How to Split content from DVD player to 5 tv's? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 06-19-2013, 12:45 PM - Thread Starter
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Hope I'm in the right section of the forum guys, if not please move it. What I have been designated to do/research at our High School since I'm sort of the tech guy among the coach's is to set up 5 TV's in our school's locker room and weight room to show content from one DVD player a coach's office. The IT guy doesn't really have much help since he just deals with internet, were going to purchase 5 new flat screen's so I figure use all HDMI and get a new dvd/blu player for output. I found the following splitter http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=109&cp_id=10113&cs_id=1011308&p_id=8205&seq=1&format=2 at monoprice which is powered and besides getting proper length HDMI cables is there anything else we would need to get it working? I know if we get cable hooked up later we would have to add an A-B switch to go back and forth.
Any help would be much appreciated, Thanks.
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post #2 of 14 Old 06-19-2013, 01:28 PM
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How far will the televisions be from your splitter? All of your displays have to be either 1080p or 720p. No mixing of resolutions or the splitter won't work. What is the A/B switch for? If you want to watch cable on one of the sets, just change the input..


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post #3 of 14 Old 06-19-2013, 03:24 PM
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Definitely the issues are:
1. Monoprice splitters are mediocre and can be unreliable. They are extremely consumer, and sometimes don't work at all. This is a risk without any guarantees whatsoever.
2. If your cable length on any HDMI run is more than 25' I would recommend using a HDMI extender over single cat-5/6 cable (HD-Base-T) which can reliably send a signal that far.

There are far better splitters out there which are guaranteed to work, but they cost a lot more.

Not sure why having TVs with different resolutions would cause an issue. A typical splitter should default to the lowest common shared resolution. Generally 1080i or 720p.


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post #4 of 14 Old 06-19-2013, 08:40 PM
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Another solution would be this switcher from gefen:



The OP can connect up to four different sources and send content to four televisions. It is more expensive than the monoprice splitter - and it can send signal up to 330 feet to the end user televisions.

http://www.gefen.com/kvm/gef-hdfst-444-4elr.jsp?prod_id=11384

How It Works

Using HDMI cables, connect up to four Hi-Def sources to the four HDMI inputs on the matrix. Connect up to four HDTV displays to the included Receiver units, also using HDMI cables. Use a single CAT-5e cable, up to 330 feet (100 meters), to connect each of the Receiver units to the matrix. To control each Hi-Def source from the display location, connect an IR Extender (Gefen part no. EXT-RMT-EXTIRC or EXT-RMT-EXTIRN) to the IR Ext jack on each Receiver unit. Connect an IR Emitter (Gefen part no. EXT-IREMIT) to the corresponding IR Out for each source input on the matrix and place the IR emitter over the IR sensor of the Hi-Def source. Point the IR remote of that source towards the IR Extender at the display location to control the source. To control the display placed near the Receiver unit, connect the IR Emitter output from an automation device (such as the Gefen PACS or MINI-PACS) to the corresponding IR Input on the matrix. Connect an IR emitter (Gefen part no. EXT-IREMIT) to the IR Out on each Receiver unit, and attach the IR emitter over the IR sensor of the display. Connect the included AC power cord to the matrix and connect it to an available electrical outlet. Power to each of the Receiver units is delivered from the matrix.


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post #5 of 14 Old 06-25-2013, 09:33 AM
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Here is one solution for your project for sending 1 DVD to 5 HD Displays.
You can use a HD over LAN extender which allows you to send to the 5 Displays using a standard CAT5e cable. The IT dept will definatly have the CAT5e cables readily available. The advantage is that CAT5e are low cost and easily made so you can make the cables to the exact lengths you need as you do the install.
There are 3 pieces you need: HD over LAN Transmitter ( attach to the DVD), a ethernet switch ( 8 port will suffice), and the HD over LAN receiver ( attach to the HDTV).

Hope this helps.

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post #6 of 14 Old 08-24-2013, 03:16 PM - Thread Starter
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Bringing this thread back as Tv's were purchased got all Vizio E series from BB. Guy in charge has an former player who works for Comcast is going to hook them up and he says he can get them to work by using splitters? Kinda skeptical and was wondering if there is another way by using the cat-5E cable as all of them have Ethernet ports.
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post #7 of 14 Old 08-24-2013, 05:58 PM
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Ethernet jacks on a TV are for streaming Netflix, and perhaps stuff from your computers which is fully compressed. It is not designed around uncompressed HDMI video signals.

You really want to find out exactly what this guy is going to do before you pay him one cent and make sure it actually delivers HD. What kind of splitters? What's he talking about doing in your home and charging you money for? Is he delivering HDTV to all of your displays and what makes you think a guy that worked for Comcast would have a clue how to engineer a HD system in a home?

Cable guys are some of the last I would trust - they rank up there with the typical Best Buy employee in terms of being clueless... They excel at that.


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post #8 of 14 Old 08-25-2013, 05:45 AM - Thread Starter
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This isn't going in a home, as first post it's going in school locker room and weight room. Guy is a classmate and his son plays here and he is doing work for free, Comcast is required by contract to provide cable service to schools for free in our town, but we only get one cable box, all TV's will show the same thing on the main TV on coaches office. If we want to play game film of ourselves or opponents we put it on in the office and i'ts shown through the whole complex.
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post #9 of 14 Old 08-25-2013, 12:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewc53 View Post

all TV's will show the same thing on the main TV on coaches office. If we want to play game film of ourselves or opponents we put it on in the office and i'ts shown through the whole complex.

And that's the issue - the Comcast guys will not have a solution for doing that (playing local content to multiple displays). If the school has the infrastructure to broadcast internally-originated content via analog modulators, that would work, but if not, there's going to be some gear to buy. An SD-quality analog solution is inexpensive, digital / HD not so much. The Comcast tech should be able to find a spot in the spectrum to insert "house channels" - at least for analog / SD.

Jeff


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post #10 of 14 Old 08-25-2013, 02:20 PM
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This all comes down to what your expectations are and what your actual requirements are against a still unmentioned budget.

Home or work doesn't matter really, the tech is the same.

In an older system, you may have an analog modulation system which can do this at the lowest possible quality available. It's cheap, it works, and it's a long way from HDTV or HDMI, but it is possible. HD modulators for digital delivery are out there, work well, and can't deliver over HDMI, but can do so over component video using standard RG6 coaxial cable with splitters.

But, as said, if this guy isn't telling you what he is doing, there is no actual telling what he is doing at all.


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post #11 of 14 Old 08-26-2013, 05:25 AM - Thread Starter
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Ok they just done install yesterday to get the cable to work from the DV converter box in the coaches office. Now what we want is to play a DVD in that office and play on all 6 tv's cheapest way possible. Comcast guy said use an RF converter from a DVD player with RF out?
What we coaches use is Hudl which we upload game video to their server's and can watch via an app on phone, tablet or website. Would it be possible to link them to a PC and access the website instead of from a DVD player
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post #12 of 14 Old 08-26-2013, 11:02 AM
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Wait - You want to watch a DVD, or you want to watch content which has been uploaded onto a server somewhere and is only available via a PC?

A DVD is a DVD, not a stream from the cloud, so it would be really helpful if you could detail specifically what you want. If quality matters, then the cheapest solution won't deliver. With most current cameras shooting in high definition, then I would expect a requirement to play back with that level of quality, which can't be delivered for the lowest cost option.

The lowest cost option is not going to involve HD or HDMI or digital... It will be, as mentioned, to modulate the video feed onto a specific channel and then tune your TV to that channel to watch it. You may need to inject the video into a coaxial line which may be in place already, and frankly it is not something I have specifically done so I won't be able to say how you would specifically accomplish this.

HUDL doesn't seem to offer any stand alone playback hardware and is only viewable through a computer/tablet device, so you don't have any real options if you want output other than splitting the signal out of a PC using the previously mentioned HDMI splitters and extenders or by putting a cheap PC at every TV location.

Monoprice does have a 1x8 HDMI splitter which includes cat5/6 cable receivers in the box for $270...

http://www.monoprice.com/Product/?c_id=101&cp_id=10113&cs_id=1011308&p_id=8160&seq=1&format=1#largeimage

This would probably deliver the highest quality for the money IF it works properly. I haven't used it. I was about to recommend this:
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=101&cp_id=10113&cs_id=1011308&p_id=8205&seq=1&format=2
with 6 of these...
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=109&cp_id=10110&cs_id=1011012&p_id=8122&seq=1&format=2

Which would have run about $1,200, plus you would still need a bunch of HDMI cables.

Regardless of the cat-5/6 solution, you will need dedicated cat-5/6 run from the splitting device to each display.


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post #13 of 14 Old 08-27-2013, 06:23 PM - Thread Starter
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That first option with the all in one looks like the best bet. The head coaches is still old school, we bought an HD camera 3 yrs ago but recorded in SD because up until this year we had to trade DVDs for film swaps with opponents, And he wants a DVD of every game anyway as a hard copy. Hudl only allows so much space on severs so HD would eat it up though I still try to talk with doing HD recording he won't bite with cost of blu ray discs.
Anyway I was wondering about the option to feed it from the PC in his office instead of from DVD player to the tv's would still need the all in one kit?
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post #14 of 14 Old 08-27-2013, 09:45 PM
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With a PC, the all-in-one kit is the way to go. If you are storing videos locally on a hard drive in HD quality, then you can burn them to DVDs in any number of highly compressed flavors which will outshine DVD quality and will be in HD and fit onto a double layer DVD recordable disc rather nicely.

It is also moving forward such that flash memory is a popular way of storing HD videos for archival and editing purposes.

Either way, to deliver the best possible performance, you want a HD connection to your sources, and HD means component video, VGA, or HDMI, with HDMI being the current gold standard. That HDMI splitter delivers (or claims to deliver) HDMI over the distances you need for not a ton of cash. You can hook it to a PC, a DVD player with HDMI output, Blu-ray, cable, etc.


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