What Happened To This TV Technology - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 02-06-2012, 08:30 PM - Thread Starter
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Somewhere around '99, while in elementary school, my class was given an "Introduction To Future Technology". I don't remember much of what was discussed, but there's one thing I do remember. They passed around some type of panels. They were about 6x4 inches and 1/16 of an inch thick, flexible, and matte black. When you pressed on them with your thumb, the color would change, to bluish green, or reddish orange, depending on how hard you pushed. We were told that this technology would be used to make super thin TV's. Any idea what, if any displays were made with this tech?

I've wondered on and off over the years about what these panels were.
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post #2 of 12 Old 02-06-2012, 11:29 PM
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Probably 100 different technologies have been invented or conceived in the past 30 years that would be used for displays, according to their proponents. Three of them have ever reached market, none with less than a decade of development before doing so: plasma (aka PDP), LCD, and OLED (which has yet to be used for anything larger than a 20-something-inch broadcast monitor).

Billions of dollars has been invested in failed technologies. Whatever you saw might have burned through thousands or millions, but it probably never reached a prototype stage, let alone came close to production.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
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post #3 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 12:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HEYHI View Post

Somewhere around '99, while in elementary school, my class was given an "Introduction To Future Technology". I don't remember much of what was discussed, but there's one thing I do remember. They passed around some type of panels. They were about 6x4 inches and 1/16 of an inch thick, flexible, and matte black. When you pressed on them with your thumb, the color would change, to bluish green, or reddish orange, depending on how hard you pushed. We were told that this technology would be used to make super thin TV's. Any idea what, if any displays were made with this tech?

I've wondered on and off over the years about what these panels were.

You guys ever use those VERY basic computers that had like a 1 X 4 inch screen that was used for typing papers?

No subwoofer I've heard has been able to produce the bass I've experienced in the Corps!

Must..stop...buying...every bluray release...
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post #4 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 01:38 AM
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You are describing very early reflective passive liquid crystal displays. LCD is in fact one of the two dominent technologies today, the other being plasma.

Reflective LCDs were formerly used on watches before being replaced by E-Ink reflective displays, most LCDs have some sort of built-in backlighting, and "active display" technology to increase pixel switching performance.

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post #5 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 09:12 AM
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I'm sure it was similar to this stuff (works with liquid crystals):

http://www.amazon.com/DAVIS-Touch-Me...8634457&sr=1-4
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post #6 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Probably 100 different technologies have been invented or conceived in the past 30 years that would be used for displays, according to their proponents. Three of them have ever reached market, none with less than a decade of development before doing so: plasma (aka PDP), LCD, and OLED (which has yet to be used for anything larger than a 20-something-inch broadcast monitor).

Billions of dollars has been invested in failed technologies. Whatever you saw might have burned through thousands or millions, but it probably never reached a prototype stage, let alone came close to production.

Yup. Anybody remember these guys?
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post #7 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by slb View Post

Yup. Anybody remember these guys?

I spent more than a few posts here explaining that iFire displays would never make it to market. More than a few people told me I was wrong.

There is no difference in HDMI cables. If you can see the picture without visible dropouts or sparklies, the cable is working at 100%. No other cable will display a better version of that picture. You're simply wrong if you think there is a better digital cable than one that is already working.
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post #8 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 12:58 PM
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About 10 years ago, some ph.d. told me he had received fresh funding for this "wearable" flexible display. Haven't heard from him since.

Solution: FREE. Explanation: I will have to charge$ you.

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post #9 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

I spent more than a few posts here explaining that iFire displays would never make it to market. More than a few people told me I was wrong.

Yes, I also recall you posting about the prospects of Candela's FED technology.
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post #10 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 05:23 PM
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Is SED still dead?
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post #11 of 12 Old 02-07-2012, 09:12 PM
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I remember reading about "nano tubes" back in the 80's in Popular Science". Supposed to be so thin you could wrap it up like wall paper and hang it anywhere.
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post #12 of 12 Old 02-08-2012, 09:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serial_carpens View Post

I'm sure it was similar to this stuff (works with liquid crystals):

http://www.amazon.com/DAVIS-Touch-Me...8634457&sr=1-4

Yep, that's them alright.
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