How are flat panel PC monitors and flat panel TVs so different? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 16 Old 06-14-2011, 08:09 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
lili5689's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Almost any good PC monitor these days has HDMI inputs and does 1080p. Other than TV tuners, what's the big advantage of using a monitor over a TV for your PC display? Are monitors just a bare-bones version of a TV designed specifically for computer use? What's up
lili5689 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 06-14-2011, 08:14 PM
Senior Member
 
Fishpoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 236
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I too have always wondered about this.
Fishpoke is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 06-14-2011, 08:29 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Gary McCoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: San Jose, California, USA
Posts: 6,233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 39
Fixed pixel monitors are very similar to TVs. Sometimes a monitor makes use of a different type of panel that trades off wide angle viewing for lower gray-to-gray cell response time. Sometimes not.

Monitors typically come with a resolution scaler pre-loaded with scaling factors for all the common PC and Apple resolutions plus HDTV resolutions. Frequently HDTVs do not have such flexibility.

HDTVs come with remote controls, Monitors typically do not. Nor do monitors accept a universal remote control.

Gary McCoy
The United States Constitution ©1791. All Rights Reserved.

Gary McCoy is offline  
post #4 of 16 Old 06-15-2011, 03:24 AM
AVS Special Member
 
specuvestor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,399
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
.
specuvestor is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 06-15-2011, 03:25 AM
AVS Special Member
 
specuvestor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,399
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
The difference is blurry nowadays but essentially monitors mean to produce AS IT IS. Same thing for audio or video monitors.

TV signals correspond to certain specs and usually pre recorded or determined, whereas PC signal spec are more versatile depending on the graphics card capability, and the image is rendered on the fly.

You can hardly get >60 Hz native source or >1080p TVs but they are getting more common for PC monitors.
specuvestor is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 06-15-2011, 07:57 AM
Member
 
sopclod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
They're not different. Apparently people's needs for computers are now the same as their needs for televisions. My 15 year old crt monitor can display higher resolution than any lcd computer monitor less than 30" but oh well.

Bottom line is it's cheaper to make them all the same.
sopclod is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 06-15-2011, 09:49 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
walford's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 16,789
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
By law any unit sold as a "TV" must contain a tuner.
It used to be that monitors contained better display's and circuit technology to insure that no pc applicatiion's text would be blurred or distorted and for this reason they used to cost more then TVs.
walford is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 06-15-2011, 10:05 AM
AVS Special Member
 
HTguru3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,014
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 20
PC Monitors generally have only one input (may have a couple different types such as HDMI, DVI or VGA) from a single source where as a TV will typically have multiple inputs to get signals from several sources that can be switched internally by the TV. There may be some exceptions but generally speaking inputs and internal tuners are the main differences.
HTguru3 is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 06-20-2011, 07:12 PM
AVS Special Member
 
TomCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Convergence. We've achieved it. PC monitors can do anything TV sets can do, other than directly tune TV channels. And TV sets generally have a VGA or RGB mode that allows them to operate as well as any PC monitor.

About the only real differences are that TV sets are more versatile and have more inputs and adjustment parameters, while PC monitors seem to have more choices for matching existing arcane display rates and pixel map sizes common to the PC world.

PC monitors used to be either the older 4:3 versions, or newer 16:10 versions (at work I actually have a Magnavox HDTV [I did not choose it] that has a 16:10 PC display, making everyone look like they've been on the Atkins diet). Anything other than the 4:3 version will stretch whatever is on your PC, but this is not really problematic the way 16:9 HDTVs can make every hot chick look like she needs to drop 30.

Until a year or so ago all wide-screen PC monitors were 16:10. Now, most of them are 16:9. I would like to think that PC makers have given over to HD aspect ratios as a nod to convergence, but I think it is probably due to the realities of the marketplace, where 16:9 displays have become much cheaper and commoner than 16:10 displays, and so they go the cheap route. OK, no harm, no foul.

But I will never buy a PC monitor again. In fact, my current PC monitor is actually a 22" Vizio TV in RGB mode handed down when I upgraded a bedroom TV. Works like a champ.

There's no place like 127.0.0.1
TomCat is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 06-21-2011, 03:13 PM
Member
 
Emerick99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 149
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Monitors for some reason are much much more reliable. My LED-LCD Mac has a perfect picture, but my LCD TV blurs and ghosts. I guess it's because of the size, and TVs sometimes use S-PVA panels or something like that which are awful.
Emerick99 is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 06-22-2011, 09:23 AM
Member
 
peters_john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 24
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerick99 View Post

Monitors for some reason are much much more reliable. My LED-LCD Mac has a perfect picture, but my LCD TV blurs and ghosts. I guess it's because of the size, and TVs sometimes use S-PVA panels or something like that which are awful.

Your Apple monitor probably uses an IPS-S panel. Most computer monitors use TN panels that trade viewing angles for response time.
peters_john is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 06-26-2012, 08:33 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
lili5689's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I just bought a new flat panel TVs...lol...I am just wondering to buy a new TS-L633 here..
lili5689 is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 06-27-2012, 05:33 PM
Advanced Member
 
Mik James's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Atlantic Canada
Posts: 832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 36
Most tv's below 32" use tn panels as well. The only difference is they don't have to please a bunch of pc fps enthusiasts so response times generally aren't as low on cheap small tv's as they are on cheap tn monitors. Va panels are what is used on most higher end tv's expecially when black level is a consideration, some tv's also use ips panels to get better viewing angles than va and tn. It's mainly a question of what you want and what you want to pay for it. If you want a bigger screen with deeper blacks and decent color but don't care as much about resolution and response time then get a 32" tv cause a 27" 1920x1200 ips or va monitor will cost about the same and a 30" panel with a 2560 x1600 resolution will cost a heck of alot more.
Alot of cheaper tv's don't support 1:1 pixel mapping as well so you end up with slightly less resolution.

"My 15 year old crt monitor can display higher resolution than any lcd computer monitor less than 30" but oh well."
Not quite the way it works sopclod, i was pretty shocked when i found out my hires 2000x1500 crt can only actually display a resolution of around 1600x1200 in the center of the screen, crt's work a bit differently than lcds in the way they display an image.
Mik James is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 06-27-2012, 08:46 PM
Member
 
seanclayton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Usually higher gamut, lower input lag, higher resolution, little to no make up to hide the uglies (they call it post-processing, I call it wearing makeups).
seanclayton is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 06-27-2012, 09:20 PM
Advanced Member
 
Mik James's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Atlantic Canada
Posts: 832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 36
Your definetly referring to the higher end displays though, the cheap monitors with the tn panels usually have about 70% of the standard color range.
I'm not sure if cheap tn's are any better in tv's I'll have to read a couple reviews.
Mik James is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 06-28-2012, 11:44 PM
AVS Special Member
 
irkuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: cyberspace
Posts: 3,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked: 60
Just to add a major difference one has to be aware of: All HD monitors are prepared for the 4:4:4 RGB signals, not every TV has support for it some have only 4:2:2.

irkuck
irkuck is offline  
Reply Flat Panels General and OLED Technology

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off