the modem. The "LAN" jacks are the network switch ports.

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post #192 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 05:47 AM
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Do gigabit ethernet LAN switches slow down data transmission-are some gigabit switches faster?

Would it be better to go directly from a router to a switch and skip a patch panel and patch cable?

Would it be better to just use one of the four router ports to the switch and plug devices, (NAS, HDHR3, etc.) and cat6a cables to rooms into the switch?

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Gigabit is Gigabit. There's nothing you're likely to do in a home network that will max out a Gigabit switch no matter what you do.

The patch panel is for convenience. Unless you have bad connections or use bad cables, it's not going to effect the speed of the network.

Yes, doing all the connections at a gigabit switch is probably better than splitting them between the router and the switch. Many consumer grade routers only have a built in Fast Ethernet (100Mb) switch, not gigabit. And some of them have crappy switch implementations that will bog down the router if there's a lot of traffic on the LAN.
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I just moved in to a new house. House has ethernet ports all around maybe 6 all in all. 4 upstairs and 2 downstairs. There is a coat closet by the entrance and looks like all the cables are coming in there in a network block. There is no ethernet input however. All the wires are hard wired into the block. How do I make all the ports active? The internet cable is coming in that closet as well. I would want to make all ethernet ports active so I dont have to put the router in the closet and also hard wire the TV and Amazon Fire TV in the living room.

Currently I got the internet wire in the modem. Ethernet from modem to router and I have Wifi but dont think any of those 6 ports are active.

I would like to move the router out in the living room as well.

What I am thinking and please correct me if I am wrong or guide me. Yank all the wires from the network block out. Put ethernet terminals on them. Buy a switch put all the cables in there. Leave one port empty so I can hook up that directly from the modem and all the ports in the house will be live?

Connect the router in the living room port. Connect the TV and Fire TV in the router.

Any easier solutions? Any ideas or concerns are appreciated. Sorry if this is the wrong thread or wrong place.

Thank you for your help!
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post #195 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 10:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruttolat View Post
What I am thinking and please correct me if I am wrong or guide me. Yank all the wires from the network block out. Put ethernet terminals on them. Buy a switch put all the cables in there. Leave one port empty so I can hook up that directly from the modem and all the ports in the house will be live?
Read this thread from Page 1 - you'll get everything you need to know...

But you've got it mostly correct, except that your modem connects to your router, and any Ethernet switch must connect to your router's Ethernet ports.

We'd recommend that you terminate the bare cat5e wires to a patch panel / network block "module" instead of directly attaching RJ45 connectors - the patch panel is more durable.

Quote:
Connect the router in the living room port. Connect the TV and Fire TV in the router.

Any easier solutions?
It's easiest if you have the modem and the router in the same place, preferably in or near the wiring enclosure.

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post #196 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by jautor View Post
Read this thread from Page 1 - you'll get everything you need to know...

But you've got it mostly correct, except that your modem connects to your router, and any Ethernet switch must connect to your router's Ethernet ports.

We'd recommend that you terminate the bare cat5e wires to a patch panel / network block "module" instead of directly attaching RJ45 connectors - the patch panel is more durable.



It's easiest if you have the modem and the router in the same place, preferably in or near the wiring enclosure.
Thank you Jeff for a quick response. What do you mean by a patch panel? Should i just not cut the wires going into the network block attach a RJ45 port to those wires and put it in a switch?

So the router will remain in the coat closet but the ethernet port will be active in the living room so I can hard wire TV and Fire TV to that. Correct?

Thank you!
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post #197 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 10:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruttolat View Post
Thank you Jeff for a quick response. What do you mean by a patch panel? Should i just not cut the wires going into the network block attach a RJ45 port to those wires and put it in a switch?

So the router will remain in the coat closet but the ethernet port will be active in the living room so I can hard wire TV and Fire TV to that. Correct?

Thank you!
Do I even need a switch at this point because the network block itself is a switch? I can only cut one wire out of the block connect it to router and all the ports will be automatically active. Is there any benefit to the switch?

I got this one

TP-LINK-8-Port-Ethernet-Desktop-TL-SF1008D/dp/B0034CL3MA from amazon

House is 11 years old if it matters.

Thanks!
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post #198 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 10:51 AM
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[quote=ruttolat;44592993]Thank you Jeff for a quick response. What do you mean by a patch panel?

Quote:
Should i just not cut the wires going into the network block attach a RJ45 port to those wires and put it in a switch?
You CAN do that, but make sure you buy RJ45 connectors built for solid-core wire (not stranded). There are tool-less connectors available, too. And if you don't expect to touch this wiring, there's nothing really wrong with doing that.

A patch panel terminates each of the cat5e wires with a reliable punch-down block and provides a (female) RJ45 jack. You then run RJ45 patch cables between the panel and your router/switch/whatever. This makes for a much cleaner and more permanent and reliable setup. But the little patch panel "modules" that fit into these structured wiring enclosures are not cheap (like $40-60 for a 5-8 port panel).

Quote:
So the router will remain in the coat closet but the ethernet port will be active in the living room so I can hard wire TV and Fire TV to that. Correct?
Yes, if you attach those wires to ports on the router (or a switch connected to the router) - either by RJ45 jack or by patch panel - yes, you're set.

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post #199 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 10:59 AM
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[quote=jautor;44593161]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruttolat View Post
Thank you Jeff for a quick response. What do you mean by a patch panel?



You CAN do that, but make sure you buy RJ45 connectors built for solid-core wire (not stranded). There are tool-less connectors available, too. And if you don't expect to touch this wiring, there's nothing really wrong with doing that.

A patch panel terminates each of the cat5e wires with a reliable punch-down block and provides a (female) RJ45 jack. You then run RJ45 patch cables between the panel and your router/switch/whatever. This makes for a much cleaner and more permanent and reliable setup. But the little patch panel "modules" that fit into these structured wiring enclosures are not cheap (like $40-60 for a 5-8 port panel).



Yes, if you attach those wires to ports on the router (or a switch connected to the router) - either by RJ45 jack or by patch panel - yes, you're set.
If you can please provide me link what I need to buy on Amazon it would be awesome! Thanks!
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post #200 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by ruttolat View Post
Do I even need a switch at this point because the network block itself is a switch?
The network block / module is NOT a switch, it's just a passive set of connectors. Functionally equivalent to attaching individual connectors to each wire, just doing it in a more robust fashion.

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post #201 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 12:27 PM
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If you can please provide me link what I need to buy on Amazon it would be awesome! Thanks!
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ls?ie=UTF8&me=


To get the specific module to fit your enclosure, you need to tell us the brand of the enclosure. Or the brand on the existing telco module...

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post #202 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 01:37 PM
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I will upload a pic once I am home in few hours. That would help both of us out! Thank you for your help!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ls?ie=UTF8&me=


To get the specific module to fit your enclosure, you need to tell us the brand of the enclosure. Or the brand on the existing telco module...
hello
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post #204 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 05:06 PM
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Here is the photo
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post #205 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 05:08 PM
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So here is the photo of the ethernet cables coming in. I have ordered a TP link 5 port switch. Thinking about buying this for the whole install. Please let me know how to proceed

http://www.amazon.com/UbiGear-Crimpe...=sr_1_2&sr=8-2

Thank you
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post #206 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 05:19 PM
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I can't tell what brand that enclosure is, but you're looking for something like this:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/CE-TECH-8...5530/204294376

You could get anything similar and rig up your own mounting for it. All you really need is to make sure it's not touching the back of the cabinet, and screwed in securely.

You don't really need the crimper, you're better off buying pre-made patch cords. But you do need a punchdown tool to connect the wires to the punchdown block (the board in my first link). Something like:

http://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-.../dp/B0072K1QHM
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post #207 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
I can't tell what brand that enclosure is, but you're looking for something like this:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/CE-TECH-8...5530/204294376

You could get anything similar and rig up your own mounting for it. All you really need is to make sure it's not touching the back of the cabinet, and screwed in securely.

You don't really need the crimper, you're better off buying pre-made patch cords. But you do need a punchdown tool to connect the wires to the punchdown block (the board in my first link). Something like:

http://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-.../dp/B0072K1QHM
The brand of the enclosure is leviton. It is not a switch. I should probably but the 8 port switch. But thats besides the point.

So what exactly should I do to activate all the ethernet ports in the house.

Thank you for quick reply
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post #208 of 235 Old 06-08-2016, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by ruttolat View Post
So what exactly should I do to activate all the ethernet ports in the house.
Read this thread from the top (again?)...

Two choices:

https://store.leviton.com/collection...nt=18216684675

Which you'd replace the telco block and this would give you 6 Ethernet jacks. The larger Leviton panels are outrageously priced, so if you need more than six, go with the Leviton keystone patch panel, and buy a 10-pack of RJ45 Cat5e keystone jacks and snap them in. A 10-pack of Leviton QuickPort keystones should be like $30. Monoprice ones that should also fit would be a lot less...

https://store.leviton.com/collection...nt=18216179907

Keystone:

http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/Produ...minisite=10251

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post #209 of 235 Old 06-09-2016, 08:48 AM
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Jeff,

I am thinking about buying this.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/CE-TECH-8...5530/204294376

Take the wires from existing board out. Put them in this newly bought data expansion board that way I will have female Ethernet ports for all the rooms in this closet. I will plug an ethernet cord from the router to the switch, and fill rest of the connections on the switch to all the female ports from the data expansion board.

Let me know if that would work!

Anything I need to consider or watch out for?

Thank you!
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post #210 of 235 Old 06-09-2016, 09:03 AM
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You don't necessarily need to go through the trouble and expense (as little as it may be) of putting in a patch panel. When we are doing server rooms or data centers, it makes more sense as things may change, but for home use, we are really making a connection and leaving it. Although I am in IT and have been doing cabling since the 80's, my home installation does not have a patch panel. I terminated each cable with an RJ-45 connector and connected them directly to my switch. No issues at all. It just really depends on if you care how it looks or not. Some want the look of a patch panel, I preferred to skip it and instead ran my cabling as neatly as possible. It is all in a closet that nobody ever sees but me and the wife anyway.


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