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post #1 of 61 Old 08-31-2014, 03:00 PM - Thread Starter
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NAS...? Why Bother ?

OK, yes, I'm a noob. But as I pondered about which NAS to get, it occurred to me that maybe just using my desktop computer and leaving it on all the time would be best. Media file access 24/7 would require SOMETHING to be left on. The desktop PC is probably more capable or "sophisticated" than most NAS units. Just find a nice, big external hard drive and use it a the source of my media/music files/songs.


Well, I suspect that there is a fundamental flaw in this logic, or else there wouldn't be so much discussion about NASs. What is it?
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post #2 of 61 Old 08-31-2014, 03:13 PM
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If you make your own NAS:
1: You can use a lower power CPU.
2: Use multiple HDDs to save your data on in case of a HDD failure.
3. By using a old lower power CPU you can save money in electricity.
4: You can retrieve the data, movies, music from any PC on your LAN without any PC being on except for the NAS, and the one you want to retrieve it too.
5: Save money over buying a ready made NAS... You might even save enough to buy a new PC.

You can set your NAS up to wake on LAN if you don't want it on all the time too. I use a NAS for storing all my stuff. The NAS runs UnRaid (free for up to 3 HDD), although there are other brands you can run. I run i3 NUCs for my PC, and Media Servers. My electricity consumption is under 100 watts for the NAS, and 2 i3 NUCs running vs 300 watts or more for running a desktop pc.

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post #3 of 61 Old 08-31-2014, 03:27 PM
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I have both a Synology NAS ( DS 1513+ ) and EHDs. The convenience in having a NAS is that it can be connected directly to the network. The downside is that a NAS, at least the Synology, is basically a small computer packed with tons of drives. It is just one more piece of hardware that needs maintenance. The upsides are that a NAS is fairly easy to maintain and allows for more redundancy since RAID-5 scales better with 5 or more drives rather than two drives. Synology makes it very easy to rebuild the array when a drive fails. I wouldn't use anything other than a true NAS for 24/7 operation as drives will fail quickly at 24/7 operation.

If you just want to access media for a couple of hours a day, then EHDs would be more cost-effective. If you DO go with EHDs, then only count on USB 2.0 and eSATA for reliable connections. USB 3.0 is still unstable and is prone to disconnects, even on the newest PC chipsets.

I have a couple of EHD enclosures, the AMS Venus DS3R Pro. They hold up to two drives up to 4TB each and are only $80 for the enclosure vs. $800 for the diskless Synology 1513+. One has 3TB WD Red and the other has 4TB WD Red. I just run them in RAID 0 striped since they are just backups of what is on the Synology. I get a solid 80MB/s to 140MB/s over USB3.0 and eSATA during large file transfers from a host PC. I haven't tested transferring from the Synology to the AMS, but I suspect I'd get similar results. I get about 80MB/s to 230MB/s from PC to Synology over Ethernet, so the AMS enclosures are pretty fast for their cost.

I'm going to get a new router that has dual eSATA ports and see what happens when I connect the AMS EHDs to it.

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post #4 of 61 Old 08-31-2014, 03:48 PM - Thread Starter
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ellisr63 -


I appreciate the reply and do see your points about making one's own NAS. But, just taking a position as the "Devil's Advocate".... Let's say any NAS--home made or pre-made--would cost at least $400. OK, so if someone just used their PC as the 24/7 media server, how long could you run that before you reached the "break even" point -- the point where the cost of PC-use electricity finally equaled the purchase (or construction) price of the NAS? My PC, and probably all PCs, have power saving/sleep modes, etc. So, you can see the return to the "why bother?" position. Admittedly, I'm sure it would be fun to learn to build a NAS, to build one and use it successfully; great satisfaction, too.


Anyway, I won't be doing anything soon. Got lots of home repairs, etc., to address the rest of this year. It just seems that a NAS (media server), necessarily, has to be the first component of any proposed media network. I just felt like asking now. I often think about this, in anticipation of building the network.


MY REAL MAIN CONCERN: What forum here, or at some other web site, addresses people setting up a wireless Hi-Fi network? I haven't seen anyone here talk about designing/setting a simple wireless music network. I've been all over the Small Net Builder web site, and about all I see are reviews and discussions about routers and NASs, without (unfortunately) much discussion about their actual use. I won't buy any component of my network until I have the entire network designed and all components pre-selected. Where do I go to get help with design and critical feedback regarding proposed features / equipment (e.g., wireless DACs) in relation to an overall proposed network? (I want to draw a comprehensive schematic, labeling each component, posting it as a photo, identify each component in accompanying narrative with the reason(s) for selecting a particular component, and soliciting feedback.)


Thanks.

Last edited by boxtop; 08-31-2014 at 03:49 PM. Reason: ...didn't think I'd get another reply so soon. Addressing this to ellisr63
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post #5 of 61 Old 08-31-2014, 04:05 PM - Thread Starter
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jevans64 -


You, too, have offered food for thought. I want 24/7 always on access because I (or my wife) want to be able to easily access the media at any time of day or night, and (eventually) in multiple rooms, easily. Getting true hi-fi analog signals pumping into the auxiliary input of my amplifier just may be more challenging than the NAS question.


I'm really hoping that SSDs continue "growing" in size and popularity until they are reasonably offered at 1TB. Speed and reliability! (No disc failure, right?)


Anyway, thanks.
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post #6 of 61 Old 08-31-2014, 04:42 PM
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You also have to factor in ease of use. Store bought NAS unites usually come with software to make complete backups of all computers on your network, they offer pre install dlna/ftp/samba/nfs. If you are sticking below 10tb better to just go JBOD on a desktop once you start going over 10tb then a nas unit seems better suited for the jobs its going to do.
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post #7 of 61 Old 08-31-2014, 06:53 PM
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It's perfectly reasonable to start out with your PC or HTPC as the storage device for your media. But, things you will need to consider as time goes on are:
  • What happens when the disk you are using for storage fills up?
  • What happens when you can't fit any more disks in your PC?
  • What happens when one of the disks fail?
A NAS, by design, helps you address these issues. But if you plan to start small then by all means start with a disk in your PC (and a plan to back up your data). You can always grow later. If you know from the outset that you will have large storage requirements, though, then start with a NAS. Personally I outgrew the 2TB external drive I was using for storage prior to building a dedicated NAS from an old PC.
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post #8 of 61 Old 08-31-2014, 10:10 PM
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I was in a similar situation. What I have perceived NAS's energy saving advantage is not true. A good NAS is just another PC, with CPU, mainboard, fans, etc. Even a router consumes 10-15W. A 3.5" HDD consumes 10W power, a 3HDD array could easily top out 30W.

A low powered all in one mini-ITX PC would consume 20-30W on itself, plus all the HDDs. You don't need the monitor 24/7. So at the end of the day, NAS or HTPC is not much different in the energy consumption.

The PC is more manageable. It can easily setup sleep mode, HDD power down mode, wake on lan, etc. A good NAS can do these as well, but you are limited to what the vendor offers you, and some features are not easily documented when you're shopping.

A good NAS is more expensive than a bare bone PC. But it has better and more integrated solution for backup, recovery, etc.

A PC can be used as a download box. Many NAS have a torrent client, but, as above, you're limited to what vendor offers you. This is particularly important on some obscure download protocols.

I wish one day, an android powered box can replace a PC as a true low powered all-in-one solution, for all media playback, NAS, download box, central storage. But so far the apps are pretty limited, some can't even write to some disk formats, and performance is bad.

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post #9 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 04:50 AM
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Question, I use an old pc running Windows 7 holding 5HDD/10TB, I use HaneWIN nfs server to feed my media players. That's all it's used for and it's on 24/7, drives do power down though. If I were to convert this to NAS, what happens to existing data?

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post #10 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 05:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellisr63 View Post
If you make your own NAS:
1: You can use a lower power CPU.
2: Use multiple HDDs to save your data on in case of a HDD failure.
3. By using a old lower power CPU you can save money in electricity.
4: You can retrieve the data, movies, music from any PC on your LAN without any PC being on except for the NAS, and the one you want to retrieve it too.
5: Save money over buying a ready made NAS... You might even save enough to buy a new PC.
.
I run a computer as a nas and all of what you mention can be done on computer. Even the power issue is not that much of a concern. Today's cpu's have the ability to throttle themselves back when not in high demand. There is simply not a whole lot of difference in the power consumption of nas and PC anymore.
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post #11 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 05:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by halfelite View Post
You also have to factor in ease of use. Store bought NAS unites usually come with software to make complete backups of all computers on your network, they offer pre install dlna/ftp/samba/nfs. If you are sticking below 10tb better to just go JBOD on a desktop once you start going over 10tb then a nas unit seems better suited for the jobs its going to do.
Anything nas can do, so can a computer so this doesn't make much sense. Can you explain further?
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post #12 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 05:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdallen View Post
It's perfectly reasonable to start out with your PC or HTPC as the storage device for your media. But, things you will need to consider as time goes on are:
  • What happens when the disk you are using for storage fills up?
  • What happens when you can't fit any more disks in your PC?
  • What happens when one of the disks fail?
A NAS, by design, helps you address these issues. But if you plan to start small then by all means start with a disk in your PC (and a plan to back up your data). You can always grow later. If you know from the outset that you will have large storage requirements, though, then start with a NAS. Personally I outgrew the 2TB external drive I was using for storage prior to building a dedicated NAS from an old PC.
Again, anything nas can do, so can a computer (and probably better).... and that includes back up and expandability. My mobo comes right off the hop with 8 on-board sata heads, and if that isn't enough then there are 5 PCIe slots for sata expansion. That's another 18 or so sata slots. There is also a thunderbolt slot (faster then sata) where you can daisy chain up to 6 more drives on top of all of that.

I have added two 3-bay hot swappable drive bays to my machine and there is plenty of room for more
You can operate in RAID mode for back up or run any of the tons of auto back up software there is out there.
Frankly, nas makes no sense at all to me. It's a waste of time and money.

Last edited by bigbarney; 09-01-2014 at 05:52 AM.
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post #13 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 06:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmedrano1977 View Post
Question, I use an old pc running Windows 7 holding 5HDD/10TB, I use HaneWIN nfs server to feed my media players. That's all it's used for and it's on 24/7, drives do power down though. If I were to convert this to NAS, what happens to existing data?

Sent from my HTC One_M8
Not sure what you're asking here. Are you asking if you will lose all your data? No. Just transfer the drives.
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post #14 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 06:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmedrano1977 View Post
Question, I use an old pc running Windows 7 holding 5HDD/10TB, I use HaneWIN nfs server to feed my media players. That's all it's used for and it's on 24/7, drives do power down though. If I were to convert this to NAS, what happens to existing data?
If you continued to run Windows 7 and just wanted to add parity to protect from a drive failure you could go with something like Snapraid. Snapraid is designed to use drives with existing data. You would just need to add a new parity drive equal to or greater than your largest drive size in order to get the drive failure protection a NAS provides. I believe that Flexraid also is designed to work with drives that have existing data.

If you wanted to convert your computer to a more dedicated NAS like an unRAID or FreeNAS then the drives would be formatted and the data lost, so you would need to backup the data and then copy it to the new NAS. Having just moved from unRAID to Snapraid myself, I would look into Snapraid or Flexraid first and see if that meets your needs if your current setup is working for you. Using Snapraid or Flexraid would give the protection from drive failure and allow you to use the server in the current configuration.
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post #15 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 06:07 AM
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I got rid of all my large desk bound PC space heaters and replaced them all with SSD laptops and a NAS. I mapped my photos/music/video folders to the NAS and can access them from any of my network AV devices or from "The Cloud".

Unless you're a gamer interested in cutting edge frames per second I don't personally see the need for desk bound PC's anymore.

My NAS was a game changer in my home
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post #16 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 06:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunthat View Post
If you continued to run Windows 7 and just wanted to add parity to protect from a drive failure you could go with something like Snapraid. Snapraid is designed to use drives with existing data. You would just need to add a new parity drive equal to or greater than your largest drive size in order to get the drive failure protection a NAS provides. I believe that Flexraid also is designed to work with drives that have existing data.

If you wanted to convert your computer to a more dedicated NAS like an unRAID or FreeNAS then the drives would be formatted and the data lost, so you would need to backup the data and then copy it to the new NAS. Having just moved from unRAID to Snapraid myself, I would look into Snapraid or Flexraid first and see if that meets your needs if your current setup is working for you. Using Snapraid or Flexraid would give the protection from drive failure and allow you to use the server in the current configuration.
I guess first options is what look into, 250+ movies and some tv shows on these drives, formatting them is not an option. Thanks for the info.

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post #17 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 06:48 AM
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Lots of people use their desktop as a media server. It's pretty normal.

Quote:
Media file access 24/7 would require SOMETHING to be left on.
XBMC and similar software can automatically send a WOL packet on startup. Or some of the smartphone remote control apps (yatze etc) can send WOL packets.
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post #18 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 07:07 AM
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I used a PC as a NAS server for years, and recently switched to a Synology product (d213, I think it's called). For me it was a matter of convenience.

I ran the PC "headless," and when it needed maintenance or failed to boot properly it could be a real pain to get things working again. The synology is designed to be headless, and so I don't ever have to worry about having a spare KVM set lying around.

I can also expand the synology very easily: get a new pair of larger HDs, pull one old one, put a new one in. When the volume reports "synchronized," I R&R the other one. Bang, more space.

But yes, a PC will do the job just fine. If you don't think PC maintenance is a big deal (I get paid to do that, so I avoid it as much as possible at home), you'll be fine. Someone unfamiliar with the ins-and-outs of PCs will also be better served by a NAS, because it's engineered to do its thing and will be much easier for that kind of person to get up and running.

Oh, and as far as wireless network documentation goes, there's not a lot out there because there's not all that much to it. For the most part, it really is just plug it in and it works. The home environment simply doesn't require all the enterprise features of larger installations.

Most streamers I know about (me included) use MOCA or Ethernet-over-AC to get a wired connection to the receiver to avoid all wireless issues anyway.

Oh, and while SSDs don't have moving parts to fail, they do wear out. Not much of an issue in my Macbook Pro, which spends most of its day turned off. But in a 24x7 file server it may well become an issue. My PC-based file server (referenced above) ran 24x7 for more than ten years. Last time I checked, SSDs are definitely not rated for that kind of longevity.

At any rate, that's my 2c. Enjoy yours.
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post #19 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 08:35 AM - Thread Starter
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dscottj - Thank you for your comprehensive reply, and for pretty much recognizing the level of my knowledge and experience ("dummy").


Now having read yours and the other posts here I have to agree with you that a NAS would be the better option for someone like me. Even the convenience factor (your motivation) makes this a good idea. I really value a "set it and forget it" operation. As for my competence managing PCs, I cannot even unlock files that were copied from my old PC to my new PC a couple of years ago....


I had to look up "MOCA" and I see that this would not be a realistic option for me. I have previously thought about the Ethernet-over-AC option; I asked a question about the quality of music being delivered via this method here a while back. One of the difficult things is selecting a good DAC to interface the output module of the Ethernet/AC and the RCA analog inputs of my amp (and that DAC will need to have at least a couple of different input and output connection options in order to work). I've visited the Crutchfield website several times and can't find anything that really fits the bill.


So, during those 10 years you used your PC as a NAS, how frequent was the failure(s) of your HDDs? How long could I run an enterprise HDD 24/7 before failure? Who make the best HDDs in this regard?


Well, I could probably write/ask/elaborate/make more sense, but I've got a crappy flu bug or something, and I'm having a hard time just thinking.... Thanks.
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post #20 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 09:06 AM
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The NAS is more set and forget. Mine sits in the rack quietly humming away. Once in a while Synology ask me to update the software. It has all the software Or apps to hand so less fussing to find the right solution and maintaining that solution.
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post #21 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 09:29 AM
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Depending on your needs you may be able to use a router attached USB drive. I have my music on a Seagate 3 TB external USB drive attached to my Netgear Router. It is a WNDR4000. It supports DLNA. Netgear call that a "ReadyShare".


I use either WMC or JRiver to access the files on the drive. It is always on and works like a champ. I just set up the libraries in the media apps to point to the drive. If I want to do some maintenance I can unplug it from the router and take it to the local PC. Very basic functionality but I have both MP3 320 mbs and Flac versions of each song on the drive. Simple and straightforward.


The latest and greatest routers from Netgear and others will provide faster access to the drive and probably more features. There is nothing to do but plug your external drive into the USB port of the router and you are ready to go.

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post #22 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 09:47 AM
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You're thinking is one of the "Pros" for building an HTPC.

E.B. White said, "I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day."
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post #23 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtgray View Post
Depending on your needs you may be able to use a router attached USB drive. I have my music on a Seagate 3 TB external USB drive attached to my Netgear Router. It is a WNDR4000. It supports DLNA. Netgear call that a "ReadyShare".


I use either WMC or JRiver to access the files on the drive. It is always on and works like a champ. I just set up the libraries in the media apps to point to the drive. If I want to do some maintenance I can unplug it from the router and take it to the local PC. Very basic functionality but I have both MP3 320 mbs and Flac versions of each song on the drive. Simple and straightforward.


The latest and greatest routers from Netgear and others will provide faster access to the drive and probably more features. There is nothing to do but plug your external drive into the USB port of the router and you are ready to go.
I was thinking about doing this I also have a Netgear router. I'm currently using my PC and I have no problems with this but the attached storage would be easier I think. Does your external drive go into sleep mode when you're not using it? If it does when you access it with your network controller will it wake up right away? Sorry for the newb question

Thanks
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post #24 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 10:45 AM
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Some of your replies are a bit confusing to me. What is the current state of your network solution? Are you just starting out, or have you got something already built?

I'm probably gonna catch hell for this but I've done a ton of research and I now strongly believe it to be true: The backbone that transmits your Ethernet packets has no effect on sound quality. AC, MOCA, twisted pair, coax, wireless, fiber, etc. According to my research, it simply doesn't matter. The Ethernet technology takes care of the transport and ensures the data arrives intact to your device. After that, it's up to the device. With the system I use (DLNA client/server), there are no jitter issues because everything happens in the client, which is inside my receiver and directly connected to the DAC inside it.

I also ran AC over ethernet for about two years. The only issues I had were when a misbehaving AC adapter got plugged into an outlet, but those were binary. It either worked, or it didn't. There was no degrading. I went to MOCA to avoid that but there was no change in sound quality.

I've spent at least several months researching this so I know there are people out there who will disagree with me, some very strongly. So treat it as my opinion. For me, I'm concentrating all my efforts to improve sound quality on the DAC and everything downstream of it.

As far as drive reliability goes, I've been an IT professional for 25 years. From my experience, drive failure of any sort is extremely rare, and reliability has improved constantly. During the 14 years I directly managed a network and all its associated PCs and devices, as I recall there were 3 or 4 drives that failed. They were always in RAID 5 arrays so it was simply a matter of pulling the old one out and putting a new one in. My home file server was a simple consumer-grade PC with a pair of high capacity drives in a mirrored pair that Windows itself managed. The OS stayed on the drive that came with the system. I eventually hung a pair of old external drives off it via USB. None of the five drives involved ever failed, although one of the externals eventually acted up enough that I retired it.

Reliability aside, I simply wouldn't trust any data I care about to a single drive. I use mirroring because it's simple and (IMO) makes controller issues much less of a problem. If I were to purchase my NAS again, I'd wait a week or two between drive purchases to ensure I got two from different batches, which ensures defects that may be common to a batch of drives won't be an issue. But that's a belt-and-suspenders sort of thing, something paranoid sysadmins do, akin to waving a dead chicken at the problem.

As far as specific brands of HD, I used the Western Digital drives that Amazon claimed everyone bought when they bought my brand of NAS. 3 TB models, which was 5x more storage than the PC-based file server it replaced.
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post #25 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 11:56 AM
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I put the drive on my router so I did not have to have the PC with the drive in it running all the time. It was centralized access but as far as redundancy goes I have another copy of the library on a PC. But I don't need to PCs running to get access. People can do things however they want. But mostly what we do is stream video and audio from central store. Using the router there is nothing to be configured. It is too easy I guess. Most of us do things the hard way. Very few of us are going to have audio libraries in excess of a couple terabytes..


And of course unless the network isn't working right audio (flac files) stored on a drive at the router sounds exactly like flac files stored locally to the media player.

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post #26 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 12:00 PM - Thread Starter
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dscottj - I think your approach to everything is in keeping with my ways of thinking; "bulletproof."


Sorry for the confusion - I have not really set up any network. I want to plan it out with the proper equipment selections first, to avoid wasting time, and more importantly, money (from buying the wrong things).


Well, I do have a wireless router, and at this point in time my wife and I use it solely for our tablets (so I guess I really do have a network -- a very basic network). I have it connected via Ethernet cable to my internet modem, and then, in turn, connected to my PC. So, my computer remains hardwired to the internet. This is the current extent of my network. (I have a Roku unit that I was using with it, but I haven't subscribed to Netflix or Amazon Prime to make use of it. The 30-day free Netflix trial was OK, but I decided to postpone subscribing to any service like that for the time being.)




gtgray - I did not know that this was possible, accessing an external HDD and managing song lists without a CPU on the data source end.


I, too, try to do a lot of research before making decisions, and unfortunately my heavily researched decision to buy a TRENDnet TEW-812DRU AC1750 was flawed. While this router seems to work OK now (doesn't seem to have great range), I can see that it may not be the best, most well-advanced. Within a year of my purchase (about 1.5 years ago?), TRENDnet discontinued this model. I'm looking at the specs/features right now, and it says, "Share USB peripheral devices over the network including; flash drives, external hard drives and printers" -- There's no mention of any special feature that would make this unit particularly stand out in that regard. So, I doubt that my router is capable of computer-less sharing of data like the new Netgear ones. I must admit, that although my wireless router needs are minimal at this moment, my TRENDnet is working flawlessly for me, 24/7.


You never know just how good your router is until you set it up and start using it. After my experience setting up my router and Roku (not great signal strength) I decided that the Ethernet/AC module connections would be superior. There seems to be no sense in going wireless with stationary entertainment equipment -- you have to electrically plug this stuff in anyway; might as well plug in the data connection in, too.


I'm going to do some more overall network research, and then start a new thread with my tentative selected components, and solicit feedback; will include diagrams. Should be fun.


Thanks, all!
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post #27 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by fmedrano1977 View Post
Question, I use an old pc running Windows 7 holding 5HDD/10TB, I use HaneWIN nfs server to feed my media players. That's all it's used for and it's on 24/7, drives do power down though. If I were to convert this to NAS, what happens to existing data?

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Basically, that is NAS/Media Server.

NAS is just a term to describe a network connected appliance that is dedicated for data storage to be read by client devices. It doesn't really matter how you do it to be classified as a NAS.

If it works for you then why change anything?
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post #28 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 01:31 PM
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There will always be a CPU somewhere in the mix when it comes to accessing storage over a network. However, since file sharing is one of the most basic things a computer can do, it can be a really small, really simple processor. This will be found either in the HD, or in the router it connects to.

Boxtop: from what you've posted here, I would recommend exploring a NAS that lists itself as "DLNA compatible" or some such. Just look out for DLNA. You searched up MOCA, so I'm figuring you'll search that one up, too. As with everything in this hobby, haters hate, but I've had zero issues with this tech since 2011.

If you're into Macs and it advertises Airplay, that's good too. It sounds (ha!) like you have an amp already in place and you're just trying to figure out how to get music to it. If that's the case, look for "pre-pros" (pre-amp processors), or heck even DACs, that also advertise DLNA compatibility. DLNA devices are set up to discover each other, so once you get the NAS set up and the pre-pro (or whatever) set up, they'll see each other without any extra work.

Don't sweat the networking part. All those technologies are very mature and well-understood. Streaming audio was something that a network in the mid-90s could handle. You'll be fine with anything that works. That said, ethernet-over-AC can be hit-and-miss depending on your wiring quality. Again, it'll either work or it won't.

Good luck!
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post #29 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 02:23 PM
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Anything nas can do, so can a computer so this doesn't make much sense. Can you explain further?

Why that is true. The difference is a NAS is pre setup there is no setup really involved from the user standpoint. If you are turning a PC into a NAS its more configuration on your part. Some people are fine with that others are not.
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post #30 of 61 Old 09-01-2014, 08:05 PM
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Why that is true. The difference is a NAS is pre setup there is no setup really involved from the user standpoint. If you are turning a PC into a NAS its more configuration on your part. Some people are fine with that others are not.
Well, to be honest, I'm not even sure I agree with that. You can buy any pc off the shelf, bring it home, add a data drive, set the permissions, set for 'wake on lan' and that's pretty much it. In about 2 minutes you have your basic nas. Of course I would expand it with more than one data drive, fine tune power settings.... blah, blah, blah... but none the less there is really nothing complicated about it. Though you also have to set permissions on nas and fine tune your power settings as well. It's not quite as plugNplay as one would be led to believe.
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