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post #121 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by rogo View Post

So let me try again.

Sub pixel = stack of R + G + B OLED + a little tiny piece of color filter in only one color (or clear) [the stack is aligned precisely behind whichever piece of color filter the sub pixel is representing]
Pixel = 4 stacks of R + G +B OLED + a tiny piece of red color filter + a tiny piece of green color filter + a tiny piece of blue color filter + a tiny piece of clear front glass

I think the problem here is that this design is so unique, many want to talk about the underlying technology - and this design is essentially a two-step fractal. You have an underlying red element, green element, and blue element. These combine into white. You then take a group of those with red, green, and blue filtering (plus one unfiltered) and you have the top level structure.

What I've seen in many threads though is that when specifically discussing the tech behind the white OLED's ... many (including me) have called it a pixel and the elements making it from the red, green, and blue layers as being sub-pixels. While that's a bit of a broad usage, it certainly makes sense why people would call it that. So the question becomes ... just what should we name everything in order to aid in discussion clarity? This two-step fractal makes discussions difficult unless someone is particularly verbose. And since this design is so new, I expect people will continue discussing both levels of the physical tech.

Any recommendations on some good naming conventions to proceed with? I would submit we should use the strict definition of pixel (picture element) and sub-pixel. In other words use it to describe what we can actually see on the screen. So with that in mind, a sub-pixel would be a white OLED and its color filter. A pixel would be a grouping of 4 of those (one with a red filter, one with green, one with blue, and one with none).

Now however, what is a good naming convention so people can discuss the tech used for the white OLED? I think for the sub components, maybe layer element instead of sub-pixel? So it would be red layer element, blue layer element, and red layer element? I can't really think of a cute name for the actual white OLED that's an aggregate of them though. I guess maybe just calling it a WOLED is easiest?

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Yes, this needs to be specifically clarified. LG is using a fluorescent blue. It is designed to have good aging characteristics. My point is this, however: Nothing about stacking the colors changes the underlying issue. If any of those colors does age differently, the display will color shift just like an RGB one. People are mistakenly assuming that the stacking of the colors is magically solving the differential aging problem and it isn't. Now, the fact that LG can use a different blue than Samsung might well help with aging, but let's just agree that's a second-order effect.

While it may be a second order effect, one has to look at this in terms of actual deltas over the expected usage life time of an average TV - it's a question of magnitudes.

Obviously in a perfect world R, G, B would age at the same rate (or better yet, not at all) ... but that's not realistic at this time. There will be some drift, but we have to think about it in the aggregate. It's not just about comparing the actual half-life age values themselves ... but looking at how far those values push out serious error accumulation.

In modern PHOLEDs, both red and green have pretty long lives. Not the exact same, but it's far enough out there that the error accumulation over the average viewing life of a TV yields a relatively small drift. Regardless of how long the blue FOLED life is, as long as it's long enough ... the actual error accumulation won't be significant. And that's where the LG solution comes into play. Unless Samsung's partners have had some crazy new breakthrough for blue (which to my knowledge they haven't - and I follow Universal Display Corp quite regularly as I'm a stock owner) ... then the amount of drift their display will have will definitely be higher. While the half-life has been pushed out some ... it's still like an order of magnitude or more lower than red and green ... and the bigger problem, it's short enough that I'd expect some sizable error accumulation over the average viewing life of a TV. At least if it's used as your main set.

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If either the Samsung or LG reaches market with the brightness being used on the show floor, you will need sunglasses to watch them. I am not worried about brightness or power consumption.

Wasn't implying you necessarily should be - just discussing the tech differences. Though I'm sure some will use this for spec wars

That said, the answers to this may impact the above. All things being equal, the lower drive voltage being used ... the slower the aging.
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post #122 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by greenland View Post

The LG 55-Inch 55EM9600 has two configurations. One is a table stand version with the speakers and electronics built into the base. The other, a wall mount version with the electronics and downward firing speakers housed within a backpack that sits between the wall and the screen. This OLED is a full featured HDTV with 1080p resolution, Smart TV with voice and gesture remote and 3D. Expect to see it yourself in Q3, at a priced to be announced."

So they aren't going to have a wall mountable version without a backpack?

Crap. I was hoping they'd offer one sans speakers ... and with the electronics in a separate box connected via wire. Sounds like the base will not be removable in the backpack-less version.





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Originally Posted by ferro View Post

Samsung's pure RGB OLED relative advantages:

* Power efficiency

Until we see numbers, I'm not sure that's inherently the case.
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post #123 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

As for LG's OLED vs Samsung's... I won't be buying either this year, at any price, it seems.

While the white subpixel/white OLED design may be very smart in terms of efficiency/lifespan, a fourth subpixel is not a good thing for image quality. If we move away from RGB stripes, it should be to layered, full colour pixels, doing away with subpixels entirely. (aside from the optics, single chip DLP is so much sharper than any other display as a result of this)

Why is this exactly? What sort of issues does it create?


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As for Samsung:


Vertical RGB stripes? Useless with a computer hooked up to it.

Why does vertical stripes make it useless with a computer hooked to it?
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post #124 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Raistlin_HT View Post

Why is this exactly? What sort of issues does it create?

Why does vertical stripes make it useless with a computer hooked to it?

Computers use subpixel rendering which only works with horizontal RGB stripes. (in some instances, BGR stripes also work, but this is not universally supported) Anything else does not render things correctly. (primarily text)
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post #125 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 11:28 AM
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Regardless of the color source, the TV converts the data to RGB. On the panel, luma can be outsourced to thw white pixel ???
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post #126 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Sharp uses RGB stripes, but often turns off the upper/lower half of the subpixel for darker shades being displayed. (it is alternated) For bright images, you have a full RGB stripe lit up.

Ya it's called Delta

They improved it every year. Not sure if they still need to use Delta on their new 8 Domain panel.
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post #127 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Computers use subpixel rendering which only works with horizontal RGB stripes. (in some instances, BGR stripes also work, but this is not universally supported) Anything else does not render things correctly. (primarily text)

Good point.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subpixel_rendering


Quote:
Examples of pixel geometry, showing various arrangements of pixels and subpixels, which must be considered for subpixel rendering. LCD displays (bottom right is the most typical example) are best suited to subpixel rendering.

So the question becomes, will SW in the future always make the assumption you're using a traditional LCD? I hope at some point OS's or at least browsers will support more than just one layout for font rendering. Really wouldn't be too hard to implement.



To my initial question though, are their other IQ issues to using 4 subs (disregarding potential issues with sub-pixel rendering).
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post #128 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 12:03 PM
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I can only think of softer image since the 4th pixel is just luma. We will have to see if there are any actual problems using a colorimeter.

Hopefully RGB luminance will remain uniform across 0-255
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post #129 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Nielo TM View Post

I can only think of softer image since the 4th pixel is just luma. We will have to see if there are any actual problems using a colorimeter.

Hopefully RGB luminance will remain uniform across 0-255

Yeah I was more concerned whether he was implying some sort of visual artifact - because I can't think of any.

As far as it being softer ... I'd actually be happy as long as it can still resolve a 1080p line test. I'm currently using a 60A3000 for my main set, and the thought of losing the awesome fillrate hurts. I love the smooth, 'film-like' look to the image. It doesn't exaggerate aliasing, noise, etc like lesser file rates do.

That's actually my main concern with Sony's Crystal LED. It seems promising, but the fill rate is pretty damn low.
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post #130 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Nielo TM View Post

RGBW concept isn't new and it prime purpose is to cut power consumption.


PenTile (RGBW) top, RGB bottom

http://www.talkandroid.com/wp-conten...een.jpg?3995d3

RGBW is an LCD technology (for now). LG OLED's use all white subpixels with color filters on top.
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post #131 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 12:22 PM
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post #132 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by mrkdilkington View Post

RGBW is an LCD technology (for now). LG OLED's use all white subpixels with color filters on top.

According to sources, it also features white sub-pixel in addition to the RGB
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post #133 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Nielo TM View Post

Fill rate?

Pixel fill rate is the percentage of a pixel that's actually illuminated (versus gaps, borders, etc).

An obvious (extreme) example a low fill rate were older LCD projectors and monitors where you could visibly see a 'screen door effect' (SDE). Even if you can't actually resolve SDE though, it can still impact your viewing.

Don't get me wrong, some people actually prefer the image since it appears sharper even though the resolution is the same. And that can be nice an really high quality video, but not everything we watch is perfect. The problem is it can also exaggerate things like noise, aliasing, etc. For me personally, I'd rather have the most natural/accurate image to start off with ... and if I feel like it needs some artificial sharpening, I'll use my video processor.
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post #134 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 01:24 PM
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Ah that

I've never heard anyone use the term Fill Rate in that manner. I usually associate it with Frame Buffer

It would be ideal to have a display with no gaps in between the pixel but we have to wait until Stacked OLED becomes norm. But yes, I too would love to know how bad it is on the LG and Samsung OLEDs.
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post #135 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 01:36 PM
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Sorry to interrupt the learned discussions posted here, but how do you bolt a flat panel mount on a screen only 4mm. thick? That's asking a lot from a millimeter or two of screw.
Is there a bolt welded on to the back?

It seems like the backpack is not attached to the screen (so that could possibly be put somewhere other than behind the screen depending upon the cabling).
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post #136 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Nielo TM View Post

Ah that

I've never heard anyone use the term Fill Rate in that manner. I usually associate it with Frame Buffer

It pains me too ... I'm a software developer

But it is the term I've actually seen regularly used for it.

http://www.cine4home.com/know-how/4-...sharpness.html



Quote:


It would be ideal to have a display with no gaps in between the pixel but we have to wait until Stacked OLED becomes norm. But yes, I too would love to know how bad it is on the LG and Samsung OLEDs.

So right here is CLED (or as I call it, XLED)



What's interesting is that there doesn't seem to be any obvious delineation between sub-pixels which is great (maybe they're stacked?) ... but the actual separation between pixels if pretty huge.

Hopefully that's something that can be addressed.
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post #137 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Norde View Post

Sorry to interrupt the learned discussions posted here, but how do you bolt a flat panel mount on a screen only 4mm. thick? That's asking a lot from a millimeter or two of screw.
Is there a bolt welded on to the back?

It seems like the backpack is not attached to the screen (so that could possibly be put somewhere other than behind the screen depending upon the cabling).

You sure about that? From the description I read, it unfortunately sounded like the backpack is attached? It's got downward firing speakers on it.
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post #138 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Raistlin_HT View Post

What's interesting is that there doesn't seem to be any obvious delineation between sub-pixels which is great (maybe they're stacked?) ... but the actual separation between pixels if pretty huge.

Hopefully that's something that can be addressed.


WOW!

Pixels do appear to be stacked and the gap is massive for a 50/60".
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post #139 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Raistlin_HT View Post

I So the question becomes ... just what should we name everything in order to aid in discussion clarity? This two-step fractal makes discussions difficult unless someone is particularly verbose. And since this design is so new, I expect people will continue discussing both levels of the physical tech.

Any recommendations on some good naming conventions to proceed with? I would submit we should use the strict definition of pixel (picture element) and sub-pixel. In other words use it to describe what we can actually see on the screen. So with that in mind, a sub-pixel would be a white OLED and its color filter. A pixel would be a grouping of 4 of those (one with a red filter, one with green, one with blue, and one with none).

So the only correct definitions for pixel and sub pixel are those, in my opinion.
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Now however, what is a good naming convention so people can discuss the tech used for the white OLED? I think for the sub components, maybe layer element instead of sub-pixel? So it would be red layer element, blue layer element, and red layer element? I can't really think of a cute name for the actual white OLED that's an aggregate of them though. I guess maybe just calling it a WOLED is easiest?

I think those are good terms in general. As a practical matter, once they are constructed, they will have WOLEDs (no matter that they are achieved from the multiple layers).
Quote:


While it may be a second order effect, one has to look at this in terms of actual deltas over the expected usage life time of an average TV - it's a question of magnitudes.

Obviously in a perfect world R, G, B would age at the same rate (or better yet, not at all) ... but that's not realistic at this time. There will be some drift, but we have to think about it in the aggregate. It's not just about comparing the actual half-life age values themselves ... but looking at how far those values push out serious error accumulation.

In modern PHOLEDs, both red and green have pretty long lives. Not the exact same, but it's far enough out there that the error accumulation over the average viewing life of a TV yields a relatively small drift. Regardless of how long the blue FOLED life is, as long as it's long enough ... the actual error accumulation won't be significant. And that's where the LG solution comes into play.

Basically, if LG can make the color temperature drift minimal through about 20-30K hours, they will have a great result here. I really can't say they will, but for the early adopters I hope so. I also imagine this number will improve over time (across product generations).
Quote:


Unless Samsung's partners have had some crazy new breakthrough for blue (which to my knowledge they haven't - and I follow Universal Display Corp quite regularly as I'm a stock owner) ... then the amount of drift their display will have will definitely be higher. While the half-life has been pushed out some ... it's still like an order of magnitude or more lower than red and green ... and the bigger problem, it's short enough that I'd expect some sizable error accumulation over the average viewing life of a TV. At least if it's used as your main set.

This is one of several problems Samsung will have that LG -- in theory -- will either not have or has reduced.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
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post #140 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Raistlin_HT View Post

You sure about that? From the description I read, it unfortunately sounded like the backpack is attached? It's got downward firing speakers on it.

The following was from a previous post which I think was from a review.
Sounds from this that it is not permanently attached.

The LG 55-Inch 55EM9600 has two configurations. One is a table stand version with the speakers and electronics built into the base. The other, a wall mount version with the electronics and downward firing speakers housed within a backpack that sits between the wall and the screen.
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post #141 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 10:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norde View Post

The following was from a previous post which I think was from a review.
Sounds from this that it is not permanently attached.

The LG 55-Inch 55EM9600 has two configurations. One is a table stand version with the speakers and electronics built into the base. The other, a wall mount version with the electronics and downward firing speakers housed within a backpack that sits between the wall and the screen.

Interestingly ... I read that very same description and came away with the exact opposite interpretation.

Ahhhh the beauty of the English language. Ambiguous to a fault
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post #142 of 179 Old 01-14-2012, 11:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Raistlin_HT View Post

Good point.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subpixel_rendering




So the question becomes, will SW in the future always make the assumption you're using a traditional LCD? I hope at some point OS's or at least browsers will support more than just one layout for font rendering. Really wouldn't be too hard to implement.

http://www.techotopia.com/index.php/...nt_details.jpg

Besides, iDevices don't use sub-pixel font rendering and they sell like hotcakes. (And doesn't high ppi make it moot anyway?)
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post #143 of 179 Old 01-15-2012, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Nielo TM View Post

Stacked OLED is the ultimate goal since it yields greater gamut and accuracy. It also creates more natural image due to negligible gaps between pixels and the fact that pixels can produce any color without the RGB being visible up close.

But as far as im aware, you'll need actual RGB OLED to stack. If LG managed to achieve this using white with RGB color filter, then yes that is impressive (but I doubt it tbh)

I love the idea of "stacked" color elements as I find most direct-view HD displays distractingly noise-ridden from wide-angle viewing distances merely because of the visible pixel structure from side-by-side color elements at the 1080 level.

My LCOS projector, however, allows me to get almost 1 screen width away because it has "stacked" color and small inter-pixel spacing.

If we can bring that pixel character to direct-view displays it will be a large step forward in allowing wide-angle viewing from direct-view panels. That will be a big advantage when projected images are replaced by ultra-large direct-view displays over the next decade or so (my personal time estimate for feasable direct-view 80" + displays).

1080p and lossless audio. EVERY BD should have them both.
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post #144 of 179 Old 01-15-2012, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by DaViD Boulet View Post

I love the idea of "stacked" color elements as I find most direct-view HD displays distractingly noise-ridden from wide-angle viewing distances merely because of the visible pixel structure from side-by-side color elements at the 1080 level.

My LCOS projector, however, allows me to get almost 1 screen width away because it has "stacked" color and small inter-pixel spacing.

If we can bring that pixel character to direct-view displays it will be a large step forward in allowing wide-angle viewing from direct-view panels. That will be a big advantage when projected images are replaced by ultra-large direct-view displays over the next decade or so (my personal time estimate for feasable direct-view 80" + displays).

What you said...100% agree.
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post #145 of 179 Old 01-15-2012, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Frank Benign View Post

Besides, iDevices don't use sub-pixel font rendering and they sell like hotcakes. (And doesn't high ppi make it moot anyway?)

This is because they are low power devices (less taxing to render without it) and have very high density screensat least the iPod/iPhone do, at 330 PPI.

A 55" 1080p OLED screen? 40 PPI. Computers (Windows or Mac) do use Subpixel font rendering, and it's essential for anything below about 150 PPI. (and still beneficial at higher densities)

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaViD Boulet View Post

I love the idea of "stacked" color elements as I find most direct-view HD displays distractingly noise-ridden from wide-angle viewing distances merely because of the visible pixel structure from side-by-side color elements at the 1080 level.

My LCOS projector, however, allows me to get almost 1 screen width away because it has "stacked" color and small inter-pixel spacing.

If we can bring that pixel character to direct-view displays it will be a large step forward in allowing wide-angle viewing from direct-view panels. That will be a big advantage when projected images are replaced by ultra-large direct-view displays over the next decade or so (my personal time estimate for feasable direct-view 80" + displays).

And LCoS isn't even the best example of it, because they're three chip devices that have imperfect alignment. Single chip DLP is the ultimate in sharpness because it essentially has full colour pixels without RGB subpixels, using a single chip, so there are no alignment issues.

D-ILA (JVC LCoS)


DLP:


Source

Full colour pixels (however it's achieved) is definitely the way forward, but it looks like 4K displays are likely to be the best alternative in the near future for direct-view displays, rather than projection-based displays. (doesn't fix the problem, but helps mask it with the increased pixel density)
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post #146 of 179 Old 01-15-2012, 12:20 PM
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Oh cool. Do you know off the top of your head if Windows offers something similar? That would make this moot.

Quote:


Besides, iDevices don't use sub-pixel font rendering and they sell like hotcakes. (And doesn't high ppi make it moot anyway?)

Not that I think something like this is why or why not iDevices sell like hot-cakes ... you're right for iPhone 4/4S ... the ppi makes this moot.

A large-sized 1080p display doesn't have that luxury though. A 55" screen at 1080p is like 40ppi

Obviously your viewing distance is significantly farther however. Whether sub-pixel rendering is needed or not depends on where you're sitting. Anything closer than say 10' and you're getting worse perceived performance than an iPhone retina display (assumed to be held at 12").
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post #147 of 179 Old 01-15-2012, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by DaViD Boulet View Post

I love the idea of "stacked" color elements as I find most direct-view HD displays distractingly noise-ridden from wide-angle viewing distances merely because of the visible pixel structure from side-by-side color elements at the 1080 level.

My LCOS projector, however, allows me to get almost 1 screen width away because it has "stacked" color and small inter-pixel spacing.

If we can bring that pixel character to direct-view displays it will be a large step forward in allowing wide-angle viewing from direct-view panels. That will be a big advantage when projected images are replaced by ultra-large direct-view displays over the next decade or so (my personal time estimate for feasable direct-view 80" + displays).

Agree completely. My current set is a LCoS ... and combination of stacked sub-pixels and near-perfect fill rate is fantastic.

Sony's Crystal LED looks to get it half right
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post #148 of 179 Old 01-15-2012, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

And LCoS isn't even the best example of it, because they're three chip devices that have imperfect alignment. Single chip DLP is the ultimate in sharpness because it essentially has full colour pixels without RGB subpixels, using a single chip, so there are no alignment issues.

While I generally agree, the proof is in the pudding. There are 3-chip LCoS displays that pass 1080p resolution tests, so getting the alignment right is obviously possible. I assume the issue is that alignment changes over throw distance? So you'd need alignment calibration depending on where it's located?

Certainly you are correct that single-chip solutions don't have to worry about that though. However with DLP, the side-effect is you need to worry about temporal issues due to PWM for color production.

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Full colour pixels (however it's achieved) is definitely the way forward, but it looks like 4K displays are likely to be the best alternative in the near future for direct-view displays, rather than projection-based displays. (doesn't fix the problem, but helps mask it with the increased pixel density)

Probably. Thankfully OLED and LED-based displays at least have the potential to eventually offer full color pixels. Whether it ends up being tenable or not remains to be seen though (either cost or performance issues).
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post #149 of 179 Old 01-15-2012, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by slacker711 View Post

They are the same size but Pentile has two subpixels per pixel.

http://www.nouvoyance.com/technology.html

I dont think that this is the approach that LG/Kodak has taken in the past and the press release seems to imply that LG has four subpixels per pixel.

Yes doesn't sound like pentile. Am I mistaken but doesn't pentile makes chorma subsampling a permanent "feature" :P

I think the confusion here is also that Sammy's RGB is the pixel per se, but LG's RGBW is NOT the pixel... the pixel we see is the color filter.

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It might have one. But I have two important observations:

1) Currently, it has no advantage I can detect.
2) Even if there is some small advantage, I doubt it's enough to matter in the marketplace. The Samsung might be slightly better -- emphasis on might -- but never enough to win on "better-ness".

Key word is currently Frankly I think as a first generation device it is pretty impressive. Problem is how fast can they make RGB more perceivably better than LG's RGBW (I'm no longer going to use the misleading WOLED terminology, not lest because others were using it). Otherwise it will be just as "successful" as their active 3D

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Originally Posted by specuvestor View Post

I may be imagining things but Sammy seemed to be using "artistic blooming" in many of their shots. I hope they're not trying to hide something.

My post in the OLED thread. I am an ardent supporter of OLED but I am not blind I just don't think it is an inherent OLED issue.

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Originally Posted by rogo View Post

My point is this, however: Nothing about stacking the colors changes the underlying issue. If any of those colors does age differently, the display will color shift just like an RGB one. People are mistakenly assuming that the stacking of the colors is magically solving the differential aging problem and it isn't. Now, the fact that LG can use a different blue than Samsung might well help with aging, but let's just agree that's a second-order effect.

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Originally Posted by slacker711 View Post

Weird. I really dont understand why that would be the case. The idea that WOLED's provide color stability is pretty widely reported.

I wonder if LG will give some details about their architecture at SID.

Agree that this is puzzling to me too. But literature so far has said the contrary ie the aging is similar. So I will reserve my skepticism.

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Originally Posted by rogo View Post

(Again, mobile phones are another matter. Ditto tablets and laptops. For those, Samsung's RGB design is superior and already approaching cost parity with LCD.)

Another reason why I think IGZO is for large panels, since LTPS solution is already cost parity to LCD. LG cannot compete with Sammy on small/medium sizes, maybe not even monitors.
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post #150 of 179 Old 01-15-2012, 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by specuvestor View Post

My post in the OLED thread. I am an ardent supporter of OLED but I am not blind : "I may be imagining things but Sammy seemed to be using "artistic blooming" in many of their shots. I hope they're not trying to hide something."

As I said there, it's clear to me that they were. It's also distinctly possible that what they were hiding is that they had to drive the panels to some insane level to make them pop on the show floor -- and that for whatever reason that's true it will be fixed by shipping time.

That said, here's Harry McCracken at Cnet... Pretty much expressing my feelings in spades:

"Giant OLED TVs aren't inherently amazing.
It's a long-standing CES tradition for TV makers to try and out-do each other with demos of high-end big screens that won't wind up in many living rooms anytime soon. This year, the makers in question were LG and Samsung, which had 55-inch OLED TVs at their booths. I checked out both sets--and didn't come away lusting after either one. The LG, at least when I saw it, was displaying gimmicky 3D videos, which made it hard to judge how good it would be for anything else. And the video clips I saw on the Samsung were way over-saturated, giving everything an artificial, candy-colored effect that reminded me of some OLED smartphones."

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
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