Bluray to MKV - Page 3 - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #61 of 66 Old 01-08-2013, 04:51 AM
Senior Member
 
fritzi93's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 418
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 37
You can do a main movie backup of several of the Harry Potter movies (keeping the primary audio track only), and the result will fit on a BD25 with room left over. Keeping in mind the length of those movies, and their "compressibility" (action, dark scenes), there's not much bitrate to spare.

A crf 18 constant quality encode of any of the above will not save much space. Surprisingly though, you'll see significant variation (a few GB or so) in "compressibility" even among that limited group. So again, it's essentially unpredictable.

Which is why I think it's wiser to use constant quality encoding rather than setting a target size. Find an acceptable quality level and let the file size be whatever. The exception is encoding to BD25, which is ample space for a main movie backup of an average length movie, IMO. Encoding times don't concern me, as I have a 6-core machine for this and can queue up several encoding jobs at a time to do overnight.

I can certainly see why some people prefer to do a straight rip with no re-encode. I have my original Blu-Rays stored away. If and when I get a 4k 80 plus inch display, I'll look into this again and if necessary go with straight MKV rips on a NAS. As it is, I have most of my Blu-Rays re-encoded in MKV container on several 2 TB external hard drives and can play movies directly with my TV's onboard player.
fritzi93 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #62 of 66 Old 01-08-2013, 06:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
agogley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,636
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post

. As it is, I have most of my Blu-Rays re-encoded in MKV container on several 2 TB external hard drives and can play movies directly with my TV's onboard player.

That's a good thing. I like having a jukebox display for my movies though. But playing directly on my Samsung isn't a bad way to go.
agogley is online now  
post #63 of 66 Old 01-12-2013, 02:01 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
DotJun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by agogley View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by bulls View Post

good compression settings and you wont be able to tell... then again the file size will be closer and closer to original BD file...whats the point, so i gave up wasting my time pixel peeping ... Tsmuxer that baby to original audio+video m2ts

If a "good compression setting" winds up with pretty much the same size as the original BD file, then the BD file already had pretty good compression. The debate going on here is whether a normal human being can discern that information was lost when compressing a BD to more than half its size. I mean that is a lot of reduction, even if you use a completely different algorithm.

This reminds me of the debates between HDDVD and BD. There were a lot of discussions abou compression at the time because BluRay advertised it supported higher bit rates than BluRay. So HDDVD advocates claimed that HDDVD didn't need higher bit rates because HDDVD supposedly used a better, more efficient compression algorithm.

This is exactly what I was getting at.

Also, to the other poster above, yes I do know that if you were to losslesly encode a source that is already lossy encoded then you would more than likely end up with a bigger file size but also have the same qp as the lossy source. I never claimed otherwise.
DotJun is online now  
post #64 of 66 Old 01-12-2013, 02:08 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
DotJun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post

You can do a main movie backup of several of the Harry Potter movies (keeping the primary audio track only), and the result will fit on a BD25 with room left over. Keeping in mind the length of those movies, and their "compressibility" (action, dark scenes), there's not much bitrate to spare.

A crf 18 constant quality encode of any of the above will not save much space. Surprisingly though, you'll see significant variation (a few GB or so) in "compressibility" even among that limited group. So again, it's essentially unpredictable.

Which is why I think it's wiser to use constant quality encoding rather than setting a target size. Find an acceptable quality level and let the file size be whatever. The exception is encoding to BD25, which is ample space for a main movie backup of an average length movie, IMO. Encoding times don't concern me, as I have a 6-core machine for this and can queue up several encoding jobs at a time to do overnight.

I can certainly see why some people prefer to do a straight rip with no re-encode. I have my original Blu-Rays stored away. If and when I get a 4k 80 plus inch display, I'll look into this again and if necessary go with straight MKV rips on a NAS. As it is, I have most of my Blu-Rays re-encoded in MKV container on several 2 TB external hard drives and can play movies directly with my TV's onboard player.

I myself use a crf value of 20 with lots of other tweaks but then again I guess I don't have the golden eyes some other posters have here. At 20 crf I average 60% reduction and playback transparency, at least to my eyes.

Honestly the most time consuming portions of my process are just wait times. All in all I only put in maybe 10 min of total work per file, the rest is wait times. I don't have a 6 core for crunching but I do have two dedicated and overclocked 2600k's at work that I use.
DotJun is online now  
post #65 of 66 Old 01-13-2013, 06:47 PM
Member
 
wildwolf_ia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 32
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I've just got a 2500k @ 4.4Ghz that I use, but I decided that for me, I wanted uncompressed.

It's quite funny. I have come full circle. Seems about a year ago I was asking about how to get a DVD to compress smaller w/o losing too much quality. Never was happy, so just ripped them straight to ISOs. These were mostly my wife's workout videos (I posted a pic - she's got about 40 or 50 of the things.)

Now, I don't mind at all that I'm pulling BD videos to the hdd as "main movie" copies, then doing an mkv.remux to keep the highest quality possible w/o actually having the disc itself loaded somewhere. smile.gif

I'm not sure what converted me - but I do think it was the lower cost of drives. Now, I'm looking forward to what the next 5 years will bring in set top player's processing/video capabilities.

However, OP - I do thank you for posting the tips, tricks, and methods you use for your own movies. Reading posts like this does those like me things about the whole process, even if I opt not to use your particular process.
wildwolf_ia is offline  
post #66 of 66 Old 01-14-2013, 02:05 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
DotJun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 870
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwolf_ia View Post

I've just got a 2500k @ 4.4Ghz that I use, but I decided that for me, I wanted uncompressed.

It's quite funny. I have come full circle. Seems about a year ago I was asking about how to get a DVD to compress smaller w/o losing too much quality. Never was happy, so just ripped them straight to ISOs. These were mostly my wife's workout videos (I posted a pic - she's got about 40 or 50 of the things.)

Now, I don't mind at all that I'm pulling BD videos to the hdd as "main movie" copies, then doing an mkv.remux to keep the highest quality possible w/o actually having the disc itself loaded somewhere. smile.gif

I'm not sure what converted me - but I do think it was the lower cost of drives. Now, I'm looking forward to what the next 5 years will bring in set top player's processing/video capabilities.

However, OP - I do thank you for posting the tips, tricks, and methods you use for your own movies. Reading posts like this does those like me things about the whole process, even if I opt not to use your particular process.

First let me say thank you for the kind words.

Second, I tried just keeping iso files one time also but I have a lot of anime and a lot of them throw four or more episodes into one iso. This doesn't work for me as I like to be able to select each episode individually. Individual files looks so much nicer on mptvseries plugin.
DotJun is online now  
Reply Networking, Media Servers & Content Streaming

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off