Ethernet to Receiver or TV or Both? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 27 Old 07-22-2014, 03:33 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
smile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Ethernet to Receiver or TV or Both?

I've got a smart TV. I watch Netflix and Hulu. I'll also want internet music at some point.
I want an ethernet hard wired rather than depending on wireless. I don't care about receiver firmware updates. Do I need ethernet to both TV and streamer device or receiver (or BR player or other streamer)? Can I do just one or the other? Ethernet to one then a CAT 6 between them? Why?
What about HDMI cable that carries internet- how does that work?
So, how do I wire my walls that will be behind sheetrock?

Last edited by smile; 07-22-2014 at 04:57 PM.
smile is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 27 Old 07-22-2014, 10:36 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 8,312
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked: 379
If you have Ethernet to that location, you can add a $10 Ethernet switch to give you 4 more Ethernet ports to connect all of the above...

Rock Creek Theater -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos: http://photobucket.com/autor-ht
jautor is online now  
post #3 of 27 Old 07-27-2014, 10:46 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
fcwilt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Posts: 1,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
I don't care about receiver firmware updates.
So if a device is malfunctioning due to a bug in the firmware you rather live with the malfunction then update the firmware and fix the problem?

Interesting.

Regards, Frederick C. Wilt
fcwilt is offline  
post #4 of 27 Old 07-30-2014, 02:56 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
smile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 11
For clarity: I do not mind updating the firmware via USB; that feature alone would not impact my receiver selection or be a reason to run cable.
smile is online now  
post #5 of 27 Old 07-30-2014, 08:36 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
fcwilt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Posts: 1,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
For clarity: I do not mind updating the firmware via USB; that feature alone would not impact my receiver selection or be a reason to run cable.
OK that makes sense.

But given that so many things these days need/accept a network connection AND a 4/5/6/7/8 port switch is so cheap why not just network them all?

No real downside.

Regards, Frederick C. Wilt
fcwilt is offline  
post #6 of 27 Old 07-30-2014, 08:46 PM
Member
 
cbatc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 64
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 17
I took my old router, flashed it with DDWRT, and made it a bridge. It works better than the WIFI in all my devices.
cbatc is offline  
post #7 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 07:36 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
smile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcwilt View Post
OK that makes sense.

But given that so many things these days need/accept a network connection AND a 4/5/6/7/8 port switch is so cheap why not just network them all?

No real downside.
The purpose of the question was for me to determine what I'd give up if I purchased a receiver w/o networking/streaming capabilities (Anthem). As well, whether it was of value to run a separate CAT5e from my router, 85' of wire and through a wall and attic away. I decided no need on the receiver and yes on the cabling. Switches degrade signal so it will be a second straight connection to the router.
smile is online now  
post #8 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 08:01 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
fcwilt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Posts: 1,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
The purpose of the question was for me to determine what I'd give up if I purchased a receiver w/o networking/streaming capabilities (Anthem). As well, whether it was of value to run a separate CAT5e from my router, 85' of wire and through a wall and attic away. I decided no need on the receiver and yes on the cabling. Switches degrade signal so it will be a second straight connection to the router.
As a practical matter a good quality switch will have no discernible effect. A star-of-stars topology is quite common. Also the switches on the periphery will regenerate the signals (good) while adding some delay (ok).

Your choice but in my home every A/V location has a 5 or 8 port Netgear Gigabit switch.

Regards, Frederick C. Wilt
fcwilt is offline  
post #9 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 08:02 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 8,312
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
The purpose of the question was for me to determine what I'd give up if I purchased a receiver w/o networking/streaming capabilities (Anthem).
That's a different question than what you posed in the OP...

You asked if you needed "Ethernet" to the receiver.

Now, the question about duplicating the streaming functionality - no, you don't need to do that, although having that functionality NOT in the TV would be my preference as the AVR or streamer box implementations usually include mobile device apps for control, and don't require the TV to be on to use or "drive" the UI.

But that built-in functionality doesn't appear in the high-end audio brands for all the usual reasons. The choice of which AVR to buy is probably better asked in the Receivers forum. I've found that adding a streamer device to my old pre/pre setup has delayed my "need" to upgrade the pre-pro to something modern, as the only thing I'm really missing is an integrated app for volume/source selection vs. content browsing.

Quote:
Switches degrade signal so it will be a second straight connection to the router.
Ethernet switches do NOT degrade signals. Period.

Jeff

Rock Creek Theater -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos: http://photobucket.com/autor-ht
jautor is online now  
post #10 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 09:59 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
smile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post
That's a different question than what you posed in the OP...

You asked if you needed "Ethernet" to the receiver.

Now, the question about duplicating the streaming functionality - no, you don't need to do that, although having that functionality NOT in the TV would be my preference as the AVR or streamer box implementations usually include mobile device apps for control, and don't require the TV to be on to use or "drive" the UI.

But that built-in functionality doesn't appear in the high-end audio brands for all the usual reasons. The choice of which AVR to buy is probably better asked in the Receivers forum. I've found that adding a streamer device to my old pre/pre setup has delayed my "need" to upgrade the pre-pro to something modern, as the only thing I'm really missing is an integrated app for volume/source selection vs. content browsing.



Ethernet switches do NOT degrade signals. Period.

Jeff
Thanks to you both above. No doubt my initial post obscured my intents.
So, one CAT5 and a switch would be simpler. Your recommendation then is to wire to the receiver location and there split the signal to the TV. This is in wall so I want to future proof as much as reasonable, and some claim a switch brings signal degradation. If it is not existent or not meaningful for this application, great.
smile is online now  
post #11 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 01:14 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 8,312
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
So, one CAT5 and a switch would be simpler. Your recommendation then is to wire to the receiver location and there split the signal to the TV. This is in wall so I want to future proof as much as reasonable
If the walls are open and/or you're running wires anyway, a separate drop to the TV mount location would be a good idea. But bringing the TV's Ethernet connection to the AV stack (where you will probably have an Ethernet switch eventually anyway) is perfectly fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
and some claim a switch brings signal degradation. If it is not existent or not meaningful for this application, great.
It does NOT degrade the signal. Quite the opposite - an Ethernet switch re-times and re-transmits the signal, so it's in better shape when it leaves. Now, some folks get confused about terminology and really mean that a switch "shares the performance" among all the links, which is true. Just like a water pipe - there's only so much bandwidth. But in this application, and really in almost all home AV / networking uses, even a 100Mb switch will be fine, as almost all AV devices are only 100Mb. And the vast majority of our use is pulling data from the Internet - which will be limited by your ISP to something generally much, much lower than that, too.

Jeff

Rock Creek Theater -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos: http://photobucket.com/autor-ht
jautor is online now  
post #12 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 03:00 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
smile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post
If the walls are open and/or you're running wires anyway, a separate drop to the TV mount location would be a good idea. But bringing the TV's Ethernet connection to the AV stack (where you will probably have an Ethernet switch eventually anyway) is perfectly fine.



It does NOT degrade the signal. Quite the opposite - an Ethernet switch re-times and re-transmits the signal, so it's in better shape when it leaves. Now, some folks get confused about terminology and really mean that a switch "shares the performance" among all the links, which is true. Just like a water pipe - there's only so much bandwidth. But in this application, and really in almost all home AV / networking uses, even a 100Mb switch will be fine, as almost all AV devices are only 100Mb. And the vast majority of our use is pulling data from the Internet - which will be limited by your ISP to something generally much, much lower than that, too.

Jeff
So, a switch is not just a passive device connecting 8 wires to multiples of 8. And all the conversation about CAT6 to handle gigabits per second is theoretical as to real world video streaming needs?
What should I look for, something like this:
smile is online now  
post #13 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 03:07 PM
Member
 
FlyingDiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
So, a switch is not just a passive device connecting 8 wires to multiples of 8. And all the conversation about CAT6 to handle gigabits per second is theoretical as to real world video streaming needs?
What should I look for, something like this:
The old ethernet HUBS might have been passive devices, but SWITCHES are active devices. I haven't bought a hub in probably 8 years. Maybe 10.

Yes, that Netgear switch is fine. I usually buy 8 port units these days, because the price difference is minimal. But 5 is fine if you only expect to have 3 or 4 devices.

You want Cat 6 to future proof. You might need gigabit capacity if you're doing HDBaseT plus other heavy local data transfers on the same segment of cable. For instance, say you have a file server at one end of the house, a streaming device reading HD from the server at the AV location, and you're feeding a second TV with that stream via HDBaseT. That's when you'll be glad you have gigabit capacity on that cable section (and the switches on each end).
FlyingDiver is online now  
post #14 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 04:11 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 8,312
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
You want Cat 6 to future proof. You might need gigabit capacity if you're doing HDBaseT plus other heavy local data transfers on the same segment of cable. For instance, say you have a file server at one end of the house, a streaming device reading HD from the server at the AV location, and you're feeding a second TV with that stream via HDBaseT. That's when you'll be glad you have gigabit capacity on that cable section (and the switches on each end).
Note that Gigabit Ethernet also runs fine on Cat5E...

The cost delta between Cat5E and Cat6 wire is so small these days that any wire that might be used for networking or HDMI distribution (HDBaseT) should be cat6, though for any new installations...

Rock Creek Theater -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos: http://photobucket.com/autor-ht
jautor is online now  
post #15 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 04:19 PM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 8,312
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
So, a switch is not just a passive device connecting 8 wires to multiples of 8. And all the conversation about CAT6 to handle gigabits per second is theoretical as to real world video streaming needs?
There is nothing in residential AV / home networking usage today that *requires* anything beyond Cat5E. Gigabit Ethernet will be the norm for a long, long time in homes. HDBaseT runs at rates faster than that, but the technology can also work on cat5e (works at longer distances on cat6 - but still beyond what is needed for most of us).

Video streaming, from the Internet or a local file server, uses the heavily encoded/compressed data formats, and only needs a fraction of that bandwidth. A typical HD stream from Netflix/Amazon is in the ~5Mb/s range. A Blu-ray disc ISO may need ~35-50Mbs. Which can be done even on 100Mbs Ethernet...

Rock Creek Theater -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos: http://photobucket.com/autor-ht
jautor is online now  
post #16 of 27 Old 08-01-2014, 01:53 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
smile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post
There is nothing in residential AV / home networking usage today that *requires* anything beyond Cat5E. Gigabit Ethernet will be the norm for a long, long time in homes. HDBaseT runs at rates faster than that, but the technology can also work on cat5e (works at longer distances on cat6 - but still beyond what is needed for most of us).

Video streaming, from the Internet or a local file server, uses the heavily encoded/compressed data formats, and only needs a fraction of that bandwidth. A typical HD stream from Netflix/Amazon is in the ~5Mb/s range. A Blu-ray disc ISO may need ~35-50Mbs. Which can be done even on 100Mbs Ethernet...
Could I use a router as a switch and get the bonus of better internet coverage?
smile is online now  
post #17 of 27 Old 08-01-2014, 02:00 PM
Member
 
FlyingDiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by smile View Post
Could I use a router as a switch and get the bonus of better internet coverage?
If you mean use the router in access point mode (not as a router) to get better Wifi coverage, and use the built-in switch for the devices, then yes that should work. You'll need to tweak the Wifi settings on both devices to keep them from conflicting with each other. You need to make sure that the second unit (the one not connected to your cable/dsl/whatever modem) is NOT in router mode and does not have DHCP turned on.
FlyingDiver is online now  
post #18 of 27 Old 08-01-2014, 03:10 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
fcwilt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Posts: 1,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 24
RANT := ON

"router as switch"

"router in access point mode"

I do wish folks (including those in marketing) would try to be more precise in their use of terminology. It makes for much improved understanding - much less guess work as to what the person meant.

Strictly speaking both of those quotes above are nonsense - a router is not a switch, a router is not an access point - a router is just that, a router - and, as you might guess, it routes.

The "all-in-ones" that often end up in residential environments are multi-function devices that include the functions of (but are not limited to) a router, a firewall, a Ethernet switch and an WiFi wireless access point (WAP or AP).

And you will see them marketed as router, wireless router, firewall, etc but all of those names are incomplete at best.

And while it is quite often possible to use just the AP part of such a multi-function device the router part just sits there doing nothing - it is not being an switch, it is not being an access point - it is, if anything, being "unemployed".

RANT := OFF

Regards, Frederick C. Wilt
fcwilt is offline  
post #19 of 27 Old 08-01-2014, 03:23 PM
Member
 
FlyingDiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Nice rant, but did it really add anything to the conversation? Yes, most consumer "router" devices have at least three parts to them - router, Wifi access point, and ethernet switch. And you can use them in pretty much any combination, not using the parts you don't need. So when you use one of these devices as a Wifi access point + ethernet switch (not using the WAN port or router functions), what do you think we should call it?
FlyingDiver is online now  
post #20 of 27 Old 08-01-2014, 04:28 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
fcwilt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Posts: 1,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 24
Add anything?

I don't know... perhaps...

A bit of knowledge. A bit of understanding. To help folks ask better questions, to become better consumers of technology, to not be snowed under by the "Geek Squad" and their ilk.

As many folks, besides Francis Bacon, have observed over the years, "knowledge is power".

Regards, Frederick C. Wilt
fcwilt is offline  
post #21 of 27 Old 08-02-2014, 09:24 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 8,312
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
Nice rant, but did it really add anything to the conversation? Yes, most consumer "router" devices have at least three parts to them - router, Wifi access point, and ethernet switch. And you can use them in pretty much any combination, not using the parts you don't need.
The "Residential Gateway" term has been thrown around, and while somewhat descriptive, doesn't really roll off the tongue.

Quote:
So when you use one of these devices as a Wifi access point + ethernet switch (not using the WAN port or router functions), what do you think we should call it?
An Ethernet / WiFi "Bridge". Some of the devices will properly describe this setting as "bridge mode".

Rock Creek Theater -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos: http://photobucket.com/autor-ht
jautor is online now  
post #22 of 27 Old 08-02-2014, 09:29 AM
Member
 
FlyingDiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post
The "Residential Gateway" term has been thrown around, and while somewhat descriptive, doesn't really roll off the tongue.
Well, it would really need to be "Residential Network Gateway", wouldn't it? Which is worse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post
An Ethernet / WiFi "Bridge". Some of the devices will properly describe this setting as "bridge mode".
My Asus has the following modes available in the setup pages:

Wireless router mode (Default)
Repeater mode
Access Point (AP) mode
Media bridge

I don't know that "Bridge" mode is any more descriptive than "AP Mode", but whatever...
FlyingDiver is online now  
post #23 of 27 Old 08-02-2014, 09:48 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jautor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 8,312
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 324 Post(s)
Liked: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
Well, it would really need to be "Residential Network Gateway", wouldn't it? Which is worse.
Well, we omit the 'network' term from all of these device descriptions (and certainly in context)... Ethernet Network Switch, Wireless Network Access Point, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
I don't know that "Bridge" mode is any more descriptive than "AP Mode", but whatever...
Well, it's the correct networking term for the function, but yeah, not very descriptive if you didn't know what that meant beforehand...

Rock Creek Theater -- CIH, Panamorph, Martin Logan, SVS PB2000, Carada Masquerade, Grafik Eye, Bar table, Green Glue, JVC RS50 
Theater build photos: http://photobucket.com/autor-ht
jautor is online now  
post #24 of 27 Old 08-02-2014, 10:05 AM
Member
 
FlyingDiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post
Well, we omit the 'network' term from all of these device descriptions (and certainly in context)... Ethernet Network Switch, Wireless Network Access Point, etc.
Except both Ethernet and Wireless imply Networking, but "Residential Gateway" could refer to some sort of Home Automation or Media product that has nothing to do with IP networking. Yeah, in context you would know what it means, but not as a stand-alone term.

Next home network I build out, I'm going to avoid the whole issue by using individual routers and access points. Probably Ubiquity EdgeRouter and UniFi products.
FlyingDiver is online now  
post #25 of 27 Old 08-02-2014, 10:16 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
fcwilt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Posts: 1,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 24
"Residential Gateway" does have at least two things going for it.

When setting up a network adapter in Windows one of the Internet Protocol v4/v6 fields to fill in (when not relying DHCP) is the IP address of the "Default Gateway".

And none of the commonly referenced functions (router, switch, access point, etc) of such a device appear in that name.


As to "Bridge" mode being more descriptive the "AP Mode" - not sure what is meant by that - since they are different modes. But it may be an example of the confusion that can result when terms are not fully understood and used correctly.

Regards, Frederick C. Wilt

Last edited by fcwilt; 08-02-2014 at 11:01 AM.
fcwilt is offline  
post #26 of 27 Old 08-02-2014, 10:22 AM
Member
 
FlyingDiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcwilt View Post
"Residential Gateway" does have at least two things going for it.

When setting up a network adapter in Windows one of the Internet Protocol v4/v6 fields to fill in (when not relying DHCP) is the IP address of the "Default Gateway".

And none of the commonly referenced functions (router, switch, access point, etc) of such are device appear in that name.


As to "Bridge" mode being more descriptive the "AP Mode" - not sure what is meant by that - since they are different modes. But it may be an example of the confusion that can result when terms are not fully understood and used correctly.
Heh. OSX just uses "Router" for the setup field.

I was going to comment on the Bridge name issue, since my Asus (at least) uses that term for the Media Bridge mode, which as you mention is very different. To them (and me, I guess), bridge mode is used for Internet->ethernet->Router or AP->Wifi->Media Bridge->ethernet->Device scenarios.
FlyingDiver is online now  
post #27 of 27 Old 08-02-2014, 11:17 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
fcwilt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Posts: 1,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
Heh. OSX just uses "Router" for the setup field.
Well there you go - even Apple has become confused.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingDiver View Post
I was going to comment on the Bridge name issue, since my Asus (at least) uses that term for the Media Bridge mode, which as you mention is very different
Now just to be sure we are on the same page this is what the terms mean to me:

An "Access Point" provides a WiFi client a connection to the LAN. (Laptop --wireless--> AP --wired-> LAN)

A "Bridge" provides a "hardwired" (think Ethernet) client a wireless connection to the WiFi "network". (Computer --wired-> Bridge --wireless-> AP --wired-> LAN)


I've see the term "Bridge", "Client Bridge" and (it seems) "Media Bridge" to describe this mode - and there are probably lots of other names that have been used.

And to me the multiplicity of names to describe what appears to be the same mode is just a path to confusion.


And trust me at my age you can become easily confused.

Regards, Frederick C. Wilt
fcwilt is offline  
Reply Home A/V Distribution

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off