Roku Streaming Problem/Issues - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 08:07 AM - Thread Starter
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I recently received my Roku XD|S box. Setup was a bit more complicated than I expected since I had to play with my router (a Linksys WRT120N) settings to be able to complete the process. But after several calls to Roku support, that was completed to my satisfaction.

What wasn't and isn't to my satisfaction is the ability of this box to connect to Netflix, Amazon or even Pandora at times. Case in point: I just tried to continue watching Ken Burn's "The Civil War" on my bedroom system. It was unable to connect, which is often the case. Other times it connects at low quality than constantly re-buffers before giving up altogether.

Here's the kicker: four feet away in my living room, my PS3 is streaming an HD movie from Netflix without a hiccup. Always works like a charm.

According to Speedtest, my ISP, Cox, even with the "strain" of streaming an HD film to my PS3, is delivering a download speed of 15.7mb/s and an upload of 3.3 MB/s with a ping time of 11ms. The Netflix Speed test 2 results are equally solid: 12970 kBps (fb: 15ms) The computer is in the same room as the Roku box only another six feet further away from the PS3.

So it isn't my ISP, and it probably isn't Netflix since it runs just fine on my PS3. (In case you're wondering, given the relatively low picture and, especially, sound quality of streaming video, I prefer to watch it on my 24" monitor with 2-channel sound in my bedroom.)

Here's my question: do it sound like I have a bad box? I really want that to be the answer. I like the idea of Roku: as described, it's ideal for my purposes. But man this sample is a lemon.

Thank you for any advice.
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post #2 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 08:23 AM
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I just bought my first Roku...an HD. I always resisted, because I hate the idea of a box that only does one thing. However, I have to say...it's the best $60 I've ever spent on technology; it's small and it just works (OK, the remote is the picture of CPOS, but for $60...). Mine has been rock-solid.

Of course, I'm wired; sounds like you're wireless? My guess is that's your problem, or maybe the Roku's have crappy wireless reception. There can't be much of an antennae in there; it's sooo small.

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post #3 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 09:24 AM
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If you are using a wireless connection to your Roku, can you try a wired connection and see if things improve?
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post #4 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 09:30 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hps70w View Post

If you are using a wireless connection to your Roku, can you try a wired connection and see if things improve?

Not really. I don't see the point: I have a netbook, laptop, Wii and PS3 that operate just great with my wireless network -- laying cable from my office to my bedroom for a <$100 box seems excessive and a case of the tail wagging the dog.

I am willing to try one of those ethernet powerline contraptions but even that seems a bit much for a product that touts its connectivity options.

Thanks.

Edit: I should add that the only place I could plug it in is my office. Even if there were a compatible monitor there, which there isn't, the point is to not have watch Netflix and listen to Pandora in my office.

I'm not trying to be difficult. As I said, I very much want the Roku to work but if I can't get it to work in my wireless setup, which is excellent and probably better than most American users, I'm not sure who can use it on a wireless setup. That causes me to suspect I have a bad unit.
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post #5 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 10:46 AM
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The only reason I suggested trying it wired was to see if the wireless connection to the Roku was causing your problems. No need to get all defensive about it. It's just basic troubleshooting.

If you try a wired connection and you still see frequent rebuffers and/or consistently get low bit-rate streams, then you'll know it's something else - possibly a defective unit.

If the problems go away when wired, then you'll know it is something to do with the wireless connection.
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post #6 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 11:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hps70w View Post

The only reason I suggested trying it wired was to see if the wireless connection to the Roku was causing your problems. No need to get all defensive about it. It's just basic troubleshooting.

If you try a wired connection and you still see frequent rebuffers and/or consistently get low bit-rate streams, then you'll know it's something else - possibly a defective unit.

If the problems go away when wired, then you'll know it is something to do with the wireless connection.

Thanks. BTW, do you have any experience and/or opinion with Ethernet over powerline adapters?
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post #7 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hps70w View Post

The only reason I suggested trying it wired was to see if the wireless connection to the Roku was causing your problems. No need to get all defensive about it. It's just basic troubleshooting.

If you try a wired connection and you still see frequent rebuffers and/or consistently get low bit-rate streams, then you'll know it's something else - possibly a defective unit.

If the problems go away when wired, then you'll know it is something to do with the wireless connection.

I agree; no one's saying pull a permanent cable there, if you don't want to (although wired is always better than wireless...just less convenient). But if you can pull a long patch there, temporarily, it'll give you an idea if the issue is your network, the box, or a wireless problem.

CD

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post #8 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roberto Carlo View Post

Thanks. BTW, do you have any experience and/or opinion with Ethernet over powerline adapters?

No, I don't. Sorry. All I know about them is from what I've read, which isn't much. The main point I've gotten from my reading is that powerline adapters aren't necessarily going to give you much of an increase in speed (if any), but generally provide a more stable and reliable connection than wireless. Not sure if that's entirely true anymore, since I haven't really kept up on the subject. Perhaps someone who has actually used them can chime in and give their opinion.

FWIW, I have two Roku's and both seem to work fairly well via wireless connection. My XDS is one level up from my wireless router, and my HD is three levels up (I live in a four-level split house, and my router is in the basement). I have a fairly poor internet connection (1.5Mbps down), and I consistently get 1.0 to 1.3Mbps connection speeds to both Roku's, which is 3-dot quality for most channels (including Netflix). It's impossible for me to get 4-dot (HD) quality with my slow internet connection, so it's quite possible that my wireless speeds could suffer more-so under that scenario with them being so far away from my router. Until I get a faster internet connection, I'll never know for sure though.
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post #9 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 01:16 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hps70w View Post

No, I don't. Sorry. All I know about them is from what I've read, which isn't much. The main point I've gotten from my reading is that powerline adapters aren't necessarily going to give you much of an increase in speed (if any), but generally provide a more stable and reliable connection than wireless. Not sure if that's entirely true anymore, since I haven't really kept up on the subject. Perhaps someone who has actually used them can chime in and give their opinion.

FWIW, I have two Roku's and both seem to work fairly well via wireless connection. My XDS is one level up from my wireless router, and my HD is three levels up (I live in a four-level split house, and my router is in the basement). I have a fairly poor internet connection (1.5Mbps down), and I consistently get 1.0 to 1.3Mbps connection speeds to both Roku's, which is 3-dot quality for most channels (including Netflix). It's impossible for me to get 4-dot (HD) quality with my slow internet connection, so it's quite possible that my wireless speeds could suffer more-so under that scenario with them being so far away from my router. Until I get a faster internet connection, I'll never know for sure though.

Thank you, this is helpful. It reinforces my suspicion that there may be something wrong with my particular unit.
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post #10 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 04:19 PM
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I use Ethernet over Powerline (the 200 megabit class ones). The consistency of the throughput is high even when the devices report that the connection is "less good than it's best" (which it does through a series of lights).

It's clearly superior on sustained throughput to wireless but that said, I'd prefer a real Cat6 network, so I'm replacing mine.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
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post #11 of 12 Old 10-10-2010, 05:15 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by rogo View Post

I use Ethernet over Powerline (the 200 megabit class ones). The consistency of the throughput is high even when the devices report that the connection is "less good than it's best" (which it does through a series of lights).

It's clearly superior on sustained throughput to wireless but that said, I'd prefer a real Cat6 network, so I'm replacing mine.

Thanks a lot. My concern isn't so much the throughput but the consistency part. I just watched some stuff on Vimeo and it looked gorgeous on the 24 inch system. I got up to do something, came back 20 minutes later and cannot connect to the videos even though, according to Netflix Speed Test I just ran, I have plenty of bandwidth.

If I may ask: why are you switching to Cat 6?
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post #12 of 12 Old 02-16-2012, 10:29 PM
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My Roku XD worked great for 6 months through my wireless router; always HD picture quality, fast loading, etc.

About a month ago, it started loading slower and giving low picture quality; before it showed 4 dots plus "HD" to the right of the red progress bar when loading, but now down to 2.

I tried moving the router and Roku a little closer together and put the Roku on top of a tower speaker and it helped a lot.

Tonight, it was back to very slow loading and bad quality, and then it completely refused to connect to my network after a reboot. It shows my network name icon and I select it, and my password is still there, but then it shows a red dot and indicates it is unable to connect.

It seems Like the receiver may have just slowly died over a few weeks. A Netflix rep said it might be something else; he said to contact the router people about something called "port forwarding", but I don't see how that relates to the problem I have.

Anyone have any similar experience or know anything?
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