Powerline adapter causing sub static. - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 4 Old 08-02-2014, 10:26 PM - Thread Starter
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Question Powerline adapter causing sub static.

My home theater speaker setup is old but still fits my needs, Polk RM6600 satellites and Polk PSW350 sub. In my apartment my modem and main wireless router, Apple AirPort Extreme 4th gen is upstairs in my office. My living room is on the first floor and master bedroom is adjacent on the same floor. My bedroom is a dead spot for wifi and in the living room I have a couple devices that need a wired Ethernet connection (Slingbox Pro HD, H/K AVR 1700, Panny Plasma). I purchased a second AEBS (5th gen.) and put it in my a/v rack as well as an Airport Express that I installed in my bedroom. I tried just using the additional Airports to extend my wifi but it was still unsatisfactory.

Since I am renting the running of Ethernet cables in-wall was out of the question so I purchased the Netgear XAVB2001 powerline kit and an additional XAV2001 unit for the bedroom. The installation was simple and now my TWC 50Mb up/ 5Mb down connection stretches everywhere I need it. I just set the additional Airports to bridge mode and manually set each one to operate on different channels, all using the same SSID and password. The second AEBS has enough Ethernet ports to take care of the devices I need it in my a/v rack and the AE in the bedroom has one port which is connected to my AppleTV.

I finally thought everything was set, then I noticed that while my a/v system was off I had a low static noise coming from my sub. After much internet searching and realization I moved the Netgear adapter from the wall socket to a PLC plug on my Monster HDP-2500. This helped a lot but it didn't eliminate the static altogether. Since my sub is on the same wall that the powerline adapter is located, and I have no other option) I am at a loss. I posted on another forum and someone suggested I use an EMI clip on filter and I'm waiting for the one I ordered to come in.

Is there anything else I can do short of running Ethernet cables or moving sub?
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post #2 of 4 Old 08-03-2014, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KOTULCN View Post
My home theater speaker setup is old but still fits my needs, Polk RM6600 satellites and Polk PSW350 sub. In my apartment my modem and main wireless router, Apple AirPort Extreme 4th gen is upstairs in my office. My living room is on the first floor and master bedroom is adjacent on the same floor. My bedroom is a dead spot for wifi and in the living room I have a couple devices that need a wired Ethernet connection (Slingbox Pro HD, H/K AVR 1700, Panny Plasma). I purchased a second AEBS (5th gen.) and put it in my a/v rack as well as an Airport Express that I installed in my bedroom. I tried just using the additional Airports to extend my wifi but it was still unsatisfactory.

Since I am renting the running of Ethernet cables in-wall was out of the question so I purchased the Netgear XAVB2001 powerline kit and an additional XAV2001 unit for the bedroom. The installation was simple and now my TWC 50Mb up/ 5Mb down connection stretches everywhere I need it. I just set the additional Airports to bridge mode and manually set each one to operate on different channels, all using the same SSID and password. The second AEBS has enough Ethernet ports to take care of the devices I need it in my a/v rack and the AE in the bedroom has one port which is connected to my AppleTV.

I finally thought everything was set, then I noticed that while my a/v system was off I had a low static noise coming from my sub. After much internet searching and realization I moved the Netgear adapter from the wall socket to a PLC plug on my Monster HDP-2500. This helped a lot but it didn't eliminate the static altogether. Since my sub is on the same wall that the powerline adapter is located, and I have no other option) I am at a loss. I posted on another forum and someone suggested I use an EMI clip on filter and I'm waiting for the one I ordered to come in.

Is there anything else I can do short of running Ethernet cables or moving sub?
Sounds like a ground loop possibly introduced by your cable or satellite box. Ground loop isolators are sold to take care of this problem.

Wait to see if the filter you ordered takes care of the problem. If it doesn't, then look into this further.

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post #3 of 4 Old 08-03-2014, 12:34 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Mr.G View Post
Sounds like a ground loop possibly introduced by your cable or satellite box. Ground loop isolators are sold to take care of this problem.

Wait to see if the filter you ordered takes care of the problem. If it doesn't, then look into this further.
I'm having a hard time finding the correct filter. The one I ordered is round and I just realized my power cable is flat.
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post #4 of 4 Old 08-04-2014, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by KOTULCN View Post
I'm having a hard time finding the correct filter. The one I ordered is round and I just realized my power cable is flat.
The ground loop is just speculation on my part since I can't see your actual setup but it's not uncommon.

Quote:
Ground loop issues with television coaxial cable can affect any connected audio devices such as a receiver. Even if all of the audio and video equipment in, for example, a home theater system is plugged into the same power outlet, and thus all share the same ground, the coaxial cable entering the TV is sometimes grounded by the cable company to a different point than that of the house's electrical ground creating a ground loop, and causing undesirable mains hum in the system's speakers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_...electricity%29

If the ground loop hum is being introduced (for example) by your cable box then there are ground loop isolators or transformers that can remedy the problem.

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