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post #31 of 46 Old 09-06-2013, 10:33 AM
 
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Find someone locally that does computer networking. Call a A/V pro, and they may charge you anywhere from $75-125 per outlet, on top of a hourly rate. It is not that hard to do the networking to a patch panel.

My patch panel is now a six keystone plate, since I went from 14 jacks, to only six runs in my house, due to the rest is wireless-n.

This is actually very easy to do, so do not think that you cannot do it. It is just following the directions that we give you, and you posting pictures and links of gear to get input, to help you and lead you in the right direction.
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post #32 of 46 Old 09-06-2013, 02:05 PM
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here is a picture of the wiring... it says it's a "basic 1 x 11 telecom" all of the blue wires go to each of the jacks on all of rooms. also note that there are NO separate telephone jacks in the house except in one room.

thanks in advance
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post #33 of 46 Old 09-06-2013, 04:56 PM
 
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You just need this module for networking http://www.legrand.us/onq/networking/wired-networks/data-modules/364770-01.aspx#.UiprAzY2WSo Just follow the instructions that comes with the module. Pass-Seymour & LeGrand, have various modules for the OnQ panels for whatever you are needing. You can get the modules at any Home Depot, Lowe's, Menard's hardware or just order online, have shipped to your house.
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post #34 of 46 Old 09-09-2013, 10:34 AM
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A follow-up question...

After reading the installation instructions for the Anyline Data Module, I'm still a bit confused. As you see in my picture, there is a gray wire with what appears to be a CAT5 plug (it's to the left middle of the picture). Is this the "incoming phone service" as described in step 3.h of the instructions, or is this a "Bridge/Out" line that would simply just need to go to a router?

I guess I am just trying to understand the difference between what is already done to the room drops on my existing Basic Telecom module and what I would need to do on the Anyline Data Module.

Also, if I still need to use the Anyline Data Module, do I still then need a router? And, if so, what room drop becomes the "In" for the router?

Sorry if these seem like basic or no-brainer questions...I feel as though I am fairly tech savvy, but this is just confusing me.
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post #35 of 46 Old 09-09-2013, 10:56 AM
 
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They gray line from the module, plugs into another module for incoming phone. It gets confusing with the whole OnQ setup, is why you just have to take it a piece at a time. As for the router, it can go in the cabinet, but I would place a Wireless Access Point somewhere else in the home. Most routers with wireless, do not have enough output power, if the door is placed back on the cabinet. Here is one one person did their setup, that posted it over at Dslreports.com About the best example I can find. http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r23874440-My-new-home-network-setup Another setup http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r23454500-Help-With-Ethernet-Wired-Home-Network See about halfway down, another Structured panel example http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,27256565?hilite=onq+panel
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post #36 of 46 Old 09-09-2013, 11:44 AM
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In regard to the router that would go into the cabinet, which cable becomes the "In" for the router?

Also, I have Comcast cable with a router already. Would that router go into this cabinet with the cable line going into the router and then the outs go to the Anyline Data Module? If so, the gray cable appears to be a network cable and not a telephone line...the Comcast router has a telephone line in and only one output.

I think I'm starting to see light at the end of the tunnel...smile.gif
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post #37 of 46 Old 09-09-2013, 01:24 PM
 
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You could like I stated before, as the others have done, in the examples that I posted. For telephone, you will need to figure out which lines in that cabinet, you want for telephone.
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post #38 of 46 Old 09-10-2013, 07:52 AM
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Ok...I really think I have the path forward now.

I think I am going to pull the wires out of the OnQ module and have them terminate into RJ45 plugs.

Please let me know if I am on the right path from that point on...

First, I will connect my cable modem into the wall jack in my office (we'll call that cable 1).
Then, I will install a router in the OnQ cabinet (# of ports to be determined)
Then, I will plug cable 1 from above and plug into the router.
Then, I will plug all of the other cables that I terminated into RJ45 plugs (that are wired into all of the other rooms) into the router.

AT THIS POINT, I SHOULD HAVE INTERNET ACCESS IN ALL MY ROOM JACKS, CORRECT??!!

Now, to take it a step further, will this also give me phone access in all of those rooms as well? This is a picture of the back of the modem. Notice there is both an Ethernet and Phone 1 and 2.
https://secure.xfinity.com/anon.comcastonline2/support/help/faqs/emta/EMTAdiagram.pdf
I'm assuming it will not transmit the phone through those ethernet cables.

As an alternative, I could install my cable modem into the cabinet, right? If so, I would have the 'cable in' plug into the cable modem and then route that signal to the splitter already in the cabinet. Then, I would do the above with the ethernet connections having the ethernet "out" from the modem plug into the router and all of the incoming ethernet cables plug into the router as well. This just moves the "starting point" from my office to the OnQ cabinet, right?

If I did install the modem in the cabinet, that still does not solve the phone issue, does it? In fact, that will make it worse as I would not have an active phone jack in the house, right?

Thank you for bearing with me here...I want to make sure I fully understand everything before starting to pull wires and mess with what is already there.
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post #39 of 46 Old 09-10-2013, 09:57 AM
 
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Before you get started, go grab one of these http://www.lowes.com/pd_111115-12704-62-200_4294722453__?productId=3127545&Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1 This one is $98 http://www.idealindustries.com/prodDetail.do?prodId=33-856&div=2&l1=testers&l2=testers_coax&l3=33-856 at Lowes, and tests Phone, Ethernet, and Coax. I would go with the second one, since you will find you will be using it more than you think. If you only get the first one, it is good for checking your connections on Ethernet, if that is all you are going to use it for, or testing jumpers when you have issues, to determine if it is equipment or jumper issue.

I would just do like I did, and terminate the ends coming into the panel, into Keystones, that will go into a plate, to keep the costs low. I just had six runs, so I terminated all lines to Keystones, and mounted in a six port plate, then mounted that to a deep box that I have on a board that is under my main power panel. Below that is a shelf that I keep all my network gear on. It actually works out really well for what gear I have there. I used to use a 3 foot a/v rack that I had two shelves on, and a 24 port patch panel, but since I have shrunk down the number of wired connections, I went with this route.

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post #40 of 46 Old 11-19-2013, 11:40 AM
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Hey Guys,

 

I'm piggybacking off of this thread as well.  I've read through the two OP's questions and your responses with great interest and have learned a lot already, so I thank you for that.

 

Here's my situation:

 

1. Each room in my house has Cat5e cable run to it, and it all terminates in an OnQ box in an upstairs bedroom closet.

 

2. Currently, they're all terminated into a telecom module, which I already know from your explanations won't work.

 

3.  I understand that the best thing to do would be to get a switch, toss it in the box, terminate all of the cables with RJ45 jacks, plug them into the switch, and put my cable modem and router in the box with it.

 

3a. The critical flaw with the plan above is that my OnQ box has no power run to it - it's in a closet in an upstairs bedroom (currently my 8-month-old's room), and the only way to get power there that I can see is to run a cord from an adjacent wall jack around the corner and into the closet.  This is aesthetically displeasing and a potential safety hazard for my child as she ages, so it's not something I want to do (nor is it something I think my wife would let me do).  Therefore, I have no way to power a switch, the cable modem, or router at the OnQ box.

 

4. Currently I have my cable modem (modem only) connected to the cable jack in my office.  I have a wireless router/4-port switch unit connected to the cable modem.  Connected to the switch ports I currently have my work computer and a Cisco IP Phone which connects to my office phone system (I work from home).  

 

5.  What I would like to do is set up my old wifi router/switch upstairs in my game room to act as a WAP.  I would also like to plug in my PS3, Smart TV, and Airvana Airave cell tower device to the switch ports on that router/switch.  I know how to set the configuration options to make it a WAP, I just need to connect it to my actual router.

 

So, all of that is a very long-winded way of asking this question: I realize that it's not the honest-to-goodness, "kosher" way of doing it, but if I were to identify which wires were the ones for my office and the game room, would it work for me to splice them together (perhaps by punching both into the same spot on the telecom panel), essentially creating a long network run from my office to the game room?  I realize that doing so would not enable any of the other ports throughout the house, which is fine.

 

Thanks for the help!

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post #41 of 46 Old 11-19-2013, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t0r0nad0 View Post

3a. The critical flaw with the plan above is that my OnQ box has no power run to it - it's in a closet in an upstairs bedroom (currently my 8-month-old's room), and the only way to get power there that I can see is to run a cord from an adjacent wall jack around the corner and into the closet.  This is aesthetically displeasing and a potential safety hazard for my child as she ages, so it's not something I want to do (nor is it something I think my wife would let me do).  Therefore, I have no way to power a switch, the cable modem, or router at the OnQ box.

You could use a power inlet (power bridge type solution) to tap an existing outlet safely. Is there power on the other side of the wall that you could tap to install an outlet in the box by chance?

Otherwise, a Power-over-Ethernet powered switch would be an option to at least get the switch there. Like this one:

http://www.amazon.com/POEmax-8000-PoE-Powered-Ethernet-Switch/dp/B00322Q2UK


Jeff

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post #42 of 46 Old 11-19-2013, 12:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post


You could use a power inlet (power bridge type solution) to tap an existing outlet safely. Is there power on the other side of the wall that you could tap to install an outlet in the box by chance?

Otherwise, a Power-over-Ethernet powered switch would be an option to at least get the switch there. Like this one:

http://www.amazon.com/POEmax-8000-PoE-Powered-Ethernet-Switch/dp/B00322Q2UK


Jeff

I thought of that... unfortunately the wall it's on backs up to an attic crawl space that seems to be sealed off.  The PoE solution is intriguing, however.  Would it just get its power from one of the wifi router/switches I have plugged in to a wall jack, or do I have to get a special kind of switch that would supply power to it?

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post #43 of 46 Old 11-19-2013, 05:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t0r0nad0 View Post

I thought of that... unfortunately the wall it's on backs up to an attic crawl space that seems to be sealed off.

If it backs to an attic space, you might be able to fish a wire through to somewhere with power - something to look at...
Quote:
 The PoE solution is intriguing, however.  Would it just get its power from one of the wifi router/switches I have plugged in to a wall jack, or do I have to get a special kind of switch that would supply power to it?

You could, but all PoE equipment is more expensive - for this one use I'd get a PoE "Power Injector" module instead, which would go in-line on the uplink line to your router from the switch.

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post #44 of 46 Old 11-25-2013, 02:40 PM
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So as an update, I went ahead and identified the cables from my game room and study, then spliced each wire in those cables together, essentially creating a long, point-to-point Cat5e run.  My WAP is plugged in to the wall in the game room and is communicating with the wi-fi router and cable modem in my study without issue. Granted, this leaves every other outlet in the house dead, but I'm okay with that for now.  Thanks to you all, if I do get the desire to eventually make my other ports live, I now know that I can get a power injector and a PoE-powered switch to do the job right.  I appreciate the help!

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post #45 of 46 Old 12-15-2013, 10:12 PM
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Hi there,

 

I've been closely following this thread and I have a similar situation. I think I found a solution, but wanted to check with you guys to see if this is correct.

 

Below is my setup:

 

 

1. The yellow cat5 cables are not terminated on anything. They are just cut off. It sounds like I need to get this 8-Port Network Interface module (http://www.legrand.us/onq/networking/wired-networks/data-modules/363486-01.aspx#.Uq6PP2RDvwE) to terminate those cables.

 

2. I have the DSL wireless router on the first floor. I connect a patch cable into the wall from the router, which leads to one of these yellow wires in the home network. (I have no idea which one it is, so I just have to do a process of elimination by checking each one.) I can check each one by connecting a cat5 cable into the 8-Port Network Interface module by plugging it in and seeing if I get an internet connection when connected to my laptop.

 

3. Once I find which is the "live" wire. I can connect that into the cable modem port in a switch by using a patch cable. Then using patch cables, connect the rest from the Interface module onto a switch.

 

4. I should be able to get wireless as usual on the first floor and get wired connection on the second floor in other rooms by connecting right into the wall jack. 

 

5. If I wanted wireless in another room that doesn't get a good signal from the first floor, can I connect a wireless router to the wall to increase the signal?

 

Please let me know if all of these make sense and if I am correct or totally off base. Give a girl some help here!!!

 

Thanks,

GOF

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post #46 of 46 Old 01-26-2014, 08:22 PM
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Sorry no one has gotten back to you on this. I'll give it a try if still needed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GirlOnFire View Post

Hi there,

I've been closely following this thread and I have a similar situation. I think I found a solution, but wanted to check with you guys to see if this is correct.

Below is my setup:




1. The yellow cat5 cables are not terminated on anything. They are just cut off. It sounds like I need to get this 8-Port Network Interface module (http://www.legrand.us/onq/networking/wired-networks/data-modules/363486-01.aspx#.Uq6PP2RDvwE) to terminate those cables.

Yes, that is easiest and quickest. It will be best to take a wall plate off and check which wiring scheme they used when terminating the ports.

2. I have the DSL wireless router on the first floor. I connect a patch cable into the wall from the router, which leads to one of these yellow wires in the home network. (I have no idea which one it is, so I just have to do a process of elimination by checking each one.) I can check each one by connecting a cat5 cable into the 8-Port Network Interface module by plugging it in and seeing if I get an internet connection when connected to my laptop.

Yes, or an inexpensive tester will also let you assure your terminations, and the builder's are good.

3. Once I find which is the "live" wire. I can connect that into the cable modem port in a switch by using a patch cable. Then using patch cables, connect the rest from the Interface module onto a switch.

Not sure what you mean by "cable modem port", any port on the switch will suffice. There should be some documentation included if you are buying a switch for this purpose.

4. I should be able to get wireless as usual on the first floor and get wired connection on the second floor in other rooms by connecting right into the wall jack. 

Assuming all terminations are good.

5. If I wanted wireless in another room that doesn't get a good signal from the first floor, can I connect a wireless router to the wall to increase the signal?

You have to turn off the "DHCP" server in the second router and usually change it's IP address but this will work. Google "daisy chaining routers".

Please let me know if all of these make sense and if I am correct or totally off base. Give a girl some help here!!!

Good Luck, again, sorry no one got to you sooner.

Thanks,
GOF
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