Help! What is a Lumagen VP and what is it doing for me? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 07-03-2014, 10:21 AM - Thread Starter
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Question Help! What is a Lumagen VP and what is it doing for me?

I am looking at needing to switch from reference plasma to projection. Unfortunately, as I have discovered over the past two weeks or so, I have absolutely no idea what is going on with front projection. (For instance, I had zero idea that 70 hours of viewing/week was considered prohibitively excessive.) I'm quite used to simply having my panel calibrated, plugging the HDMI cable in and having a perfect picture. No muss, no fuss, just nearly endless hours of watching crisp, clean video.

Apparently I need one of these devices if I am projecting onto a 2.35:1 screen. Since I watch basically two things, baseball (about 500 games per season) and movies (lots and lots of them) I decided that I would go with the 2.35:1 screen to accommodate the picture style of many, many of my movies. The Director did after all make a choice to shoot in that ratio for a specific reason(s). Baseball is just viewing, ratio is unimportant.

Before I go adding $1,800 - $5,000 to the price of an already expensive projector, I figure it might be a good idea to at least find out what the heck it is doing for me. It seems like an awful price-tag just to vary the picture size, which I can do by zooming the lens in and out. So, I am assuming (and hoping) there is more to it than just that.
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post #2 of 6 Old 07-04-2014, 08:40 AM
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You'll want to start by going to the Lumagen website and taking a look at the material there.

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post #3 of 6 Old 07-04-2014, 09:23 AM - Thread Starter
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I did look at their site, it's basically simply an online sales pamphlet that doesn't tell me a thing about what a video processor is or what it is doing for me, or why I would need one to change the size of my picture. That's why I thought I would ask here. I figured that in AVS forums dedicated to video processors with sub-forums specifically for the model/company recommended, that there might be a few souls out there that could clue me in.

The best I can tell is that it works in place of my displays calibration and attempts to force an up-scaling of the source picture resolution. This is why I am somewhat confused as to why I would need/want one.
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post #4 of 6 Old 07-04-2014, 10:52 AM
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The Lumagen has massively superior calibration capabilities than any domestic display. If you have a competent calibration specialist, with experience of Lumagens, use it to calibrate your display you will get a superior image. You could also buy tools to do this yourself although you will need to take the time to learn some processes and to gain an understanding of what you are doing and why.

As you say, you can also use it to do the scaling of image content so you can use a 2.35:1 screen without the requirement of another lens (expensive) or constant zooming in and out and refocussing (Annoying). Also, if you do then get a lens at a later date you can still make use of it's superior scaling to get the best image quality from your sources.

Talking of scaling. The more you upscale a low resolution signal the more likely you are to see the compression artefacts or problems in the signal. Lumagens proprietry "no ring" scaling algorithm keeps the detail without amplifying ringing artefacts that you tend to get with on board scaling in displays and sources.

The motion adaptive de-interlacing in the current models is at least as good, if not better than most sources or displays and the noise reductions and sharpness controls as superior to those in most displays....also, if you don't go for the mini3D but for one of the 20xx or 21xx units you also get benefit of Darbee processing which again is great at adding a sense of depth and perspective to an image without adding or amplifying artefacts.

All these processing settings, noise, sharpness, calibration etc can be applied "on the fly" without user intervention in different amounts for different sources. This is good because SD colour in north america has a quite different colourspace to HD. Your display is extremely unlikey to be able to deal with this difference on the fly while the lumagen can be set up to recognise the difference between SD and HD and to apply different calibration procedures to each...you could even have custom gamma profiles you could load up at the push of a button for when you want to watch your baseball with some light in the room.

I'm not sure if you watch 3D at all but one other thing they can do is convert one 3D format to another. this can be useful if you have a display which is better doing one type of 3D rather than another, although it's not something i've ever used.

As well as all this the scaler can apply masking and overscan to inputs and outputs to remove the garbage you may get at sides of broadcast images on some channels and with some content.

So there is quite a lot they can do but whether you use all the feautres or not is up to you. They are very powerful devices and even though displays have many of these tools in them none of them work to the same performance as Lumagen...There is a good reason why virtually all of Lumagens competitors do not exist anymore and why so many Lumagen owners swear by using their units and look forward to upgrading when new units come out with superior performance. Hope this helps a little

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post #5 of 6 Old 07-04-2014, 11:06 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Fraser View Post
The Lumagen has massively superior calibration capabilities than any domestic display. If you have a competent calibration specialist, with experience of Lumagens, use it to calibrate your display you will get a superior image. You could also buy tools to do this yourself although you will need to take the time to learn some processes and to gain an understanding of what you are doing and why.

As you say, you can also use it to do the scaling of image content so you can use a 2.35:1 screen without the requirement of another lens (expensive) or constant zooming in and out and refocussing (Annoying). Also, if you do then get a lens at a later date you can still make use of it's superior scaling to get the best image quality from your sources.

Talking of scaling. The more you upscale a low resolution signal the more likely you are to see the compression artefacts or problems in the signal. Lumagens proprietry "no ring" scaling algorithm keeps the detail without amplifying ringing artefacts that you tend to get with on board scaling in displays and sources.

The motion adaptive de-interlacing in the current models is at least as good, if not better than most sources or displays and the noise reductions and sharpness controls as superior to those in most displays....also, if you don't go for the mini3D but for one of the 20xx or 21xx units you also get benefit of Darbee processing which again is great at adding a sense of depth and perspective to an image without adding or amplifying artefacts.

All these processing settings, noise, sharpness, calibration etc can be applied "on the fly" without user intervention in different amounts for different sources. This is good because SD colour in north america has a quite different colourspace to HD. Your display is extremely unlikey to be able to deal with this difference on the fly while the lumagen can be set up to recognise the difference between SD and HD and to apply different calibration procedures to each...you could even have custom gamma profiles you could load up at the push of a button for when you want to watch your baseball with some light in the room.

I'm not sure if you watch 3D at all but one other thing they can do is convert one 3D format to another. this can be useful if you have a display which is better doing one type of 3D rather than another, although it's not something i've ever used.

As well as all this the scaler can apply masking and overscan to inputs and outputs to remove the garbage you may get at sides of broadcast images on some channels and with some content.

So there is quite a lot they can do but whether you use all the feautres or not is up to you. They are very powerful devices and even though displays have many of these tools in them none of them work to the same performance as Lumagen...There is a good reason why virtually all of Lumagens competitors do not exist anymore and why so many Lumagen owners swear by using their units and look forward to upgrading when new units come out with superior performance. Hope this helps a little

Thank you. Now this, is what I consider a helpful response. Since I am new to projectors entirely, many of the things you touched on are aspect/features that I was still unaware of being significant factors. The "experts" at the local shops are either too preoccupied with trying to oversell me equipment by leaps and bounds (no, sorry, I do not need/want your $80,000 projector or your $1500 screen) or they are simply sales reps on the floor regurgitating the selling points from the latest sales meeting or from the latest info pamphlet.
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post #6 of 6 Old 07-04-2014, 12:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aryn Ravenlocke View Post
Thank you. Now this, is what I consider a helpful response. Since I am new to projectors entirely, many of the things you touched on are aspect/features that I was still unaware of being significant factors. The "experts" at the local shops are either too preoccupied with trying to oversell me equipment by leaps and bounds (no, sorry, I do not need/want your $80,000 projector or your $1500 screen) or they are simply sales reps on the floor regurgitating the selling points from the latest sales meeting or from the latest info pamphlet.
Thank you.

Yes, it is often the problem that folk in shops know little about the products they sell except the margin they make....I have worked in retail and as the distributor for Lumagen products in Europe I visit many installers and retailers and it amazes me how incompetent and useless many of them are (even ones that are supposed "award winners")..i am pretty careful who I allow to represent the products over here specifically because of this. Good news is that this place is a great resource for consumers who wish to learn. The problem becomes asking the right questions and then working out whether the replies are from folk who you can trust...
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