Charter cable modem will not connect to gigabyte switch - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 08-06-2012, 08:31 PM - Thread Starter
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I'm new to charter and am trying to connect my Cisco cable modem directly to my netgear gigabyte switch. The modem will power a few of the ports but not all ports. Seems very sporadic. Rg11 comes into the house and is run through two different 1 to 8 amplified splitters. I noticed that the cable modem is coming off one of these amplified feeds. Does data have to be on its own clean feed? Charter says no. Could it be a firewall problem. I can hook up my Cisco wireless router and the four LAN ports work on the back of the router. I tried running from the router to the switch but still no luck with switch. Any ideas would be great
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post #2 of 6 Old 08-07-2012, 03:49 AM
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Your modem needs to be connected to your router, the WAN port which I'm guessing they're still labeling as such. I'm guessing you already did this when you ran the setup wizard for the router. Your switch will then be connected to the router so you will lose one of the 4 ports on the router. It wasn't real clear to me how you had things set up so figured I'd start there. Charter does not need it's own clean data feed, I have a number of non amplified splitters before it reaches the modem without issue.
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post #3 of 6 Old 08-07-2012, 06:03 AM
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Unless your amplified 8 way splitters are two-way amplification (passes signals in both direction), they're not suitable to connect your cable equipment to, either your cable modem or your cable box. Your cable modem of course is both sending and receiving data at the same time and if you put it on the output side of a cable distribution amplifier that doesn't pass signals in both directions properly, it's not going to work.

Even amplifiers that are labeled as two-way can be suspect as they aren't going to be two-way at all frequencies or at the frequencies that your particular cable modem or cable box uses for upstream communications. Charter in my neck of the woods always puts a two-way passive splitter on the incoming line as the very first device after the grounding block, and runs a line to the cable modem off one of the two splitter outputs. Then the rest of your equipment goes on the other port through whatever combination of splitters you need. Unless the amplified RF distribution equipment was provided and installed by Charter themselves, they're going to blame it first for all your problems.

And I'm not sure how many local IP addresses a cable modem can provide using DHCP before it chokes (maybe only one), so connecting an ethernet switch to your cable modem without it being a router (a router has the ability to hand out IP addresses, a switch usually not), you could be having IP addressing issues from that configuration. Always better to have the modem connect to the WAN port on a router, have the router set to DHCP mode to deliver whatever number of local IP addresses you need in your system (and your devices set the same to accept a local IP address from the router via DHCP), and use an ethernet switch (or two) on the LAN side of the router to give you the number of ports you need in your system.
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post #4 of 6 Old 08-07-2012, 11:43 AM
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The RG11 drop should hit a groundblock or a splitter in a housebox and be bonded to you electrical service ground. Your modem should be on the low loss leg of the first splitter. If an amplified splitter it should have a data port that is -3.5 db and bypasses the amplified portion of the splitter. Any deeper into a cascade of amplified splitters and you will have issues. Not if but When do issues arise. Also why all the amplified splitters? how long is your drop? You should only amplify once and then only good signals, anything else is just causing problems.
Please post a screenshot of modem diagnostics found at 192.168.100.1.
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post #5 of 6 Old 08-07-2012, 08:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the ideas. It is my brothers new house in Wisconsin. I will be heading up there on Thursday to check everything out. There are 13 cable tv feeds in the house that's why the 2 8 way splitters. Charter installed the amplified splitters. The cable modem is not connected to the data port connection on the splitter. I have charter coming out Friday morning but I'm not sure if they know what to do. I asked over the phone for the tech to bring a non amplified 2 way splitter to split off data and cable tv. This sounds like the best choice to me. I did try to plug the modem into the data port on the amplified splitter and it sparked.
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post #6 of 6 Old 08-08-2012, 07:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrisc31759 View Post

I'm new to charter and am trying to connect my Cisco cable modem directly to my netgear gigabyte switch. The modem will power a few of the ports but not all ports. Seems very sporadic. Rg11 comes into the house and is run through two different 1 to 8 amplified splitters. I noticed that the cable modem is coming off one of these amplified feeds. Does data have to be on its own clean feed? Charter says no. Could it be a firewall problem. I can hook up my Cisco wireless router and the four LAN ports work on the back of the router. I tried running from the router to the switch but still no luck with switch. Any ideas would be great
What modem do you have? Most need a router because the address table is limited. My SurfBoard SB6120 can handle up to 32 addresses and that's a lot for a modem. I connect the modem to a wireless router and my switch to it. This has 2 advantages. It provides a better DHCP server and it also provides a hardware firewall.
Quote:
DHCP Server Enabled
The SURFboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN). When the Cable Modem is disconnected from the Internet, users on the LAN can be dynamically assigned IP Addresses by the Cable Modem DHCP Server. These addresses are assigned from an address pool which begins with 192.168.100.11 and ends with 192.168.100.42. Statically assigned IP addresses for other devices on the LAN should be chosen from outside of this range


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