New home construction...Every room gets a single Cat5e drop with a switch or multiple wall panels? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 15 Old 08-09-2012, 12:31 AM - Thread Starter
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If you were to build and wire a new home and multiple rooms needed multiple Cat5e connections(TV's, HTPCs, gaming consoles) would you give each room a single drop and have a switch in every room OR run multiple lines to every room terminating them on a wall panel? All the rooms would converge to a media storage closet where the router/modem is also located.

Which is considered "cleaner"?
Any cost difference considering how cheap CAT5 is these days?
Any performance difference?

Thanks.
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post #2 of 15 Old 08-09-2012, 02:32 AM
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I would Do a single drop to rooms that might not need a lot. A bedroom bring in 1 or 2 drops, a room you will use for your tv run 4 drops or so, Multiple drops at one location can look cleaner then having a switch with flashing lights.
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post #3 of 15 Old 08-09-2012, 06:08 AM
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At least 2 drops per room, theyre cheap during rough-in and youll never regret them. Ethernet has so many more possibilitie other than internet.

In a media room/area at least 4 every component you can hardwire frees up your wifi.
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post #4 of 15 Old 08-09-2012, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicksHitachi View Post

At least 2 drops per room, theyre cheap during rough-in and youll never regret them. Ethernet has so many more possibilitie other than internet.
In a media room/area at least 4 every component you can hardwire frees up your wifi.

I'm hoping to get my house at the end of the year, and I am doing 4 drops in each bedroom, I am doing at least 4 in the backyard, 4 in the front of the house, 4 in the garage, and in the HT room will have 8 biggrin.gif I'm wanting to install camera's for a security system as well, but I am thinking I will be needing more.

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post #5 of 15 Old 08-09-2012, 01:43 PM
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There isn't much of a difference between running 1 cable through the wall or running 4 or more, so IMO run multiple drops and terminate to wall plates. I recently hardwired my new home, and ran 4 drops to the living room and one to the basement. You also might want to consider running Cat6 just to future proof rather than Cat5e.
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post #6 of 15 Old 08-09-2012, 03:52 PM
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Agree with the multiple drop crowd, but I would make sure I had at least one on every wall in every room and even a hallway if I thought I might need it.

I hate exposed wires, so I would do whatever necessary to limit that possibility.

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post #7 of 15 Old 08-09-2012, 04:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KingFeta View Post

Which is considered "cleaner"?
I will let you decide that one.
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Any cost difference considering how cheap CAT5 is these days?
Depends on whether you are doing it yourself or paying someone else. A couple thousand feet of Cat 6 (use Cat 6, not Cat 5) doesn't cost a lot. Each additional circuit run will cost you if you are paying someone else.
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Any performance difference?
Maybe, maybe not. It depends on what is connecting to what. Normally you take that into consideration in network design. If you want the most flexibiity, homerun a line for each device.
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post #8 of 15 Old 08-09-2012, 05:32 PM
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I agree with the others about using Cat6 rather than Cat5e. I replaced all of my Cat5e with the exception of one due to the length almost 100 feet wink.gif.

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post #9 of 15 Old 08-10-2012, 05:39 PM
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Keep in mind that a good switch can give you very high back plane throughput. Two switches exchanging data over a single GigE port will not perform nearly a good as one larger switch transferring data across a multi-gigabit backplane. I use a 24 port managed switch with 48 gigabit backplane and bring all drops directly to the switch. I recommend using a single large, preferably managed, switch and pull cat 6.
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post #10 of 15 Old 08-10-2012, 06:00 PM
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Don't forget to run some for the doorbell. When i built my house in '09; i bought some cable (partsexpress?) that has 2 cat5e and 2 rg6 quad bundled together. It is barely enough in some rooms. Re: cat5, when in doubt - go overboard.......
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post #11 of 15 Old 08-14-2012, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KingFeta View Post

If you were to build and wire a new home and multiple rooms needed multiple Cat5e connections(TV's, HTPCs, gaming consoles) would you give each room a single drop and have a switch in every room OR run multiple lines to every room terminating them on a wall panel? All the rooms would converge to a media storage closet where the router/modem is also located.
Which is considered "cleaner"?
Any cost difference considering how cheap CAT5 is these days?
Any performance difference?
Thanks.

If all you are doing is standard networking then 1 cable is fine. While yes it is just as easy to run multiple cables termination and ongoing maintenance can be more trouble prone. Now let me contradict myself. If you want to distribute video like component or HDMI then you need at least 3. One is network and the other 2 are for baluns (HDMI requires 2 cat5e cables). And if you are going to run 3 might as well run 4 for control or other av/comm needs.

Just another view.

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post #12 of 15 Old 08-20-2012, 11:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccbadd View Post

Keep in mind that a good switch can give you very high back plane throughput. Two switches exchanging data over a single GigE port will not perform nearly a good as one larger switch transferring data across a multi-gigabit backplane. I use a 24 port managed switch with 48 gigabit backplane and bring all drops directly to the switch. I recommend using a single large, preferably managed, switch and pull cat 6.

+1

In most home environments, you won't be communicating among computers, you will mostly be sharing a connection to the outside world. The exceptions are printers, NAS, and media servers. Design so that you directly connect the media source with the receiver/device that is streaming it through a good switch (not hub).

Run 3 to each room (see bobsilver, above), 4 to an office or media room. In the case of the office, it is nice to have a port for a desktop, printer, phone, and even a wireless AP without having to have an ugly hub/switch.

Run CAT6, but remember that the CAT6 standard is not simply the construction and materials of the wire, it also encompasses the terminals and the actual connections.

Don't run RG6 except service entry, dish, cable modem, or media closet. It is a total waste to whole-house wire with RG6, and the money is better spent on a better network.

Run a length of CAT6 to the ceiling at the top of the stairs and install a "smoke detector" wireless AP using POE. Wireless APs are ugly as crud and it is the clean way to get a great signal. Spend time thinking about where you are going to put APs before you close the walls. It may suggest random places for running wire!

Here is a post I wrote a long while ago with some hard-won tips on wiring: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1273786/20-tips-from-a-first-time-whole-house-wiring-veteran
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post #13 of 15 Old 09-04-2012, 08:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Ok, I understand the redundancy needs of running multiple Cat6 drops instead of just one or two. At what point/number does it become ridiculous to run a huge amount of drops? For example, in the living room I'll probably need and actually use 8 Cat6 connections(TV, receiver, HTPC, SONOS, XBOX, cable box, and a few for IP-to-IR boxes for HA use).

Money aside, would it be crazy to run ~10 Cat6 drops to one room instead of a couple and use one in a switch in that room?
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post #14 of 15 Old 09-07-2012, 05:49 PM
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Like other's have mentioned, definitely at least 2 drops per room.

You can do a lot with ethernet cabling. HDMI over ethernet is one of them, connecting IP cameras is another.

You'll need to figure out where everything will end up. Maybe you have a small closet that all your cabling gets home run to.

While a 100MB switch would probably suffice, you might as well get GB as the price difference is not that bad.
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post #15 of 15 Old 09-07-2012, 08:16 PM
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I would use CAT6 and 1G main switch. If you need more than one end-point in the room, use local 100M switch with 1G uplink. There is limit for length of 1G cables, which is much lower than for 100M, you need to keep it in mind planning cable runs. 1G connections will likely be enough for the next 10 years. After that you will need redo the work, as future networks will probably be optical.
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