Cat 6 cable - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 02-24-2013, 06:26 AM - Thread Starter
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I see posts about advice running cat 6 cables but not what they are for. What do they control in an a/v system? Thanks

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post #2 of 8 Old 02-24-2013, 06:52 AM
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Cat6 are Ethernet cables for hardwired LAN setups. If you are using gigabit lan devices you will want to run Cat5E or Cat6.

Mt receiver uses 10/100 lan (not gigabit) but I ran Cat6 anyways.
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post #3 of 8 Old 02-24-2013, 07:03 AM - Thread Starter
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Sorry still confused. So instead of controlling your receiver wirelessly you would run cat 5 or 6 from reciever to some sort of control interface? What the benefit over controlling everything wirelessly from iPhone, tablet etc.? Thanks

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post #4 of 8 Old 02-24-2013, 07:44 AM
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Cat5e/Cat6 can be used for almost anything in an A/V system.

Ethernet (including IP control)
Control (IR & serial to A/V components, wired keypads/touch panels)
Distribution (such as HDBaseT HDMI extenders; and baluns for HDMI, component or composite video, analog or coax digital audio)
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post #5 of 8 Old 02-24-2013, 11:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horsegoer View Post

Sorry still confused. So instead of controlling your receiver wirelessly you would run cat 5 or 6 from reciever to some sort of control interface? What the benefit over controlling everything wirelessly from iPhone, tablet etc.? Thanks

My receiver (Onkyo 609) is a network enabled unit (as are pretty much all new receivers). This means that I just plug in an Ethernet cable to the receiver and I'm done. I can update the firmware from the internet, play media that is stored on my network enabled devices and use my phone as a remote control using Onkyo's remote control app.

For me having the receiver network enabled is not really useful other than the remote control app that lets me stream media directly from my phone. Having my TV and Bluray networked on the other hand is great (Youtube, netflix...).
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post #6 of 8 Old 02-24-2013, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horsegoer View Post

Sorry still confused. So instead of controlling your receiver wirelessly you would run cat 5 or 6 from reciever to some sort of control interface? What the benefit over controlling everything wirelessly from iPhone, tablet etc.? Thanks

cshepard answered the "what for" question.

scipper77 explained network enabling a receiver, you would run a Cat 6 cable from your internet headend (modem) to a receiver. Your reciever is now on the network, my Denon has Pandora built in which is enabled for use when it is on my network using a Cat 6 cable.

The benefit of controlling a receiver with a control system is redundancy each of the rooms in a home with a control system will act the same when you pick up a remote and push on, the receiver and TV will turn on. And that function will act the same in every room. In some of the projects (homes) a client will have the same control system in 3 homes, so everyone that stays in those 3 homes will get to know the control system and how it works. That doesn't only apply to turning the TV on it applies to camera control and interface, climate control, lighting control, motorized window treatment and pool/spa control.

The reason, in my opinion, one would decide to use a handheld device to control a receiver rather than using a control system is size of a home and end user. In this area of AVS you have folks working on their own homes using the latest technology to their benefit and asking members who are in the home integration business for advice. So many of the end users that are participating here, like you, would use a down loaded application on their handheld device to control a receiver.
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post #7 of 8 Old 02-24-2013, 04:26 PM - Thread Starter
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What interface is there that I could mount on my wall say in my kitchen that I could control my music if say my computer is not on, and I don't want to use my iPhone? Would it require cat 6? Thanks

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post #8 of 8 Old 02-25-2013, 09:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horsegoer View Post

What interface is there that I could mount on my wall say in my kitchen.


Please provide an example of "interface" as you understand it.
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