Would bias lighting be worth it in my set up? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 03:34 AM - Thread Starter
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I have a 50" Vizio on its stand inside of an entertainment center. There is a large opening behind it to the wall. I have very little space on each side, maybe 1" to the sides of the cabinet and 6" above. My walls are light peach. I'm interested in the Ideal Lume but not sure if it is worth it for my situation. I know it is supposed to be against a neutral background but I'm not planning on painting the walls. Would my wall color negate the benefits of that light?

Just to see the effect of any lighting, I put a lamp with a 10w bulb behind the tv and it was way too bright but worse, it created shadows because of the cords behind the entertainment center. I used some white posterboard taped to the back of the cabinet to cover the opening and that helped with the shadows at least.

I'd like to try a solution locally first before spending the money and paying shipping, in case I don't like it. I've read tons of posts about aquarium lights, rope lights, regular fluorescent under cabinet lights. I don't know which would be the best to try to see if I'd even like the effect Some of the reviews said the rope light was too yellow and with peach walls, I'm assuming this would make the yellow even more noticeable. What's my best option? The standard light at $59 would be the one I'd be looking at.
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post #2 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 04:37 AM
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A good way to check it out is to put a light with some dimmer stuff behind your TV.


D65 video bias lighting
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1162578/d65-video-bias-lighting-fundamental-theory-and-practice
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post #3 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 06:33 AM - Thread Starter
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Well, I did try the 10w bulb, should I try it with the shade on it? I figured I'd pick up some rope light from Home Depot if I can find white and not yellow. Would it be better to light the inside of the cabinet so it doesn't spill out on to the wall?
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post #4 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 06:36 AM
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I don't think there's much point in a D65 bias light if you are not shining it on a neutral wall.
That said, I don't like bias lighting at all. (meaning a lamp behind, or fixed to the back of the display)
For me it does nothing to improve the perception of contrast, because it usually covers too small of a surface area, and only serves to make my display appear smaller and highlight the thickness of the bezel. I find them very distracting.

If I'm not watching a display in the dark, I much prefer to have a lamp in the room that is off to the side of the TV (to avoid reflections & glare) and out of my eyeline so that it's not distracting.
This provides a much better perceptual contrast improvement, because you are raising the illumination level of the room, rather than a small spot behind the TV.

I also prefer to use a warm incandescent halogen lamp rather than D65 lighting - I just find they make the viewing environment far more comfortable and relaxing.
While I use D50 lamps as task lights when working, I don't like D50 - and D65 lighting even less - when trying to relax and watch a film at night.
And while I can see the argument for using D65 bias lighting, the television is by far the brightest light source in my viewing environment (even at reference levels) which means that it is what my eye adjusts to, regardless of the temperature of the lower-level ambient lighting.


Is it potentially affecting my perception of the image? Maybe - but not in any meaningful way. My color perception is good enough that with a reference disc I am used to, I am able to set up color to below ~3dE by eye on a new display (often much better) if it offers sufficient control to do this.
Of course I rely on instrumentation to perform a proper calibration, but my point with that example is that I'd consider myself a trained observer rather than a layman, and I have a pretty good idea of how color perception works, considering that I am working in a calibrated environment all day.

Would I be using 3000K lamps if I was working in a studio doing color grading for professional work? Absolutely not.
But I'm sitting at home trying to relax and enjoy a film. Having the display calibrated is enough - at least the way my perception works.
Maybe some people are more influenced by the surround than I am, or sit further back so their display doesn't cover as much of their field of vision.
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post #5 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 07:10 AM
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I have to agree: a lamp off to the side is far better. That's what I do, but you'll have to decide for yourself.
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post #6 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 10:12 AM
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I tryed dimmed white-ish/D65-ish LEDs behind the TV for some time - some of this LED light can be seen on the left and right side behind the TV. I took my eyes to long to adjust, at least half an hour, sometimes more than an hour, its very unpleasant IMO.. So i added some dimmed yellow light on the left/right side behind the TV, up in the air, directed at the wall. btw Light can only be seen in dark scenes!

I basically use the bais lighting stuff for a more pleasant TV watching experience smile.gif
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post #7 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 11:29 AM
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I use a 60W equivalent CFL bulb (temp is approximately 5800k) placed behind my tv which sits on a console. The receptacle for the light is a "bucket type" so the bulb is exposed (no shade) and is angled to reflect off of the wall and not the back of the tv. The wall behind it is a neutral color and the light illuminates the wall behind it and the sides evenly. It is usually the only light on in the evening when we watch tv and the effect is noticeable and enhances our viewing experience in a positive manner.
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post #8 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 12:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies so far.

Otto, I read some of your posts in other threads on this. I don't know what you mean by bucket type receptacle. Can you clarify please?

I tried this just using a small bedroom lamp but 10 watt cfl seemed really bright. I have no idea what temp it is, it does not look like it is the warm or soft light, I think I needed the brightest I could go in that lamp in that room so it is probably a daylight bulb.

I don't know if I'm getting a lot of eyestrain with watching tv in the dark, I've always attributed it to wearing my contacts for long hours but it could be partly from the tv. My only option for lighting is getting a floor lamp to put next to the entertainment center. My living room is pretty small. I sit about 10-11 feet away from the tv. I have a staircase off to the side and behind the entertainment center, the top 1/2 is blocked by the wall but there is a light at the top that shines down. I could try a dimmer bulb in that and see if it helps at all. I'm more interested in trying this for perceived black levels and picture quality than eyestrain but anything would be a benefit.
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post #9 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 06:51 PM
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^^^^^ The bucket light is the Hampton Bay Round Back Uplight (275 707) found at Home Depot. It looks like an oval bucket but is round at the bottom and "open" at the top. The bulb screws into the "bucket" and the entire device can rotate so you can angle it anyway you want. If your tv is wall mounted, this won't work. It fits nicely on my LG because the tv stand for the console has a large enough swivel base that it hides the bucket quite nicely. The CFL bulb that I use is a 15W (60W equivalent). There are other options for bias lighting that are just as effective. I just happened to be in Home Depot and saw the Uplight and figured that it would work. It has one of those thumb screw like on/off switches but I have it plugged into an outlet that is directly behind the tv and is operated by a wall switch which is on an adjacent wall. Perfect for us. It's not as elegant as a remote controlled system but it works and it cost less than $20 (light bulb not included). There is also a 12' cathedral ceiling on the wall behind the ceiling so the reflected light goes all the way up. Basically most of the wall behind the tv is evenly illuminated from the top of the console to the tv.

Most of what I've read has said that watching tv in total darkness in not good because eye strain can result. The added benefit of using proper bias lighting is the enhanced "perception" of blackness and color. Definite scientific reasons. I have an LCD so black levels are not real good but the bias light really helps nighttime viewing just pop. On a full array LED/LCD or a plasma it should be even better.
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post #10 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 06:59 PM
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If you don't like the lamp effect, chances are you won't like any other bias light either. Apparently, there are people who don't like the effect. I can't explain that except that we each have personal preferences. I personally love the effect with my Panasonic GT55. I have flourecent undercounter lights velcroed to the back sides and top back of the TV. I have them wired to each other and connected to a foot switch. As the sun sets, I turn on the light for an evening of TV viewing. I love it. To each his own.
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post #11 of 51 Old 06-04-2013, 07:50 PM
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There are lots of ways to setup bias lighting. It all depends on what works best for you. Attaching fluorescent lights to the back of your tv is also an effective way. I'm sure I'll have to come up with something different when we replace the tv someday because by that time, the swivel stands will be really small and so i won't be able to hide the uplight. I think one of the commercial bias lights (Ambilight?) attaches to the back of the tv, but yes, personal preference is what works best for you. Lots of good advice so just experiment and see what works.
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post #12 of 51 Old 06-05-2013, 02:58 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the info. Apparently the Home Depots near me don't carry the fluorescent one but do have the halogen model, I found something similar at Walmart though that I will pick up tonight and uses fluorescent bulbs.

It wasn't that I didn't like the lamp effect, it was just very bright. But I'm used to watching in pitch darkness at night. The other issue is that behind the tv is a large opening in the entertainment center, 25 x25. It's a cutout for old TV's. Behind the entertainment center is 1/2 wall and 1/2 staircase. The light reflected the cords hanging behind onto the wall. I put up some white poster board on the back of the cabinet and that looked better. Last night I also tried putting the 10w bulb I have in a clip on desk lamp. That looked much nicer however the bulb got very hot so I didn't want it next to the poster board. It did look a lot better with the light a little dimmer. The fluorescent undercabinet light would definitely fit better behind the tv. I was looking at those online last night so I'll probably pick one of those up at Walmart also to try.
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post #13 of 51 Old 06-05-2013, 04:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

Most of what I've read has said that watching tv in total darkness in not good because eye strain can result. The added benefit of using proper bias lighting is the enhanced "perception" of blackness and color. Definite scientific reasons. I have an LCD so black levels are not real good but the bias light really helps nighttime viewing just pop. On a full array LED/LCD or a plasma it should be even better.
And most of that research is based on displays that are set far too bright for watching in a dark room (they should be between 48-100 nits) and funded by companies trying to sell you something which "fixes" this problem. (Philips ambilight, bias lighting, plasma displays etc.)
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post #14 of 51 Old 06-05-2013, 09:17 AM
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^^^^ there's probably a lot of truth in what you say (even tho you'd probably get some disagreement over in the DispCal forum wink.gif) so no argument here. For myself and a lot of others, bias lighting has definitely improved pq for whatever reasons, and the best implementation of that is what works best for your setup and viewing environment.
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post #15 of 51 Old 06-06-2013, 07:52 AM
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I purchased my flourescent lights at Menards. I haven't found them anywhere else, not even on the internet. They are inexpensive and the results are fantastic.
The science of bias light goes like this...(I think):
When we watch a TV or monitor in a dark room, our pupils dilate and constrict in proprotion to the light coming from the screen. In dark screens, our pupils dilate, causing us to see noise as well as details coming from the screen. In bright screens, our pupils constrict, reducing the brightness of the TV coming to our retina. The brain compensates for this to some extent.
With a bias light coming from the back of the TV, our pupils stay constricted, causing a preceived increase in contrast. The dark scenes look darker because less noise is being precieved. Night scenes against a dark background are especially beautiful. You don't need to have Kuro technology to get preceived Kuro results.
I have a Philips plasma with Ambilight. It has differenct light color options. I prefer a warm steady light, as opposed to a color changing light in proportion to the dominant light color coming from the TV at the moment. A steady warm light is less distracitng to me. My wife loves the effect too. She is clueless to the science behind it, but she turns the light on earlier than I do, at the first sign of dusk.
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post #16 of 51 Old 06-06-2013, 08:17 AM
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^^^^^ a consistent light temperature is best, but some prefer changing light colors, which I find very distracting and diminishes the usefullness of properly implemented bias lighting. But, to each his own.
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post #17 of 51 Old 06-22-2013, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

Most of what I've read has said that watching tv in total darkness in not good because eye strain can result. The added benefit of using proper bias lighting is the enhanced "perception" of blackness and color. Definite scientific reasons. I have an LCD so black levels are not real good but the bias light really helps nighttime viewing just pop. On a full array LED/LCD or a plasma it should be even better.
And most of that research is based on displays that are set far too bright for watching in a dark room (they should be between 48-100 nits) and funded by companies trying to sell you something which "fixes" this problem. (Philips ambilight, bias lighting, plasma displays etc.)
Opinions are like posterior orifices, everyone has one (and every public forum has no shortage of both). The human factors research, and international imaging industry standards bodies' recommended practices, pertaining to critical monitor viewing environments, occurred long before 'Ambilight,' Ideal-Lume,' or more recent related consumer products.

The technique of monitor bias lighting has been used by imaging industry professionals for over a half century. Your claims are cynical, isolated, undocumented, illogical, contrary to world-wide proven professional practice, and falsely defamatory. The starting point for recommended best practices in video system design should be founded upon proven imaging science, not intuition, isolated anecdotal exceptions, personal preferences, unsupported opinions, or innuendo. Individual exceptions to general practice can and do exist, but are usually rare. I work directly with studios and post houses all over the world, and can assure you that certain hundreds of them follow recommended practices when designing their monitor viewing environments. They want the proven benefits of the practice. They come to me for solutions to help them achieve specific results. I don't go to them, nor do I advertise. It's all by word of mouth and their own searching for products that meet their requirements.

Most consumers have never been informed that the motion imaging industries are standards-based. Imaging industry standards bodies (SMPTE, EBU, ITU, ISO, ANSI, CIE, etc.) are non-profit organizations, dedicated to the advancement of the technology and related media, not the promotion of products. The experimentation has already been done. Human perception fundamentals are the foundation of video industry best practices, not fashion/fad/trend/whim/preference/accident, or predatory commercial manipulation. Video consumers too often are left to grope about in their ignorance until they "like" what they find. Reference imaging and fidelity are foreign concepts to most, when referring to watching TV. Following video industry standards and best practices results in reference-grade viewing experiences.wink.gif

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
G. Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.
A Lion AV Consultants affiliate

"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
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post #18 of 51 Old 06-22-2013, 01:59 PM
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Awesome. What he said. What did you actually say? Is bias lighting a good thing or a bad thing. If it's a good thing what do you recommend.?
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post #19 of 51 Old 06-22-2013, 02:15 PM
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Awesome. What he said. What did you actually say? Is bias lighting a good thing or a bad thing. If it's a good thing what do you recommend.?
It's a good thing, if done correctly:

'D65 Video Bias Lighting- Fundamental Theory And Practice'

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1162578

Another "sticky" thread that explains why:

'How Viewing Environment Conditions Can Corrupt Or Enhance Your Calibration.'
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=849430
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post #20 of 51 Old 06-23-2013, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post

Opinions are like posterior orifices, everyone has one (and every public forum has no shortage of both). The human factors research, and international imaging industry standards bodies' recommended practices, pertaining to critical monitor viewing environments, occurred long before 'Ambilight,' Ideal-Lume,' or more recent related consumer products.
This is not opinion - most of the research I have read on the subject of bias lighting, or in favor of Plasma vs LCD in dark viewing environments is based around the panels being at or near full brightness. (typically 500 nits)
If the display is at 500 nits in a dark room, I absolutely recommend raising the ambient light level to reduce eye strain - but a bias light is not going to be enough for that. I rarely bring my display up to 500 nits in daylight, and the lighting in my home is not bright enough that a 500 nit display would not be uncomfortable to watch.

Unfortunately the APDC website seems to have disappeared some time in 2012 (one source of this research) archive.org does not have a copy of the images used on the site, and I can't find the image which actually demonstrates levels of fatigue/eye strain. But here's an example of how the comparisons are largely invalid:

en_0275ukoj.jpg

Plasma has a variable, but average brightness of 100 nits? Well you can simply reduce the LCD from 500 nits to 100 nits to achieve that as well. Or use a software-based ABL (which many sets offer) if you prefer that.
This research is clearly biased in Plasma's favor, trying to spin a weakness into being an asset, as a dimmer display absolutely is more comfortable to watch in a darkened room.

I'm quite sure that the research papers on Ambilight (the technology that popularized bias lighting over 10 years ago) are still available to be read somewhere, and are based on similarly high brightness levels in a dark viewing environment, rather than displays which are set at a reasonable brightness level for watching in a dark room.

You will not find an industry paper that is recommending more than ~120 nits at the display, with modern standards being 48 nits for projectors, and 100 nits for monitors. (previous standards included the EBU 80 nits, and SMPTE 120 nits)
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post

The technique of monitor bias lighting has been used by imaging industry professionals for over a half century.
Modern studios typically forego this, and mastering is performed in a mostly dark room, especially with the new extremely high contrast OLED panels and 2.4 gamma standard. (BT.1886)
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post

Most consumers have never been informed that the motion imaging industries are standards-based. Imaging industry standards bodies (SMPTE, EBU, ITU, ISO, ANSI, CIE, etc.) are non-profit organizations, dedicated to the advancement of the technology and related media, not the promotion of products. The experimentation has already been done. Human perception fundamentals are the foundation of video industry best practices, not fashion/fad/trend/whim/preference/accident, or predatory commercial manipulation. Video consumers too often are left to grope about in their ignorance until they "like" what they find. Reference imaging and fidelity are foreign concepts to most, when referring to watching TV. Following video industry standards and best practices results in reference-grade viewing experiences.wink.gif
Can you show me standards which advocate bias lighting? (i.e. a lamp attached to the back of a display) It has been a number of years since I poured over all this information, but I don't seem to recall any mentioning it. At most, a maximum ambient light level would be specified. The only standard which I recall including a minimum ambient light level is the sRGB specification, which is completely outdated and irrelevant today - it recommends a monitor be configured to have an 80:1 contrast ratio, with white set at 80 nits.

And many standards which do recommend some level of ambient lighting in the room, recommend D50 lighting, not D65 lighting.
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post #21 of 51 Old 06-23-2013, 01:20 PM
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This discussion is quickly moving in the direction to which a lot of similar discussions have gone in the past, whether it be on panel calibration, audio calibration, or the proper use of lighting conditions (bias lighting). The OP asked a question and has received various opinions. It is up to him now to experiment and see what looks best to him regardless of published standards, scientific fact, or "it just looks good to me". Arguing and/or trying to disprove another's opinion or statement of fact can and will become counter-productive.
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post #22 of 51 Old 06-23-2013, 01:28 PM
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^^^^^ All that said, and there is some great, important info in those posts. some of us still don't care for bias lighting, at least when it comes to the optimal way to enjoy movie images at home.

Bias lighting can be terrific for addressing the issues it's meant to address, but everything is a trade off and of course personal priorities play a large role.
I work to remove visual distractions around the image and bias lighting acts to my eyes as a major added distraction around the image, an additional halo, emphasizing the size, borders of the image, emphasizing another surface behind the image etc. I find the effect of a (calibrated) image against a black background much more immersive and compelling. Certainly this is the case with my current projection based system, but it was also true when I used my plasma as my main movie viewing monitor. (In fact, the effect of it's image against a pitch black background - black material - was so dramatic that for years guests were convinced I must own the best, most expensive plasma you could buy. Despite that mine is actually an original old ED resolution plasma and they all owned much newer, higher resolution, higher performing plasmas...they had just never seen the image presented that way).

Given the amount of extraneous visual information many people are used to around their movie image at home, I'm sure I'm in the minority in finding bias lighting distracting. That said, I still feel that the ultimate presentation is an image with no other visual distractions at all around it.
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post #23 of 51 Old 06-23-2013, 04:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post

Opinions are like posterior orifices, everyone has one (and every public forum has no shortage of both). The human factors research, and international imaging industry standards bodies' recommended practices, pertaining to critical monitor viewing environments, occurred long before 'Ambilight,' Ideal-Lume,' or more recent related consumer products.
This is not opinion - most of the research I have read on the subject of bias lighting, or in favor of Plasma vs LCD in dark viewing environments is based around the panels being at or near full brightness. (typically 500 nits)
If the display is at 500 nits in a dark room, I absolutely recommend raising the ambient light level to reduce eye strain - but a bias light is not going to be enough for that. I rarely bring my display up to 500 nits in daylight, and the lighting in my home is not bright enough that a 500 nit display would not be uncomfortable to watch.

Unfortunately the APDC website seems to have disappeared some time in 2012 (one source of this research) archive.org does not have a copy of the images used on the site, and I can't find the image which actually demonstrates levels of fatigue/eye strain. But here's an example of how the comparisons are largely invalid....

Plasma has a variable, but average brightness of 100 nits? Well you can simply reduce the LCD from 500 nits to 100 nits to achieve that as well. Or use a software-based ABL (which many sets offer) if you prefer that.
This research is clearly biased in Plasma's favor, trying to spin a weakness into being an asset, as a dimmer display absolutely is more comfortable to watch in a darkened room.

I'm quite sure that the research papers on Ambilight (the technology that popularized bias lighting over 10 years ago) are still available to be read somewhere, and are based on similarly high brightness levels in a dark viewing environment, rather than displays which are set at a reasonable brightness level for watching in a dark room.

You will not find an industry paper that is recommending more than ~120 nits at the display, with modern standards being 48 nits for projectors, and 100 nits for monitors. (previous standards included the EBU 80 nits, and SMPTE 120 nits)
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post

The technique of monitor bias lighting has been used by imaging industry professionals for over a half century.
Modern studios typically forego this, and mastering is performed in a mostly dark room, especially with the new extremely high contrast OLED panels and 2.4 gamma standard. (BT.1886)
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post

Most consumers have never been informed that the motion imaging industries are standards-based. Imaging industry standards bodies (SMPTE, EBU, ITU, ISO, ANSI, CIE, etc.) are non-profit organizations, dedicated to the advancement of the technology and related media, not the promotion of products. The experimentation has already been done. Human perception fundamentals are the foundation of video industry best practices, not fashion/fad/trend/whim/preference/accident, or predatory commercial manipulation. Video consumers too often are left to grope about in their ignorance until they "like" what they find. Reference imaging and fidelity are foreign concepts to most, when referring to watching TV. Following video industry standards and best practices results in reference-grade viewing experiences.wink.gif
Can you show me standards which advocate bias lighting? (i.e. a lamp attached to the back of a display) It has been a number of years since I poured over all this information, but I don't seem to recall any mentioning it. At most, a maximum ambient light level would be specified. The only standard which I recall including a minimum ambient light level is the sRGB specification, which is completely outdated and irrelevant today - it recommends a monitor be configured to have an 80:1 contrast ratio, with white set at 80 nits.

And many standards which do recommend some level of ambient lighting in the room, recommend D50 lighting, not D65 lighting.
I don't know what segment of the motion imaging industry you focus on. You don't state anything in your profile about your frame of reference or credentials. Until you provide documentation or references to the research you mention, I'll rely on video program production and post production sources for recommended practices in designing viewing environment conditions. I have provided such sources in the linked "sticky" threads included above. Display brightness recommended in documents from SMPTE, ITU, ISO, EBU, Poynton, etc. for dark viewing conditions have ranged from 100 (most common) to 250 nits, or 30 to 73 ftL. Ambient lighting is most commonly recommended to be at or as near as possible to D65, with luminance levels ranging between 2 to 15% of peak white at 100%, depending upon the viewing application (10% most common).

"Modern studios," post houses, and colorists order bias lighting devices from me regularly, from over 30 nations. This includes over 90 companies in the past 12 months. I get repeat orders regularly of both my professional and consumer models from the likes of: Technicolor, Deluxe, Dolby Labs, The Motion Picture Company, Flanders Scientific, Chainsaw Edit, Encore Hollywood, Colorflow Post, etc.
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post #24 of 51 Old 06-23-2013, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

This discussion is quickly moving in the direction to which a lot of similar discussions have gone in the past, whether it be on panel calibration, audio calibration, or the proper use of lighting conditions (bias lighting). The OP asked a question and has received various opinions. It is up to him now to experiment and see what looks best to him regardless of published standards, scientific fact, or "it just looks good to me". Arguing and/or trying to disprove another's opinion or statement of fact can and will become counter-productive.
I am dedicated to advocating for proven imaging science principles and display industry standards and best practices. It's my habit to correct misinformation in this forum for the benefit of members desiring better imaging techniques and closer to reference viewing experiences. How is that "counter-productive?"
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post #25 of 51 Old 06-23-2013, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

^^^^^ All that said, and there is some great, important info in those posts. some of us still don't care for bias lighting, at least when it comes to the optimal way to enjoy movie images at home.

Bias lighting can be terrific for addressing the issues it's meant to address, but everything is a trade off and of course personal priorities play a large role.
I work to remove visual distractions around the image and bias lighting acts to my eyes as a major added distraction around the image, an additional halo, emphasizing the size, borders of the image, emphasizing another surface behind the image etc. I find the effect of a (calibrated) image against a black background much more immersive and compelling. Certainly this is the case with my current projection based system, but it was also true when I used my plasma as my main movie viewing monitor. (In fact, the effect of it's image against a pitch black background - black material - was so dramatic that for years guests were convinced I must own the best, most expensive plasma you could buy. Despite that mine is actually an original old ED resolution plasma and they all owned much newer, higher resolution, higher performing plasmas...they had just never seen the image presented that way).

Given the amount of extraneous visual information many people are used to around their movie image at home, I'm sure I'm in the minority in finding bias lighting distracting. That said, I still feel that the ultimate presentation is an image with no other visual distractions at all around it.
Your viewing preferences are certainly legitimate for you. I have read similar choices from others. As I stated above, I consider the best starting point for good video system design to be video industry standards and best practices. Each video consumer can choose to deviate from said practices according to their own inclinations. When it comes to achieving reference imaging performance, a fundamental understanding of how program creators arrive at the best picture performance and viewing conditions ought to be a winning guide.
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post #26 of 51 Old 06-24-2013, 07:28 AM
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I agree, George. That's why most of us appreciate the information you have brought with your posts.
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post #27 of 51 Old 06-25-2013, 11:23 AM
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George, what do you recommend for the new person trying bias lighting? Perhaps you can share a couple of low end prices versions that you consider a good bang for the buck. I've seen a couple for under $50.
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post #28 of 51 Old 06-25-2013, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by andy sullivan View Post

George, what do you recommend for the new person trying bias lighting? Perhaps you can share a couple of low end prices versions that you consider a good bang for the buck. I've seen a couple for under $50.
I recommend studying the fundamental principles of bias lighting and working from there. If you want to experiment with the technique, there should be something around your house, or at most hardware stores, that you can improvise to try having the ambient illumination present while watching TV. I won't recommend any complete product that competes with the solutions I've designed and perfected. My family gets its food, clothing, and housing from my professional endeavors.
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post #29 of 51 Old 06-25-2013, 01:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post

I recommend studying the fundamental principles of bias lighting and working from there. If you want to experiment with the technique, there should be something around your house, or at most hardware stores, that you can improvise to try having the ambient illumination present while watching TV. I won't recommend any complete product that competes with the solutions I've designed and perfected. My family gets its food, clothing, and housing from my professional endeavors.
OK, even though I doubt you get to involved in products in the $50 range.
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post #30 of 51 Old 08-16-2013, 07:13 AM
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Actually, the Ideal-Lume Standard is only $60. I've had one for almost eight years now (thanks, Alan!) and only now realized that I need to replace the bulb. I have it mounted on the wall behind my TV and, while the wall is not a neutral color -- it's wood paneling, ugh) the results have been wonderful.
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