Can Comcast really control access speed at different price levels? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 13 Old 10-22-2008, 08:57 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
JHouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Richmond, Texas (Southwesternish burb of Houston)
Posts: 4,318
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
I just moved and comcast jacked my bill up a bunch because I have the "blast" package. When I asked why, they said it was because I had the fastest access level. They offer two lower and slower levels. Is there any truth to this? Do they really catagorize my IP address and prioritize my data so that I always get pushed to the back of the line if I don't pay enough?

Joe -----

The harder it is to tell the difference, the less difference it makes.

 

"I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude." -- Thomas Jefferson, translated from Latin

 

Also translated as "I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery" 

JHouse is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 Old 10-22-2008, 09:11 AM
Advanced Member
 
jmallory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Essexville, MI
Posts: 621
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHouse View Post

I just moved and comcast jacked my bill up a bunch because I have the "blast" package. When I asked why, they said it was because I had the fastest access level. They offer two lower and slower levels. Is there any truth to this? Do they really catagorize my IP address and prioritize my data so that I always get pushed to the back of the line if I don't pay enough?

It isn't done by IP address, it is how your modem is configured. They can setup the modem to only send and receive at a certain rate.

-- Jim
jmallory is offline  
post #3 of 13 Old 10-22-2008, 09:19 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
JHouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Richmond, Texas (Southwesternish burb of Houston)
Posts: 4,318
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Thanks for info. The modem is already installed at the "blast" level. They said if I downgraded, no one would come out. Does that mean they can somehow reset my modem remotely?

Joe -----

The harder it is to tell the difference, the less difference it makes.

 

"I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude." -- Thomas Jefferson, translated from Latin

 

Also translated as "I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery" 

JHouse is offline  
post #4 of 13 Old 10-22-2008, 09:24 AM
Senior Member
 
stidrvr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Oshkosh, WI
Posts: 213
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
All they do is usually send a .bin file to the modem. This is what limits/regulates your speed.
stidrvr is offline  
post #5 of 13 Old 10-22-2008, 09:28 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
JHouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Richmond, Texas (Southwesternish burb of Houston)
Posts: 4,318
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Ransom

Joe -----

The harder it is to tell the difference, the less difference it makes.

 

"I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude." -- Thomas Jefferson, translated from Latin

 

Also translated as "I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery" 

JHouse is offline  
post #6 of 13 Old 10-22-2008, 04:46 PM
Member
 
lerxst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Southern California
Posts: 44
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
JHouse,

In addition to the ability to reconfigure your modem to only operate at certain speeds, service providers have other mechanisms at their disposal to control bandwidth usage on a per user basis.

For example, a few years ago I was a hardware engineer with a company and built a product that would sit "inline" between users such as yourself and the services providers' internal network and the Internet. Each and every packet traversing between users and the Internet could be observed, tracked and counted.

With such a box deployed, if a user's traffic patterns did not comply with the service providers policies, bandwidth could be limited for that user. And, this traffic monitoring wasn't just on a per user basis, but rather policies could also be created and enforced based on the type of traffic, i.e. peer to peer versus BitT**** versus http versus email and so on.

So, even though many of us might have multi-megabit Internet connections, say 3Mbit down or whatever, it's quite likely that the service provider may limit something like BitT**** traffic to something far less than that.

There are several companies building such products, the product I built being just one of them.

In addition to the ability to limit bandwidth on a per user, per protocol basis, these boxes can also do lots of other interesting things, like looking at any byte in any packet that they want to, for whatever information that is of interest. Google "deep packet inspection" if you want more information in that regard.

Regards,

Dan
lerxst is offline  
post #7 of 13 Old 10-22-2008, 08:18 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
JHouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Richmond, Texas (Southwesternish burb of Houston)
Posts: 4,318
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Scary

Joe -----

The harder it is to tell the difference, the less difference it makes.

 

"I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude." -- Thomas Jefferson, translated from Latin

 

Also translated as "I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery" 

JHouse is offline  
post #8 of 13 Old 10-23-2008, 06:43 AM
AVS Special Member
 
thirdeye11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Dallas
Posts: 1,815
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHouse View Post

Do they really catagorize my IP address and prioritize my data so that I always get pushed to the back of the line if I don't pay enough?

There is some truth to this, just not today The Internet WILL move to priority based trafficking within 2 years. The wheels are already in motion. It will mostly affect consumers, and businesses will be given priority. Beyond that the providers like Yahoo, AT&T, etc will all have top priority to internet bandwidth and they will be able to throttle their bandwidth as they see fit. Eventually people will be waiting in queues to get to their information. It sucks, but it is coming.

Google "net neutrality" if you want to read more on it.

-Chad
thirdeye11 is offline  
post #9 of 13 Old 10-23-2008, 11:19 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
JHouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Richmond, Texas (Southwesternish burb of Houston)
Posts: 4,318
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Thanks. Now the only loose end is which form of suicide to select.

Joe -----

The harder it is to tell the difference, the less difference it makes.

 

"I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude." -- Thomas Jefferson, translated from Latin

 

Also translated as "I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery" 

JHouse is offline  
post #10 of 13 Old 09-12-2012, 11:37 AM
Newbie
 
happyboy12394's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Don't joke around with the word suicide!
happyboy12394 is offline  
post #11 of 13 Old 09-12-2012, 04:32 PM
Member
 
bgavin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Orangevale, CA
Posts: 102
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Voldemort
biggrin.gif
bgavin is offline  
post #12 of 13 Old 09-13-2012, 03:48 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Sammy2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Right next to Wineville, CA
Posts: 9,635
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked: 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by lerxst View Post

JHouse,


In addition to the ability to reconfigure your modem to only operate at certain speeds, service providers have other mechanisms at their disposal to control bandwidth usage on a per user basis.


For example, a few years ago I was a hardware engineer with a company and built a product that would sit "inline" between users such as yourself and the services providers' internal network and the Internet. Each and every packet traversing between users and the Internet could be observed, tracked and counted.


With such a box deployed, if a user's traffic patterns did not comply with the service providers policies, bandwidth could be limited for that user. And, this traffic monitoring wasn't just on a per user basis, but rather policies could also be created and enforced based on the type of traffic, i.e. peer to peer versus BitT**** versus http versus email and so on.


So, even though many of us might have multi-megabit Internet connections, say 3Mbit down or whatever, it's quite likely that the service provider may limit something like BitT**** traffic to something far less than that.


There are several companies building such products, the product I built being just one of them.


In addition to the ability to limit bandwidth on a per user, per protocol basis, these boxes can also do lots of other interesting things, like looking at any byte in any packet that they want to, for whatever information that is of interest. Google "deep packet inspection" if you want more information in that regard.


Regards,


Dan

This is the reason that some groups have alternate ports, including the ports used for general internet traffic.

Sammy2 is online now  
post #13 of 13 Old 09-14-2012, 01:10 PM
Member
 
[OC]Pik4chu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHouse View Post

Thanks. Now the only loose end is which form of suicide to select.

I am pretty sure you already have made a choice, its called Comcast. wink.gif

Quote:
There is some truth to this, just not today The Internet WILL move to priority based trafficking within 2 years. The wheels are already in motion. It will mostly affect consumers, and businesses will be given priority. Beyond that the providers like Yahoo, AT&T, etc will all have top priority to internet bandwidth and they will be able to throttle their bandwidth as they see fit. Eventually people will be waiting in queues to get to their information. It sucks, but it is coming.

And here we are a few years later and one job I have is managing the network for a hosting company. I have pretty much the exact thing configured on their devices. It(router/edge appliances) watches packets for what service it is using and will prioritize or de-prioritize them based on source/destination ip and the protocol being used. And if it meets certain criteria it gets flagged and logged to a syslog server for evaluation. Terms of Use sometimes contain very interesting things indeed, lol. Despite it being a little big brother it is also incredibly fascinating how well it does its job.
[OC]Pik4chu is offline  
Reply Networking, Media Servers & Content Streaming

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off