[SOLVED] connect router to a TV via cat5e through patch panel without switch - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 09-22-2013, 07:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Hello,

I've been reading here and found a few very similar threads but hopefully my case is more simplistic.

My goal it is to connect one of the ports of my wireless router ASUS RT-N66U, located in den, to my TV in a living room.

My house is already wired with cat 5e and I have R45 jacks close to TV and my router.
All wires are coming to ONQ panel box. I did not have a patch panel for data so I went ahead I got this patch panel from home depot:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-Structured-Media-6-Port-Cat5e-Voice-and-Data-Stand-Alone-Module-with-Bracket-R00-47605-CB5/100662465#.Uj-nOtLOlKA

My in wall plugs and patch panels are using 586A standard.

After reading here, I know I need to punch down my cables now to a patch panel (done!) and then use small patch cords to connect each of them to a switch.

My question though is if there is a way to avoid getting a switch. I really only need to connect my router in den to a TV in a living room - I am not planing to use wired Ethernet for anything else since I am happy with wifi.

Is it possible to connect two ports now on my data patch panel with a patch cord so the signal will go straight from a plug in my den to a plug in my living room?

Just for testing, I tried to plug my laptop to a patch panel jack connected to a wire to den but with no luck. I found the wire going to den but I cannot find the wire that goes to a living room - my second question how i can test it from a panel box?
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post #2 of 10 Old 09-22-2013, 09:00 PM
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Your router is also a switch, that is what the 4 ports are. You simply need to plug the router into the outlet in the den, jumper that at your patch panel and connect the TV to the plug in the living room, and you're done.
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post #3 of 10 Old 09-22-2013, 09:44 PM
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To put it simply, a switch directs traffic. You can hardwire the traffic with a single cable connecting the homerun cables from the router room to the tv room. You can do this with only a laptop and no special tools needed. Just plug an ethernet cable from one of the (most likely) 4 outputs into the rj-45 wall jack going to the patch panel. Then take your laptop to the patch panel, and test each port of the patch panel by plugging another cable into the LAN port of the laptop. You've found the right one when you have a network connection on the laptop. The ethernet cable will remain plugged into that port of the patch panel, and you will do a similar process to find the homerun cable going to the tv room. This will involve a little bit of running around. You will try plugging the other end of the cable at the homerun into each remaining port of the patch panel. Each time, run over to the laptop which is new connected to the rj-45 jack in the tv room, and see if you have a network connection. Once you do, you're done.

It's easier with testing devices, but there's no sense in buying them if you can do it without in less time than it takes to go to the store. The advantage of testing tools is they will tell you if the pairs are terminated properly. If they aren't it might still work, but you won't know until you try.
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post #4 of 10 Old 09-23-2013, 06:22 AM - Thread Starter
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thanks guys. Matt, this is exactly what I tried yesterday - thanks for confirming my thought that it should work. Unfortunately it does not.

So I connected cables to a data patch panel and I found the port there that goes to my den (and router). I used my spare router instead of laptop to test connection and the signal light went up on that port but I am not getting connected to a network for some reason. I cannot get past that test so I guess something is wrong with either a wiring from den or with my patch panel and looks like I need to get a tester tool to check all 8 wires in a cable.

Then I tried my laptop like you suggested and laptop could not connect to any of the 6 ports on a patch panel.
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post #5 of 10 Old 09-23-2013, 08:26 AM
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Generally speaking, it's always the wiring.

If you don't intend to do this often, you may want to send out an email at your office to see if anyone has some testers you can borrow. It is common now for several office members to have something that they own that isn't in heavy use. This may include a cable toner as well as a network tester.

You want to:
1. Be sure the cables you have punched down actually go where they are suppose to go.
2. Make sure that the colors in use are in the right spot.
3. Make sure they are fully punched down as they should be.

If you can, bring your router to the basement and plug it in there and see if you can get network lights on all of the devices plugged into it.

Worth saying that I just did an installation where my client used Wi-Fi throughout the home, then I wired in his A/V rack locally to the router and the router did not work with a wired connection. I'm not sure if you have tested the router directly with a wired connection to a local PC or laptop, but you do want to be sure that you are starting with a working product there.

Post some photos of everything if you can, it can help.


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post #6 of 10 Old 09-23-2013, 09:46 AM - Thread Starter
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I am getting a cheap tester for $4 from ebay to check the wires. Good idea to ask around in the office but hey $4 i can swallow smile.gif

Thanks, I tested my router and its 4 ports - they work fine if I connect to them directly. So it must be a wire that goes from my den to a panel box.

I am going to try that tester and will report back my findings - thanks all for ideas!

I wanted to make sure I do not need to reverse some wire or if I need a cross over cable - looks like I should be fine just doing what I had in mind so just need to figure out now why it does not work.
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post #7 of 10 Old 09-23-2013, 06:55 PM
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Not sure where you are located but in the US typically we use the B standard. I suppose as long as both ends of a run use the same standard it shouldn't matter, so if in fact the wall jacks are using the B standard you may punched them down improperly. A test device will typically include a main unit to display results and 1 or more remote units to connect to the other end (a patch cable connecting the remote to the wall jack). The remote units can be numbered to be used for mapping a wired network. Post a link to the product that you purchased. If you mixed some pairs up in the wiring the tester should at least tell you that you found the right cable and even better is if it tells you which pairs are the culprit.
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post #8 of 10 Old 09-23-2013, 09:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acesat View Post

Not sure where you are located but in the US typically we use the B standard. I suppose as long as both ends of a run use the same standard it shouldn't matter, so if in fact the wall jacks are using the B standard you may punched them down improperly. A test device will typically include a main unit to display results and 1 or more remote units to connect to the other end (a patch cable connecting the remote to the wall jack). The remote units can be numbered to be used for mapping a wired network. Post a link to the product that you purchased. If you mixed some pairs up in the wiring the tester should at least tell you that you found the right cable and even better is if it tells you which pairs are the culprit.
This has been beaten to death, but the recommendation is to use 568a, not 568b by the spec. Leviton, as a company, exclusively uses 568a as their recommendation in their cabling and should always be wired to the 568a standard. But, it is worth triple checking the wiring pinouts if ever anyone is not 100% sure the way things were wired. Pull any existing jacks off the wall and visually check that they are wired to the standard that you expect them to be wired to, then test them with a cable tester.


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post #9 of 10 Old 09-27-2013, 06:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Hi, I am in Florida and the house was built in early 2000s. All the wiring to ONQ panel and jacks are done with 568A so I used that to be consistent
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post #10 of 10 Old 09-27-2013, 06:22 PM - Thread Starter
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I am happy to report that I found an issue. I bought a cheap network tester off ebay for $4.51 (search for "RJ45 RJ11 Cat5e Cat6 Network Lan Cable Tester Test Tool") and I was able to identify the problem. Apparently one of the wires in RJ45 jack was so tough and stiff so my punch down tool could not punch it. First time I saw something like that...So I just used my wire stripper and after that all started to work!

Thanks all for your advice and replies!
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