Best comb filter EVER? C2? Holo? Entech? Put on your gloves! - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 09:01 AM - Thread Starter
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OK, after an afternoon digging around the archives and elsewhere on the net I am still without a clear answer.

EDIT: It appears all you need for VHS is a deck with S-video out, as the signals are recorded seperately.

I'm looking to archive a number of old VHS tapes. I'll be playing them out of a professional/broadcast deck that hasn't seen use in decades (crosses fingers). I'm digitizing them into an Avid Media Composer with external I/O (not the Mojo) but it's composite input is typically lacking.

I haven't been all that keen on the EDGE's composite input, but maybe I'm expecting too much.

So, here's what I've come up with as far as worthy contenders for external comb filters:

- RCA DRC8335 impressive zone plate performance, but exhibits flicker and dot crawl
- Holo3DGraph II using SAA7118
*update - Crystalio II using TI-TVP5160 seems to be the most universally praised
- Entech's SVSI-1 external 2D filter (Composite to SVideo)
- Entech's CVSI-1 external 2D filter (Composite/S-Video to Component)
- Alchemy VPG Visual Reality Engine ext. box
- Kramer FC-4044

Am I missing anything? In what order would you rank the above? I'm not only interested in theoretical, but impressions from those who have used one or more of the above.

I don't currently have access to any of them, so cost and availability are an issue.

This archival project means a lot to me as my family had 8mm films etc transferred to VHS some time ago, and now of course the originals are nowhere to be found. All we've got are *ugh* VHS.

Although many people (including within my family) won't see an appreciable difference, I'd like to give future generations a shot in hell of watching some of these events without vomiting. The more detail I preserve, what little there may be, will help things in the end.

As always--thanks for any contributions!

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post #2 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 09:38 AM
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IMO the best is getting them onto a PC and processing them with AVISynth using TComb (or the older Guavacomb) or one of many other filters that can accomplish the task (lots of rainbow killers, and dedot, decrawl and some others that can help with dot crawl)

It takes a lot of effort to get things like this as good as possible, no matter what you use. And you will unfortunately never be able to get them back to original quality (though you seem to understand that already).

"Vintage" is good for wine, not for A/V equipment.

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post #3 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 12:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DonoMan View Post

IMO the best is getting them onto a PC and processing them with AVISynth using TComb (or the older Guavacomb) or one of many other filters that can accomplish the task (lots of rainbow killers, and dedot, decrawl and some others that can help with dot crawl)

It takes a lot of effort to get things like this as good as possible, no matter what you use. And you will unfortunately never be able to get them back to original quality (though you seem to understand that already).

Great suggestion--thanks. I've used AVISynth extensively. What you're describing though is step #2. I'm looking for step #1--getting it digitized with a minimum of dot crawl, ghosting, bleeding etc introduced in the first place.

No doubt there will have to be some clean-up either now or down the road, but what I hope to achieve is to create a digital copy that is as close to the "original" as possible--during ingest. There's no point in going to lengths to remove things that shouldn't exist in the first place. A good comb filter will eliminate or greatly reduce dot crawl etc.
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post #4 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 12:53 PM
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A good postprocessing can make up a lot ! I've captured about a hundred tapes a few years back using a Sweetspot (PDI Deluxe card). I re-captured one after I got your working CVSI-1. The difference was noticable, but I would not call it great.

**MUCH** more important is a **GREAT** VHS player. I've played around with about 10 different high-end (S)VHS Machines, ranging from Sony to Panasonic to JVC. I've tried all those "great" players and wasn't satisfied till I switched to a professional grade Sony Player (SVO-1500P). It's not even a S-VHS deck, just plain PAL & NTSC VHS, but the jump in quality was so huge, even compared to the best of the consumer decks.

For postprocessing I used NeatVideo (commercial NR plugin) and the results were really stunning. The final MPEG2 files easily surpassed the original VHS tapes.
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post #5 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 01:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Fudoh View Post

A good postprocessing can make up a lot ! I've captured about a hundred tapes a few years back using a Sweetspot (PDI Deluxe card). I re-captured one after I got your working CVSI-1. The difference was noticable, but I would not call it great.

**MUCH** more important is a **GREAT** VHS player. I've played around with about 10 different high-end (S)VHS Machines, ranging from Sony to Panasonic to JVC. I've tried all those "great" players and wasn't satisfied till I switched to a professional grade Sony Player (SVO-1500P). It's not even a S-VHS deck, just plain PAL & NTSC VHS, but the jump in quality was so huge, even compared to the best of the consumer decks.

For postprocessing I used NeatVideo (commercial NR plugin) and the results were really stunning. The final MPEG2 files easily surpassed the original VHS tapes.

I'm not arguing against post-processing--believe me! Hell, I've even used "neat image" on .tga sequences before there was a "neat video".

I have use of a broadcast deck--don't have the model #--it's at work (i'm not). I'm going to give the heads a good cleaning--that also helps immensely. Next step is to avoid the Avid's comb filter. We're really an (HD)SDI shop, but can take component in a pinch. S-video if need be.

Fudoh--you've used the C2 and the entech--which do you think gave the better picture? (If you say entech, I'm really going to wish I'd done this project before trading it to you! )

Finding ANY of these (save the C2) is a difficult mission!
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post #6 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 01:13 PM
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C2 = Crystalio II ? Nice processor with a nice comb filter (nidi's using a X0 + C2), but it won't help you with capturing (*). I've watched so few LDs since I've sold my last Faroudja-based processor, but I wouldn't have thought about suggesting an Entech unit in addition to a C2...

I've just ordered my new capture device (BMD Multibridge Pro2) and I'm looking forward to do some capturing experiments from analogue sources with all equipment I've got on hand...

Quote:


Finding ANY of these (save the C2) is a difficult mission!

you tell me ! I had to laugh about uderman's statement in the new LD thread, when he suggested "simply buying a Entech SVSI-1"


[ (*) unless you have the C2 upscale the picture to 720p, capture the VHS in 720p and downscale them again in the postprocessing. Quite silly, but I've actually thought about this for 480p source since the BMD capture solutions don't capture 480p, just SD and 720p upwards. ]
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post #7 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 01:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudoh View Post

C2 = Crystalio II ? Nice processor with a nice comb filter (nidi's using a X0 + C2), but it won't help you with capturing (*). I've watched so few LDs since I've sold my last Faroudja-based processor, but I wouldn't have thought about suggesting an Entech unit in addition to a C2...

I've just ordered my new capture device (BMD Multibridge Pro2) and I'm looking forward to do some capturing experiments from analogue sources with all equipment I've got on hand...


you tell me ! I had to laugh about uderman's statement in the new LD thread, when he suggested "simply buying a Entech SVSI-1"


[ (*) unless you have the C2 upscale the picture to 720p, capture the VHS in 720p and downscale them again in the postprocessing. Quite silly, but I've actually thought about this for 480p source since the BMD capture solutions don't capture 480p, just SD and 720p upwards. ]

Yes, C2 = Crystalio II.

Sorry--I have the capturing part down--that's the Avid. I have the playback deck--broadcast level. All I need is something with a half-decent comb filter to take in composite, and spit out s-video, component, HDMI, SDI--you name it. As long as the comb filter stage is done by something more competent than that Avid's I/O box. I've tried a few still-stores and TBCs at work and been very disappointed in their comb filters--especially for broadcast gear.

And as for Entech rarity--yah, let's get a power-buy going.
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post #8 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 01:34 PM
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and spit out s-video, component, HDMI, SDI--you name it.

What's your end format ? DVD ? I always had timing problems when I had a VP upscale and/or deinterlace the picture and then re-interlace it before capturing (using a Extron Scan Converter with RGBHV input and SDI output). If you want an interlaced end format like DVD, you should stay interlaced all the way. I don' think using a C2 for it's comb filter, then deinterlacing and then re-interlace the picture is a good idea. Of course it's a whole different affair if your end format is something like progressive AVI....
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post #9 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 01:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDgaming42 View Post

Great suggestion--thanks. I've used AVISynth extensively. What you're describing though is step #2. I'm looking for step #1--getting it digitized with a minimum of dot crawl, ghosting, bleeding etc introduced in the first place.

Unfortunately the hardware I do not have so much extensive experience with, so I decided not to answer that part. I'd tell you if I knew.

"Vintage" is good for wine, not for A/V equipment.

-Dan D.
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post #10 of 198 Old 05-18-2009, 09:27 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudoh View Post

What's your end format ? DVD ? I always had timing problems when I had a VP upscale and/or deinterlace the picture and then re-interlace it before capturing (using a Extron Scan Converter with RGBHV input and SDI output). If you want an interlaced end format like DVD, you should stay interlaced all the way. I don' think using a C2 for it's comb filter, then deinterlacing and then re-interlace the picture is a good idea. Of course it's a whole different affair if your end format is something like progressive AVI....

I'm in agreement about staying interlaced from start to finish. It didn't occur to me that most VPs etc. will only output progressive.

I guess I could ingest it at 1080i. Would the C2 internally deinterlace 480i to 480p, scale it and THEN deinterlace it back to 1080i or would it simply be scaled to 1080i and sent out? Any idea?

In the immediate future yes the destination format would be DVD, but I want to have a pristine "master" source in digital form that I can later work on when 2k, 4k or whatever we're using when I have grandkids is the new standard.

DonoMan: no worries--I appreciate the help.
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post #11 of 198 Old 05-19-2009, 12:21 AM
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I guess I could ingest it at 1080i. Would the C2 internally deinterlace 480i to 480p, scale it and THEN deinterlace it back to 1080i or would it simply be scaled to 1080i and sent out? Any idea?

I think the signal path in the processors is fixed: deinterlacing before scaling and postprocessing. Therefore my guess is that the picture is deinterlaced to 480p, scaled to 1080p and then reinterlaced to 1080i.
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post #12 of 198 Old 05-19-2009, 05:19 PM
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I still have the Faroudja VP-100 in my closet somewhere that I use
occasionally with my LD player. The box does composite to Svideo conversion
http://www.sdinfo.com/volume_4_2/faroudja100.html

There is also the Faroudja VS50. I don't own one . $$$
http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...oudjavs50.html

The Faroudja A1 is a video DSP with composite input
and SDI output. This is for broadcast use. I have not been able to find
any links on this one. I have one one these in storage somehere..

The HD Leeza has a very good comb filter, subjectively better than any
of those above. I use this one currently for the LD.

An unrelated thing that might be useful for transferring old VHS tapes
would be a time base corrector. As you are already using a broadcast
quality deck it may already have one.
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post #13 of 198 Old 05-19-2009, 07:50 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tong Chia View Post

I still have the Faroudja VP-100 in my closet somewhere that I use
occasionally with my LD player. The box does composite to Svideo conversion
http://www.sdinfo.com/volume_4_2/faroudja100.html

There is also the Faroudja VS50. I don't own one . $$$
http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...oudjavs50.html

The Faroudja A1 is a video DSP with composite input
and SDI output. This is for broadcast use. I have not been able to find
any links on this one. I have one one these in storage somehere..

The HD Leeza has a very good comb filter, subjectively better than any
of those above. I use this one currently for the LD.

An unrelated thing that might be useful for transferring old VHS tapes
would be a time base corrector. As you are already using a broadcast
quality deck it may already have one.

Thanks for the additional info. An interesting read! Have you used any of the other processors mentioned? I'm guessing that the Crystalio II would trump the HD Leeza at this point?

So as far as direct comparisons, here is the rundown with subjective processor quality descending. Remember--we're only talking comb filters here! There are wonderful processors with mediocre comb filters.

GROUP ONE

  1. - Crystalio II using TI-TVP5160 (2005?)
  2. - Holo3DGraph II using SAA7118 (2001?)
  3. - Entech's SVSI-1 or CVSI-1


--------------------------

GROUP TWO

  1. -Key Digital HD Leeza
  2. -Crystal Vision VPS-1
  3. -Faroudja VS50 (1999)
  4. -Faroudja VP-100 (1997)
  5. -Audio Alchemy Visual Reality Engine (VRE)


--------------------------

Not yet worked into the picture:

- Kramer FC-4044
- Lumagen HDQ and Radiance
- DVDO EDGE and VP50 pro
- others?

If anyone cares to provide dates or chipsets used I'll gladly add them. I'm going to collect all the final results and update the initial post to reflect our findings. That way the next poor sap who wants to go to these lengths for composite video won't have to work so hard.
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post #14 of 198 Old 05-20-2009, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tong Chia View Post

An unrelated thing that might be useful for transferring old VHS tapes
would be a time base corrector. As you are already using a broadcast
quality deck it may already have one.


Absolutly! If you are looking for top quality conversion a TBC is essential. Most consumer scalers/decoders will accept *non-phased chroma as they have to. But nothing beats a TBC for cleaning up the edges that are compromised with varying Y/C delays do to the time base errors.

The best TBCs for VHS are either the built in units or an external unit properly connected to an industrial VHS deck. The "proper" connection involves sync and subcarrier feedback to the deck to allow processing of the raw video signal. Some TBCs will work with a consumer VHS deck but there is a price to pay. In this mode, there is additional processing added to the signal so the sync feedback to the machine is not needed. But this processing does reduce resolution somewhat, especially in the chroma.

I use a surplus broadcast decoder that has a FRAME BASED COMB FILTER. Early 1990s technology but still far superior to any consumer chip based decoder. This unit switches between the various filter modes based on analysis of the image over a frame. However this unit is very picky about input video. You can't feed raw VHS into it so a TBC is required. It also delays the video by two frames which now means the audi must be delayed as well to keep lip sync.

*In consumer VCRs. the chroma is time base corrected as you can't do color playback without some form of timebase correction. However the luminance portion is not corrrected as consumer TVs have more than enough lock in range to follow the jitter. This results in a "non-phased" signal inthat the sync and color subcarrier are no longer locked together. This is OK for viewing on a monitor but the signal no longer to broadcast specs. As the chroma is stable but the luminance is not due to the mechanical tolerances in the VCR, you have the luminance moving realitive to the chroma. This causes noise and softening of edges around saturated color areas.

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post #15 of 198 Old 05-20-2009, 11:08 PM
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Y/C is stored independently in the VHS format!!

A comb filter is unnecessary if using the S-Video output!!


You don't need the BEST COMB FILTER EVER!!! Just a S-VHS VCR!!!!!
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post #17 of 198 Old 05-21-2009, 06:50 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Axatax View Post

Y/C is stored independently in the VHS format!!

A comb filter is unnecessary if using the S-Video output!!


You don't need the BEST COMB FILTER EVER!!! Just a S-VHS VCR!!!!!

I initially disbelieved this statement, but it appears you are correct. Good news for me! The deck I'm using is a professional JVC with an internal TBC. In fact, it has component out which I found interesting.

I guess my thinking was stuck back in the era of laserdisc, which truthfully I used more than I ever used VHS. Thanks for clarifying this! I may ask the mods to merge this thread with the recent laserdisc thread, as it contains some useful info. In fact, I'm still quite interested in finishing the ranking list. It will be useful for laserdisc, the NES, anyone without an S-VHS deck, and the incurably curious.
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post #18 of 198 Old 05-21-2009, 09:07 AM
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I initially disbelieved this statement, but it appears you are correct.

wasn't this the difference between S-VHS and VHS systems ? I think it's correct for tapes recorded on S-VHS decks, but incorrect for VHS recordings or (most) original pre-recorded tapes. But somebody please correct me, if I'm wrong.

What I transfered to HDD/DVD were mainly pre-recorded tapes and I found not even the best S-VHS machine I had on hand (some high-end JVC) could touch the composite quality of a professional VHS-only player. With a self-recorded S-VHS tape is was the other way around - for obvious reasons.
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post #19 of 198 Old 05-21-2009, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudoh View Post

wasn't this the difference between S-VHS and VHS systems ? I think it's correct for tapes recorded on S-VHS decks, but incorrect for VHS recordings or (most) original pre-recorded tapes. But somebody please correct me, if I'm wrong.

What I transfered to HDD/DVD were mainly pre-recorded tapes and I found not even the best S-VHS machine I had on hand (some high-end JVC) could touch the composite quality of a professional VHS-only player. With a self-recorded S-VHS tape is was the other way around - for obvious reasons.


I believe the VHS recording system is called over and under

luma and chroma are recorded seperately

from wikipedia:

VHS tapes have approximately 3 MHz of video bandwidth, which is achieved at a relatively low tape speed by the use of helical scan recording of a frequency modulated luminance (black and white) signal, with a down-converted "color under" chroma (color) signal recorded directly at the baseband. Because VHS is an analog system, VHS tapes represent video as a continuous stream of waves, in a manner similar to analog TV broadcasts. The waveform per scan-line can reach about 160 waves at max, and contains 525 scanlines from top of the screen to bottom of the screen in NTSC (486 visible). PAL variants have 625 scanlines (576 visible). In modern-day digital terminology, VHS is roughly equivalent to 320x480 pixels with a signal-to-noise ratio of the image at 43 dB.

JVC would counter 1985's SuperBeta with VHS HQ, or High Quality. The frequency modulation of the VHS luminance signal is limited to 3 megahertz which makes higher resolutions impossible, but an HQ branded deck includes luminance noise reduction, chroma noise reduction, white clip extension, and improved sharpness circuitry. The effect was to increase the apparent horizontal resolution of a VHS recording from 240 to 250 analog (equivalent to 333 pixels from left-to-right, in digital terminology). The major VHS OEMs resisted HQ due to cost concerns, eventually resulting in JVC reducing the requirements for the HQ brand to white clip extension plus one other improvement.

In 1987 JVC introduced the new format called Super VHS which extended the bandwidth to over 5 megahertz, yielding 420 analog horizontal (560 pixels left-to-right). For comparison DVD is 480 analog lines horizontal, so a Super VHS tape can capture a DVD or broadcast standard definition DTV video with only a small amount of blurring. The chroma resolution remained the same at approximately 0.4 megahertz bandwidth or 30 analog lines horizontal, as was common across tape standards from Umatic to VHS to Betamax. Even a live NTSC broadcast is limited to 120 chroma lines maximum. (For comparison DVD is 240 chroma horizontal.)


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post #20 of 198 Old 05-21-2009, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDgaming42 View Post

I initially disbelieved this statement, but it appears you are correct. Good news for me! The deck I'm using is a professional JVC with an internal TBC. In fact, it has component out which I found interesting.

I guess my thinking was stuck back in the era of laserdisc, which truthfully I used more than I ever used VHS. Thanks for clarifying this! I may ask the mods to merge this thread with the recent laserdisc thread, as it contains some useful info. In fact, I'm still quite interested in finishing the ranking list. It will be useful for laserdisc, the NES, anyone without an S-VHS deck, and the incurably curious.


The only caveat here is the architecture of the internal TBC. I'm willing to bet they took the easy way out and built in a composite TBC as it's simpler circuitry. That means they combine the Y/C back to composite, run it thorugh the TBC, and then split it with a comb filter (or worse) on the TBC output.

So if this is the case, then a good comb filter on the TBCed composite output may be an improvement. Now if they have a Y/C based TBC built in, then the Svideo output is best but I really don't think any VHS built in TBC was of a Y/C design. I could be wrong.

But seriously here, even SVHS is not very good image quality IMHO. Worrying about the effects of a comb filter with this format is akin to throwing deck chairs off the Titanic. With Laserdisk, a good comb filter makes more sense.

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post #21 of 198 Old 05-21-2009, 07:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Deck I'm using is a JVC BR-S822DXU, so I think I'm set.

As a side note, I learned that the Canopus ACEDVio has a very similar chipset to the Holo3Dgraph II. SAA7114 vs SAA7118. No component input, just s-video, but I think I'll do a few captures with it and compare it with the Avid.
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post #22 of 198 Old 05-22-2009, 12:09 AM
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but I think I'll do a few captures with it and compare it with the Avid.

The ACEDVio's live DV encoder make things messy. One would believe that the DV bitrate would be sufficient for VHS capturing, but you'll get blocking in fast moving scenes. Better use the AVID with some kind of non-destructive codec.
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post #23 of 198 Old 05-22-2009, 06:41 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Fudoh View Post

The ACEDVio's live DV encoder make things messy. One would believe that the DV bitrate would be sufficient for VHS capturing, but you'll get blocking in fast moving scenes. Better use the AVID with some kind of non-destructive codec.

If I remember correctly, I thought that the ACEDVio allowed for uncompressed capture, as well as to DV. Or are you saying the image is passed through DV circuitry regardless of capture codec?
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post #24 of 198 Old 05-22-2009, 07:24 AM
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I think so. I was under the impression that the ACEDVio ist the internal version of the ADVC-300. Just got the call that my Blackmagic Multibridge is ready for pickup *g*
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post #25 of 198 Old 05-23-2009, 06:02 AM
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Long ago I talked with a rep. of Camelot (which makes the Crystal Vision VPS-1 comb filter unit; composite to S-video converter) and he said it recovers all of the chrominance up and down the video spectrum.

Yet I found out a little later by experimenting that the VPS-1 must have a somewhat lesser color bandwidth (and therefore a somewhat lesser chrominance resolution) than others. Using a Snell & Willcox test diagram in the LD Video Essentials, other comb filters including one in my TV showed much more red in the chrominance resolution test bars compared with the VPS-1. I would have guessed the resolution to be no more than 0.8 MHz or 65 lines per picture height (4:3 aspect ratio) out of a possible 1.5 Mhz or 120 l/ph aka TVL.

Meanwhile the VPS-1 showed less dot crawl than any of the others (in a DVDO iScan Plus, in a JVC S-VHS VCR, and in a Sony RPTV).

>>> For comparison DVD is 480 analog lines horizontal ...
DVD should be 540 l/ph for 4:3 programs and 408 l/ph for 16:9 programs or 720 pixels left-to-right.

All of the consumer analog video tape formats (Beta, VHS, 8mm, also U-matic) recorded luminance and color separately, and therefore benefit from pure or direct S-video output from the VCR.

>>> Even a live NTSC broadcast is limited to 120 chroma lines maximum ...
For NTSC broadcasts, the 120 chroma lines applies only to some colors, namely reddish orange and greenish blue. Other colors resolve at as low as 40 l/ph. Technically correct NTSC is constructed from a component video complement you can vaguely think of as Y/Porange/Pgreen; the correct term is YIQ. It will decode acceptably with any standard Y/Pb/Pr color decoder and when the decoder has an 0.5 MHz chroma bandwidth (99% of them are that way) the result is indistinguishable from programs encoded from Y/Pb/Pr.

Many broadcasts, notably newscasts, used tape equipment with Y/Pb/Pr and 0.4=0.5 MHz chroma bandwidth throughout and therefore there was no content that took advantage of the wider chroma bandwidth for reddish orange and greenish blue.

Meanwhile, TV sets with 0.5 MHz (40 l/ph chroma resolution) arrived within a few years of color TV and very shortly thereafter 99+% of TV sets sold were that way. Today a technically correct NTSC color decoder is hard to find. It would have to either go from S-video to YIQ directly to 480i RGB or from S-video to YIQ to Y/Pb/Pr the latter which could be output to a different video device.

Video hints: http://www.cockam.com/vidcolor.htm

Remember when lines and logos burned the TV screen? I was at a concert where a musical selection made extremely heavy use of about four of the keys of the piano.
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post #26 of 198 Old 05-23-2009, 11:55 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allan Jayne View Post

Long ago I talked with a rep. of Camelot (which makes the Crystal Vision VPS-1 comb filter unit; composite to S-video converter) and he said it recovers all of the chrominance up and down the video spectrum.

Video hints: http://www.cockam.com/vidcolor.htm

Thanks for your very informative post!
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post #27 of 198 Old 05-26-2009, 10:39 PM
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Wait, you mean that old CVSI-1 sitting in a box behind the bench on my sunporch is actually any good? If I recall, I bought it on ebay for <$100 years ago—back when the backbone of my video setup was component/VGA, not DVI/HDMI—to use with my NES before I decided to just RGB-mod the console. Hah. That's funny.
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post #28 of 198 Old 06-15-2009, 10:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidb View Post

Wait, you mean that old CVSI-1 sitting in a box behind the bench on my sunporch is actually any good? If I recall, I bought it on ebay for <$100 years agoback when the backbone of my video setup was component/VGA, not DVI/HDMIto use with my NES before I decided to just RGB-mod the console. Hah. That's funny.

PM if you are interested in selling it!
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post #29 of 198 Old 10-26-2009, 09:33 AM
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So is there consensus that the ENTECH SVSI-1 is a worthy addition to a home theatre with laserdisc? I plan on adding one to my existing system consisting of:

Pioneer CLD-D704 (to ENTECH SVSI-1) to DVDO Edge to Panasonic PT-AE3000U.

Opinions...
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post #30 of 198 Old 10-26-2009, 10:48 AM
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If you're thinking about the SVSI-1 on eBay right now, BUY IT! It's the only SVSI-1 I've seen on eBay in years and it's reasonably priced.
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