DLNA Server supported files... - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 05-03-2013, 01:50 PM - Thread Starter
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Easy question. Does the DLNA server decide what type of (video) files to stream or does it rely on the client? Let's say my client plays MKV files using XBMC's UPnP server (no transcoding required) will any DLNA server serve up the MKV files or do they have their own list of supported file types? If so, perhaps they won't be made available to the client...

 

Reading some if appears the only guarantee is MPEG2 for video...

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Living_Network_Alliance#Media_formats_and_transport_model

 

The reason I ask is I'm interested in a low-end NAS for DLNA and don't want to get hit with a restocking fee if it doesn't work. Apparently, it uses Twonky Server so now it's down to if they support HD MKV files.

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post #2 of 12 Old 05-03-2013, 02:14 PM
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Hi Charles,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R View Post

Easy question.
No, it's not! biggrin.gif

What happens is actually a negotiation. The server queries the client to determine which "profiles" it supports, and they decide together on which profile gets streamed, based on what they both support. Sometimes, it requires the server to transcode on-the-fly. Every time a new file is selected, the negotiation needs to take place. If they can't find a common profile, you will get some form of "media-not-supported" message.

If you want your MKVs streamed natively, then both server and client would need to support MKV.
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post #3 of 12 Old 05-03-2013, 02:59 PM
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You would be best advised to explore building your own NAS so that you have full control of codecs and clients (a/v support) on at least one end of the equation. It makes life much easier.

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post #4 of 12 Old 05-03-2013, 03:23 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nethawk View Post

You would be best advised to explore building your own NAS so that you have full control of codecs and clients (a/v support) on at least one end of the equation. It makes life much easier.

 

This guy is $100 for 2TB... not far from the cost of the drive itself. I figure there isn't much to lose...

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post #5 of 12 Old 05-04-2013, 12:34 AM
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Your own NAS (which usually means a PC) it total overkill, any basic off the shelf NAS will usually do the job fine.

Yes the DLNA server needs to support container x, y, z as does the client (if the server cant transcode). The best thing to do is getting a NAS with a well supported DLNA server, anything from Synology for instance, their lowest end model the DS112J is perfect. Synology have their own in-house DLNA server that supports almost all common container types and you can run alternate DLNA servers on it if need be but I doubt you will need to.

My Book Live has old version of Twonky something like v5 and Zyxel at v4 whereas Twonky itself is at v7, they would be fine with a capable media player like XBMC, WDTV etc but you might run into some compatibility issues with some DLNA TV media players (Samsung, Sony) as a lot of those require specific profiles to work.
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post #6 of 12 Old 05-05-2013, 05:50 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alx330 View Post

My Book Live has old version of Twonky something like v5 and Zyxel at v4 whereas Twonky itself is at v7, they would be fine with a capable media player like XBMC, WDTV etc but you might run into some compatibility issues with some DLNA TV media players (Samsung, Sony) as a lot of those require specific profiles to work.

 

It's the Iomega 2TB EZ Media and Backup Center (a Semi-NAS :)). The latest firmware upgraded Twonky to 7.x which appears to work great with the WD TV Play as far as HD MKV files go. I realize it's not much of a NAS but for $99 the drive itself is almost worth it. I'm impressed how it just works. I wanted something to stream files without having to wake up my HTPC (used for WMC) and it appears to fit the bill.

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post #7 of 12 Old 05-09-2013, 09:52 AM
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This seems like a good thread to ask my question, so here it goes.
I have a Vizio TV that can go out on the network and use DLNA. Supposedly LOL I have a WD NAS on my network, that can be a DLNA server. I'm at the point where I want to RIP my DVDs and store them to be played on my TV. Seeing as I already have the NAS and TV that are supposed to do DLNA, I'm gong to try that route first. Doing a little research on on RIPing DVDs, it looks like I need to choose a file format to store them. So this is where my question comes in. How do I find out what my NAS and TV will support and play well together? Are there some file formats better or worse for doing this? What gotchyas should I look out for?

Thanks
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post #8 of 12 Old 05-09-2013, 10:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squidwalker View Post

Are there some file formats better or worse for doing this? What gotchyas should I look out for?

 

I would find out what your TV supports. That's most important as you want to avoid transcoding if at all possible. A lot of devices aren't up to such especially with HD video/audio. Once you find out what the display supports you can easily find a tool that will for you. With DVD (SD) it shouldn't be much of a challenge.

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post #9 of 12 Old 05-10-2013, 12:50 AM
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Usually the manual for the TV has the details on what formats it supports, sometimes at the end of the manual in technical specs section.

If Vizio dont supply that information the you could see via trial and error what works, get Serviio and disable it's transcoding engine. Now try playing a variety of media to see what works.

What should work as it's part of DLNA standard is .mpg videos, you can use an application called VOB2MPG to turn DVD's into .mpg videos with no conversion as it's the same video type. You need something running in the background to decrypt DVD though like AnyDVD. MakeMKV is also a similar tool but gives you MPEG-2/MKV videos instead, again no conversion so the process is quick but the TV many not support MPEG-2 video in .mkv containers.

If the TV only supports something like H.264/MP4 or H.264/MKV then your going to have to convert the DVD video, use Handbrake or buy DVDFab.
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post #10 of 12 Old 05-10-2013, 09:00 AM
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Awesome thanks for all that info guys. I'll start by finding out what the TV supports then find software that will give that file type.
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post #11 of 12 Old 05-12-2013, 03:22 PM
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Alright now that it's the weekend, I had some time to get some details. Apparently my TV, a Vizio E551VA model, does not have DLNA support. So if that won't allow me to watch, I should be able to play through my PS3, correct? If so, what files types should be able to play through that?
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post #12 of 12 Old 05-13-2013, 02:35 AM
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PS3 best option is VOB2MPG.

Same quality as original DVD and PS3 natively plays mpg video files so no transcoding required.

Other formats that work on PS3 are H.264/M4V (MP4), VC-1/WMV (not recommended) and DivX/AVI (old don't bother). Storage is so cheap these days stick with mpg files, if you really want to compress the video then use Handbrake & generate m4v video files.
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