BT Telephone Line Patch Panel - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 9 Old 08-25-2017, 09:33 AM - Thread Starter
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BT Telephone Line Patch Panel

Hi all,

As ever I'm back with another question for all of you wise folks out there.

I have recently completed my cable schedule for the project I'm working on, and am very happy, that I've covered all of the bases.

The only thing I can't quite define properly in my head is the telephone line.

So, my thoughts are this, it's a new build, so I will assume that BT will install a Master Socket of some description in the AV hub. All well and good.

Now what I want to do is extend from the Master Socket to 4 Ports in a Patch Panel. From reading, I understand that you can only plug 4 telephony devices into a telephone line without having problems. That's not a worry here. It's mainly to keep everything nice and tidy and good looking.

Once this is done, I can just patch away to my hearts content from these 4 ports; e.g. one to the router, and then direct one to a specific location for a DECT phone system, or any other use.

Does this sound about right?
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post #2 of 9 Old 08-25-2017, 04:15 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Falcon2915 View Post
Hi all,

As ever I'm back with another question for all of you wise folks out there.

I have recently completed my cable schedule for the project I'm working on, and am very happy, that I've covered all of the bases.

The only thing I can't quite define properly in my head is the telephone line.

So, my thoughts are this, it's a new build, so I will assume that BT will install a Master Socket of some description in the AV hub. All well and good.

Now what I want to do is extend from the Master Socket to 4 Ports in a Patch Panel. From reading, I understand that you can only plug 4 telephony devices into a telephone line without having problems. That's not a worry here. It's mainly to keep everything nice and tidy and good looking.

Once this is done, I can just patch away to my hearts content from these 4 ports; e.g. one to the router, and then direct one to a specific location for a DECT phone system, or any other use.

Does this sound about right?
Does anyone have any information on this? It would really help?
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post #3 of 9 Old 08-29-2017, 01:39 PM
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Routers are a part of a network and have nothing to do with telephone. As far as how many devices can be connected to a telephone line, it depends on the REN (Ringer Equivalency Number) load. The maximum REN load is 5, so if the connected devices each have a REN of 0.25, you can have 20 devices connected. The REN is listed on the device.

You have the main line coming in, which goes to a telephone module in your panel (A/V Hub). Modules typically have space for 6 or 7 cables, which go to the outlets where you need or may need telephones.

CIAO!

Ed N.
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post #4 of 9 Old 08-29-2017, 04:52 PM
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Yeah, All I can say is run some Cat5 or 6 to locations where you may want to put phone jacks. Home run it all to your network room. Get a phone distribution module to terminate all the wires. Its a waste to use Cat6 for phone, but if you are like me, most of the phone locations have become additional network jacks. In fact every location in my house (which is 2 per room) got a RG6 + 2 Cat5 cables. Some rooms got more, like the office. We do have a home phone system, but its all off the 1 phone in the office, the rest are wireless handsets.

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post #5 of 9 Old 08-30-2017, 04:07 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by egnlsn View Post
Routers are a part of a network and have nothing to do with telephone. As far as how many devices can be connected to a telephone line, it depends on the REN (Ringer Equivalency Number) load. The maximum REN load is 5, so if the connected devices each have a REN of 0.25, you can have 20 devices connected. The REN is listed on the device.

You have the main line coming in, which goes to a telephone module in your panel (A/V Hub). Modules typically have space for 6 or 7 cables, which go to the outlets where you need or may need telephones.
I'm aware that the network and telephone are separate systems.

But there must be a telephone line in to the router for internet access.
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post #6 of 9 Old 08-30-2017, 04:14 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by RBalwinski View Post
Yeah, All I can say is run some Cat5 or 6 to locations where you may want to put phone jacks. Home run it all to your network room. Get a phone distribution module to terminate all the wires. Its a waste to use Cat6 for phone, but if you are like me, most of the phone locations have become additional network jacks. In fact every location in my house (which is 2 per room) got a RG6 + 2 Cat5 cables. Some rooms got more, like the office. We do have a home phone system, but its all off the 1 phone in the office, the rest are wireless handsets.
Hi,

The system which is going to be installed is a pretty robust CAT6 backbone in the property, whilst using CAT6 for telephone is of course overkill, it can be used for Data too. Hence All of my Room drops which are not solely for TV or other specific purpose, actually consist as a VD (Voice/Data) setup.

I was under the impression that I could go from my BT Mater socket with a 4 core (or just use a bit of CAT and only use 2 pairs) Then take it up to the 4 spare ports on my PP and daisy chain it along.
Resulting in 4 Main Telephone outlets.

e.g.

BT RJ11 to the 4 Patch Panel Ports

Then I can Patch from one of these ports to whichever outlet I want my primary telephone to be

I can also Patch from one of these outlets to my router.
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post #7 of 9 Old 08-30-2017, 04:25 PM
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Alright -- it wasn't clear that your telephone company is also your ISP. Yes, then -- you're absolutely correct in your description of the connectivity. There should be a DSL filter on the phone line that the modem is connected to isolating the internet from the phone.

CIAO!

Ed N.
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post #8 of 9 Old 08-30-2017, 04:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by egnlsn View Post
Alright -- it wasn't clear that your telephone company is also your ISP. Yes, then -- you're absolutely correct in your description of the connectivity. There should be a DSL filter on the phone line that the modem is connected to isolating the internet from the phone.
Cool, thanks for the sanity check.

Am I correct also in thinking that the POT line only uses 4 cores?
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post #9 of 9 Old 08-30-2017, 06:50 PM
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POTS lines utilize 1 pair, or 2 wires. A single CAT5e (or whatever 4-pair twisted-pair cable is used) can carry up to 4 POTS lines.

CIAO!

Ed N.
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